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Nyheder2018oktober15

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Beer supply threatened by future weather extremes

Severe climate events could cause shortages in the global beer supply, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia (UEA).

1h

For evigt slut med at åbne vinduet: Flertal vil tillade hermetisk lukket boligbyggeri i støj og stank

Dansk Folkeparti og Socialdemokratiet bakker op om regeringens lovforslag om at tillade byggeri i områder, hvor det i dag er forbudt på grund af for meget støv, støj og stank. Prisen er, at vinduerne ikke kan åbnes, og at altaner bliver forbudt. Kritikere frygter dårligt indeklima.

9h

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LATEST

EU states push for sanctions for cyber attackers

A group of EU states including Britain and the Baltic countries is pushing the bloc to slap sanctions on cyber attackers, as Europe seeks to strengthen its electronic defences.

7min

Hawking's final book offers brief answers to big questions

Stephen Hawking's final work, which tackles issues from the existence of God to the potential for time travel, was launched on Monday by his children, who helped complete the book after the British astrophysics giant's death.

7min

PPR virus poses threat to conservation

A team of conservationists from the Royal Veterinary College, WCS, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna published a letter in this week's edition of the journal Science on the threat of the virus peste des petits ruminants (PPR) to conservation.

7min

NASA sees remnants of Post-Tropical Cyclone Leslie over Spain

Post-tropical cyclone Leslie made landfall in Portugal bringing heavy rains and hurricane-force winds. On Oct. 14, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spotted the remnant clouds over northern Spain.

7min

New model helps define optimal temperature and pressure to forge nanoscale diamonds

To forge nanodiamonds, which have potential applications in medicine, optoelectronics and quantum computing, researchers expose organic explosive molecules to powerful detonations in a controlled environment. These explosive forces, however, make it difficult to study the nanodiamond formation process. To overcome this hurdle, researchers recently developed a procedure and a computer model that ca

10min

Finding better drug 'fits,' avoiding medication tragedies like thalidomide

Researchers, including chemistry professor and Nobel Prize winner Ei-ichi Negishi, have developed technology to create a new chemical process to synthesize drug-like molecules with ultra-high purity.

10min

Tracking the movement of the tropics 800 years into the past

For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics back 800 years. The movement of the tropical boundary affects the locations of Northern Hemisphere deserts including the Sonoran, Mohave and Saharan. The Earth's climate system affects the movement of the tropics, which have been expanding since the 1970s. The research team found that in the

10min

Man Dies from Extremely Rare Disease After Eating Squirrel Brains

A man in New York developed an extremely rare and fatal brain disorder after he ate squirrel brains, according to a new report of the case.

11min

The Buildings That Survived Michael Hold the Key to Adaptation

Houses that survived were mostly built after Florida’s stringent building code was passed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12min

New model helps define optimal temperature and pressure to forge nanoscale diamonds

Nanodiamonds, bits of crystalline carbon hundreds of thousands of times smaller than a grain of sand, have intriguing surface and chemical properties with potential applications in medicine, optoelectronics and quantum computing. To forge these nanoscopic gemstones, researchers expose organic explosive molecules to powerful detonations in a controlled environment. These explosive forces, however,

13min

Purdue drug discovery aims to find better drug 'fits,' avoid medication tragedies like thalidomide

When a medication doesn't "fit" the body quite right, the results can be devastating. Such is the case for thalidomide, which was prescribed in the 1950s and 1960s as a sedative or hypnotic, even for pregnant women.

13min

Researchers announce the discovery of an atomic electronic simulator

Targeting applications like neural networks for machine learning, a new discovery out of the University of Alberta and Quantum Silicon Inc. in Edmonton, Canada is paving the way for atomic ultra-efficient electronics, the need for which is increasingly critical in our data-driven society. The key to unlocking untold potential for the greenest electronics? Creating bespoke atomic patterns to in tur

13min

For Some Poor Countries, Climate Science Comes Too Late

It’s easy to talk about how climate change will alter Earth’s surface in the century to come. It will raise sea levels, flood cities, and set off droughts. As this month’s dire UN report shows, decades of climate science have made the worldwide dangers of human-caused warming unambiguous. Yet it’s far harder to talk about how these changes will play out locally. No two places will experience clim

13min

Norsk teknologi skal redde fisk og skildpadder fra spøgelsesgarn

Tonsvis af fiskeudstyr ender hvert år i havene. Det udgør en trussel for fisk, sæler, hvaler og skildpadder.

17min

Viking ship burial discovered in Norway just 50cm underground

Archaeologists detect 20-metre ship using motorised high-resolution ground-penetrating radar Archaeologists have discovered a Viking ship burial in Norway using ground-penetrating radar that suggests the 20-metre keel and many of its timbers remain well preserved just half a metre below the topsoil. The ship lies in farmland in Østfold county in south-east Norway. Just three other intact ship bur

25min

Scientists chase mystery of how dogs process words

Experimental results suggest that dogs have at least a rudimentary neural representation of meaning for words they have been taught, differentiating words they have heard before from those they have not.

32min

The state of the early universe: The beginning was fluid

Scientists recently collided Xenon nuclei, in order to gain new insights into the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (the QGP). The QGP is a special state consisting of the fundamental particles, the quarks, and the particles that bind the quarks together, the gluons. The result was obtained using the ALICE experiment at the superconducting Large Hadron Collider.

32min

Potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa

A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with zebras, giraffes, elephants and other wild mammals — to the benefit of all.

32min

Is ‘don’t push yet’ bad advice for women in labor?

How soon a woman begins pushing during childbirth does not appear to affect C-section rates, but delaying pushing too long may raise the risk for other complications, a study finds. More than three million women in the United States give birth each year. But obstetricians have differing opinions about when women should begin pushing during labor and whether the timing of pushing increases the lik

36min

Researchers find no progress in media representation of nurses over last 20 years

A replication of the 1997 "Woodhull Study on Nursing and the Media" led by the George Washington University School of Nursing found nurses continue to be underrepresented as sources in heath news stories despite their increasing levels of education and expertise.

36min

PPR virus poses threat to conservation

A team of conservationists from the Royal Veterinary College, WCS, Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna published a letter in this week's edition of the journal Science on the threat of the virus peste des petits ruminants (PPR) to conservation.

36min

Announcing the discovery of an atomic electronic simulator

Targeting applications like neural networks for machine learning, a new discovery is paving the way for atomic ultra-efficient electronics, the need for which is increasingly critical in our data-driven society. The key to unlocking untold potential for the greenest electronics? Creating bespoke atomic patterns to in turn control electrons.

36min

Purdue aims to find better drug 'fits,' avoid medication tragedies like thalidomide

Purdue University researchers, including chemistry professor and Nobel Prize winner Ei-ichi Negishi, have developed technology to create a new chemical process to synthesize drug-like molecules with ultra-high purity.

36min

The U.S. military is developing mind-controlled drones

Military researchers have been testing implants that allow the operator to control drones with thoughts. The tech translates thinking into code. More development is necessary. Technological progress has often been driven by military needs. Whether this is progress we want may be debatable, but the U.S. military's research arm, DARPA , tested technology that would allow an operator to control up t

37min

how climate change could cause global beer shortages

Severe climate events could cause shortages in the global beer supply, according to new research. The study warns that increasingly widespread and severe drought and heat may cause substantial decreases in barley yields worldwide, affecting the supply used to make beer, and ultimately resulting in 'dramatic' falls in beer consumption and rises in beer prices.

46min

New interactive scenario explorer for 1.5 degrees C pathways

IIASA and the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC) have made the scenarios underlying last week's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1.5 degrees C Special Report publicly available, in an interactive online resource. The resource provides scenarios and a suite of visualization and analysis tools, making the assessment more transparent to researchers, policymakers, and the

46min

People ordered into mental health care less likely to perceive it as helpful

A new study finds that people who independently seek mental health care are more likely to rate their treatment as effective, compared to people ordered into care.

46min

Security vulnerabilities in terahertz data links

Scientists have assumed that future terahertz data links would have an inherent immunity to eavesdropping, but new research shows that's not necessarily the case.

46min

Biomaterials with 'Frankenstein proteins' help heal tissue

Biomedical engineers have demonstrated that, by injecting an elastic biomaterial made from ordered and disordered proteins, a scaffold can form that responds to temperature and easily integrates into tissue.

46min

Parasites from medieval latrines unlock secrets of human history

A radical new approach combining archaeology, genetics and microscopy can reveal long-forgotten secrets of human diet, sanitation and movement from studying parasites in ancient excrement, according to new research.

46min

Unravelling the genetics of fungal fratricide

Selfish genes are genes that are passed on to the next generation but confer no advantage on the individual as a whole, and may sometimes be harmful. Researchers have, for the first time, sequenced (or charted) two selfish genes in the fungus Neurospora intermedia that cause fungal spores to kill their siblings. Unexpectedly, the genes were not related to each other, perhaps indicating that selfis

46min

Ultra-light gloves let users 'touch' virtual objects

Scientists have developed an ultra-light glove — weighing less than 8 grams per finger — that enables users to feel and manipulate virtual objects. Their system provides extremely realistic haptic feedback and could run on a battery, allowing for unparalleled freedom of movement.

46min

Your Memory Could Store Up to 10,000 Faces, or More

How many faces do you retain in your memory? It's likely a lot more than you'd expect.

54min

Viking Ship and Cemetery Found Buried in Norway

Archaeologists discovered the anomaly using radar scans of an area in Østfold County.

54min

Perspectives on adding folic acid to flour to prevent spinal bifida | Letters

Dr JK Anand , Chris Page and Pam Lunn reflect on the UK government’s decision Of course the planned fortification of flour with folic acid will help – where the cause of spina bifida is nutritional deficiency of folic acid ( All UK flour to be given folic acid additive , 15 October). However, it can not conceivably prevent the defect where it is due to genetic factors – two defective genes from t

55min

Finding hope in the reign of a super-ego | Letters

Guardian readers respond to Gary Greenberg’s essay on Trumpian psychoanalysis Gary Greenberg’s beautifully written but flawed account of the first two years of the Trump presidency highlights the limitations of using psychoanalytic concepts to explain wider political and social developments ( Analyse this , The long read, 12 October). Far from Trumpism representing the return of “our archaic herit

55min

Nick Foster obituary

My father, Nick Foster, who has died aged 61 after suffering a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, was an agricultural engineer devoted to improving conditions for rural people in the developing world. He wanted to empower communities by encouraging participation and education, and established water-user groups that led to the sustainable management of irrigation schemes. Continue reading…

55min

55min

Does risk of embryonic malformations outweigh benefits of using SSRIs in pregnant women?

