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Nyheder2018oktober16

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Study documents paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm

Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious.

13h

Tysk lovændring baner vej for at bygge Femern-tunnelen allerede fra næste år

En ny udgave af den tyske planlov skal forhindre miljøorganisationer i at forhale byggetilladelsen til Femern-tunnelen ved at gå til domstolene. Konsekvensen kan være, at byggeriet går i gang allerede næste år og står færdig før ventet.

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Klimaforandringer kan sende ølpriser på himmelflugt

Ekstreme vejrforhold skader høsten af byg. Og det kan give dyrere øl i blandt andet Danmark, viser ny forskning.

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LATEST

Simple test may help predict long-term outcome after stroke

A simple test taken within a week of a stroke may help predict how well people will have recovered up to three years later.

22min

Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives

In a recent study, researchers wanted to know how replacing coal-fired powerplants in China and India with clean, renewable energy could benefit human health and save lives in the future. The researchers found that eliminating harmful emissions from powerplants could save an estimated annual 15 million years of life in China and 11 million years of life in India.

22min

A 150-year-old drug might improve radiation therapy for cancer

A drug first identified 150 years ago and used as a smooth-muscle relaxant might make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. Researchers found that the drug papaverine inhibits the respiration of mitochondria, the oxygen-consuming and energy-making components of cells, and sensitizes model tumors to radiation. They found that the drug does not affect the radiation sensitivity of well-oxygenat

22min

Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current

Scientists have now identified a key mechanism, which they call the 'ice-ocean governor,' that controls how fast the Beaufort Gyre spins and how much fresh water it stores. Researchers report that the Arctic's ice cover essentially sets a speed limit on the gyre's spin.

22min

Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017

The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017).

22min

Bursting the clouds for better communication

We live in an age of long-range information. Research is turning towards the use of lasers which have several advantages. However, this new technology faces a major problem: clouds. Due to their density, clouds stop the laser beams and scramble the transfer of information. Researchers have now devised an ultra-hot laser that creates a temporary hole in the cloud, which lets the laser beam containi

22min

Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to new findings, having sex with an ex doesn't seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true even for those who continue to pine for their ex.

22min

A curious branch of plankton evolution

Planktonic foraminifera — tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea — left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when and how new lineages arose. However, a new study reveals that one lineage evolved much more rapidly than everyone predicted, and researchers are looking beyond

22min

Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect

The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male 'vagina.'

22min

Scientists caught an Antarctic ice shelf singing a strange tune

Environment This bizarre phenomenon could better predict how quickly the planet’s ice is melting into the ocean. The team eventually found that these trapped firn waves were created by the constant hum of wind brushing against the snow on the surface of the shelf.

26min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Everybody Take Five

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines President Donald Trump said the U.S. is asking Turkey for the audio recordings they claim to have, relating to the alleged murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul earlier this month. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met w

27min

Overlooked No More: Yamei Kin, the Chinese Doctor Who Introduced Tofu to the West

Long before veggie burgers and soy lattes were fashionable, Kin was sent on a mission by the United States government to uncover the benefits of the soybean to Americans.

28min

Tales From The Bering Sea: Crab Counting Nightmares | Deadliest Catch

Captain Sean Dwyer worked so hard his first season that crabs invaded his dreams! Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitte

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Stephen Hawking's Children and Colleagues Discuss Physicist's Final Book, Legacy

In his final book, released Oct. 16, Stephen Hawking tackles big questions about the universe, delving into physics, cosmology, the existence of God and the future direction of humanity.

49min

US tornado frequency shifting eastward from Great Plains

A new study finds that over the past four decades, tornado frequency has increased over a large swath of the Midwest and Southeast and decreased in portions of the central and southern Great Plains, a region traditionally associated with Tornado Alley.

51min

Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff

A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, scientists tested their theories with a novel 3D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has remained frozen for tens of thousa

51min

Largest autism sequencing study to date yields 102 genes associated with ASD

In the largest genetic sequencing study of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to date, researchers have identified 102 genes associated with ASD, and report significant progress toward teasing apart the genes associated with ASD from those associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay, conditions between which there is often overlap.

51min

Tinder For Cheetahs; and An Unusual Blindness

Scientific American assistant news editor Tanya Lewis and collections editor Andrea Gawrylewski host a new podcast that takes an deeper look at short articles from the Advances news section of the… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

The Problem with Popular Mechanics’ Love Letter to Elon Musk

On Tuesday, Popular Mechanics magazine put the cover story of its November issue online: A collection of essays titled “In Defense of Elon Musk,” authored by a mix of staff journalists and technology-industry professionals. “The Tesla and SpaceX maestro is under attack for bad tweets, production woes, and strange behavior,” the introduction said. “But we need people who take risks. We need people

1h

BabySeq, MedSeq projects reveal how many people carry rare disease genetic risk variants

Two projects in which healthy individuals have had their genomes sequenced have revealed that searching for unanticipated genetic results in newborns and adults can unearth far more variants associated with diseases than previously thought, and, importantly, reveal previously unrecognized but related clinical features of genetic conditions.

1h

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The USDA has approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people. (Image credit: Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University)

1h

Why Won’t Turkey Release the Khashoggi Tapes?

The soundtrack to Jamal Khashoggi’s beating, vivisection, and murder lasts just seven minutes, according to Turkish officials who spoke anonymously to several outlets yesterday. By the end of the recording, the screams have subsided, and Khashoggi is dead, although his alleged killer—a Saudi doctor named Salah Muhammed al-Tubaigy—must have continued sawing away at his limbs for some time after. (

1h

The Secretive Organization Quietly Spending Millions on Facebook Political Ads

Over just two weeks in September, a limited-liability company calling itself “News for Democracy” spent almost $400,000 on more than 16 million impressions for a network of 14 Facebook pages that hadn’t existed until August. This represented the second-largest political ad buy on Facebook for the period, trailing only Beto O’Rourke’s Texas Senate campaign, and substantially overshadowing the thir

1h

Can Burger King's 'Nightmare King' Really Give You Bad Dreams?

A new, limited-time-only burger at Burger King has a peculiar selling point: It's supposed to give you nightmares.

1h

Stephen Hawking's Final Book Says There's 'No Possibility' of God in Our Universe

Is there room for God in the endless, expanding universe? In his final book, Stephen Hawking says no.

1h

1h

Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives

The 2.7 billion people who live in China and India—more than a third of the world's population—regularly breath some of the dirtiest air on the planet. Air pollution is one of the largest contributors to death in both countries, ranked 4th in China and 5th in India, and harmful emissions from coal-fire powerplants are a major contributing factor.

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Do dogs understand the words we say to them?

Dogs have at least a rudimentary neural representation of meaning for words they have been taught, differentiating words they have heard before from those they have not, new research suggests. When some dogs hear their owners say “squirrel,” they perk up or become agitated. They may even run to a window and look out of it. But what does the word mean to the dog? Does it mean, “Pay attention, some

2h

A 150-year-old drug might improve radiation therapy for cancer

A drug first identified 150 years ago and used as a smooth-muscle relaxant might make tumors more sensitive to radiation therapy. Researchers found that the drug papaverine inhibits the respiration of mitochondria, the oxygen-consuming and energy-making components of cells, and sensitizes model tumors to radiation. They found that the drug does not affect the radiation sensitivity of well-oxygenat

2h

Eliminating emissions in India and China could add years to people's lives

In a recent study, researchers from Harvard University wanted to know how replacing coal-fired powerplants in China and India with clean, renewable energy could benefit human health and save lives in the future. The researchers found that eliminating harmful emissions from powerplants could save an estimated annual 15 million years of life in China and 11 million years of life in India.

2h

Simple test may help predict long-term outcome after stroke

A simple test taken within a week of a stroke may help predict how well people will have recovered up to three years later, according to a study published in the Oct. 17, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

2h

A mysterious polio-like illness in children has the CDC baffled

Health Sudden muscle weakness and paralysis has been hitting young kids, and experts haven't pinned down a cause. Truly mysterious illnesses don’t come around that often. Sudden, tiny outbreaks of rare diseases make headlines for their mystique, but generally they’re not so much…

2h

Trump’s Attacks on Stormy Daniels Echo an Uncomfortable Era

O n Tuesday, Donald Trump did the thing Donald Trump is consummately good at doing: He tweeted something that was at once profoundly petty and sweepingly cruel. The something, this time around, was about Stormy Daniels: The president mocked the fact that a judge had dismissed the defamation case the adult-film star had filed against him. “‘Federal Judge throws out Stormy Danials [ sic ] lawsuit v

2h

Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff

A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists tested their theories with a novel 3-D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has re

2h

Adolescent THC exposure alters neurons/gene networks associated with psychosis risk

Adolescent THC exposure reduces the branching of prefrontal cortical neurons and the number of spines, which are critical for cellular communication. This adolescent exposure is also associated with a reorganization of the gene expression of specific genes that are predominantly related to neuron development, synaptic plasticity and chromatin organization (epigenetic mechanisms).

2h

A role for circadian enhancers to prevent myocardial injury in the perioperative setting

The current study demonstrates a deleterious effect of midazolam administration prior to myocardial ischemia and reveals reduced circadian protein Period 2 (PER2) levels as the underlying mechanism. These findings highlight PER2 as a cardioprotective mechanism and suggest the PER2 enhancer nobiletin as preventative therapy for myocardial injury in the perioperative setting where midazolam pretreat

2h

Swiping left or right has now been engrained into the cultural vernacular. Across the world with approximately 50 milli…

Swiping left or right has now been engrained into the cultural vernacular. Across the world with approximately 50 million people swiping on the daily, Tinder has become one of the most popular dating platforms online. However, it's most certainly not everlasting love everyone is after. Recent surveys suggest that anywhere between 18 and 25 percent of users are in what's considered an "exclusive"

2h

Researchers identify new approach for controlling dengue fever and Zika virus

To be able to reproduce and become effective disease carriers, mosquitoes must first attain optimal body size and nutritional status. A pair of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have succeeded in using CRISPR-Cas9, a powerful tool for altering DNA sequences and modifying gene function, to decrease mosquito body size, moving the research one step closer to eliminating mosquito

2h

Arctic greening thaws permafrost, boosts runoff

A new collaborative study has investigated Arctic shrub-snow interactions to obtain a better understanding of the far north's tundra and vast permafrost system. Incorporating extensive in situ observations, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists tested their theories with a novel 3D computer model and confirmed that shrubs can lead to significant degradation of the permafrost layer that has rem

2h

Google Pixel 3 review: The best smartphone camera around (for now)

Gadgets The gap in smartphone image quality is narrow, but Google is winning the HDR war. Google's Pixel 3 smartphone is the has the best camera in the bunch.

2h

Massive organism is crashing on our watch

Researchers have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for 'I Spread') is diminishing by attrition.

3h

Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail

In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities.

3h

Virtual reality can help make people more compassionate compared to other media

Researchers found that people who underwent a virtual reality experience, called 'Becoming Homeless,' were more empathetic toward the homeless and more likely to sign a petition in support of affordable housing than other study participants.

3h

The original 'Big Bird' puppeteer is leaving Sesame Street

His last performance will be this coming Thursday, Oct. 19 A feature movie about him was made in 2014 Other actors will take over. Well, at least, they'll try … Carroll Spinney is now 84 years old, and he began to be the voices of these characters at age 34, way back in 1969, after being recruited by Jim Henson himself. Here's an image of that time: None He stopped being a puppeteer for both Bi

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Physicists Model Electrons in Unprecedented Detail — Spoiler Alert: They're Round

Electrons are extremely round, and some physicists will not be pleased about it.

3h

Study: US tornado frequency shifting eastward from Great Plains

A new study finds that over the past four decades, tornado frequency has increased over a large swath of the Midwest and Southeast and decreased in portions of the central and southern Great Plains, a region traditionally associated with Tornado Alley.

3h

The Lancet HIV: PrEP implementation is associated with a rapid decline in new HIV infections

Study from Australia is the first to evaluate a population-level roll-out of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in men who have sex with men.

3h

More Reports of Children Being Paralyzed by Mysterious Disease

Dozens of cases of acute flaccid myelitis have occurred this year, and while it resembles polio, health officials have ruled out poliovirus.

3h

Immune System: Diseases, Disorders & Function

The job of the immune system is to protect against disease.

3h

Nurse practitioners can do more than you might think

Adults in the United States have a limited understanding of the basic duties that nurse practitioners and physician assistants can perform, according to a new study. “Odds are, if you are a new patient and have been to ‘the doctor’s office’ recently for a primary care checkup, it might not have been a doctor you actually saw,” says Evan K. Perrault, assistant professor of health communication in

3h

Nope, your boss probably isn’t actually a psychopath

Claims that a huge number of business leaders are psychopaths or that leadership positions attract high numbers of psychopaths are overblown, according to new research. If you’ve ever worked for an impulsive or vengeful boss, headlines like “CEO is the profession with the most psychopaths,” or “1 in 5 CEOs is a psychopath, study finds,” may not seem so far-fetched. But when researchers started di

3h

Mexico's vaquita porpoise gets new chance; 6 sighted

Experts want to enclose a small area of the Gulf of California where the critically endangered vaquita porpoise remains after they sighted about a half dozen of the elusive creatures in September.

3h

Conceptual framework to study role of exercise in multiple sclerosis

Researchers have proposed a conceptual framework for examining the relationship between exercise and adaptive neuroplasticity in the population with multiple sclerosis (MS).

3h

First GWAS analysis of 'type 1.5 diabetes' reveals links between immune and metabolic disease

Scientists who performed the largest-ever genetic study of a puzzling type of adult-onset diabetes have uncovered new connections to the two major types of diabetes, offering intriguing insights into more accurate diagnosis and better treatment. Latent automimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively common disorder that shares features of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

3h

Wind farms and reducing hurricane precipitation

New research reveals an unexpected benefit of large-scale offshore wind farms: the ability to lessen precipitation from hurricanes.

3h

Vast leukemia dataset could help researchers match therapies to patients

Data on the molecular makeup and drug sensitivity of hundreds of patient samples could accelerate progress against the aggressive blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia.

3h

Picture perfect: Researchers gain clearest ever image of Ebola virus protein

Near-atomic resolution model of viral protein complex brings clearer understanding of the viral mechanics.

3h

Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight

A study of dandelion seeds in motion has revealed a form of flight not seen before, and explains why the plant is among nature's best fliers.

3h

Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival

Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species.

3h

Broadcaster urges football authorities not to leave market 'to criminals'

Broadcaster Eleven Sports says it will no longer show matches during the Saturday afternoon football blackout in the UK but has urged authorities not to leave the market "in the hands of criminals".

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The weirdest things we learned this week: birthing rabbits, gruesome taxidermy, and the Parthenon's best-kept secret

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

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Groundbreaking Australian HIV trial should be replicated, researchers say

Trial resulted in 25% fall in new infections in year after rapid rollout of PrEP medication High-income countries with people at high risk of HIV should replicate a groundbreaking trial in Australia, which has seen new infections fall by 25% in one year following the rapid rollout of free HIV medication, researchers say. When taken daily the pre-exposure prophylaxis drug known as PrEP is almost 1

3h

Newly published files confirm plan to move Assange to Russia

Julian Assange: Hacker. Journalist. Diplomat? Newly released Ecuadorean government documents have laid bare an unorthodox attempt to extricate the WikiLeaks founder from his embassy hideaway in London by naming him as a political counselor to the country's embassy in Moscow.

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Dry conditions in East Africa half a million years ago possibly shaped human evolution, study finds

Samples of ancient sediments from a lake basin in East Africa have revealed that arid conditions developed in the area around half a million years ago, an environmental change that could have played a major role in human evolution and influenced advances in stone technology, according to an international research team that includes geologists from Georgia State University.

3h

First GWAS analysis of 'type 1.5 diabetes' reveals links between immune and metabolic disease

Scientists who performed the largest-ever genetic study of a puzzling type of adult-onset diabetes have uncovered new connections to the two major types of diabetes, offering intriguing insights into more accurate diagnosis and better treatment. Latent automimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is a relatively common disorder that shares features of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.

3h

Researchers propose conceptual framework to study role of exercise in multiple sclerosis

'Exercise is a low-cost, non-invasive modality,' noted Dr. John DeLuca, 'so we are very interested in learning more about how activity results in these improvements. Rethinking how we view exercise in the long-term management of MS and other neurological conditions is our first step. We anticipate that the PRIMERS framework will accelerate advances in treatment by integrating the contributions fro

3h

How does brain structure influence performance on language tasks?

