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Researchers confirm Earth's inner core is solid

A new study by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) could help us understand how our planet was formed.

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Here’s why NASA is working on a concept crewed mission to Venus

Space The upper atmosphere of Venus is surprisingly similar Earth. Today, Venus is unlikely to be a dream destination for aspiring space tourists.

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Dansk 14 kW-strømforsyning skal bringe sonder i kredsløb om Merkur

Danske Terma har leveret strøm og kontrolsoftware til Merkur-sonden BepiColombo, som sendes op i morgen tidlig.

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Regular exercise should be part of cancer care for all patients

Including exercise or sport as part of cancer care can significantly improve symptom management, quality of life and fitness during and after treatment, French researchers have concluded in two presentations to be reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich. Even among patients at highest risk of poor quality of life, exercise can make a difference.

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New research shows benefits of exercise for first time in advanced lung cancer

Most people with lung cancer are unaware of the benefits of regular exercise, yet new data show it can significantly reduce fatigue and improve well being. Results of two studies to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich underline the value of exercise, including in patients with advanced or metastatic lung cancer.

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Social vulnerability and medical skepticism top factors limiting adherence to screening

Social vulnerability showed to be a major limitation to participation in cancer screening for four tumors types – breast, cervical, colorectal and lung — according to the French nationwide observational survey, EDIFICE 6. Also, a disbelief in cancer test efficacy among target populations was highlighted as new indicator of the non-uptake of screening, according to results to be presented at the E

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Immunotherapy is safe and feasible in cancer patients treated for HIV, study suggests

Immunotherapy has been a major breakthrough in oncology — but little is known about its safety for HIV-positive cancer patients. A study to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich has now provided data to suggest that treatment with PD-1/PD-L-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors, which target the very system affected by the HIV virus, is feasible in this patient population for whom cancer is c

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Pregnancy possible after chemotherapy for breast cancer patients, but many no longer wish

Chemotherapy is known to have a negative impact on the reproductive potential of young breast cancer patients. Its effects on women's post-treatment fertility, however, are still poorly understood. A study to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, has confirmed that natural pregnancies are possible after chemotherapy but that survivors' desire to have children decreases greatly after tr

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Russian Trolls Are Still Playing Both Sides—Even With the Mueller Probe

The latest indictment against Russian trolls shows how they sowed division in the US on wedge issues, including the investigation into their activity.

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The US accuses Russia of meddling in upcoming electionsDoJ Russian P. Lakhta US

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Meddling: Now in 2018

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines The Justice Department charged a Russian woman for her participation in an online disinformation campaign aimed at interfering with the 2018 midterm elections . A caravan of migrants began crossing into Mexico after a brief confrontation with Mexican police that reportedly involved tear gas.

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Yes, you really can work yourself to death

Technology Stress and sleeplessness are surprisingly lethal. Tech companies and gig economy platforms love to boast sleepless nights and 100 hour weeks. But there’s a danger to working too much.

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Exquisitely Preserved Lungs from 120 Million Years Ago Stun Scientists Studying Early Bird

Ancient organs rarely fossilize, so paleontologists were stunned to find the incredibly well-preserved remains of a lung that belonged to bird from the dinosaur age, a new study finds.

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Merging mathematical and physical models toward building a more perfect flying vehicle

When designing flying vehicles, there are many aspects of which we can be certain but there are also many uncertainties. Most are random, and others are just not well understood. University of Illinois Professor Harry Hilton brought together several mathematical and physical theories to help look at problems in more unified ways and solve physical engineering problems.

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Oldest Brazilian human fossil Luzia found amid National Museum debris

Museum director Alexander Kellner said the fossil was broken and 80% of its pieces had been recovered One of the most prized possessions of Brazil’s National Museum has been found amid debris after a huge fire on 2 September sent the building up in flames . Related: Project to salvage images of collection lost in fire as Brazil mourns museum Continue reading…

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Monkeys do not start to resemble their parents before puberty

Researchers experienced human raters with digital images of rhesus macaques of different ages and asked them to identify related individuals. They found that although infant rhesus macaque faces are individually distinguishable, only just before they reach puberty can offspring be matched correctly to the faces of their parents.

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Federal Trade Commission Takes Action Against Stem Cell Clinics

The FTC, in its first crack down on the industry, gets two California companies selling unproven treatments to stop their false advertising and pay a fine.

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The world's largest organism is being eaten alive by deer

Environment His name is Pando and he’s very nice. The world's largest cloned forest—located in Fishlake National Forest in Utah—has been shrinking. In a new paper, researchers figured out that deer, and us humans, are…

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Einstein and the Incredible Hulk Now Have Their Own Constellations (But You'll Never See Them)

NASA added 21 new "constellations" to the sky, thanks to invisible gamma-ray light.

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Inside Facebook’s Stormy Debate Over 'Political Diversity'

Former Facebook engineer Brian Amerige accused the company of a “political monoculture that’s intolerant of different views," but says Republicans have received his message all wrong.

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UTA researchers find genomic evidence of rapid adaptation of invasive Burmese pythons in Florida

UTA researchers set out to determine whether pythons could have adapted to an extreme Florida freeze event in 2010. They generated data for dozens of samples before and after the freeze event. By scanning regions of the Burmese python genome, they identified parts of the genome that changed significantly between the two time periods, providing clear evidence of evolution occurring over a very shor

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Healthy diets linked to better outcomes in colorectal cancer

Colorectal cancer patients who followed healthy diets had a lower risk of death from colorectal cancer and all causes, even those who improved their diets after being diagnosed.

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Anti-inflammatory drug effective for treating lymphedema symptoms

Two early-stage clinical trials have shown that ketoprofen can improve skin damage in patients with lymphedema.