A comprehensive new review article presents the most current understanding of the role selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) play in increased risk of multiple diverse gestational malformations and takes aim at the ongoing debate over whether SSRIs as a drug class can cause these malformations.

57min

NASA sees remnants of Post-Tropical Cyclone Leslie over Spain

Post-tropical cyclone Leslie made landfall in Portugal bringing heavy rains and hurricane-force winds. On Oct. 14, 2018, NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite spotted the remnant clouds over northern Spain.

57min

Ketamine is a safe, effective alternative to opioids in treating acute pain in the ED

Intravenous, low-dose ketamine (LDK) is as effective as intravenous morphine in the control of acute pain in adults in the emergency department (ED).

57min

New smart watch algorithms can help identify why you are sleeping poorly

New algorithms take advantage of multiple smart watch sensors to accurately monitor wearers' sleep patterns. As well as obtaining rich information on wearers' sleep, the software, called SleepGuard, can estimate sleep quality and provide users with practical advice to help them get a better night's snooze.

57min

Scientists chase mystery of how dogs process words

Experimental results suggest that dogs have at least a rudimentary neural representation of meaning for words they have been taught, differentiating words they have heard before from those they have not.

57min

Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL Review: Software Is Eating Your Phone

Our favorite Android phone is back, and this time it’s loaded with even more AI smarts.

58min

Sponges on ancient ocean floors 100 million years before Cambrian period

Researchers have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils.

1h

Cellular 'tuning mechanism' builds elegant eyes

Scientists discover a molecular 'brake' that helps control eye lens development in zebrafish.

1h

The tightest non-aminoglycoside ligand for the bacterial ribosomal RNA A-site

A research group has made a significant discovery with positive implications for the development of bacteria-fighting drugs. The aminoacyl-tRNA site (A-site) of the 16S RNA decoding region in the bacterial ribosome looks promising for a new era of antibiotic drug development.

1h

Molecular atlas of postnatal mouse heart development

Researchers mapped the postnatal changes in mouse myocardium on three omics levels and multiple time points, highlighting the importance of metabolic pathways as potential drug targets.

1h

Lift off for world-first ultrasound levitation that bends around barriers

Researchers have become the first in the world to develop technology which can bend sound waves around an obstacle and levitate an object above it.

1h

New model helps define optimal temperature and pressure to forge nanoscale diamonds

To forge nanodiamonds, which have potential applications in medicine, optoelectronics and quantum computing, researchers expose organic explosive molecules to powerful detonations in a controlled environment. These explosive forces, however, make it difficult to study the nanodiamond formation process. To overcome this hurdle, researchers recently developed a procedure and a computer model that ca

1h

Ultra-light gloves let users 'touch' virtual objects

Scientists from EPFL and ETH Zurich have developed an ultra-light glove — weighing less than 8 grams per finger- that enables users to feel and manipulate virtual objects. Their system provides extremely realistic haptic feedback and could run on a battery, allowing for unparalleled freedom of movement.

1h

Unravelling the genetics of fungal fratricide

Selfish genes are genes that are passed on to the next generation but confer no advantage on the individual as a whole, and may sometimes be harmful. Researchers at Uppsala University have, for the first time, sequenced (or charted) two selfish genes in the fungus Neurospora intermedia that cause fungal spores to kill their siblings. Unexpectedly, the genes were not related to each other, perhaps

1h

Trump sends Pompeo to Saudi Arabia to discuss journalist's disappearance

Trump vowed "severe punishment" on Saudi Arabia if it's shown the royals had something to do with the vanishing and possible murder of Khashoggi. Saudi Arabia faces mounting pressure from Western nations and businesses to explain why the journalist was never seen again after he stepped into the Saudi embassy in Turkey on October 2. It's unclear how Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will handle the m

1h

Endurance exercise training has beneficial effects on gut microbiota composition

According to recent research, endurance exercise training beneficially modifies gut microbiota composition. After six weeks of training, potentially inflammation causing microbes (Proteobacteria) decreased and microbes that are linked to enhanced metabolism (Akkermansia) increased.

1h

Neck device shows promise in protecting the brain of female soccer players

A new study of female high school soccer players suggests that a neck collar may help protect the brain from head impacts over the course of a competitive soccer season.

1h

1h

When a Drone Crashes into an Airplane, Everyone Has a Bad Time

A drone crashed into an airplane. The results were seriously scary.

1h

Scientists create synthetic prototissue capable of synchronised beating

A tissue-like material capable of synchronised beating when heated and cooled has been developed by a team of University of Bristol chemists.

1h

Parasites from medieval latrines unlock secrets of human history

A radical new approach combining archaeology, genetics and microscopy can reveal long-forgotten secrets of human diet, sanitation and movement from studying parasites in ancient poo, according to new Oxford University research.

1h

People ordered into mental health care less likely to perceive it as helpful

A new study, led by Sirry Alang of Lehigh University, finds that people who independently seek mental health care are more likely to rate their treatment as effective, compared to people ordered into care. The study was published online recently in the journal Society and Mental Health.

1h

Alcohol-related liver disease patients need more care, study finds

Patients with alcohol-related liver disease (ALD) tend to have worse outcomes than others following a stay in intensive care, research shows.

1h

The state of the early universe: The beginning was fluid

Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, and their colleagues from the international ALICE collaboration recently collided Xenon nuclei, in order to gain new insights into the properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (the QGP). The QGP is a special state consisting of the fundamental particles, the quarks, and the particles that bind the quarks together, the gluons. The resu

1h

New interactive scenario explorer for 1.5 degrees C pathways

IIASA and the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC) have made the scenarios underlying last week's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 1.5 degrees C Special Report publicly available, in an interactive online resource. The resource provides scenarios and a suite of visualization and analysis tools, making the assessment more transparent to researchers, policymakers, and the

1h

Function of neutrophils during tumor progression unraveled

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have characterized the function of neutrophils, a type of white blood cells, during early stages of tumor progression, showing that they migrate from the bone marrow to distant sites and facilitate tumor cell seeding and establishment of metastasis. Importantly, these neutrophils don't possess the immunosuppressive characteristics of polymorphonuclear myeloid-de

1h

Physics: Not everything is where it seems to be

Scientists at TU Wien, the University of Innsbruck and the ÖAW have for the first time demonstrated a wave effect that can lead to measurement errors in the optical position estimation of objects. The work now published in Nature Physics could have consequences for optical microscopy and optical astronomy, but could also play a role in position measurements using sound, radar, or gravitational wav

1h

Biomaterials with 'Frankenstein proteins' help heal tissue

Biomedical engineers from Duke University and Washington University in St. Louis have demonstrated that, by injecting an elastic biomaterial made from ordered and disordered proteins, a scaffold can form that responds to temperature and easily integrates into tissue.

1h

Attacking RNA with small-molecule drugs

Yale researchers have developed a way to target RNA with small-molecule drugs, creating a new method for tapping into a vast number of biological mechanisms critical to metabolism and gene expression.

1h

Flexible fertilizer regulations could reduce pollution, save billions

To reduce pollution and save billions of dollars in damages, the United States and other national governments should require manufacturers to sell nitrogen fertilizer with compounds designed to increase their efficiency and reduce pollution.

1h

When light, not heat, causes melting

Researchers at MIT and elsewhere observe for the first time in detail a type of phase transition that processes very differently from ordinary freezing and melting.

1h

Applying auto industry's fuel-efficiency standards to agriculture could net billions

Adopting benchmarks similar to the fuel-efficiency standards used by the auto industry in the production of fertilizer could yield $5-8 billion in economic benefits for the U.S. corn sector alone, researchers have concluded in a new analysis.

1h

Diversity is key to sustainability for local chicken farming in Africa

Adopting a more local and flexible approach to sustainable development could be key to boosting the productivity of small-scale chicken farms in Africa, a new study reports. Research led by the University of Liverpool, in collaboration with UK and African partners, reveals village chicken populations in Ethiopia to be genetically diverse and highly adapted to their local physical, cultural and soc

1h

Immune health maintained by meticulously ordered DNA

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have revealed how immune health is maintained by the exquisite organisation skills of a protein called Pax5.

1h

How common are tobacco, marijuana use in hip-hop music videos?

Popular hip-hop music videos frequently feature tobacco and marijuana use, and because of the genre's broad appeal, this may contribute to growing public health concern about the use of these products in traditional combustible or new electronic forms.

1h

Tracking the movement of the tropics 800 years into the past

For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics back 800 years. The movement of the tropical boundary affects the locations of Northern Hemisphere deserts including the Sonoran, Mohave and Saharan. The Earth's climate system affects the movement of the tropics, which have been expanding since the 1970s. The research team found that in the

1h

Oldest evidence for animals found by UCR researchers

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils.

1h

Study finds potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa

A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with zebras, giraffes, elephants and other wild mammals — to the benefit of all.

1h

Global warming will have us crying in what's left of our beer

In a study published today in Nature Plants, researchers from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions report that concurrent droughts and heat waves, exacerbated by anthropogenic global warming, will lead to sharp declines in crop yields of barley, beer's main ingredient.

1h

Study reveals how climate change could cause global beer shortages

Severe climate events could cause shortages in the global beer supply, according to new research involving the University of East Anglia.The study warns that increasingly widespread and severe drought and heat may cause substantial decreases in barley yields worldwide, affecting the supply used to make beer, and ultimately resulting in 'dramatic' falls in beer consumption and rises in beer prices.

1h

Stanford study traces hospital-acquired bloodstream infections to patients' own bodies

The most common source of a bloodstream infection acquired during a hospital stay is not a nurse's or doctor's dirty hands, or another patient's sneeze or visitor's cough, but the patient's own gut, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators have found.

1h

Study exposes security vulnerabilities in terahertz data links

Scientists have assumed that future terahertz data links would have an inherent immunity to eavesdropping, but new research shows that's not necessarily the case.

1h

This is how Earth feeds volcanic ‘supereruptions’

Researchers have learned more details about how Earth builds the magma systems that feed volcanic supereruptions. To figure out where magma gathers in the earth’s crust and for how long, a team of researchers traveled to its most active cluster: the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand, where some of the biggest eruptions of the last 2 million years occurred—seven in a period between 350,000 and 24

1h

Scientists create synthetic prototissue capable of synchronised beating

The discovery, published in Nature Materials, is the first chemically programmed approach to producing an artificial tissue. The findings, which could have major health applications in the future, could see chemically programmed synthetic tissue being used to support failing living tissues and to cure specific diseases.