The architecture of each person's brain is unique, and differences may influence how quickly people can complete various cognitive tasks. But how neuroanatomy impacts performance is largely an open question. To learn more, scientists are developing a new tool — computational models of the brain — to simulate how the structure of the brain may impact brain activity and, ultimately, human behavior

3h

Stem cell proliferation is controlled directly by nervous system, scientists find

A new study demonstrates that stem cell proliferation is directly controlled by the autonomic nervous system.

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Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher

Human and avian youngsters learn behaviors by imitating adults. But learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher. Young male zebra finches must learn to copy the song of an adult male to mate, but juveniles won't imitate songs played through a loudspeaker or sung by other species of birds. New findings show how the juvenile birds identi

3h

Unprecedented look at electron: Size limit for undiscovered subatomic particles determined

A new study suggests that many theorized heavy particles, if they exist at all, do not have the properties needed to explain the predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe. If confirmed, the findings would force significant revisions to several prominent theories posed as alternatives to the Standard Model of particle physics, which was developed in the early 1970s.

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Attending the 'best' high school may yield benefits and risks for students

Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren't uniformly beneficial to students' educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.

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For stronger bones, diet trumps exercise

Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise, according to a new study. Researchers looked at mineral supplementation and exercise in mice, and found surprising results—nutrition has a greater impact on bone mass and strength than exercise. Further, even after the exercise training stopped, the mice retained bone strength gains as long as they ate a mineral-supplemented diet. “Th

3h

Bacterioplankton: Taking their vitamins

New research finds that more bacterioplankton utilize vitamin B1 or B1 precursors from their environment than synthesize their own. The researchers also found that B1 availability can directly limit bacterioplankton growth, which could have larger impacts on aquatic microbial food webs, as well as energy and nutrient exchange.

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Robots at Work and Play

Advancements in robotics are continually taking place in the fields of space exploration, health care, public safety, entertainment, defense, and more. These machines—some fully autonomous, some requiring human input—extend our grasp, enhance our capabilities, and travel as our surrogates to places too dangerous or difficult for us to go. Gathered here are recent images of robotic technology, inc

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To Prevent Loneliness, Start in the Classroom

Starting in September of 2020, schoolchildren across the United Kingdom will learn from their teachers how to fend off loneliness. In January, British Prime Minister Theresa May appointed the first “minister of loneliness.” This week, her administration released a 84-page plan detailing the specific actions it will take to curb loneliness across the country, including measures that will be enacte

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The Decline of the Largest Aspen Colony in the World

The Decline of the Largest Aspen Colony in the World Despite conservation efforts, close assessment of Pando reveals significant losses. Pando_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Paul Rogers/Utah State University Earth Wednesday, October 17, 2018 – 14:00 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) — Attempts to keep deer from nibbling Pando, the Trembling Giant, to death have hit a setback. Pando is th

4h

How does brain structure influence performance on language tasks?

The architecture of each person's brain is unique, and differences may influence how quickly people can complete various cognitive tasks. But how neuroanatomy impacts performance is largely an open question. To learn more, scientists are developing a new tool — computational models of the brain — to simulate how the structure of the brain may impact brain activity and, ultimately, human behavior

4h

Wind farms and reducing hurricane precipitation

New research reveals an unexpected benefit of large-scale offshore wind farms: the ability to lessen precipitation from hurricanes.

4h

Engineered enzyme eliminates nicotine addiction in preclinical tests

Scientists at Scripps Research have successfully tested a potential new smoking-cessation treatment in rodents.

4h

Drivers of inflammation provide valuable targets for new gum disease therapies

A subset of T cells contributes to the inflammation and bone loss that characterizes periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease. According to new research, led by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis and scientists at the National Institutes of Health, drugs that specifically inhibit these cells may offer an effective therapy for the condition.

4h

Virtual reality can help make people more compassionate compared to other media

Stanford researchers found that people who underwent a virtual reality experience, called 'Becoming Homeless,' were more empathetic toward the homeless and more likely to sign a petition in support of affordable housing than other study participants.

4h

Exposure to malaria before birth may boost childhood immunity

Pamela Odorizzi and colleagues have discovered that human fetal immune cells can proliferate in response to malaria infection in pregnant women, a finding that helps to demystify fetal immunity and potentially has implications for malaria control programs.

4h

Local adaption of tuberculosis, not human migration, spread TB resistance mutations

Migration from Europe during the colonial period drove the spread of the dominant strain of tuberculosis seen today, lineage four, a new study reports. Drug resistance to this infectious disease evolved independently in various regions multiple times, the study also suggests, with little international dissemination after independent disease evolution.

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How drug resistant TB evolved and spread globally

The most common form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB) originated in Europe and spread to Asia, Africa and the Americas with European explorers and colonialists, reveals a new study led by UCL and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health.

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Engineered enzyme eliminates nicotine addiction in preclinical tests

Treatment quickly reduced the animals' motivation to take nicotine, reversed their signs of nicotine dependence, and kept them from relapsing when they were given access to nicotine again.

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Researchers identify immune culprits linked to inflammation and bone loss in gum disease

An unhealthy population of microbes in the mouth triggers specialized immune cells that inflame and destroy tissues, leading to the type of bone loss associated with a severe form of gum disease, according to a new study in mice and humans. The findings could have implications for new treatment approaches for the condition.

4h

Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail

In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities, according to a study published Oct. 17, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

4h

Virtual reality may encourage empathic behavior

Virtual reality could be a useful tool to encourage empathy, helpful behavior, and positive attitudes towards marginalized groups, according to a study published Oct. 17, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fernanda Herrera from Stanford University, USA, and colleagues.

4h

Massive organism is crashing on our watch

Utah State University researchers Paul Rogers and Darren McAvoy have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for 'I Spread') is diminishing by attrition.

4h

Scientists find stem cell proliferation is controlled directly by nervous system

Somatic stem cells are microscopic workhorses, constantly regenerating cells throughout the body: skin and the lining of the intestine, for example. And to University of Illinois neuroscientists, they represent untapped potential.

4h

Life on the floor of the Arctic Ocean, with rigor and in detail

In an extensive and rigorous study of animal life on the Central Arctic Ocean floor, researchers have shown that water depth and food availability influence the species composition, density, and biomass of benthic communities, according to a study published October 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The study, led by a team including Antje Boetius of the Max Planck Institute for Marine

4h

The water system that helped Angkor rise may have also brought its fall

A complex water system magnified flooding’s disruption of the medieval Cambodian city of Angkor.

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Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current

Scientists at MIT have now identified a key mechanism, which they call the 'ice-ocean governor,' that controls how fast the Beaufort Gyre spins and how much fresh water it stores. In a paper published today in Geophysical Research Letters, the researchers report that the Arctic's ice cover essentially sets a speed limit on the gyre's spin.

4h

Illinois scientists find stem cell proliferation is controlled directly by nervous system

Somatic stem cells are microscopic workhorses, constantly regenerating cells throughout the body: skin and the lining of the intestine, for example. And to University of Illinois neuroscientists, they represent untapped potential.

4h

Trilobites: Pando, the Most Massive Organism on Earth, Is Shrinking

The grove of 47,000 quivering aspen trees in Utah is being diminished by mule deer, foraging cattle and human mismanagement.

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Ancient Sea Monsters Swallowed a Lot of Salty Water. This Is How They Got Rid of It.

Ancient sea monsters inadvertently swallowed mouthfuls of seawater whenever they gulped down prey, but they had a stealthy trick to get rid of all that unwanted salt in their systems.

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First comprehensive assessment of Pando reveals critical threats

Utah State University researchers Paul Rogers and Darren McAvoy have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show continuing deterioration of this 'forest of one tree.' While a portion of the famed grove is recovery nicely as a result of previous restoration, the majority of Pando (Latin for "I Spread") is diminishing by attrition.

4h

Audio tapes prove Saudis killed missing journalist, say Turkish officials

Jamal Khashoggi was killed just moments after entering the Saudi consulate on Oct. 2., according to the anonymous senior official. News of the alleged tapes broke the same day U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo met with Saudi officials about the disappearance. President Donald Trump has reportedly requested copies of the tapes. Gruesome audio recordings prove that missing journalist Jamal Khasho

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Canada has legalized marijuana. Here's why they did it.

The new Canadian law goes into effect Wednesday, October 17, 2018 The first legal sale? A place called "Tweeds" in Newfoundland Commercial edibles aren't yet legal, but they soon will be. Individuals wishing to make their own can do so, however. Today is the first day of fully legal recreational cannabis in Canada. It has been illegal there since 1923, but medical cannabis was approved nation-wid

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Vi udrydder pattedyr med rekordhast: Naturen er syv millioner år om at komme sig

Forskere har beregnet, hvor hurtigt naturen kan erstatte tabet af pattedyrarter. Og det tager sin tid at rydde op efter mennesker.

4h

Yes, Flat-Earthers Really Do Exist

Despite some methodological flaws, a recent poll credibly indicates that flat-Earthery persists — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

NASA catches the scattered remains of former Tropical Storm Tara

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the remnants of former Tropical Storm Tara after it dissipated near the coast of western Mexico's Jalisco state. Jalisco is a western Mexican state along the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

4h

US tops WEF competitiveness ranking but obesity weighs on score

The United States has the world's most competitive economy, a World Economic Forum ranking showed Wednesday, but inequality and health problems including obesity took a toll on its score.

4h

Watch: Grass-eating animal gut microbes could lead to better fuels

Could the study of grass-eating animals lead to the discovery of new sustainable fuels and chemicals? It’s not as far-fetched as you might think. Cows and other large herbivores evolved to graze on grasses and other woody forage and have the ability to “unlock” the energy contained in plant cellulose, and convert it to sugar. By understanding and cultivating the microbes that these animals have i

4h

Ian Kiernan, Australian Sailor Who Battled Pollution, Dies at 78

Appalled by the trash he saw in the world’s oceans, he began a cleanup campaign in Sydney that went global.

4h

Why Does ‘First Man’ Say Gemini as ‘Geminee’? NASA Explains. Sorta.

The pronunciation of the 1965-66 program is a space agency thing. Sometimes it was pronounced normally. NASA’s chief historian gives the back story.

4h

What’s at Stake in Brazil’s Election? The Future of the Amazon

The next president of Brazil may shape the destiny of the Amazon, which is vital to reining in climate change. The stakes for the planet are huge.

4h

We’re Covering Heritage Sites Threatened by Climate Change. The List Just Got Longer.

A new study says some of the most important ancient places in the Mediterranean might not survive global warming.

4h

Nonfiction: The Man Who Pioneered Food Safety

In “The Poison Squad,” Deborah Blum tells the story of the early-20th-century U.S.D.A. inspector who changed the way we think about food.

4h

Twitter releases 10 million tweets from foreign influence effortsTwitter Russia Iran

Twitter on Wednesday released data on foreign influence campaigns on its platform showing some 10 million tweets, mostly from Russia, dating back as far as 2009.

5h

NASA's Fermi mission energizes the sky with gamma-ray constellations

Long ago, sky watchers linked the brightest stars into patterns reflecting animals, heroes, monsters and even scientific instruments into what is now an official collection of 88 constellations. Now scientists with NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have devised a set of modern constellations constructed from sources in the gamma-ray sky to celebrate the mission's 10th year of operations.

5h

How to Respond to a Diplomatic Crisis Like Khashoggi’s Disappearance

Details of audio leaked to Turkish news media, confirmed Wednesday by a Turkish official to The New York Times , revealed that the Saudi journalist and dissident Jamal Khashoggi was beheaded and dismembered by his killers inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2. Khashoggi’s disappearance, the Saudis’ alleged role in it, the leaks from Turkey, and a bipartisan eruption of anger at Saud

5h

More Autism Genes Identified

Researchers parse genes linked with intellectual disability and autism from those tied to autism alone.

5h

Caution! Trigger warnings come with trade-offs

New research shows that some people feel less negative about content when they receive trigger warnings beforehand. But those who believe the warnings to be protective—rather than coddling—don’t feel better for having had these alerts. A trigger warning is a statement that alerts individuals to distressing content and can prompt them to avoid the content or situation. There is a debate in various

5h

Aquifers: Underground Stores of Freshwater

Aquifers are underground layers of rock that are saturated with water that can be brought to the surface through natural springs or by pumping.

5h

Unprecedented look at electron brings us closer to understanding the universe

In a new study, researchers at Northwestern, Harvard and Yale universities examined the shape of an electron's charge with unprecedented precision to confirm that it is perfectly spherical. A slightly squashed charge could have indicated unknown, hard-to-detect heavy particles in the electron's presence, a discovery that could have upended the global physics community.

5h

Extremely close look at electron advances frontiers in particle physics

An unprecedented, close examination of the electron has opened a window into the mind-bending nature of particles, energy and forces at infinitesimal scales.

5h

Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight

A study of dandelion seeds in motion has revealed a form of flight not seen before, and explains why the plant is among nature's best fliers.

5h

Picture perfect: Researchers gain clearest ever image of Ebola virus protein

Near-atomic resolution model of viral protein complex brings clearer understanding of the viral mechanics.

5h

Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher

Human and avian youngsters learn behaviors by imitating adults. But learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher. Young male zebra finches must learn to copy the song of an adult male to mate, but juveniles won't imitate songs played through a loudspeaker or sung by other species of birds. New findings from Duke University scientists sh

5h

OHSU-led effort results in largest cancer dataset of its kind

After more than five years and 672 patient samples, an OHSU research team has published the largest cancer dataset of its kind for a form of leukemia. The study, 'Functional Genomic Landscape of Acute Myeloid Leukemia,' published today in Nature.

5h

Vast leukemia dataset could help researchers match therapies to patients

Data on the molecular makeup and drug sensitivity of hundreds of patient samples could accelerate progress against the aggressive blood cancer acute myeloid leukemia.

5h

New study sets a size limit for undiscovered subatomic particles

A new study suggests that many theorized heavy particles, if they exist at all, do not have the properties needed to explain the predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe. If confirmed, the findings would force significant revisions to several prominent theories posed as alternatives to the Standard Model of particle physics, which was developed in the early 1970s.

5h

Combining genetic and sun exposure data improves skin cancer risk estimates

By combining data on individuals' lifetime sun exposure and their genetics, researchers can generate improved predictions of their risk of skin cancer, according to findings presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif.

5h

How Dandelion Seeds Stay Afloat for So Long

How Dandelion Seeds Stay Afloat for So Long New research suggests they create a newfound type of air vortex to slow their descent. Dandelion_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Smudge 9000 via flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Physics Wednesday, October 17, 2018 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — A single breath from a playing child can send dozens of fluffy dandelion seeds

5h

Why plans to achieve zero suicides might actually be counterproductive

Health bodies and politicians are aiming for zero suicides, but doctors are warning this ambitious goal is simply unrealistic

5h

World’s oldest fossils might turn out to just be ancient rocks

In 2016, researchers unveiled 3.7-billion-year-old fossils – a reassessment suggests the ‘fossils’ are actually physical scars left when the rocks were deformed

5h

Canada has legalized marijuana. Here's why they did it.

The new Canadian law goes into effect Wednesday, October 17, 2018 The first legal sale? A place called "Tweeds" in Newfoundland Commercial edibles aren't yet legal, but they soon will be. Individuals wishing to make their own can do so, however. Today is the first day of fully legal recreational cannabis in Canada. It has been illegal there since 1923, but medical cannabis was approved nation-wid

5h

Chinese city 'plans to launch artificial moon to replace streetlights'

‘Dusk-like glow’ of proposed satellite could light an area with a diameter of 10-80km, People’s Daily reports In Chengdu, there is reportedly an ambitious plan afoot for replacing the city’s streetlights: boosting the glow of the real moon with that of a more powerful fake one. The south-western Chinese city plans to launch an illumination satellite in 2020. According to an account in the People’

5h

Attending the 'best' high school may yield benefits and risks for students

Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren't uniformly beneficial to students' educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.