1h

Parasites from medieval latrines unlock secrets of human history

A radical new approach combining archaeology, genetics and microscopy can reveal long-forgotten secrets of human diet, sanitation and movement from studying parasites in ancient poo, according to new Oxford University research.

1h

Kids' sleep may suffer from moms' tight work schedules

After studying the sleep habits of children from ages five to nine, researchers found that when mothers reported less flexibility in their work schedules, their children got less sleep. When they gained flexibility in their work schedules, their children slept more.

1h

Discovery of inner ear function may improve diagnosis of hearing impairment

Results from a research study show how the inner ear processes speech, something that has until now been unknown.

1h

Giant planets around young star raise questions about how planets form

Researchers have identified a young star with four Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets in orbit around it, the first time that so many massive planets have been detected in such a young system. The system has also set a new record for the most extreme range of orbits yet observed: the outermost planet is more than a thousand times further from the star than the innermost one, which raises interesting

1h

Perovskites: Materials of the future in optical communication

Researchers have shown how an inorganic perovskite can be made into a cheap and efficient photodetector that transfers both text and music.

1h

People donate more when they sense they are being watched

The mere presence of a pair of eyes on a sign requesting donations makes people more likely to give more. These findings support the idea that people tend to act according to pro-social norms when they sense that they are being watched. It also suggests that eyes play a special role in promoting cooperation in humans.

1h

Blue phosphorus mapped and measured for the first time

Until recently, the existence of 'blue' phosphorus was pure theory: Now a team was able to examine samples of blue phosphorus at BESSY II for the first time and confirm via mapping of their electronic band structure that this is actually this exotic phosphorus modification. Blue phosphorus is an interesting candidate for new optoelectronic devices.

1h

Arsenic for electronics

The discovery of graphene, a material made of one or very few atomic layers of carbon, started a boom. Today, such two-dimensional materials are no longer limited to carbon and are hot prospects for many applications, especially in microelectronics. Scientists have now introduced a new 2D material: they successfully modified arsenene (arsenic in a graphene-like structure) with chloromethylene grou

1h

Climate Change Might Double the Cost of a Beer

More extreme droughts and heat waves will hit barley especially hard, so growers are trying to hack the grain to make it more resistant.

1h

Will there be beer shortages as the world warms? Well, maybe

Predictions of beer shortages and rocketing prices as extreme weather hits barley production should not be taken too literally but do highlight a very real problem

1h

Earliest ever animal fossil is a 660-million-year-old sponge

Chemical evidence locked in rocks and oil suggests that the first animals were alive 100 million years earlier than we thought from fossils

1h

Neck device shows promise in protecting the brain of female soccer players

First-of-its-kind study looks at female athletes wearing experimental neck collar.

1h

Memristive device as an active synapse

Biological neurons are coupled unidirectionally through a special junction called a synapse. An electrical signal is transmitted along a neuron after some biochemical reactions initiate a chemical release to activate an adjacent neuron. These junctions are crucial for cognitive functions, such as perception, learning and memory.

1h

Kids' sleep may suffer from moms' tight work schedules

After studying the sleep habits of children from ages five to nine, researchers found that when mothers reported less flexibility in their work schedules, their children got less sleep. When they gained flexibility in their work schedules, their children slept more.

1h

Endurance exercise training has beneficial effects on gut microbiota composition

Endurance exercise training beneficially modifies gut microbiota composition.

1h

Applying auto industry's fuel-efficiency standards to agriculture could net billions

Adopting benchmarks similar to the fuel-efficiency standards used by the auto industry in the production of fertilizer could yield $5-8 billion in economic benefits for the U.S. corn sector alone, researchers have concluded in a new analysis.

1h

Study shows what happens when ultrafast laser pulses, not heat, cause a material to change phase

The way that ordinary materials undergo a phase change, such as melting or freezing, has been studied in great detail. Now, a team of researchers has observed that when they trigger a phase change by using intense pulses of laser light, instead of by changing the temperature, the process occurs very differently.

1h

Attacking RNA with small-molecule drugs

Yale researchers have developed a way to target RNA with small-molecule drugs, creating a new method for tapping into a vast number of biological mechanisms critical to metabolism and gene expression.

1h

Diversity is key to sustainability for local chicken farming in Africa

Adopting a more local and flexible approach to sustainable development could be key to boosting the productivity of small-scale chicken farms in Africa, a new study reports.

1h

Study finds potential benefits of wildlife-livestock coexistence in East Africa

A study of 3,588 square kilometers of privately owned land in central Kenya offers evidence that humans and their livestock can, in the right circumstances, share territory with zebras, giraffes, elephants and other wild mammals—to the benefit of all.

1h

Biomaterials with 'Frankenstein proteins' help heal tissue

Biomedical engineers from Duke University and Washington University in St. Louis have demonstrated that, by injecting an artificial protein made from a solution of ordered and disordered segments, a solid scaffold forms in response to body heat, and in a few weeks seamlessly integrates into tissue.

1h

Tracking the movement of the tropics 800 years into the past

For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics back 800 years, reports a University of Arizona-led international team.

1h

Oldest evidence for animals found

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have found the oldest clue yet of animal life, dating back at least 100 million years before the famous Cambrian explosion of animal fossils.

1h

Study exposes security vulnerabilities in terahertz data links

A new study shows that terahertz data links, which may play a role in ultra-high-speed wireless data networks of the future, aren't as immune to eavesdropping as many researchers have assumed. The research, published in the journal Nature, shows that it is possible for a clever eavesdropper to intercept a signal from a terahertz transmitter without the intrusion being detected at the receiver.

1h

Fracking starts at landmark Lancashire site

It is first time fracking has occurred in the UK since it was linked to earthquakes in 2011.

1h

Rothera wharf 'kit of parts' heading to Antarctica

A team is preparing for the trip to the "most remote construction site in the world".

1h

Predicting an El Niño or La Niña year 17 months in advance

El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) leads to extreme climatic variations called El Niño and La Niña that cause dangerous weather conditions in many regions throughout the world. Currently, a reliable forecast of the ENSO phases can be made about a year beforehand. This study details a novel method that allows for the accurate forecast of its phases up to 17 months in advance.

1h

Economic analysis provides watershed moment for environmental groups

Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality.

1h

Human and cattle decoys trap malaria mosquitoes outdoors

Host decoy traps which mimic humans or cattle by combining odor, heat and a conspicuous visual stimulus could be effective at measuring and controlling outdoor-biting mosquitoes in malaria endemic regions.

1h

Half of parents say their preschooler fears doctor's visits

One in 25 parents had postponed a vaccine due to their child's fear of doctor visits and one in five said it was hard to concentrate on what the doctor or nurse was saying because their young child was so upset.

1h

Teenaged girls did not engage in riskier sexual behavior after HPV vaccination introduced in school

Despite fears to the contrary, sexual behaviors of adolescent girls stayed the same or became safer after publicly funded school-based HPV vaccinations were introduced in British Columbia (BC), according to new research.

1h

More clues revealed in link between normal breast changes and invasive breast cancer

A research team details how a natural and dramatic process — changes in mammary glands to accommodate breastfeeding — uses a molecular process believed to contribute to survival of pre-malignant breast cells.

1h

Liver-on-a-chip, the ideal test environment for CRISPR

Organ-on-a-chip liver platform marks first time this breakthrough gene-editing technology will be used on a non-animal, multicellular model.

1h

Abnormal vision in childhood can affect brain functions

A research team has discovered that abnormal vision in childhood can affect the development of higher-level brain areas responsible for things such as attention.

1h

The EPA just scrapped two expert panels tasked with evaluating air pollution

Environment Some argue this is another step to take science out of the agency's decision making. The EPA just replaced two independent panel of scientists that reviews air quality standards for two of the most problematic air pollutants with seven people.

1h

Trouble Brewing? Climate Change Closes In on Beer Drinkers

Increasing droughts and heat waves could have a devastating effect on barley stocks—and beer prices — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Let's protect the oceans like national parks | David Lang

You don't have to be a scientist to help protect the world's oceans, says underwater drone expert and TED Fellow David Lang — in fact, ordinary citizens have pulled together to save the planet's natural treasures many times in history. Lang asks us to take a lesson from the story of the US National Parks Service, offering a three-point plan for conserving underwater wonders.

2h

Minister påstod igen og igen, at milliard-kabel var til gavn for klimaet, men det passer ikke

Energiminister Lars Chr. Lilleholt hævdede, at Viking Link-kablet til England giver CO2-reduktion, men da var analysen end ikke udarbejdet. Nu er en gammel beregning dukket op, som viser negativ klimaeffekt.

2h

Protesters lose public support when they get violent

Violent protests can undercut public support for popular causes, according to new research inspired by recent confrontations between white nationalist protesters and anti-racist counter-protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia, and Berkeley, California. When protests turn violent, people tend to view protesters as unreasonable, says study author Robb Willer, professor of sociology at Stanford Univ

2h

Arsenic for electronics

The discovery of graphene, a material made of one or very few atomic layers of carbon, started a boom. Today, such two-dimensional materials are no longer limited to carbon and are hot prospects for many applications, especially in microelectronics. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new 2D material: they successfully modified arsenene (arsenic in a graphene-like st

2h

Blue phosphorus — mapped and measured for the first time

Until recently, the existence of 'blue' phosphorus was pure theory: Now an HZB team was able to examine samples of blue phosphorus at BESSY II for the first time and confirm via mapping of their electronic band structure that this is actually this exotic phosphorus modification. Blue phosphorus is an interesting candidate for new optoelectronic devices.

2h

People donate more when they sense they are being watched

The mere presence of a pair of eyes on a sign requesting donations makes people more likely to give more. This is according to a field study in Springer's journal Human Nature. Lead author Caroline Kelsey of the University of Virginia in the US says the findings support the idea that people tend to act according to pro-social norms when they sense that they are being watched. It also suggests that

2h

Scientists discover new properties of uranium compounds

A group of physicists predicted that much lower pressures of about 50,000 atm can produce 14 new uranium hydrides, of which only one, UH3, has been known to date. They include compounds rich in hydrogens, such as UH7 and UH8, that the scientists predicted to be superconducting too. Many of these compounds were then obtained in the experiments conducted at the US Carnegie Institution of Washington

2h

Giant planets around young star raise questions about how planets form

Researchers have identified a young star with four Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets in orbit around it, the first time that so many massive planets have been detected in such a young system. The system has also set a new record for the most extreme range of orbits yet observed: the outermost planet is more than a thousand times further from the star than the innermost one, which raises interesting

2h

MIT unveils new $1 bn college for artificial intelligenceMIT Stephen A AI College

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced plans Monday to create a new college of artificial intelligence with an initial $1 billion commitment for the program focusing on "responsible and ethical" uses of the technology.

2h

Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate.

2h

When ignoring your spouse can help your relationship

It is a classic relationship stalemate: One partner asks the other to change something and the partner who is asked shuts down. But that type of response may actually be beneficial for the relationship of lower-income couples, according to new research. Conversely, withdrawing can negatively affect higher-income couples' relationship satisfaction, the study found.

2h

Increasing vigorous exercise decreases risk of type two diabetes, cardiovascular disease in childhood

Physical exercise can reduce the risk factors of type two diabetes and cardiovascular disease even in children, a new study shows. In a two-year follow-up of primary school children, sedentary behavior increased the accumulation of risk factors, whereas increasing the amount of vigorous exercise reduced it. This is one of the first follow-up studies to reliably demonstrate these associations in ch

2h

Artificial intelligence aids automatic monitoring of single molecules in cells

Researchers developed a system that can automatically image single molecules within living cells. This system employs learning via neural networks to focus appropriately on samples, search automatically for cells, image fluorescently labeled single molecules, and track their movements. With this system, the team achieved the automated determination of pharmacological parameters and quantitative ch

2h

High-performance flexible transparent force touch sensor for wearable devices

Researchers reported a high-performance and transparent nanoforce touch sensor by developing a thin, flexible, and transparent hierarchical nanocomposite (HNC) film. The research team says their sensor simultaneously features all the necessary characters for industrial-grade application: high sensitivity, transparency, bending insensitivity, and manufacturability.

2h

Extensive trade in fish between Egypt and Canaan 3,500 years ago

Some 3,500 years ago, a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea had already begun. This conclusion follows from the analysis of 100 fish teeth that were found at various archeological sites in what is now Israel.

2h

3D mammography detected 34 percent more breast cancers in screening

After screening 15,000 women over a period of five years, a major clinical study in Sweden has shown that 3D mammography, or breast tomosynthesis, detects over 30% more cancers compared to traditional mammography — with a majority of the detected tumors proving to be invasive cancers.

2h

Energy harvesting and innovative inputs highlight tech show gadgetry

Wearable technology developed at Dartmouth College with the potential to change the way we live and work will be introduced at the 31st ACM User Interface Software and Technology Symposium (UIST 2018).

2h

Nu bliver Opel også ransaget: Efter tre år vil Dieselgate ingen ende tage

Tysk politi gennemsøgte mandag Opels kontorer i byerne Kaiserslauten og Rüsselheim i jagt på beviser for svindel med emissionerne fra 95.000 biler.

2h

DNA databases are too white. This man aims to fix that.

Carlos D. Bustamante’s hunt for genetic variations between populations should help us better understand and treat disease.

2h

Lift off for world-first ultrasound levitation that bends around barriers

Researchers at the University of Sussex have become the first in the world to develop technology which can bend sound waves around an obstacle and levitate an object above it.

2h

Molecular atlas of postnatal mouse heart development

Researchers mapped the postnatal changes in mouse myocardium on three omics levels and multiple time points, highlighting the importance of metabolic pathways as potential drug targets.

2h

Scientists found common genes in different peoples of the Ural language family

The genetic diversity of peoples of the Ural language family living in Europe and Siberia are strongly influenced by a geography. However, the genetics from Estonia and Russia found common genetic component in Ural-speaking populations. Presumably, it originated from West Siberia. This means that the Ural family languages have spread over a wide area due to population migrations.

2h

'Universal' blood test for earlier diagnosis of cancer moves closer to market

UK researchers behind a potential 'universal' liquid biopsy blood test for cancer detection have licensed the technology to an industrial partner to take it to market.

2h

Discovery of inner ear function may improve diagnosis of hearing impairment

Results from a research study published in Nature Communications show how the inner ear processes speech, something that has until now been unknown. The authors of the report include researchers from Linköping University, Sweden, and Oregon Health & Science University, United States.

2h

Perovskites — materials of the future in optical communication

Researchers at the universities in Linköping and Shenzhen have shown how an inorganic perovskite can be made into a cheap and efficient photodetector that transfers both text and music. "It's a promising material for future rapid optical communication", says Feng Gao, researcher at Linköping University.

2h

3D mammography detected 34 percent more breast cancers in screening

After screening 15 000 women over a period of five years, a major clinical study in Sweden has shown that 3D mammography, or breast tomosynthesis, detects over 30 percent more cancers compared to traditional mammography – with a majority of the detected tumors proving to be invasive cancers. The extensive screening study was conducted by Lund University and Skåne University Hospital in Sweden, and

2h

Blood test biopsy for kids with brain tumors is simple, safe way to see if treatment is working

A new blood test for children with brain tumors offers a safer approach than surgical biopsies and may allow doctors to measure the effectiveness of treatment even before changes are identified on scans, according to research led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and Children's National Health System.

2h

Ionic decision-maker capable of self-learning

A NIMS research group has invented an ionic device, termed an ionic decision-maker, capable of quickly making its own decisions based on previous experience using changes in ionic/molecular concentrations. The group then succeeded in demonstrating its operation. This device is capable of making decisions while efficiently adapting to changing situations by a means unrelated to the storage of past

2h

BepiColombo monitoring camera test image

An unusual view of part of the BepiColombo spacecraft stack, taken by one of the monitoring cameras (or 'selfie-cams') fixed to the Mercury Transfer Module, MTM. The camera is looking up towards the solar array drive (top left) and the back side of the solar array closest to the 'body' of the spacecraft module. The image was taken in late September as part of launch preparations at Europe's Spacep

2h

Not Even Trump Wants to Praise Robert E. Lee

On Sunday morning, President Trump broke with precedent, discarded norms, and did something few of his predecessors would ever have considered: He angrily denied the suggestion that he had praised Robert E. Lee. “NBC News has totally and purposely changed the point and meaning of my story about General Robert E Lee and General Ulysses Grant,” Trump objected in a tweet. “Was actually a shoutout to

2h

Male Gorillas Love Hanging Around With Infants

Isabukuru , a silverback mountain gorilla who lived in Rwanda until his death last year, was known for being exceptionally affectionate toward the infants in his group. “One infant, named Mushya, was his favorite,” says Stacy Rosenbaum , an anthropologist at Northwestern University. “[Isabukuru] would routinely pick Mushya up, groom him, and try to get him to interact, when Mushya clearly wanted

2h

New way to track sepsis could mean fewer deaths

Scientists have developed a new way to track, on the molecular level, how deadly sepsis develops. They’re hopeful the finding could save lives and reduce suffering. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of hospital deaths—and can result in serious disabilities for those who survive. It begins with an infection but can rapidly result in organ failure and septic shock. To treat sepsis, physicians nee

2h

German prosecutors raid Opel over diesel allegations

French-owned carmaker Opel became the latest household name of the German auto industry in prosecutors' sights over diesel emissions, as authorities raided two factories belonging to the lightning-bolt brand and prepared a mass recall.

2h

Extensive trade in fish between Egypt and Canaan already 3,500 years ago

Some 3,500 years ago, there was already a brisk trade in fish on the shores of the southeastern Mediterranean Sea. This conclusion follows from the analysis of 100 fish teeth that were found at various archeological sites in what is now Israel.

2h

High-performance flexible transparent force touch sensor for wearable devices

Researchers reported a high-performance and transparent nanoforce touch sensor by developing a thin, flexible, and transparent hierarchical nanocomposite (HNC) film. The research team says their sensor simultaneously features all the necessary characters for industrial-grade application: high sensitivity, transparency, bending insensitivity, and manufacturability.

2h

Invention of ionic decision-maker capable of self-learning

A NIMS research group has invented an ionic device, termed as ionic decision-maker, capable of quickly making its own decisions based on previous experience using changes in ionic/molecular concentrations. The group then succeeded in demonstrating its operation. This device is capable of making decisions while efficiently adapting to changing situations by a means unrelated to the storage of past

2h

Eating royal poop improves parenting in naked mole-rats

Have you ever seen a picture of a mother dog caring for an unusual baby, like a kitten? This sort of animal adoption story is an example of a phenomenon known as alloparenting: care provided to offspring that are not genetically related.

3h

Ford faces outrage in France over factory closure

US carmaker Ford came under fire from the French government on Monday over its plans to close a factory producing gear boxes in southwest France that employs 850 people.

3h

13 dead as flooding hits southwestern France

At least 13 people died when violent rainstorms turned rivers into raging torrents in southwest France on Monday, prompting some of the deadliest flooding in years, officials said.

3h

Saudi Arabia Does a Big Favor For Iran

When the Trump administration talks about “ severe punishment ” for a country in the Middle East, it is generally referring to Iran, a country whose regional influence troubles both its Arab neighbors as well as the United States. Yet on Sunday, President Trump used those words to describe what could happen to Saudi Arabia— arguably the closest U.S. ally in the Muslim world— if investigations d e

3h

A Long-Term Solution For Scooter Sharing

On Monday, after the great Scooter Wars of the spring and the hotly contested permitting process of the summer, e-scooters will relaunch in San Francisco. The SF Municipal Transportation Agency blessed two companies —Skip and Scoot—of the 12 that applied for a license with the right to operate a pilot program within the city. Starting now, residents and visitors will get to see what a regulated s

3h

Energy harvesting and innovative inputs highlight tech show gadgetry

A battery-free energy harvester, a novel conductive system for smartwatches, and a prototype that extends body language to the human ear feature at new tech conference.

3h

Increasing vigorous exercise decreases risk of type two diabetes, cardiovascular disease in childhood

Physical exercise can reduce the risk factors of type two diabetes and cardiovascular disease even in children, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. In a two-year follow-up of primary school children, sedentary behavior increased the accumulation of risk factors, whereas increasing the amount of vigorous exercise reduced it. This is one of the first follow-up studies to reliab

3h

Bio-inspired nanoreactors

Catalysis, in the course of which a substance accelerates a chemical reaction, but remains unchanged, is of central importance to many industrial processes. To develop efficient catalysts optimized for various applications, researchers of different disciplines working in the Collaborative Research Center "Molecular Structuring of Soft Matter" (CRC 1176) of KIT were inspired by biological models. T

3h

Giant planets around young star raise questions about how planets form

Researchers have identified a young star with four Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets in orbit around it, the first time that so many massive planets have been detected in such a young system. The system has also set a new record for the most extreme range of orbits yet observed: the outermost planet is more than a thousand times further from the star than the innermost one, which raises interesting

3h

Taxing carbon may sound like a good idea, but does it work?