5h

Earth used to be purple, new NASA study shows

NASA-funded research says retinal, not chlorophyll, gave the early Earth its color The two pigments co-evolved but retinal came first We should be looking for retinal-based life throughout the Universe Earth used to be a color the late musician Prince would approve of – a shade of purple. Such is the intriguing possibility raised by new NASA-supported research which says a purple-tinged molecule

5h

Study uncovers new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and bumblebee decline

Adding to growing evidence that pesticide use may be contributing to the decline of many bumblebee species across North America, a new study reveals that daily consumption of even small doses of a widely used class of insecticides known as neonicotinoids reduces the survival of queen and male bees, which are critical to the survival of wild populations. The study also found that exposure to the ch

5h

Oops, the Oldest Fossils Ever Found Might Be Just Rocks

At first, Abigail Allwood saw nothing wrong with Allen Nutman ’s claims. In August 2016, Nutman , a geologist from the University of Wollongong, announced that he and his colleagues had found the world’s oldest fossils in an outcrop in Greenland. The team discovered rows of inch-high conical humps embedded in 3.7-billion-year-old rocks, and interpreted them as stromatolites—layered mounds created

5h

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' in 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone. (Image credit: Courtesy of Abigail Allwood)

5h

Evidence of earliest life on Earth disputed

When Australian scientists presented evidence in 2016 of life on Earth 3.7 billon years ago—pushing the record back 220 million years—it was a big deal, influencing even the search for life on Mars.

5h

Public investment funds join call for independent Facebook chair

Four public investment fund officials on Wednesday joined a call to install an independent chairman at Facebook, saying the move would improve governance and accountability at the world's biggest social network.

5h

EPA puts off final decision on science transparency rule

The Environmental Protection Agency says it is putting off for at least a year any final announcement on a controversial proposal overhauling how the agency evaluates science. Critics say it could bar the use of landmark public health studies.

5h

Verdens ældste fossiler sendt til tælling af amerikansk-dansk forskergruppe

Geologisk analyse af verdens ældste klippemateriale med henblik på at finde evidens for liv på Jorden kan være ganske kompliceret, understreger ny undersøgelse med deltagelse af Minik Rosing fra Københavns Universitet.

5h

Gestational Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis & Complications

Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that develops, or is first diagnosed, during pregnancy. The condition, like other forms of diabetes, involves high blood sugar levels.

5h

These ancient mounds may not be the earliest fossils on Earth after all

A new analysis suggests that tectonics, not microbes, formed cone-shaped structures in 3.7-billion-year-old rock.

5h

Dandelion seeds create a bizarre whirlpool in the air to fly

Researchers have deciphered the physics underlying dandelion flight.

5h

What the electron’s near-perfect roundness means for new physics

The electron remains stubbornly round, meaning we may need to build beyond the Large Hadron Collider to find physics outside of the standard model.

5h

UC researchers recommend universal screening to tackle rise in Hepatitis C

Physicians are encountering a growing number of younger patients who are testing positive for hepatitis C virus (HCV) fueled largely by the opioid crisis impacting communities around the country. That increase and more effective and tolerable drug regimens for HCV infection, means one-time universal screening of all adults for HCV is now cost effective and recommended, say physician researchers in

5h

New file type improves genomic data sharing while maintaining participant privacy

Based on an analysis of data leakages and opportunities to prevent the potential misuse of genetic information, researchers have developed a new file format for functional genomics data that enables data sharing while protecting the personal information of research participants. The findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif.

5h

Glitzy 'Science Oscars' to make stars of researchers

Nine scientists were recognized Wednesday with a "Breakthrough Prize," a $3 million Silicon Valley-funded award meant to confer Oscars-style glamour and prestige on the basic sciences.

5h

Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017

The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017).

5h

Near-atomic resolution model of Ebola virus protein brings clearer understanding of the viral mechanics

Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have for the first time imaged the structure of a central component of the Ebola virus at near-atomic resolution.

5h

Startup plans to launch small satellites from Virginia coast

A California-based startup said Wednesday that it will rocket small satellites into orbit from Virginia, an endeavor that reflects increasing demand from companies and governments alike to monitor ships, crops and the weather from space.

5h

Pupil's brain recognizes the perfect teacher

Youngsters learn many important behaviors by imitating adults. But young learners are selective in who they copy, and scientists don't understand how they choose the right teacher.

5h

Study supports Standard Model of particle physics, excludes alternative models

In a new study, researchers at Northwestern, Harvard and Yale universities examined the shape of an electron's charge with unprecedented precision to confirm that it is perfectly spherical. A slightly squashed charge could have indicated unknown, hard-to-detect heavy particles in the electron's presence, a discovery that could have upended the global physics community.

5h

Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight

The extraordinary flying ability of dandelion seeds is possible thanks to a form of flight that has not been seen before in nature, research has revealed.

5h

Probiotics and antibiotics create a killer combination

In the fight against drug-resistant bacteria, MIT researchers have enlisted the help of beneficial bacteria known as probiotics.

5h

Signs of Ancient Microbial Life Questioned

New findings cast doubt on previous claims that structures found preserved in rocks in Greenland are stromatolites, but the original authors say the discrepancy lies in different samples.

5h

Breastfeeding protects infants from antibiotic-resistant bacteria

A new study shows that infants that are breastfed for at least six months have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their gut compared with babies breastfed for a shorter time. On the other hand, antibiotic use by mothers increases the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in infants.

5h

Researchers find bacterioplankton rely on environmental vitamin B1 rather than making their own

New research from North Carolina State University and the University of Copenhagen finds that more bacterioplankton utilize vitamin B1 or B1 precursors from their environment than synthesize their own. The researchers also found that B1 availability can directly limit bacterioplankton growth, which could have larger impacts on aquatic microbial food webs, as well as energy and nutrient exchange.

5h

Canada offers pardons to citizens with pot possession charges

Canada legalized recreational marijuana on Wednesday, October 17. The new laws allow citizens to carry up to 30 grams and grow up to four plants. It's currently unclear how the nation will conduct the pardoning process, though one official suggested it could be as simple as submitting a form. On Wednesday October 17, Canada became the world's second and largest nation to legalize marijuana. As pa

5h

Social media buffers depression among older adults with pain

With a few finger strokes or swipes on a computer or cell phone, seniors with pain reduce the risk of depression when visiting social media sites.

5h

Ember's Temperature-Regulating Mug Just Keeps Getting Better

Crowdfunding projects often crash and burn. But Ember's heated travel mug just keeps improving.

5h

New study supports survival of microbes and organic compounds in space

Environmental data collected from an exposure panel exposed to the space environment for one year suggests that microbes and organic compounds present in the exposure panel would be able to survive, supporting the possibility of interplanetary migration of microbes and organic compounds. A description of the study and the resulting environmental data is published in Astrobiology, a peer-reviewed j

5h

NASA catches the scattered remains of former Tropical Storm Tara

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared image of the remnants of former Tropical Storm Tara after it dissipated near the coast of western Mexico's Jalisco state. Jalisco is a western Mexican state along the Eastern Pacific Ocean.

5h

Women of color at higher risk of life-threatening childbirth

Tens of thousands of American women each year need life-saving emergency treatment during childbirth. A new study shows how much racial and ethnic background—and underlying health—factor in. In all, 1.6 percent of women face this kind of situation. Women of color, and those of Hispanic heritage, have higher rates of severe birth-related health issues than non-Hispanic white women—even if they are

5h

Our favorite finalists from the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards

Animals So majestic. The annual competition releases its finalists and published a book.

6h

Rising Seas Threaten Iconic Mediterranean Sites

The canals of Venice and an ancient Phoenician city are among the historic sites imperiled by sea level rise and coastal erosion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Letter: Laquan McDonald’s Death and the Rhetoric of Police

Elyse Blennerhassett / Elizabeth Robillard Brimhall The Chicago Culture That Created Jason Van Dyke On October 5, a jury found a Chicago police officer, Jason Van Dyke, guilty of second-degree murder in the 2014 shooting of Laquan McDonald, who was 17. Following the verdict, Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve wrote about the context for Van Dyke’s actions. “The city convicted one cop,” she wrote, “but the

6h

The Conners Frees Itself of Roseanne Barr

“People die. Whaddaya gonna do?” So says Joey (Ashton Pulis) upon hearing the news of Roseanne Conner’s death in the pilot episode of The Conners , which aired Tuesday night. “Seen a little too much action in ’Nam, Joey?” replies a deadpan Dan Conner (John Goodman), just three weeks removed from the loss of his wife. So goes the message of ABC’s hastily assembled replacement for its hit revival R

6h

Designers are reinventing hurricane maps for an era of extreme weather

As climate dangers rise, researchers are testing new ways of communicating clearly about uncertainty.

6h

Why Does This Glacier Near Everest Make Loud Booming Sounds at Night?

Each night, the glacier made noises loud enough to keep a team of scientists camping on its surface awake. They figured out why.

6h

Case Western Reserve researchers cure drug-resistant infections without antibiotics

Biochemists, microbiologists, drug discovery experts and infectious disease doctors have teamed up in a new study that shows antibiotics are not always necessary to cure sepsis in mice. Instead of killing causative bacteria with antibiotics, researchers treated infected mice with molecules that block toxin formation in bacteria. Every treated mouse survived. The breakthrough study, published in Sc

6h

Study uncovers new link between neonicotinoid pesticide exposure and bumblebee decline

Adding to evidence that pesticide use may be abetting the decline of bumblebee, a new study reveals that daily consumption of even small doses of neonicotinoids reduces the survival of queen and male bees, which are critical to the viability of wild populations. The study also found that exposure to neonicotinoids alters the expression of many bee genes, suggesting that the chemicals may be having

6h

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney

There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kidney with the

6h

Selfish people have fewer children and earn less money

What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others? According to an interdisciplinary study, unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people.

6h

Regulating microglial activity may reduce inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

A group of investigators is proposing that targeting immune checkpoints — molecules that regulate the activity of the immune system — in immune cells called microglia could reduce the inflammatory aspects of important neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS.

6h

Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets

Astrophysicist now have a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.

6h

New imaging tool captures how sound moves through the chinchilla ear

Researchers have developed a new device that can be used to visualize how sound-induced vibrations travel through the ear.

6h

Tree rings show how the tropics shifted over time

For the first time, scientists have traced the north-south shifts of the northern-most edge of the tropics dating back 800 years. The movement of the tropical boundary affects the locations of Northern Hemisphere deserts including the Sonoran, Mohave, and Saharan. Those deserts sit just north of the tropical belt, which includes the subtropics. Before now, scientists had information about the loc

6h

A.I. allows ‘dynamic dosing’ for cancer drugs

Researchers have harnessed a powerful artificial intelligence platform to successfully treat a patient with advanced cancer, completely halting disease progression. The development represents a big step forward in personalized medicine, they say. In this clinical study, researchers gave a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (MCRPC) a novel drug combination consisting of t

6h

Social media buffers depression among older adults with pain

With a few finger strokes or swipes on a computer or cell phone, seniors with pain reduce the risk of depression when visiting social media sites.

6h

Albuterol: Dosage & Side Effects

Albuterol is a prescription medicine prescribed for patients struggling with asthma, emphysema, bronchitis and other lung diseases.

6h

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape.

6h

Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time

Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dangerous alterations in air quality using a sustainable, natura

6h

World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels

In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas. In the course of the 21st century, these sites will increasingly be at risk by storm surges and increasing coastal erosion due to sea-level rise.

6h

The most iconic photograph of Earth | Letter

David Nowell , a fellow of the Geological Society, is captivated by Earthrise over the moon, taken in 1968 Rather than being taken from “inner space”, the most iconic photograph of Earth ( Martyrdom? I’ve seen that movie, thanks , 13 October) was taken in December 1968 by Apollo 8 astronaut Frank Borman, showing Earthrise , as the disc of our planet could be seen rising above the lunar surface. E

6h

Evidence of dogs accompanying humans to Europe during Neolithic

A team of researchers from across Europe and Israel has found evidence of dogs traveling with people from the Near East to Europe during the Neolithic. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their genetic study of dogs living in ancient Europe and the Near East and what they found.

6h

Stor stigning på få år: Her må du indtage cannabis

Antallet af lande, hvor især medicinsk cannabis er lovligt, stiger hurtigt.

6h

Substantial changes in air pollution across China during 2015 to 2017

The first detailed analysis of air pollution trends in China reveals a 20 per cent drop in concentrations of particulate pollution over the last three years (2015-2017).

6h

Probiotics and antibiotics create a killer combination

MIT researchers have shown that by delivering a combination of antibiotics and alginate-encapsulated probiotics, they can eradicate two strains of drug-resistant bacteria that often infect wounds.

6h

Novel method for precise, controllable cell deposition onto tissue engineering constructs

A new study presents a novel method of using a microfluidic flow cell array to achieve precise and reproducible control of cell deposition onto engineered tissue constructs to produce tunable cell patterns and generate essential integration zones.

6h

Just the right dose: antiepileptic drug clearance changes during pregnancy

Study finds significant changes in how seizure medications are metabolized during the different trimesters of pregnancy.

6h

5 of the richest companies in history

You've definitely heard of Apple. But what about the Dutch East India Company? Did a 1911 Supreme Court decision result in more millionaires in America than any other court case? One example of how not to do it: the rise and fall of the Mississippi Company. Dutch East India Company Known under the initials VOC (Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie), the Dutch East India Company would be worth about

6h

Distrust Of Health Care System May Keep Black Men Away From Prostate Cancer Research

Black men are hit hardest by prostate cancer, but they are underrepresented in research. Researchers held focus groups in three states to understand why. (Image credit: Tetra Images/Getty Images/Tetra images RF)

7h

Death of a Fossil Hunter

Junchang Lü was is one of the most important dinosaur researchers of the past half century — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Take hope: this Fukushima disaster map is a fake

The pace and scale of environmental degradation can induce despair and inaction. This map of radioactive pollution of the Pacific after Fukushima adds to the damning evidence. Fortunately, it's a fake. Which means there's room for hope – and action. We have about 12 years left to save the world . The IPCC report making that dire prediction was published earlier this month. Immediately, normal lif

7h

Blooming early! Japan's famed cherry blossoms make unexpected appearance

The delicate blossoms of the cherry tree might be synonymous with the onset of spring in Japan—except this year they're also blooming in autumn, a weather forecasting company said Wednesday.

7h

Cosmic supercluster is largest object ever seen in the early universe

A gigantic supercluster of galaxies that existed just two billion years after the big bang could tell us how much dark matter was around in the early universe

7h

Astronomers find a cosmic Titan in the early universe

Astronomers have discovered a titanic structure in the early universe, just two billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy proto-supercluster, nicknamed Hyperion, is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance.

7h

Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time

Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dange

7h

Taking their vitamins

New research finds that more bacterioplankton utilize vitamin B1 or B1 precursors from their environment than synthesize their own. The researchers also found that B1 availability can directly limit bacterioplankton growth, which could have larger impacts on aquatic microbial food webs, as well as energy and nutrient exchange.

7h

Medical management of opioid-induced constipation differs from other forms of condition

Traditional laxatives are recommended as first-line agents to treat patients with a confirmed diagnosis of opioid-induced constipation, according to a new guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association. If an adequate trial of laxatives results in suboptimal symptom control, the guidelines recommend peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) drugs, namely naldemedine,

7h

Bone cell response to mechanical force is balance of injury and repair

Scientists have revealed the intricate process that bone cells use to repair themselves after mechanical injury.

7h

Bursting the clouds for better communication

We live in an age of long-range information. Research is turning towards the use of lasers which have several advantages. However, this new technology faces a major problem: clouds. Due to their density, clouds stop the laser beams and scramble the transfer of information. Researchers at UNIGE have devised an ultra-hot laser that creates a temporary hole in the cloud, which lets the laser beam con

7h

Largest galaxy proto-supercluster found

An international team of astronomers using the VIMOS instrument of ESO's Very Large Telescope have uncovered a colossal structure in the early universe. This galaxy proto-supercluster — which they nickname Hyperion — was unveiled by new measurements and a complex examination of archive data. This is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance — merely 2 b

7h

Astronomers find a cosmic Titan in the early universe

An international team of astronomers has discovered a titanic structure in the early universe, just two billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy proto-supercluster, nicknamed Hyperion, is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance.

7h

Emergency department blood test may help rule out heart attack within 15 minutes

A new, quick and accurate, bedside blood test done in an emergency department could help reduce the time it takes to rule out heart attacks. A preliminary study suggests a 15-minute blood test in the emergency department to measure a protein in the blood (cardiac troponin) may have similar ability to rule out a heart attack as blood tests that take longer to be measured in a laboratory.

7h

More caffeine from coffee associated with decreased rosacea risk

Consuming caffeine from coffee but not from other foods (tea, soda and chocolate) was associated with less risk of rosacea, a common chronic inflammatory skin disease where the skin appears red and flushed. This observational study included more than 82,000 women in the Nurses' Health Study II with data collected on coffee, tea, soda and chocolate consumption.

7h

A curious branch of plankton evolution

Planktonic foraminifera — tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea — left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when and how new lineages arose. However, a study publishing Oct. 17 in the journal iScience reveals that one lineage evolved much more rapidly than everyone predic

7h

Why It's Hard To Change Minds About Climate Change

The science is there. But some people aren't. (Image credit: Aishath Adam/Getty Images)

7h

7h

Revolutionary Microscopy Technique Nets Most Lucrative Prize in Science

The Breakthrough awards, each worth U.S. $3 million, honor advances in the life sciences, physics and mathematics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Astronomers find a cosmic Titan in the early universe

An international team of astronomers has discovered a titanic structure in the early Universe, just two billion years after the Big Bang. This galaxy proto-supercluster, nicknamed Hyperion, is the largest and most massive structure yet found at such a remote time and distance.

7h

Prioritizing help for the poorest hit by deadly natural disasters

A new statistical tool to help target resources following deadly natural disasters has been created by the University of Bristol, allowing governments to prioritise getting aid to the most vulnerable people.

7h

Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets

New research by a team led by an astrophysicist at the University of Warwick has a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.

7h

Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney

There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kid

7h

Plant hormone makes space farming a possibility

With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable. But the plant hormone strigolactone could make it possible, plant biologists have shown. The hormone supports the symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, thus encouraging plants' growth — even under the challenging conditions found in space.

7h

Societies can remain distinct despite migration

Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.

7h

Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors

Researchers have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude. The speedier electronics could lead to improved solar power and transistor use across the world, according to the scientists.

7h

Scientists Catch Rare Glimpses of the Endangered Vaquita

An expedition in the Gulf of California yielded photographs and video of a species nearing extinction.

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Why White Supremacists Are Chugging Milk (and Why Geneticists Are Alarmed)

The appropriation of genetic research by those with extremist views on race has scientists grappling with how to respond.

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Trilobites: City Rats Eat Meat. Country Rats Eat What They Can.

New research on rats suggests that Aesop was on to something in his ancient fable, “The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse.”

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Jeff Sessions Is Quietly Transforming the Nation’s Immigration Courts

Dorothea Lay was on track to become a member of the Board of Immigration Appeals, part of the Justice Department’s Executive Office for Immigration Review. Her 25-year government career had prepared her for the post, as reflected in four letters of recommendation from academics and current and former officials. In December 2016, nine months after submitting her application, she was offered the jo

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Attending the 'best' high school may yield benefits and risks for students

Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren't uniformly beneficial to students' educational and professional outcomes in the following decades. The findings are publis

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New study supports survival of microbes and organic compounds in space

Environmental data collected from an exposure panel exposed to the space environment for one year suggests that microbes and organic compounds present in the exposure panel would be able to survive, supporting the possibility of interplanetary migration of microbes and organic compounds.

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Going to bed with your ex might not be as bad you think

Conventional wisdom holds that people set themselves up for even greater heartache when they jump into bed with their ex-partner after a breakup. However, according to the findings of a study in Springer's journal Archives of Sexual Behavior, having sex with an ex doesn't seem to hinder moving on after the breakup. This is true even for those who continue to pine after their ex, says lead author S

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Breastfeeding protects infants from antibiotic-resistant bacteria

A new study shows that infants that are breastfed for at least six months have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their gut compared with babies breastfed for a shorter time. On the other hand, antibiotic use by mothers increases the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in infants.

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Loss of protein p53 helps cancer cells multiply in 'unfavourable' conditions

Researchers have discovered a novel consequence of loss of the tumour protein p53 that promotes cancer development.

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New imaging tool captures how sound moves through the chinchilla ear

Researchers have developed a new device that can be used to visualize how sound-induced vibrations travel through the ear.

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A curious branch of plankton evolution

Planktonic foraminifera (forams) – tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea—left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively sturdy grasp on when and how new lineages arose and developed their own unique features. However, a study publishing October 17 in the journal iScience reveals that one foram

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Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines

Aerial insectivores—birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing—are declining across North America. Conserving vulnerable species such as these requires a good understanding of the factors impacting them at every stage of life. Juveniles and adults, for example, may face different threats and die at different rates. Two new studies from The Condor: Ornithological Applications take a deep dive into

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A Magnetic 'Flea' That Spins and Hovers

A Magnetic 'Flea' That Spins and Hovers The operating principles of ordinary magnetic stirrers may help create better microfluidic pumps for applications ranging from inkjet printing to drug delivery. magneticstirrer_final1.gif Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Physics Wednesday, October 17, 2018 – 10:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Wr

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Societies can remain distinct despite migration

Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.

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Sydney to move away from CBD model

Sydney may soon undergo a transition from a monocentric city with sprawling suburbs radiating from one CBD, to a polycentric model—one marked by several sub-centres—according to a recent study led by a multidisciplinary team at the University of Sydney.

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Baby-saving drug wins $3m prize in 'Oscars for science'

Treatment for rare genetic disease to receive one of seven $3m Breakthrough awards at glitzy ceremony New techniques for peering into the intricate innards of cells and a discovery that has given hope for infants with a deadly genetic condition are among the developments that are being lauded in this year’s “Oscars for science”. The 2019 Breakthrough prize will see seven winning discoveries each

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Mitt Romney Isn’t Coming to Help Liberals

Mitt Romney, whose ascent to the U.S. Senate is virtually assured, apparently sought last week to rewrite history when he denied that he’d been a prominent foe of Donald Trump in 2016. It happened while he was stumping in Arizona for a fellow Senate candidate, after reporters mentioned his leading role in the Never Trump movement. In response , Romney said, “I don’t think that was the case.” Actu

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School students identify sounds caused by solar storm

School students have successfully identified sounds caused by a solar storm in the Earth's magnetic shield, as part of a Queen Mary University of London research project.

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Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival

Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now Rutgers scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species.

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Double dust ring test could spot migrating planets

New research by a team led by an astrophysicist at the University of Warwick has a way of finally telling whether newly forming planets are migrating within the disc of dust and gas that typically surrounds stars or whether they are simply staying put in the same orbit around the star.

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Selfish people have fewer children and earn less money

What happens to those who behave unselfishly and make sacrifices for the sake of others? According to an interdisciplinary study by researchers from Stockholm University, the Institute for Futures Studies and the University of South Carolina, unselfish people tend both to have more children and to receive higher salaries, in comparison to more selfish people. The results have now been published in

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World Heritage Sites threatened by rising sea levels

In the Mediterranean region, there are numerous UNESCO World Heritage Sites in low-lying coastal areas. In the course of the 21st century, these sites will increasingly be at risk by storm surges and increasing coastal erosion due to sea-level rise.

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Regulating microglial activity may reduce inflammation in neurodegenerative diseases

A group of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators is proposing that targeting immune checkpoints — molecules that regulate the activity of the immune system — in immune cells called microglia could reduce the inflammatory aspects of important neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and ALS.

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Sleeping beauty helps identify genes involved in a fatty liver-associated liver cancer

Hepatocellular carcinoma, a deadly form of liver cancer, is increasingly being linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; however, the underlying genetic mechanism of disease progression had remained unknown. Using a Sleeping Beauty mutagenesis screen, Osaka University researchers found that Sav1 and downstream components of the Hippo signaling pathway are drivers of the development of liver can

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New method uses just a drop of blood to monitor lung cancer treatment

Osaka University researchers have devised a simple method to measure the amount of cancer medication nivolumab that is bound to immune T-cells. The method requires just a drop of blood and can also measure the level of proliferation of those T-cells. The researchers show that these tests provide much more useful information for making treatment decisions than blood levels of the medication alone.

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Ulovlig dataindsamling: Højesteret afviser Patientdataforeningen

For tredje gang er Patientdataforeningens ønske om at få afprøvet, om der fortsat indsamles patientdata på ulovlig vis blevet afvist. Denne gang af Højesteret.

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Study challenges concerns around imported farmed shrimp

Scientists at the University of Stirling have challenged concerns around the consumption of imported farmed shrimp – with new research indicating that it is as safe as any other seafood product.

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Banking on private finance to tackle the world's water crisis

With global water resources under ever-increasing stress, a new report from WWF, ING and The Boston Consulting Group (BCG) calls for urgent efforts by corporates, investors, governments and NGOs to deliver sustainable, bankable freshwater projects, which will help improve water security, create financial value and enhance the health of the world's river basins.

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Study shows city rats eat better than country rats

A pair of researchers, one with Trent University in Canada, the other the University of Manchester in the U.K. has found evidence that rats living in cities have a much richer diet than rats living in the country. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Eric Guiry and Michael Buckley describe their isotopic analysis of rats living in Toronto during the years 1790 to 1890, a

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Gennembrud i HIV-forskning: Fem patienter kureret

Den nye kur fjerner virussen helt fra kroppen. Kuren kan kun hjælpe ganske få, siger dansk forsker.

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How Equality and Inequality Shape the Birds and the Bees

Before tackling this month’s puzzle, try this simple physics experiment: Hold a ruler (or another thin flat object like a pencil) horizontally in front of you, supported at either end by your outstretched left and right index fingers. Now slide your fingers toward each other. If you do this slowly, you’ll find that one finger starts moving first but soon grinds to a halt. Then the other finger mo

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Taking steps toward a wearable artificial kidney

There just aren't enough kidney transplants available for the millions of people with renal failure. Aside from a transplant, the only alternative for patients is to undergo regular dialysis sessions to clear harmful cellular waste from their bodies. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a new urea sorbent that could accelerate progress toward the development of a lightweight, wearable artificial kid

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Moss rapidly detects, tracks air pollutants in real time

Moss, one of the world's oldest plants, is surprisingly in tune with the atmosphere around it. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report that they have found a simple and inexpensive way to detect air pollutants, specifically sulfur dioxide, in real time based on subtle changes in moss leaves. The discovery could rapidly alert authorities to potentially dange

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3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape. They report their results in ACS Applied Energy Ma

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Moon helps reveal secrets of the Universe

The Moon may be the key to unlocking how the first stars and galaxies shaped the early Universe.A team of astronomers led by Dr Benjamin McKinley at Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) and the ARC Centre of Excellence for All Sky Astrophysics in 3 Dimensions (ASTRO 3D) observed the Moon with a radio telescope to help search for the faint signal f

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The Moon helps reveal secrets of the universe

The Moon may be the key to unlocking how the first stars and galaxies shaped the early universe.

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Partisanship runs deep in America – even among 'independents'

In voting, it doesn't really matter which party you register with on paper.

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How monitoring local water supplies can build community

Water insecurity is a touchstone for 2018. Our planet isn't running out of water, but various kinds of mismanagement have led to local water crises across the planet, directly threatening millions of people.

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Regulating gene transcription using light

Researchers led by Mustafa Khammash have developed a new method that uses blue light to control the transcription of DNA into RNA in single cells. The technology could also be used in tissue engineering and stem cell research.

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Brief Answers to the Big Questions review: seeking the real Hawking

Stephen Hawking peered deep into black holes and helped integrate the biggest ideas in physics. But the extraordinary genius was very much a man of his times

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2019 Breakthrough Prize winners set to receive share in $22 million

Silicon valley’s Breakthrough Prize reveals the 21 scientists who have been recognized this year for work in drug design, biology, astrophysics, and mathematics

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Worry about GMO food probably extends to nanotech

If someone is skeptical about the safety of genetically modified foods, chances are they’re wary of nanotechnology, too, researchers report. A new study shows that an individual’s perception of genetically modified organisms might impact their judgments about whether or notnanotechnology-enabled products should be labeled in stores. GMOs are foods and organisms that have been genetically modified

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Protein derived from cottonseed for human nutrition one step closer to reality

Cottonseed ground into flour to deliver protein to millions of people, a project to which Dr. Keerti Rathore has devoted more than half his professional career, is one step closer to reality.

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Legal cannabis vs. black market: Can it compete?

The Oct. 17 launch of legal recreational cannabis in Canada brings many challenges. Retailers are now worrying about possible product shortages or web site glitches. Governments are still debating how to handle amnesties, impaired driving, and workplace safety.

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Combined X-ray and fluorescence microscope reveals unseen molecular details

A research team from the University of Göttingen has commissioned a worldwide unique microscope combination at DESY's X-ray source PETRA III to gain novel insights into biological cells. The team led by Tim Salditt and Sarah Köster describes the combined X-ray and optical fluorescence microscope in the journal Nature Communications. To test the performance of the device installed at DESY's measuri

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Fish undisturbed by flash photography

Fish experience stress, as do mammals and humans. When under stress, fish release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol. A team of scientists spearheaded by IGB has investigated whether flash photography induces an increase in cortisol levels of fish in aquariums. The good news: you need not worry about taking snapshots of the ram cichlid.

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Jonah Hill Strives for Authenticity With Mid90s

The act of skateboarding requires a lot of persistence for very little reward, especially at first. For Stevie (Sunny Suljic), the main character in Jonah Hill’s film Mid90s , that means falling down over and over again in his driveway as he attempts to learn how to ollie . Hill includes multiple montages of Stevie repeatedly landing on his back; it’s painful to watch, but it’s all worthwhile onc

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Meet the Endoterrestrials

A lexis Templeton remembers January 12, 2014, as the day the water exploded. A sturdy Pyrex bottle, sealed tight and filled with water, burst like a balloon. Templeton had just guided her Land Cruiser across the bumpy, rock-strewn floor of Wadi Lawayni, a broad, arid valley that cuts through the mountains of Oman. She parked beside a concrete platform that rose from the ground, marking a recently

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Zinc oxide nanoparticles: Therapeutic benefits and toxicological hazards

Despite the widespread application of zinc oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine, their use is still a controversial issue. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were are reported to have therapeutic benefits.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Ville man være højere hvis man boede på Jupiter?

En læser diskuterer tyngdekraftens påvirkning på planeterne med sin kone. Lektor på Aarhus Universitet afgør dysten.

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Stunning Photos of Ordinary Life in Ukraine's Conflict Zone

The Donbass region has been convulsed by civil war since 2014, yet many residents refuse to evacuate.

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Eighty tons of illegal bluefin tuna pose a threat to sustainable fisheries and human health

Spanish authorities announced the arrest of 76 people involved in a large illegal trade of bluefin tuna worth over €12 million per year between Malta and Spain, and with the engagement of other EU countries. 80,000 kg of illegally caught and marketed tuna were seized in the investigation, led under the coordination of EUROPOL. Irregularities found in the handling of the fish could also cause food

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Are two parents better than one? Yes, but only if you're a burying beetle

Parenting behaviour varies greatly across the animal kingdom. In most mammals, only mothers look after the young, and in most fishes, only fathers look after the young. When it comes to birds, mothers and fathers usually work together to build a nest, feed their chicks, keep them warm, and protect them from predators. At the opposite end of the spectrum are insects, where in most cases, the young

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Cellular clean-up crews linked to how body handles sugar

How our bodies handle glucose—the simple sugar that provides energy from the food we eat—appears to be intertwined with how cells keep themselves functioning normally, according to new University of Chicago research.

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Researchers investigate the peculiar radio source IC 1531

An international team of researchers has investigated a peculiar extragalactic radio source known as IC 1531. The new study analyzes the nature of IC 1531's high-energy emission, suggesting that the source is a radio galaxy. The findings are presented in a paper published October 5 on arXiv.org.

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Why Cross-Training Is Essential (and Improves Your DNA)

Including cross-training in your fitness program allows you to vary the stress placed on specific muscles and your cardiovascular system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cellular stress defense

Small heat-shock proteins (sHSPs) are molecular chaperones that bind to unfolded proteins to prevent protein aggregation and defend against cellular stress. Mutations in human sHSPs are associated with inherited diseases including cataract and cardiomyopathy.

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Award-winning algorithm takes search for habitable planets to the next level

An international team of scientists, including KAUST high performance computing experts and astronomers from the Paris Observatory and the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), in collaboration with NVIDIA, is taking the search for habitable planets and observation of first epoch galaxies to the next level.

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Why is Pluto no longer a planet?

Space Short answer: Because we changed the definition of the word “planet” to better fit its meaning. When the IAU officially defined the word “planet” for the first time, Pluto simply didn’t fit. To keep its planetary status along with Earth, Saturn, and the rest, it…

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Ny professor i krydsfeltet mellem hjertekarsygdom og demens

Ruth Frikke-Schmidt er nyudnævnt professor i Klinisk Biokemi og skal forske i årsagssammenhænge mellem biomarkører, hjertekarsygdomme og demens.

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Societies can remain distinct despite migration

Countries around the world can retain distinct cultures despite migration, new research shows.

8h

School students identify sounds caused by solar storm

School students have successfully identified sounds caused by a solar storm in the Earth's magnetic shield, as part of a Queen Mary University of London research project.