Exxon Mobil is backing a proposal to tax oil, gas and coal companies for the carbon they emit and redistribute the money raised that way to all Americans. It's also giving a group urging Washington to enact a tax on carbon US$1 million to advocate for this policy.

3h

Ny professor forudsiger udviklingen af sygdomme via blodprøvesvar

Henrik Løvendahl Jørgensen er ny professor i Klinisk Biokemisk Afdeling på Hvidovre Hospital. Han skal via gamle blodprøvesvar kigge efter advarsler for sygdomme og dødelighed.

3h

Five science tricks to scare up a better Halloween costume

DIY Add lights and smoke and just a bit of body horror. Halloween is coming, which means the race for the most awesome costume is on. Fortunately, a little science can add some serious fright to your get-up.

3h

The New Fastest Camera in the World Sees Lasers Move at 10 Trillion Frames Per Second

Older cameras could watch light cross the surface of a sesame seed. This is much faster than that.

3h

Unravelling the genetics of fungal fratricide

Selfish genes are genes that are passed on to the next generation but confer no advantage on the individual as a whole, and may sometimes be harmful. Researchers at Uppsala University have, for the first time, sequenced (or charted) two selfish genes in the fungus Neurospora intermedia that cause fungal spores to kill their siblings. Unexpectedly, the genes were not related to each other, perhaps

3h

Astronomy student searches for giant rings with pictures from 1890

Meticulous analysis of hundreds of photographic plates from the star J1407 between 1890 and 2007 show no stellar eclipses. Robin Mentel, a Master's student at Leiden University, could not detect eclipses of the star J1407 by a planet hypothesized to have giant rings, called J1407b. However, an eclipse may have been missed since the measurement series contains gaps. Mentel's research has been accep

3h

Americans spend $70 billion on pets, and that money could do more good

Sylar, the border collie, has his own mansion along with a trampoline and indoor pool. The dog's adorable features, along with his notable intelligence, earned his owner's devotion along with many social media fans.

3h

The Roman 'Brexit': how life in Britain changed after 409 AD

Leaving a major political body is nothing new for mainland Britain. In 409AD, more than 350 years after the Roman conquest of 43AD, the island slipped from the control of the Roman Empire. Much like the present Brexit, the process of this secession and its practical impacts on Britain's population in the early years of the 5th century remain ill-defined.

3h

Perovskites – materials of the future in optical communication

Researchers at the universities of Linköping and Shenzhen have shown how an inorganic perovskite can be made into a cheap and efficient photodetector that transfers both text and music. "It's a promising material for future rapid optical communication", says Feng Gao, researcher at Linköping University.

3h

Covalently modified two-dimensional arsenic

The discovery of graphene, a material made of one or very few atomic layers of carbon, started a boom. Today, such two-dimensional materials are no longer limited to carbon and are hot prospects for many applications, especially in microelectronics. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new 2-D material: they successfully modified arsenene (arsenic in a graphene-like s

3h

Sea snail shells dissolve in increasingly acidified oceans

Shelled marine creatures living in increasingly acidified oceans face a fight for survival as the impacts of climate change spread, a new study suggests.

3h

Survey shows widespread skepticism of flu shot

The consensus among medical professionals is that the flu shot is safe and is the most effective tool we have in preventing the flu, but a new national survey that a shocking number of parents are still skeptical about the safety and effectiveness of the flu shot.

3h

Sound, vibration recognition boost context-aware computing

Smart devices can seem dumb if they don't understand what's happening around them. Researchers say environmental awareness can be enhanced by analyzing sound and vibrations. The researchers report about two approaches — one that uses the ubiquitous microphone, and another that employs a modern-day version of eavesdropping technology once used by the KGB.

3h

Facebook: 30 millioner af vores brugere har haft besøg af ubudne gæster

Facebook har nedjusteret estimatet for, hvor mange der blev ramt af stort sikkerhedsbrud. Til gengæld har angriberne haft adgang til så godt som alle oplysninger på det sociale medie.

3h

Bernie Sanders Offers a Foreign Policy for the Common Man

Last Tuesday, Bernie Sanders delivered a speech entitled “A Global Democratic Movement to Counter Authoritarianism.” In so doing, he resurrected the legacy of a man mostly forgotten by the makers of American foreign policy: Henry Wallace. Wallace is best known for his renegade 1948 presidential run, in which he argued for cooperation—not cold war—with the Soviet Union. But his most significant st

3h

Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

A new method for observing water within ice has revealed stored meltwater that may explain the complex flow behavior of some Greenland glaciers, an important component for predicting sea-level rise in a changing climate.

3h

The tightest non-aminoglycoside ligand for the bacterial ribosomal RNA A-site

A research group at Tohoku University has made a significant discovery with positive implications for the development of bacteria-fighting drugs. The aminoacyl-tRNA site (A-site) of the 16S RNA decoding region in the bacterial ribosome looks promising for a new era of antibiotic drug development.

3h

Cellular 'tuning mechanism' builds elegant eyes

Scientists discover a molecular 'brake' that helps control eye lens development in zebrafish.

3h

When ignoring your spouse can help your relationship

It is a classic relationship stalemate: One partner asks the other to change something and the partner who is asked shuts down. But that type of response may actually be beneficial for the relationship of lower-income couples, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. Conversely, withdrawing can negatively affect higher-income couples' relationship satisfaction, th

3h

Artificial intelligence aids automatic monitoring of single molecules in cells

Japanese researchers developed a system that can automatically image single molecules within living cells. This system employs learning via neural networks to focus appropriately on samples, search automatically for cells, image fluorescently labeled single molecules, and track their movements. With this system, the team achieved the automated determination of pharmacological parameters and quanti

3h

NUS researchers elucidate roles TP63 and SOX2 in squamous cell cancer progression

Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore (CSI Singapore) at the National University of Singapore have identified a SCC-specific protein complex activated by TP63 and SOX2 which triggers a gene cascade that promotes SCC growth.

3h

Scientists find missing piece in glacier melt predictions

Stanford scientists have revealed the presence of water stored within a glacier in Greenland, where the rapidly changing ice sheet is a major contributor to the sea-level rise North America will experience in the next 100 years. This observation – which came out of a new way of looking at existing data – has been a missing component for models aiming to predict how melting glaciers will impact the

3h

Cells' route in response to disease is not always straight, new study finds

The steps cells take in response to challenges are more complex than previously thought, a new study finds. The work investigates a system relevant to cancer, viral infection, and diabetes as well as Parkinson's and Lou Gehrig's disease.

3h

Observations unveil an ionized halo of planetary nebula IC 5148

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have performed observations of the planetary nebula IC 5148. The new study, described in a paper published October 2 on the arXiv pre-print server, unveils the presence of IC 5148 ionized halo and provides fundamental parameters of its central star.

3h

Many cases of dementia may arise from non-inherited DNA 'spelling mistakes'

Only a small proportion of cases of dementia are thought to be inherited — the cause of the vast majority is unknown. Now a team of scientists believe they may have found an explanation: spontaneous errors in our DNA that arise as cells divide and reproduce.

3h

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids — and not necessarily only their own, according to new research.

3h

Feminine leadership traits: Nice but expendable frills?

The first study to examine tradeoffs in masculine versus feminine leadership traits reveals that stereotypically feminine traits — like being tolerant and cooperative — are viewed as desirable but ultimately superfluous add-ons. Instead, both men and women believe successful leaders need stereotypically masculine traits such as assertiveness and competence. The finding could help explain the con

3h

Cells' route in response to disease is not always straight

The steps cells take in response to challenges are more complex than previously thought, finds new research. The study investigates a system relevant to cancer, viral infection, and diabetes.

3h

Gletsjer slår sprækker: Snart brækker gigantisk isbjerg af Antarktis

For anden gang på mindre end et år er et stort isbjerg ved at løsrive sig fra vigtig antarktisk gletsjer.

3h

League of (responsible, respectful, resilient) Legends

Teamwork. Respect. Responsibility. Positivity. What if our children could learn these things while engaged in their all-time favourite pastime? Video games.

3h

Rolls-Royce Wants to Fill the Seas With Self-Sailing Ships

The vision starts with helping humans stay safe at sea, but could put fully robo-boats into action as ferries in just a few years.

3h

Regionernes administration får ros for at være effektive

Regionernes administration er lige så effektiv som den mest effektive fjerdedel af de større private virksomheder på verdensplan. Dog kan der effektiviseres op mod 15-30 pct. ekstra.

3h

The Milky Way could be spreading life from star to star

For almost two centuries, scientists have theorized that life may be distributed throughout the universe by meteoroids, asteroids, planetoids, and other astronomical objects. This theory, known as Panspermia, is based on the idea that microorganisms and the chemical precursors of life are able to survive being transported from one star system to the next.

3h

Researchers report innovative optical tissue imaging method

A UK-wide research team, led by the University of St Andrews, has developed an innovative new way to optically image through tissue, which could allow for a more detailed understanding and diagnosis of the early stages of various diseases, including cancer.

3h

Alcohol disorder screening tests fail in weight-loss surgery patients

People who undergo Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, a common type of bariatric surgery, are at an increased risk for alcohol-related problems. However, common screening tools that help physicians identify patients at high risk for alcohol use disorder fail to work well in this population. The analysis also found that adults who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery steadily increased their f

3h

Getting a longer heads-up on El Niño

El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) leads to extreme climatic variations called El Niño and La Niña that cause dangerous weather conditions in many regions throughout the world. Currently, a reliable forecast of the ENSO phases can be made about a year beforehand. This study, led by researchers at POSTECH, details a novel method that allows for the accurate forecast of its phases up to 17 months i

3h

USC analysis solves puzzle of poor cancer prognosis in young Americans

For decades, some researchers believed cancer survival rates were dismally low among adolescents and young adults in the United States. A reexamination of long-term data by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program shows that 15- to 39-year-olds had the best survival of any age group for many years, and maintained that lead until pediatric ca

3h

Early Alzheimer's brain pathology linked to psychiatric symptoms

UC San Francisco researchers, in collaboration with the unique Brazilian Biobank for Aging Studies (BBAS) at the University of São Paulo, have shown that the earliest stages of the brain degeneration associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are linked to neuropsychiatric symptoms including anxiety, depression, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances.

3h

Economic analysis provides watershed moment for environmental groups

Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality.