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Sydney to move away from CBD model

Sydney may soon undergo a transition from a monocentric city with sprawling suburbs radiating from one CBD, to a polycentric model — one marked by several sub-centres — according to a recent study led by a multidisciplinary team at the University of Sydney. Topics: Greater Sydney Commission, urbanisation, urban sprawl, complex systems, transport, residential, suburbs

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Physicists create guidelines for non-equilibrium measurements of many-body systems

When it comes to non-equilibrium physics, not all assumptions are created equal. At least, those are the latest findings from NC State physicist Lex Kemper and colleagues from NC State and Georgetown University.

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The role of traumatic stress in the violent and romanticized Old West

More than 130 years ago, a small community of settlers in a remote northern Arizona valley erupted into a frenzy of ambushes, murders and massacres.

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Unlimited spending on television political ads fails to deliver votes

There is a reason it may seem as if every television ad right now is a political one. Millions of dollars are spent to reach voters through this one medium, but does it pay off on Election Day?

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Installing life support the hands-free way

Last week saw the installation of ESA's next-generation life-support system on the International Space Station. The new facility recycles carbon dioxide in the air into water that can then be converted into oxygen reducing supplies sent from Earth by half.

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Why collecting water turns millions of women into second-class citizens

A family in India needs fresh water. But this family can't just turn on a tap. Instead, the women in the household must walk to fetch it, sometimes travelling miles carrying plastic or earthenware pots, possibly with a child or two in tow, to the nearest safe source – regularly repeating the journey up to three times a day. In the scorching summer months of April and May, when temperatures regular

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Engineers report a new method for producing new flexible LCD screens

RUDN engineers have discovered substances to simplify the production of flexible LCD screens that display 3-D images. The work has been published in the Journal of the Society for Information Display.

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Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect

The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male "vagina."

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Extinction is forever—and ecosystem recovery takes a really, really long time

Researchers from the University of Leeds studying fossil data surrounding the Permo-Triassic (P-Tr) extinction of 252 million years (Ma) ago found that a marine ecosystem, in comparison with the taxonomic genera that comprise it, took a whole order of magnitude longer to recover after the mass extinction event that defines and separates the two geologic periods. The extinction event was responsibl

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‘It’s Time to Hand the Mic to Gun Owners’

When The Atlantic writer Elaina Plott was shot in a drive-by shooting, her views on the right to bear arms began to change. Just as is the case for two out of every five Americans, Plott had grown up in a gun-owning household and a community that revered firearms. But her experience afforded her a new perspective. In a new video, she expands upon the experience she detailed in her piece, “ The Bu

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Plant hormone makes space farming a possibility

With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable. But the plant hormone strigolactone could make it possible, plant biologists from the University of Zurich have shown. The hormone supports the symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, thus encouraging plants' growth — even under the challenging conditions found in space.

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Study challenges concerns around imported farmed shrimp

Scientists at the University of Stirling have challenged concerns around the consumption of imported farmed shrimp — with new research indicating that it is as safe as any other seafood product.

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FEFU astrophysicist contributed into international-team efforts on study Comet 29P

Evgenij Zubko of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with other team members has developed a comprehensive model to explain the results of a photometric study of the Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (29P) which was successfully accomplished recently. The findings came as a real surprise revealed that the dust environment of 29P predominantly consists of only one type of material —

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High-dose radiation therapy improves survival in patients once thought incurable

In the first randomized, phase II clinical trial of its kind, researchers have shown that an aggressive form of high-precision radiation therapy can greatly increase how long oligometastatic patients live and doubles how long they live without cancer. The findings will be presented in a news briefing and the plenary session at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology

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Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors

Researchers from Graduate School of Bio-Applications and Systems Engineering at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude. The speedier electronics could lead to improved solar power and transistor use across the world, according to the scientists.

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Blue crab baby sizes and shapes influence their survival

Like people, blue crabs aren't all the same sizes and shapes. Now Rutgers scientists have discovered substantial differences in the body structures of larval crab siblings and among larvae from different mothers. And that can mean the difference between an early death and survival into adulthood for this important commercial and recreational species.

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Getting to the root of long-term tree swallow declines

Aerial insectivores — birds that hunt for insect prey on the wing — are declining across North America. Conserving these vulnerable species requires a good understanding of the factors impacting them at every stage of life. Two new studies take a deep dive into the demographic factors behind declining populations of tree swallows and show that although specifics may vary between locations, actio

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Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. This was discovered by scientists of the Friedrich Schiller University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, together with partners from Belgium. The algae depend on nutrients in order to reproduce. However, they also need reproductive partners

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Modifying a virtual environment in just a few clicks

Creating and modifying a virtual reality environment just got a lot easier thanks to software being released today by Imverse, an EPFL spin-off. The secret behind Imverse's program, which works much like a photo editor, is a three-dimensional rendering engine based on 3-D pixels called voxels. The rendering engine can be used for other virtual reality applications as well, such as depicting real p

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Magnetic fields may be the key to black hole activity

Collimated jets provide astronomers with some of the most powerful evidence that a supermassive black hole lurks in the heart of most galaxies. Some of these black holes appear to be active, gobbling up material from their surroundings and launching jets at ultra-high speeds, while others are quiescent, even dormant. Why are some black holes feasting and others starving? Recent observations from t

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Acrylic tanks provide clear window into dark matter detection

Scientists have a new window into the search for dark matter – an acrylic vessel that features a grouping of 12-foot-tall transparent tanks with 1-inch-thick walls.

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Herlev-læge modtager svensk diabetespris

Overlæge Jannet Svensson på Børne- og Ungeafdelingen på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital har modtaget den svenske Barndiabetesfondens Johnny Ludvigsson pris.

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Chemists test a new nanocatalyst for obtaining hydrogen

A chemist from RUDN was the first to use catalysts with ruthenium nanoparticles to obtain hydrogen under the influence of visible light and UV radiation. In the future, such catalysts may be used for large-scale production of hydrogen fuel under the influence of sunlight. The results of the study were published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.

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A research toolbox sheds light on social identity changes in Europe

An EU initiative has studied the cultural dynamics characterising societies and institutions, and their impact. The resulting analyses can guide the development of policies to effectively address the crisis in Europe.

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Controlling organic semiconductor band gaps by electron-acceptor fluorination

Organic semiconductor materials have the potential to be used in innovative applications such as transparent and flexible devices, and their low cost makes them particularly attractive. The properties of organic semiconductor materials can be tuned by controlling their structure at the molecular level through parts of the structure known as electron-accepting units. A group of researchers centered

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Razer Blade Review (2018): A Cut Above

If you're a gamer, or a pro looking for a MacBook alternative, this is the laptop for you.

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Helm Wants You to Control Your Own Data Again

Helm hopes to make running your own private, encrypted server easy for everyone.

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Study shows White House, Pentagon are literally some of the hottest spots in Washington

A heat-mapping study of Washington, D.C. and Baltimore by Portland State University researchers show that some of the most famous buildings in the nation's capital – The White House, U.S. Capital and The Pentagon – are located in areas that have the highest temperatures in the city and surrounding areas.

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5 transformational policies for a prosperous and sustainable world | Johan Rockström

In a talk about how we can build a robust future without wrecking the planet, sustainability expert Johan Rockström debuts the Earth3 model — a new methodology that combines the UN Sustainable Development Goals with the nine planetary boundaries, beyond which earth's vital systems could become unstable. Learn more about five transformational policies that could help us achieve inclusive and prosp

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Novel switching valve to receive more semen in a sex-role reversed cave insect

The female of a sex-role reversed cave insect species Neotrogla has evolved a switching valve to receive more semen during mating, when a penis-like structure in the female anchors in the male 'vagina.'

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Forest carbon stocks have been overestimated for 50 years

Basic density is widely used to compute carbon storage by trees. A formula used to calculate basic wood density has recently been corrected. Researchers estimate that the error in the initial formula resulted in an overestimation of forest carbon stocks, to the tune of almost 5 percent. These results were published in the scientific journal American Journal of Botany on 16 October.

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Penetrating the soil's surface with radar

Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily. Researchers' calculations from the data informs agricultural water use and climate models.

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Paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm

Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious. A new study in the roundworm C. elegans documents the transmission via sperm of epigenetic marks that are both necessary and sufficient

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No sweat required: Hypertension treatment mimics effect of exercise

By studying a chemical produced predominately in the liver, hypertension researchers have found a novel approach to lower blood pressure, even without reducing sodium intake or increasing exercise.

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Dual vaccine against anthrax and plague

A team of researchers has now engineered a virus nanoparticle vaccine against Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, tier 1 agents that pose serious threats to national security of the United States. B. anthracis and Y. pestis are the pathogens that cause anthrax and plague, respectively. Using bacteriophage T4, the scientists developed the vaccine by incorporating key antigens of both B. anthrac

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World Food Day: Fish gone, people gone

On World Food Day, WWF warns against the dramatic impact of overfished oceans on people around the globe. Currently, 33 percent of fish stocks are overfished (in the Mediterranean it is 85 percent) with a further 60 percent at maximum capacity with no possibility to increase catches without overfishing the stock. At the same time, more than three billion people rely on fish as an essential source

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Tuning the electrocatalytic performance of bifunctional catalysts

In the search for highly active and inexpensive electrocatalysts, two reactions pose a particular challenge: the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Both are important for the development of better fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and electrolytic water-splitting. Materials such as platinum, iridium oxide and ruthenium oxide are well suited for these reactions,

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Plans for a modular Martian base that would provide its own radiation shielding

The idea of exploring and colonizing Mars has never been more alive than it is today. Within the next two decades, there are multiple plans to send crewed missions to the Red Planet, and even some highly ambitious plans to begin building a permanent settlement there. Despite the enthusiasm, there are many significant challenges that need to be addressed before any such endeavors can be attempted.

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Arctic ice sets speed limit for major ocean current

The Beaufort Gyre is an enormous, 600-mile-wide pool of swirling cold, fresh water in the Arctic Ocean, just north of Alaska and Canada. In the winter, this current is covered by a thick cap of ice. Each summer, as the ice melts away, the exposed gyre gathers up sea ice and river runoff, and draws it down to create a huge reservoir of frigid fresh water, equal to the volume of all the Great Lakes

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The Strange Pathos of Ariana Grande’s Breakup

The title of Ariana Grande’s latest album, Sweetener , reclaims the often-used knock on radio-ready sing-alongs as “saccharine.” Perky music doesn’t just make life yummier, in Grande’s view. It makes life bearable. Her first album after the 2017 terrorist attack on one of her concerts, Sweetener arrived with lyrics about responding to bitterness with sugar , dark with light , suffocation with bre

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The Tricky Allure of Becoming a Black American Expatriate

In his 1960 short story “This Morning, This Evening, So Soon,” which was first published in The Atlantic , James Baldwin describes the pervasive feeling that informed his expatriatism: the bitter push of American racism versus the sweet pull of life elsewhere. When the story’s main character—a black American expat who lives in France with his Swedish wife and their French-born son—wonders whether

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Hjertelæge får doktorgrad i medicin på Aarhus Universitet

Lars W. Andersen fra Aarhus Universitet har netop forsvaret sin doktordisputs om hjertestop på hospital.

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Exploring new spintronics device functionalities in graphene heterostructures

Graphene Flagship researchers have shown in a paper published in Science Advances how heterostructures built from graphene and topological insulators have strong, proximity induced spin-orbit coupling which can form the basis of novel information processing technologies.

9h

Larval fish database to show effects of climate change on fisheries

A new larval fish database collated over the last 30 years will be used to measure marine ecosystem state and change as well as seasonal patterns of various fish species.

9h

Physicist describes the shape of a wormhole

A RUDN physicist demonstrated how to describe the shape of any symmetrical wormhole—a black hole that theoretically can be a kind of a portal between any two points in space and time—based on its wave spectrum. The research would help understand the physics of wormholes and better identify their physical characteristics. The article was published in the Physics Letters B journal.

9h

Simulating nuclear safety

Commercial operation of the CHASNUPP-1 996 megawatt intermediate type pressurised water reactor began in May 2000 in Pakistan. It is a conventional two-loop PWR and is run by the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. Now, scientists Khurram Mehboob and Mohammad Aljohani of the Department of Nuclear Engineering at King Abdul Aziz University in Saudi Arabia have carried out simulations of the activity

9h

Teslas Model 3 slår rekorder i amerikansk sikkerhedstest

Tesla-modellen klarer sig bedre i sikkerhedstest end nogen anden bil, der er blevet testet af de amerikanske myndigheder.

10h

Human placenta stem cells help people recover from hip surgery

The placenta is usually discarded after childbirth but it's a source of mesenchymal stem cells – and they help people regain muscle strength after hip surgery

10h

Sneak peek at Hawking’s last book, Brief Answers to the Big Questions

Do black holes eat information or do zero-energy particles nicknamed "hairs" somehow store it instead? Before he died, Stephen Hawking was working on new ideas, as this exclusive extract shows

10h

Participating in sports during childhood may have long-term benefits for bone health

Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age.

10h

Winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate

Researchers have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks — which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter — is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period.

10h

Supermassive black holes and supercomputers

The universe's deep past is beyond the reach of even the mighty Hubble Space Telescope. But a new review explains how creation of the first stars and galaxies is nevertheless being mapped in detail, with the aid of computer simulations and theoretical models — and how a new generation of supercomputers and software is being built that will fill in the gaps.

10h

Controlling organic semiconductor band gaps by electron-acceptor fluorination

Researchers synthesized a fluorinated electron-acceptor for use in organic semiconductors. The high electronegativity of the fluorine substituents enhanced the electron-accepting properties of the widely used electron-acceptor. The power conversion efficiency of a thin film solar cell based on the fluorinated product was shown to be significantly higher than that of a cell containing an unmodified

10h

Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise

One question that scientists and fitness experts alike would love to answer is whether exercise or nutrition has a bigger positive impact on bone strength.

10h

New research identifies two types of drought across China and how they evolve

Flash drought is a rapidly intensifying water deficit process accompanied by high temperatures in a short period of time. Recently, heat extremes have become more frequent in a warming climate, and have substantially increased the occurrence of flash drought, which threatens crop yields and water supply.

10h

Climate changes require better adaptation to drought

Europe's future climate will be characterised by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem—especially for spring sown crops such as maize.

10h

Bees deal with darkness the same way humans do

Science It just took an eclipse, some microphones, and a bunch of schoolchildren to prove it. North American bees stop pollinating when the sun goes down. Now researchers understand how they react to solar eclipses too.

10h

Novel study shows promise for managing wild horse populations

For more than eight years, Colorado State University researchers have studied a vaccine called GonaCon as a safe and humane solution for the overpopulation of wild horses.

10h

Svar fra styrelse om om tolkegebyr skaber flere spørgsmål

Efter lang ventetid har Johan Ludvig Reventlow fået svar fra Styrelsen for Patiensikkerhed på sit bekymringsbrev om tolkegebyr. Men svaret skaber flere spørgsmål, end det opklarer, mener den praktiserende læge.

10h

I Ditched Google for Bing. Here's What I Found—and What I Didn't

I spent the last few months using Bing instead of Google for search. It's a whole new world, but not always for the better.

10h

Nasa-astronaut om Soyuz-fejl: Besvimede ved turbulent fald med påvirkning på 6-7 G

Det blev en turbulent rutsjebanetur for Nasa-astronauten, som i sidste uge måtte nødlande efter fejl på Soyuz-raket. Det fortalte han på et pressemøde i går.

10h

Image of the Day: Weevil Eye

The Nikon photomicrography competition winners of 2018 include striking close-ups of a compound eye, a fern, and an insect's bubble house.

10h

Why Is it Fun to Be Frightened?

Visiting an extreme haunted house can be delightfully terrifying.

10h

Jam-Resistant US Military Communications Satellite Lifts Off in Midnight-Hour Launch

An advanced U.S. military communications satellite soared into space in the midnight hour Wednesday (Oct. 17), lighting up the sky over Florida as it launched into orbit.

10h

Robin Ince's top 10 books about the human condition

From Douglas Adams to Oliver Sacks, the standup comedian reveals some of the writers that have helped him try to work out what makes us tick Most of my standup shows, whether about the behaviour of the bonobo ape or my addiction to celebrity narrowboat TV shows, are really me trying to work out what it is to be human and trying to see how wrong I am getting it. In middle age, I’ve been trying to

11h

The most important science policy issue in every state

Science A state-by-state breakdown of policies that could change your community. These are the top science, technology, or environment issues facing each state—plus Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C. Even if it never surfaces on the campaign trail,…

11h

These New Tricks Can Outsmart Deepfake Videos—for Now

We'll soon find it hard to know with our own eyes if a video is real or generated by AI, but new algorithms are staying one or two steps ahead of the fakers.

11h

How McLaren Learned to Treat its Formula One Pit Crew Like Athletes

It started with stealth video recordings and ended with visual tracking goggles and orange nuts.

11h

The Real Heroine of 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Isn't Hope Van Dyne

It's actually someone whose name is far less known.

11h

The Butterflies That Hear With Their Wings

When Jayne Yack speaks, she knows that her butterflies can hear her. They’re listening with their wings. Yack, a professor at Carleton University, studies a group of butterflies called nymphalids, which include well-known species like monarchs, morphos, emperors , and admirals . Many members of this group have ears at the base of their wings. If one lifted its top pair of wings in the air, “the e

11h

Unlocking the "Mystery" of Consciousness

Explaining it requires neither supernatural intervention nor any new fundamental physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

What's in a Half a Degree? 2 Very Different Future Climates

A new IPCC report shows the impacts in the near future that can be avoided by limiting warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius instead of 2 degrees C — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

VVM-rapport frifinder alternativ Nord Stream-rute for miljøpåvirkninger

VVM-rapport, der nu sendes i høring, finder ikke, at en alternativ rute for den omdiskuterede Nord Stream 2-gasledning påvirker miljøet på nogen måde. Dermed er den danske mulighed for at forhindre projektet sandsynligvis væk.

12h

12h

Elizabeth Warren’s DNA Is Not Her Identity

After receiving a direct challenge from President Donald Trump to prove her Native American ancestry by submitting to a DNA test, Senator Elizabeth Warren released her results Monday morning . As an enrolled member of the Diné (Navajo) Nation, I obviously have some thoughts on this development. As a geneticist-bioethicist, I have even more. Whether or not Warren has genetic ties to indigenous peo

12h

When Being the Boss’s Son Isn’t Enough

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an oral-history series where Aaron Reiss interviewed the young-adult sons and daughters of Chinatown shopkeepers about how they are helping to keep their families’ businesses alive. Ken Ma, a 32-year-old M.B.A. who is being groomed to become the CEO of his parents’ optical empire, Mott Optical Group, recalls the difficulty of taking over as a “boss’s son” in

12h

How a Struggling Business United a Family

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an oral-history series where Aaron Reiss interviewed the young-adult sons and daughters of Chinatown shopkeepers about how they are helping to keep their families’ businesses alive. Kevin Huang, a 22-year-old college student, recounts how short staffing at his family’s bakery found him unexpectedly spending his evenings after school helping to make buns and

12h

Finding a Place in the Family Business

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an oral-history series where Aaron Reiss interviewed the young-adult sons and daughters of Chinatown shopkeepers about how they are helping to keep their families’ businesses alive. Cynthia Koo, a 30-year-old designer, uses her marketing and art expertise to help manage an Instagram presence and an English-language website for her family’s Cantonese restaura

12h

Her Parents Wanted Her to Land a Cushy Job. She Wanted to Build Their Legacy

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an oral-history series where Aaron Reiss interviewed the young-adult sons and daughters of Chinatown shopkeepers about how they are helping to keep their families’ businesses alive. Olympia Moy, a 35-year-old with a background in nonprofit work and advocacy, who helps manage her parents’ music school, Florentine School of Music, Art and Academics, shares the

12h

The Burden of Being the Oldest Son of Immigrants

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an oral-history series where Aaron Reiss interviewed the young-adult sons and daughters of Chinatown shopkeepers about how they are helping to keep their families’ businesses alive. Jason Luo, a 24-year-old entrepreneur who graduated from helping resolve problems with English-speaking customers in his parents’ JieLi Laundromat to running his own gadget store

12h

Using Technology to Preserve the Culture of a Chinatown Shop

Editor’s Note: This article is part of an oral-history series where Aaron Reiss interviewed the young-adult sons and daughters of Chinatown shopkeepers about how they are helping to keep their families’ businesses alive. Alice Liu, a 24-year-old community advocate, lends a hand at her parents’ small shop, GTW Tea and Water, which sells Chinese cultural goods including teas, Buddhist items, and to

12h

Taking Over the Family Business in Chinatown

New York’s Chinatown is one of the few neighborhoods in Manhattan where parks are still packed with multigenerational, four-season activity, where diverse cultures, cuisines, and traditions are found spilling out of storefronts and community centers, and where immigrants and non-English speakers can find a familiar foothold in a new and different country. Still, over the past few decades, gentrif

12h

Gravitational waves from black hole pairs could act like tractor beams

When two black holes orbit one another, they create a swirling vortex of gravitational waves that could trap any nearby objects like a sci-fi tractor beam

12h

Tre mio. europæere ramt af sikkerhedsbrud: Kan udløse milliardbøde til Facebook

Septembers store sikkerhedsbrud hos Facebook omfatter tre millioner europæiske brugere. Det irske datatilsyn er ved at undersøge sagen, der kan betyde en bøde på mere end 10 milliarder kroner.

12h

Billund-bane uden godstog udløser »betydelig fordyrelse«

En ny plan for den enkeltsporede jernbane ventes om få uger at afsløre en klækkelig ekstraregning. Transportministeriet undrer sig over, hvorfor Banedanmark mod forventning oprindeligt har regnet på en bane med godstog.

12h

The tragedy of this American moment: Populism, elites, and the 2020 election

"We'll be better off" is the lie that sank America, says Giridharadas. When it comes to globalization, trade and automation, for decades American elites have been "rich-splaining" to ordinary people, saying: 'Don't worry, it will all be fine in the aggregate'. "As though anybody lives in the aggregate," quips Giridharadas. Populism was inevitable with the current economic order. The tragedy of it

12h

Infographic: Who and what do people fantasize about?

People who are overwhelmingly satisfied in their relationships fantasize other people More of us daydream about strangers than exes or friends Survey asks if we need to keep our fantasies to ourselves It's everybody's dirty little secret. Which is to say it's not much of a secret at all. Even when we're in relationships, we fantasize about other people. We may feel guilty about it—are we betrayin

12h

Carl Sagan on why he liked smoking marijuana

Carl Sagan was a life long marijuana user and closeted advocate of legalization. He once wrote an anonymous essay on the effects it had on his life and why he felt it should be legalized. His insights will be vital as many societies begin to legalize marijuana. The patron saint of nerds everywhere, Carl Sagan was an awesome human being. He wrote and hosted Cosmos , helped select the playlist of t

12h

This meteorite was here before Earth existed. Here's why it matters.

It's very rare that we discover something on our planet that was around before we were even a small speck. But every once in a while, we do—and this meteorite is a living testament. Scientists estimate the new discovery to be approximately 4.6 billion years old, almost as old as the solar system itself. New discoveries like this one bring us a small step closer in piecing together what an earlier

12h

Tornadoes are spinning up farther east in US, study finds

Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting—decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain why.

12h

Tesla secures land for Shanghai factory, first outside US

Electric auto brand Tesla Inc. says it has secured land in Shanghai for its first factory outside the United States, pushing ahead despite mounting U.S.-Chinese trade tensions.

12h

Facebook makes reality TV its new weapon for web supremacyFacebook Portal RW

Facebook said Wednesday it was reviving the pioneering MTV reality show "The Real World" as its secret weapon to lure viewers away from YouTube.

12h

New emission tests brake EU car sales in September

Car sales slumped across Europe in September, industry data published Wednesday showed, with the hangover from a sales binge before new emissions tests came into force knocking Volkswagen out of its traditional top spot in monthly sales.

12h

Faktatjek: Er medicinsk cannabis en mirakelkur?

Fra kræft til manglende sexlyst. Der er næsten ikke det, cannabis ikke får skyld for at kunne kurere. Men holder påstandene, når vi kigger på forskningen?

12h

Lægemidler har førsteprioritet indtil Medicinrådet udvides

Når det gælder prioritering ligger det lige for at ligestille alle typer af ny behandling, så behandling med lægemidler ikke længere prioriteres højere end al anden behandling i det danske sundhedsvæsen.

12h

We can now customize cancer cures, tumor by tumor

But can any company afford to manufacture one-off medical treatments?

13h

Study documents paternal transmission of epigenetic memory via sperm

Studies of human populations and animal models suggest that a father's experiences such as diet or environmental stress can influence the health and development of his descendants. How these effects are transmitted across generations, however, remains mysterious. A new study in the roundworm C. elegans documents the transmission via sperm of epigenetic marks that are both necessary and sufficient

13h

Survey Finds Widespread 'Moral Distress' Among Veterinarians

Most of the 800 veterinarians surveyed feel ethical qualms when pet owners ask them to euthanize animals that could be treated, or when owners ask to keep pets alive who will suffer needlessly. (Image credit: Anya Semenoff/Denver Post via Getty Images)

13h

DNA-based molecular computing will pave the way for programmable pills

Molecular circuitry offers a better way to measure, and potentially harness, cellular signaling mechanisms.

14h

Norske elfly-byggere tror ikke, at batterier er nok: Designer ny rækkeviddeforlænger

At fremtidens luftfart er elektrisk, er der efterhånden bred enighed om. Men vejen dertil byder på mange mulige rutevalg.

14h

Reaktion på EU-bøde: Google stopper 'bundling' af apps

Mobilproducenter skal nu købe licensaftaler for at sælge mobiler med Google Apps.

14h

58 Australian fairy penguins slaughtered in suspected dog attack

Wildlife officials in the southern Australia on Wednesday announced an investigation into the mass death of 58 penguins they believe were killed in a dog attack.

14h

Blandt Monte Carlo-algoritmer og kødædende planter: »Jeg kan godt lide pæne problemer«

Interview: Christian Wulff-Nilsen forsker i dynamiske grafer og håber en dag at finde det matematiske svar på, hvordan man nemmest og hurtigst forbinder to datapunkter.

15h

Japan company admits falsifying data for quake shock absorbers

A company supplying equipment to protect major buildings in Japan from earthquakes has admitted falsifying data, authorities said Wednesday, stressing there was no immediate safety risk.

15h

Nearly half the world lives on less than $5.50 a day: World Bank

Despite progress in reducing extreme poverty, nearly half the world's population lives on less than $5.50 a day, with a rising share of the poor in wealthier economies, the World Bank said Wednesday.

15h

At least 30 killed by Hurricane Michael, according to estimates

Hurricane Michael killed at least 30 people in four states, as the storm made its way through the southeastern United States last week, new local estimates showed Tuesday.

15h

Once kings of TV, US broadcast networks face reckoning

They once produced must-see television shows like "Seinfeld," "ER" and "Friends" but America's broadcast networks are facing a major crisis, as more and more viewers cut the cord in search of innovative content elsewhere.

15h

Anna Stockl (JMU and Lund U.): Neural Summation to Improve Night Vision

https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/night-vision Dr. Anna Stockl describes how neural summation improves night vision in the elephant hawkmoth. Elephant hawkmoths have excellent night vision. But how can these insects see so well under low light conditions? In this talk, Dr. Anna Stockl reveals that the secret behind their improved night vision is neural summation, a process by which neurons in

15h

Filipa Rijo-Ferreira (UTSW): Circadian Rhythms of the African Sleeping Sickness Parasite

https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/african-sleeping-sickness Dr. Filipa Rijo-Ferreira shows that Trypanosoma brucei, the African sleeping sickness parasite, has circadian rhythms. Trypanosoma brucei acts by disturbing the circadian rhythms, and therefore the sleep, of its host. But does T. brucei also have circadian rhythms? Dr. Filipa Rijo-Ferreira shows that yes, the African sleeping sicknes

15h

Darienne Myers (UCSF): A Mouse Model to Understand Lupus

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/lupus Dr. Darienne Myers investigates the molecular mechanisms of lupus using a mouse model. Lupus is a disease in which the immune system becomes erroneously activated and attacks a patient’s own tissues. Using a mouse model of lupus called Rasgrp1, Dr. Darienne Myers investigates the molecular mechanisms of this autoimmune disease. Specifically, she asks how

15h

Johana Goyes-Vallejos (UConn and KU): Do Female Frogs Call?

https://www.ibiology.org/ecology/frogs-call Dr. Johana Goyes-Vallejos discovers that in the smooth guardian frog of Borneo, female frogs call. In frog species, typically male frogs call, while females stay silent. Dr. Johana Goyes-Vallejos shows that in the smooth guardian frog of Borneo (Limnonectes palavanensis) this is not the case and that female frogs call, too, producing spontaneous vocaliz

15h

Blue wine? A tea-infused vintage? Spain startup shakes things up

Five years ago, a group of university students in Spain's Basque Country decided they wanted to shake up a sector—any sector—but preferably one to do with food or drink.

15h

Potentially deadly infection hits California sea lions

A rescue center says California sea lions are coming down with a potentially fatal bacterial infection in near-record numbers.

15h

YouTube goes down for more than an hour

YouTube's video streaming service went out for more than an hour on Tuesday, apparently affecting locations around the world.

15h

Researchers say winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate

As winter in New England seems to get warmer, fall lingers longer and spring comes into bloom earlier, areas like northern New Hampshire and western Maine are seeing an unusual continued increase in winter ticks which are endangering the moose population. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the swell of infestations of this parasite, which attaches itself to moose during

15h

The impact of microplastics on the environment unclear, study suggests

Scientists say there is not yet enough evidence to conclude that microplastics do or do not cause harm to the environment, following a review of more than 300 global studies.

15h

Penetrating the soil's surface with radar

Ground penetrating radar isn't something from the latest sci-fi movie. It's actually a tool used by soil scientists to measure the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily.

16h

Smiling does make you happier – under carefully controlled conditions

The idea that smiling changes the way we perceive things seemed like another casualty of social psychology’s replication crisis – but something more interesting was going on In 1988, Fritz Strack and colleagues published one of the most wonderful studies in psychology . They asked volunteers how funny they thought some cartoons were. While looking at the cartoons, some of the participants held a

16h

We once marvelled at Neil Armstrong. Now space is a playground for the rich | John Harris

Nasa’s greatest feats were a triumph for mankind. History will be less kind to today’s space pioneers The promised journey is from Earth to the edge of space, rather than London Euston to Crewe, but the story of Richard Branson’s company Virgin Galactic still has echoes of a bad passenger experience on his trains. For the best part of a decade, his potential customers have been waiting for an expe

17h

Penetrating the soil's surface with radar

Ground penetrating radar measures the amount of moisture in soil quickly and easily. Researchers' calculations from the data informs agricultural water use and climate models.

18h

UNH researchers say winter ticks killing moose at alarming rate

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found that the swell of infestations of winter ticks — which attach themselves to moose during the fall and feed throughout the winter — is the primary cause of an unprecedented 70 percent death rate of calves over a three-year period.

18h

Nutrition has a greater impact on bone strength than exercise

One question that scientists and fitness experts alike would love to answer is whether exercise or nutrition has a bigger positive impact on bone strength.

18h

Inducing labor at 39 weeks may benefit pregnant women and their babies

As the prevalence of maternal and fetal complications increases with advancing pregnancy beyond 39 weeks, induction of labor at 39 weeks has been proposed as a means to ensure optimal maternal and newborn health.

18h

Global experts gather in Montreal for opening of 11th World Stroke Congress

The 11th World Stroke Congress brings together leading international stroke experts and an unparalleled scientific program covering epidemiology, prevention, acute care, rehabilitation and recovery in hundreds of sessions and oral posters. Congress is attended by close to 2,500 stroke professionals, researchers, policy makers, survivors and caregivers from around the world.

18h

Are microplastics in the environment truly harmful?

Investigators who analyzed the published literature have found significant gaps in our understanding of the effects of microplastics — plastic particles less than 5mm in size — in the environment.

18h

Mindfulness-based program may help reduce stress in infertile women

An eight-week mindfulness-based program was effective for reducing stress and depressive symptoms while increasing general well-being in a study of infertile women.

18h

Study examines aspects of conscientious objection among nurses

One-on-one interviews with eight nurses in Ontario revealed that nurses making conscientious objections to ethically relevant policies lack concrete supports and need protection in healthcare practice settings.

18h

Prescription opioid and benzodiazepine misuse linked with suicidal thoughts

Misuse of prescription opioids or benzodiazepines (such as Xanax) was associated with suicidal ideation in a study of US older adults.

18h

Many infertile men have undiagnosed prediabetes

In a study of 744 infertile men, prediabetes was found in 114 (15.4 percent) of participants.