3h

Neuroscientists Use Rabies to Explore the Brain

Using engineered forms of the rabies virus, neuroscientists can map brain circuits with unprecedented precision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Young and Struggling in Science

Life is hard for early-career researchers, who must contend with uncertain futures, compete for funding and balance family life, with the frequent need to move for jobs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Insight on molecular regulation of cilium structure and composition

The surfaces of most cell types are covered by hair-like cilia that play critical roles in cell and fluid motility, environment sensing, and cell-cell communication (signalling).

4h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor er skorstenene på atomkraftværker brede i bunden?

En læser undrer sig over skorstenenes karakteristiske form på atomkraftværker. Det svarer DTU Nutech på.

4h

Using puffed rice to simulate collapsing ice shelves and rockfill dams

A pair of researchers at the University of Sydney has found that puffed rice and milk can serve as a stand-in to simulate collapsing ice shelves and rockfill dams. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Itai Einav and François Guillard discuss their experiments with rice and milk in their lab and what they believe it showed them about real-world collapse events.

4h

Marrying technology and home language boosts maths and science learning

Technology, like mobile apps and online learning platforms, is becoming an increasingly important teaching tool all over the world. That's also true in emerging markets; accessible technologies can essentially be used to take information and digital resources into remote, rural and under-resourced schools.

4h

The untapped power of fuel cells

In recent years, renewable energy has been on the rise in the United States. Still, the overwhelming majority of our energy comes from fossil fuels. And, renewable energy needs to overcome significant limitations and obstacles to contribute a greater share of our overall energy solution. Hydrogen fuel cells may be the key to our sustainable energy future.

4h

Is it time to move beyond the limits of 'built environment' thinking?

The constructed world around us provides the stage for our daily life. The term "built environment" is in the past tense, describing a scenario after the fact. What does it actually mean beyond the obvious connotation of buildings and parks?

4h

Artificial intelligence aids automatic monitoring of single molecules in cells

To understand the mechanisms by which molecules act in cells, or the effects of drugs on them, it would be ideal to be able to track individual molecules, including where in the cell they are located and what modifications they undergo when conditions in the cell change. However, this has proven difficult with existing technologies, particularly given the amount of time required to perform such mo

4h

Hurricanes, hog manure and the dire need for carbon pricing

"Once-in-a-lifetime" hurricanes are striking the southern United States with alarming frequency. Hurricane Michael just slammed into the Florida panhandle, and the destructive power of Hurricane Florence is still being felt, especially in North Carolina.

4h

Rabbit-killing virus may have mutated to kill hares too

Brown hares are turning up dead across the UK, raising fears that myxomatosis – the rabbit infection in ‘Watership Down’ – may have mutated to target hares

4h

Delivered from evil: Humans aren’t always corrupted by power after all

The Stanford prison experiment was the classic demonstration of how power can bring out the worst in us. But now it seems it was more about showbiz than science

4h

Environmental defense fund develops methane-hunting satellite

Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), a U.S.-based nonprofit environmental advocacy group, intends to launch a new satellite designed to measure methane emissions worldwide. The spacecraft, named MethaneSAT, could offer a substantial help for countries and companies in combating global warming.

4h

The easy way may not be the best

The steps cells take in response to challenges are more complex than previously thought, finds new research. The study investigates a system relevant to cancer, viral infection, and diabetes.

4h

Quantum computers tackle big data with machine learning

Every two seconds, sensors measuring the United States' electrical grid collect 3 petabytes of data – the equivalent of 3 million gigabytes. Data analysis on that scale is a challenge when crucial information is stored in an inaccessible database.

4h

Fast, accurate estimation of the Earth's magnetic field for natural disaster detection

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have applied machine-learning techniques to achieve fast, accurate estimates of local geomagnetic fields using data taken at multiple observation points, potentially allowing detection of changes caused by earthquakes and tsunamis. A deep neural network (DNN) model was developed and trained using existing data; the result is a fast, efficient method f

4h

Tropical moths in the mountains are larger

Researchers from three universities have measured more than 19,000 tropical moths from 1,100 species to find out whether their size varies with elevation. Scientists from Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena (Germany) worked on the study together with colleagues from Marburg in Germany and Connecticut in the USA. "Body size plays a central role in the ecology and evolution of organisms," explains Dr

4h

How Instagram Saved Poetry

Tom spent his days as a clerk, two floors below ground level in the cellars of Lloyds Bank. He worked in the foreign-transactions department from 9:15 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. each day, and in his free moments between filing and tabulating balance sheets, he wrote. Tom was better known to the world as T. S. Eliot. By the time he started as a clerk in 1917, his most popular poems— The Love Song of J. Alf

4h

Sundhedsplatformen ændrede lægers recepter på smertestillende medicin

I seks uger ændrede Sundhedsplatformen automatisk lægers recepter på smertestillende medicin, hvilket satte 3.134 patienter i risiko for medicinforgiftning.

4h

Earth Science in Our Lives: photography competition winners 2018 – in pictures

The Geological Society of London has announced the results of its 2018 Earth Science Week photography competition. Entrants were asked to submit images of geological sites in the UK and Ireland that meant something in their lives. These 12 winning images will feature in a calendar and be displayed at the Geological Society during Earth Science Week 2018 (13-21 October). Continue reading…

4h

VR technology gives new meaning to 'holidaying at home.' But is it really a substitute for travel?

Tourism is often about seeking deeper emotional and personal connections with the world around us. It's a quintessential part of the "experience economy", creating memories that can be recalled, re-lived and re-shared for a lifetime.

4h

Image of the Day: Landscaping

Hurricane Florence reshaped the shoreline near Beaufort, North Carolina.

4h

What does a black hole look like?

At the center of our galaxy lies a swirling, energy-spewing supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A* or Sgr A*, for short. For billions of years, surrounding gas and dust have been falling into it. Every 10,000 years or so, it swallows a nearby star.

5h

African smoke-cloud connection target of NASA airborne flights

Over the southeast Atlantic Ocean, a 2,000-mile-long plume of smoke from African agricultural fires meets a near-permanent cloud bank offshore. Their meeting makes a natural laboratory for studying the interactions between cloud droplets and the tiny airborne smoke particles. This month, NASA's P-3 research aircraft and a team of scientists return on their third deployment to this region as part o

5h

Best Kids' Space Books for the Holidays

Feed and inspire a kid's thirst for space with these book picks by Space.com's writers and editors.

5h

With thick ice gone, Arctic sea ice changes more slowly

The Arctic Ocean's blanket of sea ice has changed since 1958 from predominantly older, thicker ice to mostly younger, thinner ice, according to new research published by NASA scientist Ron Kwok of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. With so little thick, old ice left, the rate of decrease in ice thickness has slowed. New ice grows faster but is more vulnerable to weather and win

5h

Deforestation down 57% in the winter habitat of Mexican monarch butterflies

Deforestation in the core zone of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve in Mexico decreased by 57.6 per cent, from 15.8 hectares lost during the 2016-2017 period to to 6.7 hectares in 2017 -2018.

5h

Getting a longer heads-up on El Nino

Changes in Atlantic Ocean sea surface temperatures can be used to predict extreme climatic variations known as El Niño and La Niña more than a year in advance, according to research conducted at Korea's Pohang University of Science and Technology and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

5h

A novel catalyst for high-energy aluminum-air flow batteries

A recent study affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel electric vehicle (EV) battery technology that is more energy efficient than gasoline-powered engines. The new technology involves replacing battery packs instead of charging them, bypassing the slow-charging issues of existing EV battery technology. It also provides lightweight, high-energy density power sources with little risk of burnin

5h

Wheat flour to be fortified with folic acid in the UK

Folic acid helps prevent birth defects but is most effective taken around the time of conception. Adding it to wheat could benefit unplanned pregnancies

5h

Mysterious cosmic radio signal spotted unusually close to Earth

The first fast radio burst to be detected in a nearby galaxy may provide clues about what – or who – is able to transmit these strange, powerful signals

5h

How Accurate Are Online DNA Tests?

Geneticist and author Adam Rutherford examines the evidence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Active galactic nuclei and star formation

Most galaxies host a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at their nucleus. (A supermassive black hole is one whose mass exceeds a million solar-masses.) A key unresolved issue in galaxy formation and evolution is the role these SMBHs play in shaping their galaxies. Most astronomers agree that there must be a strong connection because of the observed correlations between a SMBH's mass and its galaxy's l

5h

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) near Geneva, Switzerland is said to be the largest particle accelerator in the world. The accelerator occupies a tunnel 27 kilometers in circumference as deep as 175 meters beneath the French-Swiss border. The facility has helped scientists uncover the Higgs boson, the last particle predicted by the Standard M

5h

The Goldilocks principle in biology—fine-tuning the 'just right' signal load

In the fairy tale "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," Goldilocks invades the bears' house, where she finds three bowls of porridge, but only one has just the right temperature. Similarly, in biological processes, there often exist "just right" conditions—this is called the Goldilocks principle. This is what an international research team has done by demonstrating that in order to get the right amoun

5h

Disrupting crystalline order to restore superfluidity

What if you could disrupt the crystalline order of quantum matter so that a superfluid could flow freely even at temperatures and pressures where it usually does not? This idea has been demonstrated by a team of scientists led by Ludwig Mathey and Andreas Hemmerich from the University of Hamburg.

5h

Photos: Ancient Tomb of 'Grand Lady' Discovered in China

Archaeologists in China have uncovered the tomb of a 900-year-old "Grand Lady," along with various artifacts, such as the remains of a model house.

5h

900-Year-Old 'Grand Lady' Skeleton Emerges from Watery Coffin

The exquisitely preserved skeleton still had hair and fingernails. Inside her coffin was a tiny dollhouse.

5h

Forskere opdager helt ny type af støj fra varme elektroner

Forskere har fundet en trejde støj-kilde, delta-T i elektroniske kredsløb. Den beviser ikke blot en 61 år gammel teori, men kan også blive udgangspunktet for en form for sensor.

5h

How nectar bats fly nowhere

Exquisitely sensitive tech makes first direct measurements of the forces of bat wingbeats.