18h

Psoriasis linked with need for cardiovascular interventions in patients with hypertension

Psoriasis is linked with increased risks of hypertension and cardiovascular disease, but its effect on the course of cardiovascular disease remains unknown.

18h

Participating in sports during childhood may have long-term benefits for bone health

Participation in organized sport during childhood and adolescence is associated with bone mass at 20 years of age, according to a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study.

18h

Many seemingly healthy children show signs of metabolic problems

More than a quarter of otherwise healthy 6-year-old children may have metabolic risk factors that put them at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, according to results from an Acta Paediatrica study.

18h

Does weight loss before surgery provide benefits?

For obese and overweight patients, it is common for various surgical procedures to be deferred until they have lost weight through diet and exercise.

18h

Study examines factors linked with opioid misuse among university students

In a survey-based study of 9,449 university students at a large, public Midwestern university, misusers of prescription opioid medications were more likely to live off campus, have a lower grade point average, and exhibit increased impulsivity.

18h

Novel antidepressant may improve sleep in patients with depression

In a study of 15 patients affected by major depressive disorder and complaining of insomnia, initiating treatment with vortioxetine for their depressive symptoms led to significant improvements in subjective sleep quality and daytime sleepiness.

18h

Childhood abuse linked to increased arthritis risk in adulthood

In a survey-based study of 21,889 adults in Canada, severe and/or frequent physical abuse during childhood and frequent childhood exposure to intimate partner violence were linked with higher risks or arthritis during adulthood arthritis, even after controlling for a range of factors.

18h

African-American men's health disparities: Research, practice, and policy implications

The burden of risk factors for chronic disease is substantially higher in black men compared with their white counterparts, including a higher prevalence of obesity and hypertension. The Center for Healthy African American Men through Partnerships (CHAAMPS) presents results from several studies that pinpoint some of the issues and propose strategies to solve these in a special supplement to the Am

18h

The impact of microplastics on the environment unclear, study suggests

A review of more than 300 global studies has revealed a large 'mismatch' in the types of microplastics measured in the environment to those tested for effects in the laboratory.

18h

Supermassive black holes and supercomputers

The universe's deep past is beyond the reach of even the mighty Hubble Space Telescope. But a new review published in Frontiers in Astronomy and Space Sciences explains how creation of the first stars and galaxies is nevertheless being mapped in detail, with the aid of computer simulations and theoretical models — and how a new generation of supercomputers and software is being built that will fi

18h

Ian Kiernan: The man who wanted to clean up the world

Ian Kiernan's iconic anti-litter campaign, begun in Australia in the 1980s, became a global success.

18h

Researchers reveal the story of the oldest stars and galaxies, compiled from 20 years of simulating the early universe

The Big Bang has captured our imagination like no other theory in science: the magnificent, explosive birth of our Universe. But do you know what came next?

18h

Antiterror-blokering af hjemmesider skulle forhindre propaganda: bliver slet ikke brugt

Antallet af hjemmesider der er blokeret af myndighederne vokser støt og roligt, men ingen er blokeret på grund af mistanke om terrorpropaganda, som en antiradikaleringspakke ellers var designet til.

19h

Analyse: Sådan strikker regeringen sit vigtigste våben i ny klimaplan sammen ved skrivebordet

Hæng med, når vi dykker ned i detaljerne om, hvordan kulstofoptag i jord og skov, kaldet LULUCF, beregnes, og når vi forklarer, hvorfor den beregning næppe kommer klimaet til gode.

19h

Largest autism sequencing study to date yields 102 genes associated with ASD

In the largest genetic sequencing study of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to date, researchers have identified 102 genes associated with ASD, and report significant progress toward teasing apart the genes associated with ASD from those associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay, conditions between which there is often overlap. The findings were presented at the American Societ

21h

Controlling organic semiconductor band gaps by electron-acceptor fluorination

Osaka researchers synthesized a fluorinated electron-acceptor for use in organic semiconductors. The high electronegativity of the fluorine substituents enhanced the electron-accepting properties of the widely used electron-acceptor. The power conversion efficiency of a thin film solar cell based on the fluorinated product was shown to be significantly higher than that of a cell containing an unmo

22h

A long walk: New insight into history of dogs and humans

A study of ancient dog DNA shows man's best friend has been at our side for at least 9,000 years.

22h

The Atlantic Daily: Is It Still Worth It?

What We’re Following To the Border: A group of around 2,000 migrants are heading toward the U.S.-Mexico border from Honduras, fleeing gangs, death threats, rape, and domestic violence. The U.S. government has tried deterrence policies—from family detention under President Barack Obama to recent family separations under President Donald Trump —before. How effective are policies that don’t consider

23h

Male birds can be good singers or good looking, but not both

The prettier the bird, the worse it sings. A study of over 500 species has revealed that birds evolve to attract mates in one of two ways, and don’t combine them

23h

Special coating gives condoms self-lubricating powers

A polymer coating turns condoms slippery once it comes in contact with body fluids – and it doesn’t dry out

23h

Self-lubricating condom design may encourage safe sex

Slippery-when-wet concept may raise comfort and outlast couples’ stamina, say scientists Condoms could be set for a makeover that might not only boost couples’ sex lives but encourage safe sex, according to researchers. Experts say a big-turn off for condom use is a lack of lubrication: current latex condoms are relatively rough, which can lead to breakage and discomfort, while commercial lubrica

23h

What Does Elizabeth Warren's 'Native' Ancestry Mean?

Sen. Elizabeth Warren's DNA test results indicate she has Native American ancestry. But what does that really mean?

23h

Why Life Expectancy in 2040 Could Be Lower Than It Is Today

Life expectancy is expected to rise in 2040, under most circumstances

23h

Spain to beat Japan in world life expectancy league table for 2040

Mediterranean lifestyle takes effect in Spain but US continues to drop down table People in Spain are predicted to have the longest life expectancy in the world by 2040 – beating Japan into second place – and much of the reason is to do with the way they eat, according to the authors of the most comprehensive study of the global burden of disease. In the years to come, the biggest threats to our

23h

A mysterious polio-like disease has sickened as many as 127 people in the U.S.

Medical experts are trying to trace the cause of 62 confirmed cases of acute flaccid myelitis this year.

23h

'Terrorism does not terrorize' claims new study

The impact of terrorist events on mental wellbeing may be less significant than we are led to believe, argue the authors of a significant new study published today in The Lancet Psychiatry.

23h

How healthy will we be in 2040?

A new scientific study of forecasts and alternative scenarios for life expectancy and major causes of death in 2040 shows all countries are likely to experience at least a slight increase in lifespans. In contrast, one scenario finds nearly half of all nations could face lower life expectancies.

23h

Mount St. Helens Eruption: Facts & Information

Picturesque Mount St. Helens erupted on May 18, 1980 and remains the most destructive example of volcanic activity in the United States.

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Jack Dorsey on Twitter's Role in Free Speech and Filter BubblesJack Dorsey Twitter

The Twitter CEO talks with WIRED Editor-in-Chief Nicholas Thompson about how the social media service is different today than 12 years ago.

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Wildlife photography prize goes to stunning picture of golden monkeys

Hellbenders, vampire finches, and mud-daubers were among animals depicted in winning photographs in the 2018 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition

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Here's what's devastating Puerto Rico's insect populations—and the animals that eat them

Environment The effects spell peril for the entire food web. New findings published Monday illustrate how insect and other arthropod populations in the rain forests of Puerto Rico have declined 60-fold over the last four decades.

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11 Fascinating Facts About Our Milky Way Galaxy

We should all get to know our galactic home better.

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Gazing monkeys image wins

Two snub-nosed monkeys sitting on a stone is the top shot at Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2018.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Stormy Chaser

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In a pair of tweets, President Donald Trump said Saudi Arabia's crown prince Mohammed bin Salman “totally denied any knowledge” of what happened to journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Istanbul October 2. Secretary

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What I Loved About Paul Allen

Paul Allen, one of my oldest friends and the first business partner I ever had, died yesterday. I want to extend my condolences to his sister, Jody; his extended family; and his many friends and colleagues around the world. I met Paul when I was in seventh grade, and it changed my life. I looked up to him right away. He was two years ahead of me in school, really tall, and proved to be a genius w

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Get ready for a lot more facial recognition at the airport

Technology The TSA knows our phones have made us more comfortable with biometric tech. The TSA outlined their plans for moving forward with biometric security at airports.

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Netflix surges on user gains, strong profits

Netflix reported Tuesday a strong jump in profits and better-than-expected growth in users in the past quarter, sparking a rally in shares of the streaming television market leader.

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Google to charge for apps on Android phones in Europe

Google plans to start charging smartphone makers to pre-install apps like Gmail, YouTube and Google Maps on Android handsets sold in Europe, a response to a record $5 billion antitrust fine imposed by the European Union.

1d

Just how blind are bats? Color vision gene study examines key sensory tradeoffs

Could bats' cave-dwelling nocturnal habits over eons enhanced their echolocation acoustic abilities, but also spurred their loss of vision?

1d

Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on large mammals in Yellowstone National Park, conducted by University of Alberta ecologist Mark Boyce.

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Lymphatic system, key player in human health

Defects in the lymphatic system have been linked to a wide range of health consequences, but new findings of how the system works could lead to future therapies.

1d

New reservoir computer marks first-ever microelectromechanical neural network application

A group of researchers reports the construction of the first reservoir computing device built with a microelectromechanical system. The neural network exploits the nonlinear dynamics of a microscale silicon beam to perform its calculations. The group's work looks to create devices that can act simultaneously as a sensor and a computer using a fraction of the energy a normal computer would use.

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A bad influence: Interplay between tumor cells and immune cells

Research has yielded new insights into the environment surrounding different types of lung tumors, and described how these complex cell ecosystems may in turn ultimately affect response to treatment.

1d

Automated system identifies dense tissue, a risk factor for breast cancer, in mammograms

Researchers have developed an automated model that assesses dense breast tissue in mammograms — which is an independent risk factor for breast cancer — as reliably as expert radiologists. This marks the first time a deep-learning model of its kind has successfully been used in a clinic on real patients, according to the researchers. With broad implementation, the researchers hope the model can h

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How communication among cells affects development of multicellular tissue

Using a combination of computational modeling and experimental techniques, a research team has developed new information about how intercellular communication affects the differentiation of an embryonic stem cell colony over time.

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New understanding of Mekong River incision

An international team of earth scientists has linked the establishment of the Mekong River to a period of major intensification of the Asian monsoon during the middle Miocene, about 17 million years ago, findings that supplant the assumption that the river incised in response to tectonic causes. Their findings are the subject of a paper published in Nature Geoscience on Oct. 15.

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Can a unified path for development and conservation lead to a better future?

The U.S. city of Louisville, Kentucky isn't known as a hotbed of environmental action and innovation, but that could change as it has recently become home to a first-of-its-kind collaboration between environmentalists, city leaders and public health professionals. The Green Heart Project, funded in part by the United States National Institutes of Health, will plant trees in neighborhoods throughou

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Researchers develop new method to address deep-seated biases in science, starting with birds

New UMBC research is helping dismantle gender and publication biases in science. A team of researchers working across disciplines has developed a new statistical technique to understand similarity, rather than difference, in the natural world. With this new technique, they've determined that among Eastern Bluebirds the structure of songs female birds sing is statistically indistinguishable from so

1d

Antarctic ice shelf 'sings' as winds whip across its surface

Winds blowing across snow dunes on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf cause the massive ice slab's surface to vibrate, producing a near-constant set of seismic "tones" scientists could potentially use to monitor changes in the ice shelf from afar, according to new research.

1d

Just how blind are bats? Color vision gene study examines key sensory tradeoffs

Could bats' cave-dwelling nocturnal habits over eons enhanced their echolocation acoustic abilities, but also spurred their loss of vision?A new study led by Bruno Simões, Emma Teeling and colleagues has examined this question in the evolution of color vision genes across a large and diverse group of bat species.

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Loss of a microRNA molecule boosts rice production

Rice, one of the world's biggest staples, has fed humanity for thousands of years. A new study links the loss of a microRNA molecule to several of the yield-related traits associated with domestication of the indica variety of rice. In addition to providing insight into the origin of rice as we know it, this work suggests creative strategies to increase grain yield in an age when population growth

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Factors linked with wellbeing and medication adherence in young adults with kidney failure

In a study of young adults with kidney failure, poor wellbeing and lower medication adherence were both associated with psychological morbidity. Dialysis treatment (vs. kidney transplantation) was associated with poorer wellbeing and medication adherence.

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Renewable energy is common ground for Democrats and Republicans

As the battle lines are drawn for next month's hotly contested midterm elections, some Americans may be comforted to know there is at least one area of common ground for Democrats and Republicans.

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New understanding of Mekong River incision

An international team of earth scientists has linked the establishment of the Mekong River to a period of major intensification of the Asian monsoon during the middle Miocene, about 17 million years ago, findings that supplant the assumption that the river incised in response to tectonic causes.

1d

New method to address deep-seated biases in science

A new statistical method that tests for equivalence, rather than difference, has a role to play in dismantling gender and publication biases in science. The authors believe the technique has broad applicability across disciplines and can help remove publication bias against "negative results," opening the door to a broader investigation of natural phenomena.

1d

Research assesses geographic distribution of new antibiotics following market introduction

New study finds that between 1999 and 2014, only 25 new antibiotics entered the global market. The majority of antibiotics released in this time period originated from Japanese or US companies and were launched in Japan or the US. Of the 25 antibiotics, 18 treat community-acquired respiratory infections, 14 treat skin infections, and 12 treat urinary infections. Half treat infections caused by res

1d

Modifiable dementia risk factor in older adults identified

Stiffness of the aorta — more so than blood pressure or subclinical brain disease — is a key risk factor for dementia. Since aortic stiffness can be reduced by medication and healthy lifestyle changes, these results suggest that people can still lower their dementia risk well into old age.

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New memristor boosts accuracy and efficiency for neural networks on an atomic scale

Hardware that mimics the neural circuitry of the brain requires building blocks that can adjust how they synapse. One such approach, called memristors, uses current resistance to store this information. New work looks to overcome reliability issues in these devices by scaling memristors to the atomic level. Researchers demonstrated a new type of compound synapse that can achieve synaptic weight pr

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Age-related increase in estrogen may cause common men's hernia

An age-related increase in estrogen may be the culprit behind inguinal hernias, a condition common among elderly men that often requires corrective surgery. Men could be treated with hormone inhibitor to strengthen muscle, the researcher suggests.

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Diets rich in fish oil could slow the spread and growth of breast cancer cells

Omega-3 fatty acids, such as those typically contained in fish oil, may suppress the growth and spread of breast cancer cells in mice.

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Polio: Environmental monitoring will be key as world reaches global eradication

Robust environmental monitoring should be used as the world approaches global eradication of polio, say researchers who recently studied the epidemiology of the 2013 silent polio outbreak in Rahat, Israel.

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Loss of a microRNA molecule boosts rice production

The wild rice consumed by our Neolithic ancestors was very different from the domesticated rice eaten today. Although it is unclear when humans first started farming rice, the oldest paddy fields—in the lower Yangzi River Valley—date back to 4000 BC. During its long history of cultivation, rice plants with traits that reduce yield or impede harvest (e.g., grain shattering) were weeded out, whereas

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In Fraud Detection, Everything You Do Online and Off Is a Clue

The breakneck speed of emerging technology and the old age of the Constitution make for a number of legislative idiosyncrasies. For example, if a tax agency suspected you of filing fraudulent claims, it would be illegal under the Fourth Amendment for an agent to bug your car with a GPS tracker and follow your movements. But it would be entirely legal for the agent to take pictures of your license

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A cartography of consciousness – researchers map where subjective feelings are located in the body

"How do you feel?" is a simple and commonly asked question that belies the complex nature of our conscious experiences. The feelings and emotions we experience daily consist of bodily sensations, often accompanied by some kind of thought process, yet we still know very little about exactly how these different aspects relate to one another, or about how such experiences are organised in the brain.

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Stephen Hawking: "There is no God. No one directs the universe."

Hawking's final book is geared toward a popular audience. Each of the book's 10 chapters is posed as a question, such as "How did it all begin?" Hawking claims there is no God, time travel could be possible and intelligent aliens exist. The final book from Stephen Hawking, the late theoretical physicist and cosmologist, was released Tuesday under the title Brief Answers to the Big Questions . Haw

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800 hiring managers reveal their job search tips

800 hiring managers reveal their preferences in a survey by NetQuote. Infographics help unearth the worst words to use in an interview, most important questions, and ideal resume length. Figuring out how to present yourself just got easier. Congratulations. You got the interview. You've already done better than all of the other job applicants whose piles of resumes have lead nowhere. But watch ou

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Huge Arthropod Declines Documented in Puerto Rican Rainforest

The study authors attribute the decreases to climate change.

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Ice Fishing with Jane and Atz Lee Kilcher | Alaska: The Last Frontier

With winter coming to a close, Jane and Atz Lee hope some ice fishing will bring them food before all the fish are gone. Catch an All New ALASKA: THE LAST FRONTIER Sundays 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaska: The Last Frontier: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaska-the-last-frontier/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook

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Playing Many Sports as a Kid May Help Hockey Players Reach the Top

Playing Many Sports as a Kid May Help Hockey Players Reach the Top Research suggests most North American college and professional hockey players don't specialize as youngsters. Hockey.jpg Image credits: E's Adventures in Life via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Sports Tuesday, October 16, 2018 – 16:00 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Becoming a professional athlete takes drive, d

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Countries that ban corporal punishment have less youth violence

There is less fighting among young people in countries where there is a complete ban on all corporal punishment of children, according to a new study of more than 400,000 youth in 88 countries. The findings report 31 percent less physical fighting in young men and 42 percent less physical fighting in young women compared to countries where laws permit corporal punishment both at school and at hom

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What Trump Doesn’t Understand About the Central American Caravan

The images are the same: Men, women, and children huddling together, exhausted from hours of walking, finding any space to rest their eyes— cement floors in a shelter, grass in a parking lot . The stories are also familiar: Some fear gangs and death threats, others flee rape and domestic violence. Just months after a caravan of migrants bound for the U.S. gained national attention in April , anot

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Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sources or mating partners, depending on the degree of starvation and the need to mate.

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The science of sustainability

Can humans drive economic growth, meet rising demand for food, energy and water, and make significant environmental progress? The short answer is 'yes,' but it comes with several big 'ifs.' New research shows that we can put the world on a path to sustainability if we make significant changes within the next 10 years.

1d

Looking and listening for signals of navy test explosions off Florida coast

Underwater explosions detonated by the US Navy to test the sturdiness of ships' hulls have provided seismologists with a test opportunity of their own: how much can we know about an underwater explosion from the seismic and acoustic data it generates?

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For-profit nursing home residents more likely to be diagnosed with neglect issues

Residents receiving care in for-profit nursing homes are almost twice as likely to experience health issues caused by substandard care compared with clients living in not-for-profit facilities or in homes in the community, according to a new report in the journal Gerontology.

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Now's the time to get your kids the flu vaccine

Health An unvaccinated child is this flu season's first pediatric victim It’s only October, but we already have the first confirmed pediatric flu death. Florida health officials announced that an unvaccinated child died between September 30…

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Nicotine's Effects Passed On Through Generations of Mice

Male rodents exposed to nicotine had changes in sperm genome methylation and produced pups and grandpups with abnormal behavior.

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After Journalist Disappears, Companies Reconsider Saudi Investment

U.S. executives are pulling out of an investment conference scheduled to take place in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, next week — as controversy swirls around the disappearance of a missing Saudi journalist.

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NASA astronaut describes close call following failed launch

The NASA astronaut who survived last week's failed launch and emergency landing knew he needed to stay calm.

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A Mysterious Polio-Like Illness Is on the Rise in Kids. Scientists Don't Know Why.

Dozens of children across the United States have developed a rare polio-like illness, but the reason for this spike in cases remains a mystery, according to health officials.

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Book Excerpt from Adventures in Memory

In Chapter 6, “The Elephant’s Graveyard,” authors Hilde Øsby and Ylva Østby discuss groundbreaking research into the psychology of forgetting.

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Excavation Of Lithuania's Great Synagogue Highlights A 'Painful Page' From History

The synagogue is "very important," says an archaeologist, "not only for Jews but all people living in Lithuania." Just 3,000 Jews are left in the capital, compared to some 70,000 before World War II. (Image credit: Collection of Zusya Efron, Center for Jewish Art, Hebrew University of Jerusalem )

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What makes a good life in late life? Citizenship and justice in aging societies

A new Hastings Center Special Report calls on bioethics to 'broaden its lens' to improve the experience of aging and tackle problems of injustice affecting older adults and caregivers.

1d

All in the family: Kin of gravitational wave source discovered

According to new research, an object named GRB150101B — first reported as a gamma-ray burst in 2015 — shares remarkable similarities with GW170817, the neutron star merger discovered by LIGO and observed by multiple light-gathering telescopes in 2017. The new analysis suggests that these two separate objects may in fact be directly related.

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Are trigger warnings emotionally protective?

Do you like to see warnings about violent or other distressing content before watching a TV show or movie, or reading a book?

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Public opinion on GMOs might impact similar technologies in stores

Researchers have found that an individual's perception of genetically modified organisms might impact their judgments about whether or not nanotechnology-enabled products should be labeled in stores.

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Simple stickers may save lives of patients, athletes and lower medical costs

Researchers have created wearable medical electronic devices that someone can easily attach to their skin. The devices are made out of paper to lower the cost of personalized medicine.

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Environmental factors may trigger onset of multiple sclerosis

A new study finds that certain environmental conditions like salt concentrations and temperature may precipitate structural changes that take place in myelin sheaths in the onset of multiple sclerosis (MS). Myelin sheaths are the 'insulating tape' surrounding axons; axons carry electrical impulses in neurons.

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Infants are more likely to learn when with a peer

Researchers looked at the mechanisms involved in language learning among nine-month-olds, the youngest population known to be studied in relation to on-screen learning.

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Youth violence lower in countries with complete ban on corporal punishment

A study shows that in countries where there is a complete ban on all corporal punishment of children there is less fighting among young people.

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Your Phone Can Help Predict the Weather

Earth A network of smartphones can improve short-term weather forecasts. 10/08/2018 Marcus Woo, Contributor To read more…

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The key to a better malaria vaccine | Faith Osier

The malaria vaccine was invented more than a century ago — yet each year, hundreds of thousands of people still die from the disease. How can we improve this vital vaccine? In this informative talk, immunologist and TED Fellow Faith Osier shows how she's combining cutting-edge technology with century-old insights in the hopes of creating a new vaccine that eradicates malaria once and for all.

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The science of sustainability

Can humans drive economic growth, meet rising demand for food, energy and water, and make significant environmental progress? The short answer is 'yes,' but it comes with several big 'ifs.' New research shows that we can put the world on a path to sustainability if we make significant changes within the next 10 years.

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Syracuse geologists contribute to new understanding of Mekong River incision

An international team of earth scientists has linked the establishment of the Mekong River to a period of major intensification of the Asian monsoon during the middle Miocene, about 17 million years ago, findings that supplant the assumption that the river incised in response to tectonic causes.

1d

Why heart contractions are weaker in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common genetic heart disease in the US and affects an estimated 1 in 500 people around the world. A protein called myosin acts as the molecular motor which makes the muscles in the heart contract. An international team has discovered that in transgenic rabbits with the R403Q mutation,, individual myosin molecules and myofibrils (the basic rod-

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Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. This was discovered by scientists of the Friedrich Schiller University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, together with partners from Belgium. In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sourc

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Photos: Peer at Glittering Insect Eyes and Glowing Spider Babies in Prizewinning Photos

See the spectacular closeup views of very tiny things, in the winning images of the 2018 Nikon Small World microphotography contest.

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How the Small Intestine Works

The small intestine is about as big around as a middle finger, but it is about 22 feet (6.7 meters) long.

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Spangled Beetle Eye and Retinal 'Fireworks' Dazzle in Nikon Photo Contest

A beetle eye surrounded by glittery scales took the top prize in Nikon's annual microphotography challenge.

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This may be why some kids develop scoliosis

The body’s inability to fully utilize the essential dietary mineral manganese might be to blame for some cases of severe scoliosis, according to a new study. Nobody knows why some children’s backs start to curve to one side just as they hit puberty. Most children who receive a diagnosis for scoliosis, or curvature of the spine, have no known risk factors. The new study, however, finds that childr

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Here's What Astronauts See When a Rocket Aborts Mid-Flight

Nick Hague, the NASA astronaut onboard the Soyuz rocket that failed after takeoff last week, recounts his experience inside the capsule.

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After Paul Allen Co-Founded Microsoft, He Changed Brain Science Forever

In 2003, Paul Allen created an institute to figure out how the human brain works. That institute has already made contributions that may turn out to be part of his greatest legacy. (Image credit: Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images)

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Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on large mammals in Yellowstone National Park.

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Antarctic ice shelf 'sings' as winds whip across its surface

Winds blowing across snow dunes on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf cause the massive ice slab's surface to vibrate, producing a near-constant set of seismic 'tones' scientists could potentially use to monitor changes in the ice shelf from afar, according to new research.

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When it comes to smartphone lifespan, brand name matters more than hardware

The environmental costs of smartphones are often exacerbated by the relatively short lifespans of these globally ubiquitous devices. When it comes to extending the lifespan of these products, brand name might be more important than repairability, a new study finds.

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Father's nicotine use can cause cognitive problems in children and grandchildren

A father's exposure to nicotine may cause cognitive deficits in his children and even grandchildren, according to a new study. The effect, which was not caused by direct secondhand exposure, may be due to epigenetic changes in key genes in the father's sperm.

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Can forests save us from climate change?

Additional climate benefits through sustainable forest management will be modest and local rather than global. Even if Europe's forests are managed in such a way that their carbon sequestration is maximized it will not impact the climate significantly.

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Brain cells in a dish used to study genetic origins of schizophrenia

A study has established a new analytical method for investigating the complex genetic origins of mental illnesses using brain cells that are grown in a dish from human embryonic stem cells.

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US senator Elizabeth Warren faces backlash after indigenous DNA claim

President Donald Trump goes on the attack after the Cherokee nation dismisses Elizabeth Warren's claim.

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Seven Square Miles

Spending time looking at the varying and beautiful images of our planet from above in Google Earth, zooming in and out at dizzying rates, I thought it would be interesting to compare all of these vistas at a fixed scale—to see what New York City, Venice, or the Grand Canyon would look like from the same virtual height. So, the following images are snapshots from Google Earth, all rectangles of th

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Gene editing protects pigs from killer virus

Researchers have used gene editing to successfully breed pigs that are resistant to a deadly virus. Coronaviruses, highly contagious and widespread viruses known for their distinctive microscopic halos, are responsible for a variety of deadly intestinal diseases in livestock. One such virus, Transmissible Gastroenteritis Virus (TGEV), commonly infects the intestines of pigs, causing almost 100 pe

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RUDN chemist tested a new nanocatalyst for obtaining hydrogen

A chemist from RUDN was the first to use catalysts with ruthenium nanoparticles to obtain hydrogen under the influence of visible light and UV radiation. In the future, such catalysts may be used for large-scale production of hydrogen fuel under the influence of sunlight. The results of the study were published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.

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Hippocampus yields clues to treatment strategies for cognitive deficits in MS

'Recent advances in neuroimaging have greatly improved our understanding of the involvement of the hippocampus in MS,' said John DeLuca, PhD, at Kessler Foundation. 'Now we are aware of subregions with different levels of susceptibility to damage, for example, and the potential for hippocampal plasticity and neurogenesis. The challenge is to correlate these findings with clinical manifestations an

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Video monitoring of tuberculosis treatment effective in urban and rural areas

Researchers from University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with statewide collaborators, report that patients who recorded videos of themselves taking tuberculosis (TB) medications better adhered to treatment than patients who were observed in-person.

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Antarctic ice shelf 'sings' as winds whip across its surface

Winds blowing across snow dunes on Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf cause the massive ice slab's surface to vibrate, producing a near-constant set of seismic 'tones' scientists could potentially use to monitor changes in the ice shelf from afar, according to new research.

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New, durable catalyst for key fuel cell reaction may prove useful in eco-friendly vehicles

A new catalyst exceeds Department of Energy targets for performing the oxygen reduction reaction, a key step in generating an electric current in a hydrogen fuel cell.

1d

Climate models fail to simulate recent air-pressure changes over Greenland

Climatologists may be unable to accurately predict regional climate change over the North Atlantic because computer simulations have failed to include real data from the Greenland region over the last three decades — and it could lead to regional climate predictions for the UK and parts of Europe being inaccurate.

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Moving location of fruit and vegetables can lead to 15 percent sales increase

Moving location of fruit and vegetables in shops can lead to 15 percent sales increase. Sales increased without any further messaging or marketing. Research suggests a simple 'nudge' can lead to healthier diets for young adults. Findings based on data collected between 2012-17 in a real University campus grocery store.

1d

Infectious diarrhea spores survive high temperatures of hospital laundering

Washing contaminated hospital bedsheets in a commercial washing machine with industrial detergent at high disinfecting temperatures failed to remove all traces of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile), a bacteria that causes infectious diarrhea, suggesting that linens could be a source of infection among patients and even other hospitals, according to a new study.

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Exploring new spintronics device functionalities in graphene heterostructures

Graphene Flagship researchers have shown how heterostructures built from graphene and topological insulators have strong, proximity induced spin-orbit coupling which can form the basis of novel information processing technologies.

1d

Forest carbon stocks have been overestimated for 50 years

A formula used to calculate basic wood density has recently been corrected. Basic density is widely used to compute carbon storage by trees. Researchers estimate that the error in the initial formula resulted in an overestimation of forest carbon stocks, to the tune of almost 5 percent.

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Crisp climate

Ships are the lifeblood of global trade, but their fuel is highly polluting. What's the answer?

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Jeff Bezos defends spending billions on rockets over, say, poverty

The private space enterprise he founded will be testing even more in the near future, with $1 billion investment by Bezos each year He wants to be seen as "risk taking" and a "needle mover" Watch Blue Horizon's escape module test Jeff Bezos, the one making $150,000 a minute as CEO of Amazon, has announced that he plans to sink more money into his space company, Blue Origin , to the tune of $1 bil

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New policy brief highlights role of indigenous peoples in maintaining global food security

A new policy brief released today — World Food Day — highlights the link between recognizing community land rights and ensuring global food security and climate protection. The brief notes that the failure of governments around the world to recognize community land rights leaves community lands vulnerable to expropriation for large-scale agriculture, mining, or infrastructure, which typically be

1d

Letting nature take its course: Wolves in Yellowstone National Park

Since the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995, the park's ecosystem has become a deeply complex and heterogeneous system, aided by a strategy of minimal human intervention. The new study is a synthesis of 40 years of research on large mammals in Yellowstone National Park, conducted by University of Alberta ecologist Mark Boyce.

1d

UMBC researchers develop new method to address deep-seated biases in science

A new statistical method that tests for equivalence, rather than difference, has a role to play in dismantling gender and publication biases in science. The authors believe the technique has broad applicability across disciplines and can help remove publication bias against "negative results," opening the door to a broader investigation of natural phenomena. The paper includes an example of the te

1d

Renewable energy is common ground for Democrats and Republicans

While conservatives and liberals tend to disagree on many environmental issues, they both view the development of solar power and other forms of renewable energy as financially savvy and a step towards self-sufficiency.

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Population aging and decrease may have socioeconomic and environmental benefits

Environmental scientists argue that societies should embrace population aging and decrease. They cite multiple reports of the socioeconomic and environmental benefits of population aging, mortality-related decrease, and shrinking workforces due to retirement and maintain that, contrary to some economic analyses, costs associated with aging societies are manageable, while smaller populations make f

1d

Climate changes require better adaptation to drought

Europe's future climate will be characterized by more frequent heat waves and more widespread drought. Heat and drought will both challenge crop production, but drought in particular will be a problem — especially for spring sown crops such as maize.

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This RNA-based technique could make gene therapy more effective

Biological engineers have devised a way to regulate the expression of messenger RNA once it gets into cells, giving them more precise control over gene therapy treatments for cancer and other diseases.

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Satellite tech to create more effective, 'true' shark sanctuaries

When they first set out to follow grey reef sharks around the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), researchers intended to survey their movement in the protected waters there. What they found was a disturbing development for the Pacific island nation.

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Why Haven't We Found Aliens? Because We're Just Not Looking Hard Enough.

We still have a long way to go in the search for intelligent aliens.

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Archeological find changes date of Pompeii's destruction

Inscription suggests Mount Vesuvius erupted weeks later than previously thought A newly-discovered inscription at Pompeii proves the city was destroyed by Mount Vesuvius after 17 October AD79 and not on 24 August as previously thought. Archeologists recently discovered that a worker had inscribed the date of “the 16th day before the calends of November”, meaning 17 October, on a house at Pompeii,

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Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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