5h

The Harvard Case Is About the Future of Affirmative Action

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — On Wednesday, the newly minted Harvard president Lawrence Bacow delivered a sober message to the campus community. In less than a week, he said, Harvard would be heading to federal court to defend its use of race in admissions. “This lawsuit has the potential to create divisions on our campus and in our broader alumni community,” he wrote. And on a brisk Sunday here, those divi

5h

Dear Therapist: I Was an Accomplice to an Affair

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I have been dating my boyfriend for eight months. However, we started “talking” over a year and a half ago. At the time, he had a girlfriend and they were about to buy a house. He and I just clicked immediatel

5h

How Manhattan Became a Rich Ghost Town

These days, walking through parts of Manhattan feels like occupying two worlds at the same time. In a theoretical universe, you are standing in the nation’s capital of business, commerce, and culture. In the physical universe, the stores are closed, the lights are off, and the windows are plastered with for-lease signs. Long stretches of famous thoroughfares—like Bleecker Street in the West Villa

5h

Nyt forskernetværk skal lægge kimen til skræddersyet opsporing af kræft

Lægers viden om risikofaktorer for at udvikle kræftsygdomme er så omfattende, at det kan lade sig gøre for nogle sygdomme at udvikle målrettede screeningsprogrammer, der nøje er tilpasset til den enkelte patients risikoprofil. Det vurderer kræftforsker Stig Egil Bojesen.

5h

Money worries: Why fear dominates your finances

The financial system preys on young Americans. Debt is the American way of life. Can we fix it? How education and healthcare reform can make us all richer.

5h

A home library can have a powerful effect on children

A child growing up in a home with at least 80 books will have greater literacy and numeracy in adulthood. A home library can promote reading and math skills more than college alone can. Growing up in a pro-learning home leads to a lifetime of knowledge-seeking. The average number of books in a U.S. household is 114, according to a just-published paper called " Scholarly culture: How books in adol

5h

When, Exactly, Did Politics Become a Tech Story?

Early WIRED could ignore politics because its writers were focused on imagining the future. Today, the digital revolution is upon us, so WIRED writers have a larger task: helping readers understand what is happening in the present.

5h

Why Doctors Reject Tools That Make Their Jobs Easier

From the thermometer’s invention onward, physicians have feared—incorrectly—that new technology would make their jobs obsolete — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Building a better battery, layer by layer

A team of researchers from Shinshu University in Nagano, Japan is now closer to a thin, high-capacity lithium-ion battery that could open the door to better energy storage systems for electric vehicles. The research team was led by professor Katsuya Teshima, director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Science (CEES) at Shinshu University in Japan. They published their insights online in Au

6h

Danske miljøzoner er flere år efter Sverige

Regeringens planlagte stramninger af de danske miljøzoner er for uambitiøse, lyder kritikken fra forsker, politiker og brancherepræsentant.

6h

Search for Alien Life Should Be a Fundamental Part of NASA, New Report Urges

A blue-ribbon committee finds the science of astrobiology is worthy of deep integration into the space agency’s exploration efforts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Buckethead the bear cub's head freed from jar after three days

Rangers in Maryland help "Buckethead", three days after it is spotted with a plastic jar on its head.

6h

Techtopia #74: Humle, biochips og toiletter på High Tech Summit

Et toilet, som automatisk måler mængden af afføring. Et transportabelt minilaboratorium til diagnosticering af sygdomme. Og et bryggeri med visioner om sciencebryg. Vi tager en tur rundt på High Tech Summit på DTU.

6h

War With the Newts review – this is smart sci-fi theatre at its best

A reimagining of a classic 1930s novel by Karel Capek cleverly immerses us in a terrifying future where a new intelligent species is cruelly exploited

6h

6h

First Man: Ryan Gosling's abstract Apollo mission – discuss with spoilers

The biopic of Neil Armstrong and the first moon landing has US patriots all fired up, but do Gosling and director Damien Chazelle achieve their objectives? Damien Chazelle’s film about the iron-jawed, ice-water-in-the-veins pilot and astronaut Neil Armstrong is a rocket pointed directly at the distant planet known as Awards Season. It ought to do well there, as its thrilling set-pieces, strong pe

6h

Aussie same-sex penguin 'couple' tickled pink by foster egg

Two male penguins who have paired up as a "same-sex couple" have become so good at nesting that zookeepers in Sydney have given them a real egg to look after.

6h

Delhi braces for pollution with emergency plan

Delhi's biggest coal power plant was set to shut down Monday as a new emergency plan to improve air quality in one of the world's most polluted cities came into force, Indian officials said.

6h

Some like it cryogenic

Sandia National Laboratories helped design the first generation of fueling stations for hydrogen-powered cars so that they're as safe as conventional gas stations. Now, Sandia is working to do the same for the next generation of hydrogen stations.

6h

President Trump Just Called Jim Mattis ‘Sort of a Democrat’

Nikki Haley came to the Oval Office last week to announce she’s leaving her post as U.N. ambassador by year’s end. White House counsel Don McGahn is on his way out. Everyone’s guessing how long the beleaguered Jeff Sessions will last after the midterms, with speculation rampant about who would replace him as attorney general. Some theorized that Haley resigned so she could fill South Carolina’s S

6h

If Trump Doesn’t Act on Jamal Khashoggi’s Apparent Murder, Rubio Says Congress Will

As the days drag on with no word from Jamal Khashoggi, the missing Saudi journalist allegedly killed by a Saudi assassination squad, the question shifts from “What happened to Khashoggi?” to “What will America do about it?” On Sunday, Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, the number three Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, appeared on three separate news programs to argue for account

6h

Instagram Has A Massive Harassment Problem

W hen Brandon Farbstein first joined Instagram in 2014, he was 14 and optimistic. Farbstein was born with a rare form of dwarfism , and he wanted to use the photo-sharing site to educate people about his condition—to, as he told me, “show people a glimpse into my life and inspire people.” Soon enough, though, the hateful messages started coming: death threats, expletive-laden comments about his a

6h

Paddington Bear and the Displaced Child

We ran into each other at Heathrow Airport last year. “Hello, friend,” I said, picking up a Paddington Bear plush toy from the duty-free bin. “Te ves guapo,” I said, brushing lint off his hat. I knew he understood my compliment. He is, after all, an immigrant from Latin America; it’s what brought us together. Though Paddington has starred in dozens of books, TV shows, and films, his origins were

6h

The Employer Surveillance State

Jason Edward Harrington spent six years working the luggage-screening checkpoint at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago. A college graduate and freelance writer, he initially took the job as a stopgap, but found that he enjoyed meeting passengers from all over the world, some of whom showed a real interest in him. While working for TSA, though, Harrington noticed his bosses following and vide

6h

Bloodhound supersonic car hits financial roadblock

The UK-led supersonic car project goes into administration. There are just weeks to save the venture.

7h

Ole Birk sender selvkørende robotter ud på danske fortove

Transportordførerne fra regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti giver grønt lys til en forsøgsordning med selvkørende leverencerobotter, der kan trille op til seks km/t.

7h

Many cases of dementia may arise from non-inherited DNA 'spelling mistakes'

Only a small proportion of cases of dementia are thought to be inherited — the cause of the vast majority is unknown. Now, in a study published today in the journal Nature Communications, a team of scientists led by researchers at the University of Cambridge believe they may have found an explanation: spontaneous errors in our DNA that arise as cells divide and reproduce.

7h

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids — and not necessarily only their own, according to new research published by anthropologists at Northwestern University.

7h

Feminine leadership traits: Nice but expendable frills?

The first study to examine tradeoffs in masculine versus feminine leadership traits reveals that stereotypically feminine traits — like being tolerant and cooperative — are viewed as desirable but ultimately superfluous add-ons. Instead, both men and women believe successful leaders need stereotypically masculine traits such as assertiveness and competence. The finding could help explain the con

7h

Cannabis health products are everywhere – but do they live up to the hype?

Cannabidiol, or CBD, is now available in the UK in everything from skin creams to beers. But don’t set your hopes too high This has been the year medical cannabis hit the mainstream. The government has announced that it is relaxing laws on when cannabis medicines can be prescribed by doctors, following high-profile cases such as that of Billy Caldwell , the 13-year-old boy hospitalised by his epi

7h

New Zealand votes tipsy pigeon bird of the year

A love for fermented fruit means the kereru can get tipsy at times, falling out of trees.

7h

The Man Who Broke Politics

Newt Gingrich is an important man, a man of refined tastes, accustomed to a certain lifestyle, and so when he visits the zoo, he does not merely stand with all the other patrons to look at the tortoises—he goes inside the tank. On this particular afternoon in late March, the former speaker of the House can be found shuffling giddily around a damp, 90‑degree enclosure at the Philadelphia Zoo—a rum

7h

The smartphone app that can tell you’re depressed before you know it yourself

Analyzing the way you type and scroll can reveal as much as a psychological test.

7h

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids

Males have greater reproductive success if they spend more time taking care of kids—and not necessarily only their own, according to new research published by anthropologists at Northwestern University.

7h

App-opdatering låste englændere ude af deres huse

En netværksopdatering sendte en app til smart alarm-systemet fra engelske Yale i knæ. Brugere kunne hverken komme ind eller ud af deres huse.

8h

Trump: Climate change scientists have 'political agenda'

The US president says he accepts the climate is changing but does not want to "lose millions of jobs".

8h

South Africa's ancient lost city of Kweneng rediscovered by lasers

Descendants of the 15th Century residents are now fighting to have it recognised as their homeland.

8h

Cumulative sub-concussive impacts in a single season of youth football

In an investigation of head impact burden and change in neurocognitive function during a season of youth football, researchers find that sub-concussive impacts are not correlated with worsening performance in neurocognitive function.

8h

Velkommen til fremtidens plejehjem med GPS, radar og sensorer i gulvet

GPS-tracking, dynamisk lys, armbånd, halskæder, chip i tøj, trådløs styring af lamper, teleslynger og fingerscan til medicinskabe er nogle af teknologier, som testes i nyt laboratorium. Nogle af dem er allerede i brug i plejehjem i Skovlunde.

8h

Danskere oversætter industriens it-dialekter

Danske Omnio har ­udviklet software, der hurtigt oversætter og integrerer data fra industriens mange forskellige pro­prietære protokoller til it-baserede analyseværktøjer i skyen.

8h

My Cancer Free Life: A reality series designed to promote Stanislaw Burzynski’s quackery

Stanislaw Burzynski has been selling a dubious treatment known as antineoplastons to desperate cancer patients since the late 1970s. Unfortunately, there are those who are all too willing to promote the myth of a Brave Maverick Doctor who can cure cancer. Several years ago, it was Eric Merola. Now it's Uchenna Agu, a reality TV star turned producer. He plans on making a reality docuseries featurin

9h

Studerende hentede knap en millioner Android-apps: Hundredvis var sårbare

Gennem en systematisk scanningsproces fandt studerende ved Aalborg Universitet hundredvis af sårbare Android-apps. Der er givetvis endnu flere, vurderer de.

10h

Protecting nature the best way to keep planet cool: report

The best—and fairest—way to cap global warming is to empower indigenous forest peoples, reduce food waste and slash meat consumption, an alliance of 38 NGOs said Monday.

10h

China purrs over white tiger triplets

Three playful white Bengal tiger cubs are charming visitors as they clamber around their enclosure at a zoo in China.

10h

Sea snail shells dissolve in increasingly acidified oceans, study shows

Shelled marine creatures living in increasingly acidified oceans face a fight for survival as the impacts of climate change spread, a new study suggests.

10h

Human and cattle decoys trap malaria mosquitoes outdoors

Host decoy traps which mimic humans or cattle by combining odour, heat and a conspicuous visual stimulus could be effective at measuring and controlling outdoor-biting mosquitoes in malaria endemic regions, according to a study published in the open access journal Parasites & Vectors.

10h

US's Harris, L3 merging to form a defense-technology giant

Harris and L3 Technologies, two American companies specializing in military communications and technology, announced their merger on Sunday, giving birth to a giant in the sector.

10h

Streaming: where to find the best space films

From a 50s sci-fi curio to Hollywood blockbusters, there have been giant leaps in films that reach for the moon First Man is in cinemas now, in all its crashing, whooshing, non-flag-waving glory, reminding audiences afresh that the space race has served Hollywood remarkably well over the years. Even at its most scientifically credible, there’s an eternal streak of fantasy to the business of launch

10h

UFO sightings may be falling, but Congress is still paying attention | Nick Pope

Renewed US interest could produce some fascinating hearings, but the focus should be on the quality not just the quantity of reported sightings There’s renewed interest in the UFO phenomenon and it’s coming from an unexpected source: the United States Congress. The Senate Armed Services Committee is looking into a 2004 incident where US Navy pilots flying with the USS Nimitz strike group encounte

10h

Tvivler du på evolution eller klimaproblemer? Så er selv de bedste beviser ikke nok

Nogle mennesker afviser videnskaben, fordi den ikke understøtter deres overbevisninger, siger forsker.

12h

Sound, vibration recognition boost context-aware computing

Smart devices can seem dumb if they don't understand what's happening around them. Carnegie Mellon University researchers say environmental awareness can be enhanced by analyzing sound and vibrations. The researchers report today at the Association for Computing Machinery's User Interface Software and Technology Symposium in Berlin about two approaches — one that uses the ubiquitous microphone, a

12h

Sea snail shells dissolve in increasingly acidified oceans, study shows

Shelled marine creatures living in increasingly acidified oceans face a fight for survival as the impacts of climate change spread, a new study suggests.

12h

Survey shows widespread skepticism of flu shot

The consensus among medical professionals is that the flu shot is safe and is the most effective tool we have in preventing the flu, but a new national survey by Orlando Health finds that a shocking number of parents are still skeptical about the safety and effectiveness of the flu shot.

12h

More clues revealed in link between normal breast changes and invasive breast cancer

A research team, led by investigators from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, details how a natural and dramatic process — changes in mammary glands to accommodate breastfeeding — uses a molecular process believed to contribute to survival of pre-malignant breast cells.

12h

Teenaged girls did not engage in riskier sexual behavior after HPV vaccination introduced in school

Despite fears to the contrary, sexual behaviors of adolescent girls stayed the same or became safer after publicly funded school-based HPV vaccinations were introduced in British Columbia (BC), according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

12h

Half of parents say their preschooler fears doctor's visits

One in 25 parents had postponed a vaccine due to their child's fear of doctor visits and one in five said it was hard to concentrate on what the doctor or nurse was saying because their young child was so upset.

12h

If cannabis use increases after legalization, government must alter the act

If cannabis use increases after legalization of recreational cannabis on Oct. 17, the Government of Canada should commit to changing the act to prevent negative health effects, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

12h

You’re Expecting Too Much Out of Boston Dynamics’ Robots

Boston Dynamics CEO Marc Raibert doesn't know exactly how people will use robots like the SpotMini. But at least it can do the running man.

12h

Minister fandt pludselig gammel beregning: Nu øger 11 milliarder kroner dyrt kabel alligevel CO2-udslippet

Energiministeren har fundet et halvandet år gammel notat om klimaeffekten af at bygge et nyt søkabel til England. Beregningen viser – stik modsat en beregning fra september 2018 – at det 11 milliarder kroner dyre søkabel Viking Link får CO2-udledningen til at stige.

13h

Glen Weyl on Technology and Social Innovation

Glen Weyl, a principal researcher at Microsoft, says society is relying too much on technology to solve social problems.

15h

GABA Receptors Are Normal in People with Autism

Contrary to prior evidence, a study finds receptor density is the same among people without and without the disorder, although GABA signaling still appears to be impaired.

15h

Hundreds of Supplements Spiked with Pharmaceuticals

FDA does little about it, study finds.

16h

Human and cattle decoys trap malaria mosquitoes outdoors

Host decoy traps which mimic humans or cattle by combining odor, heat and a conspicuous visual stimulus could be effective at measuring and controlling outdoor-biting mosquitoes in malaria endemic regions, according to a study published in the open access journal Parasites & Vectors.

16h

Anand Giridharadas on Saudi Money and Silicon Valley Hypocrisy

Author Anand Giridharadas says the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi is prompting some in tech to rethink ties to the Saudi regime.

16h

The health innovation system is 'broken' and failing patients, warns UCL report

NHS patients are being let down by a global health innovation system which fails to deliver the treatments they need at prices that government can afford, according to a new report led by Professor Mariana Mazzucato, Director of the UCL Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose, in collaboration with STOPAIDS, Global Justice Now and Just Treatment. The report warns that health innovation is bein

17h

Study suggests vaping does not stain teeth

Study shows e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products cause minimal teeth staining compared with conventional cigarettes.

17h

UK steps towards zero-carbon economy

Ministers are responding to scientists' climate challenge. But are they doing enough so far?

17h

Is meat's climate impact too hot for politicians?

Climate scientists say we must eat less meat but the UK government will not sell that message.

17h

Pain disruption therapy treats source of chronic back pain

People with treatment-resistant back pain may get significant and lasting relief with dorsal root ganglion (DRG) stimulation therapy, an innovative treatment that short-circuits pain, suggests a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY® 2018 annual meeting.

18h

Scientists achieve first ever acceleration of electrons in plasma waves

Researchers have demonstrated a new technique for accelerating electrons to very high energies over short distances.

18h

Fast, accurate estimation of the Earth's magnetic field for natural disaster detection

Researchers have applied machine-learning techniques to achieve fast, accurate estimates of local geomagnetic fields using data taken at multiple observation points, potentially allowing detection of changes caused by earthquakes and tsunamis. A deep neural network (DNN) model was developed and trained using existing data; the result is a fast, efficient method for estimating magnetic fields for u

18h

Potential therapy for treatment-resistant hypothyroidism proves effective in lab study

A new 'metal-coordinated' drug-delivery technology potentially could be used to supplement the standard therapy for hypothyroidism, which affects nearly 10 million Americans, and many more patients worldwide.

18h

Benzodiazepines in patients with COPD and PTSD may increase suicide risk

Long-term use of benzodiazepine medications in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, as well as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may lead to increased suicide risk, according to a new study.

18h

New route of acquiring antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the most potent one to date

For the first time in 60 years, researchers have discovered a new mechanism of genetic transduction, the process by which bacteriophages transfer bacterial DNA between bacteria. This new mechanism (lateral transduction) is the most powerful to date, able to transfer large DNA stretches at high frequencies. It likely plays a major role in bacterial evolution and acquisition of antibiotic resistance

18h

Starwatch: Mars and Saturn line up with the moon in the southern sky

The moon takes centre stage in this week’s planetary line-up – but Pluto is there too, invisible to the naked eye This week the waxing Moon glides between Saturn and Mars in the low southern sky. Mars is the brighter and redder of the two planets. The chart shows the sky at 20:00 BST on 16 October 2018 when the Moon is roughly halfway between the two visible planets. The Moon will be at first qua

20h

Postpartum depression linked to mother's pain after childbirth

While childbirth pain has been linked to postpartum depression, the culprit may be the pain experienced by the mother following childbirth, rather than during the labor and delivery process.

20h

Microfluidic molecular exchanger helps control therapeutic cell manufacturing

Researchers have demonstrated an integrated technique for monitoring specific biomolecules — such as growth factors — that could indicate the health of living cell cultures produced for the burgeoning field of cell-based therapeutics.

20h

A new study indicates the possibility to monitor the progression of Alzheimer's disease by monitoring major brain antioxidant levels using noninvasive techniques

In a breakthrough human study, anti-oxidant, glutathione (GSH), which protects the brain from stress, has been found to be significantly depleted in Alzheimer's patients compared to normal subjects. As GSH is a very important anti-oxidant that protects the brain from free radicals, the findings give us another measure to use when diagnosing potential for the advancement of Alzheimer's disease or r

20h

Math, Quilting and Activism

Mathematician Chawne Kimber shares her favorite theorems and quilts that make a statement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Age at which women experience their first period is linked to their sons' age at puberty

The age at which young women experience their first menstrual bleeding is linked to the age at which their sons start puberty, according to the largest study to investigate this association in both sons and daughters.

21h

The Neural Bases of Disgust for Cheese: An fMRI Study

submitted by /u/dataflux [link] [comments]

21h

Online natural and organic grocery Thrive aims to fill niche

Thrive Market, a four-year-old online membership-based natural and organic food retailer, has successfully filled a niche modeled after Costco but just for healthy items.

22h

'Zombie' storm Leslie smashes into Portugal

Violent storms hit Portugal early on Sunday, leaving hundreds of thousands of people without power before carrying heavy rain on into Spain, authorities said.

22h

"Whose Land Do You Live On?" Reminds Americans Colonization Happened in Their Backyards

First Peoples populated America long before Europeans arrived to stake their claim. We have largely forgotten this legacy. A mapping tool is looking to change that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

Jeff Weiner on How Technology Accentuates Tribalism

LinkedIn CEO Jeff Weiner Talks with WIRED Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Thompson about the future of work, and finding jobs.

23h

Seth Meyers Revives Saturday Night Live (For a Week)

The return of a beloved alumnus to Saturday Night Live can sometimes make for a nostalgia-filled episode, stuffed with cameos by former castmates and revived sketches. So when Seth Meyers came back to host the show for the first time since departing in 2014, he could’ve trotted out guest appearances from famed collaborators like Bill Hader or Amy Poehler, and it wouldn’t have felt out of the ordi

23h

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