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Yes, Mega Millions just passed $1 billion. What does that look like?

The Mega Millions lottery just passed $1 billion for tonight's drawing. What does that even look like, when represented by various currencies? It takes just 6 numbers to win. You can only, however, purchase tickets up until 10:45 ET tonight. Here it is as represented by pallets of $100 bills It will be the second-largest lottery jackpot, after the Power Ball lottery of January 2016 that netted ne

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Number of American parents not vaccinating infants has quadrupled

The percentage of children under 2 years old who haven't received any vaccinations has quadrupled in the last 17 years. In 2016 in Europe there were 5,273 cases of measles. One year later that jumped to 21,315 cases. Discredited doctor Andrew Wakefield's false study linking vaccines and autism still influences parents, two decades later. None Health care should be a public right today, especially

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Scientists identify critical cancer immunity genes using new genetic barcoding technology

Mount Sinai Scientists developed a novel way to barcode and track different CRISPRs by utilizing synthetic proteins built from combinations of smaller proteins, called epitopes. By being able to mark each CRISPR with a unique identifier, the protein barcodes, or Pro-Codes for short, enable hundreds of CRISPRs to be used together to knockout a multitude of genes.

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Electronic medical records show promise in reducing unnecessary testing

Upon implementing electronic medical record-based interventions, Boston Medical Center reduced unnecessary diagnostic testing and increased the use of postoperative order sets.

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A new way to measure nearly nothing

NIST scientists have designed a vacuum gauge, based on ultracold trapped atoms, is small enough to deploy in commonly used vacuum chambers.

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iPhone XR: Where to Order, Best Prices (and 5 Cheap Alternatives)

The iPhone XR is now up for preorder and we have the details, along with a few affordable alternatives.

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Q&A: Some Plants Thrive in the Shadows

They don’t need sunlight because they are busy feeding on other organisms.

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Researchers discuss the role of evidence-based medicine in healthcare decision making

A special issue of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES)'s Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making explores the competing perspectives on evidence-based medicine, best practices, and the quality movement in healthcare.

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Learn about the Brain: Lesson Plans for Grades 6-8 Now Available

Photo: Shutterstock For teachers who want to incorporate lessons about the brain into their classrooms, we have new and exciting lesson plans available on our website, which can be downloaded for free. Geared towards grades 6-8, each lesson plan comes with a PowerPoint presentation and includes a hands-on activity to get students as involved as possible in learning about the brain. The first less

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This could be the fiercest Pacific hurricane season ever

Science The storms are far from over. While the Atlantic Hurricanes Florence and Michael have rightfully gotten most of our attention this season, climate conditions in the Pacific are churning out one storm…

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BepiColombo to Launch on Long Journey to MercuryBepiColombo Mercury

The European-Japanese spacecraft will be the third mission to the rocky planet closest to the sun.

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What is Pi?

Pi represents the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Pi is an irrational number that never ends; the decimals go on forever and ever.

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A Slow Trip To A Hot Planet: Spacecraft Poised For Mission To MercuryBepiColombo Mercury

The European Space Agency's BepiColombo will take seven years to reach the innermost planet in our solar system, where temperatures at the surface can reach 800 degrees Fahrenheit. (Image credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington via AP)

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What the Heck Is the Deal with This Weird, Square Iceberg?

A NASA photograph revealed an extremely weird-looking iceberg. A NASA scientist explained why.

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3D printers have 'fingerprints,' a discovery that could help trace 3D-printed guns

Like fingerprints, no 3D printer is exactly the same. That's the takeaway from a new study that describes what's believed to be the first accurate method for tracing a 3D-printed object to the machine it came from. The advancement could help law enforcement and intelligence agencies track the origin of 3D-printed guns, counterfeit products and other goods.

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Scientists grow functioning human neural networks in 3D from stem cells

A team of researchers has developed three-dimensional (3D) human tissue culture models for the central nervous system that mimic structural and functional features of the brain and demonstrate neural activity sustained over a period of many months. With the ability to populate a 3D matrix of silk protein and collagen with cells from patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and other

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Nanocages in the lab and in the computer: How DNA-based dendrimers transport nanoparticles

How to create nanocages, i.e., robust and stable objects with regular voids and tunable properties? Short segments of DNA molecules are perfect candidates for the controllable design of novel complex structures. Physicists investigated methodologies to synthesize DNA-based dendrimers in the lab and to predict their behavior using detailed computer simulations.

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Social media may help seniors in pain ward off depression

Using social media can reduce the negative health effects of curtailed social contact that comes as a consequence of pain, according to a new study. The findings are significant among an aging society where social isolation and loneliness are key determinants of well-being, says lead author Shannon Ang, a doctoral candidate at the University of Michigan’s sociology department and Institute for So

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To get people to pay their debts, appeal to their morality

Islamic credit-card users pay their debts when they receive reminders to do what’s right, a new study finds. “The Prophet (Peace and blessings be unto Him) says: ‘When Allah wishes good for someone, He bestows upon him the understanding of the Book’ (Imam al-Bukhari). Please pay your credit card balance at your earliest convenience. Call …” This isn’t research rooted in religion, but rather an ec

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Earth’s inner core is solid, 'J waves' suggest

A new study could help us understand how our planet was formed. Scientists report that their research shows that Earth's inner core is solid — a finding made possible by a new method for detecting shear waves, or 'J waves' in the inner core.

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Photos of the Week: Virtual Parish, Drone Tourism, Rock Santa

A royal visit to Australia, a “Cat Beauty Fest” in Turkey, the 182-meter-tall Statue of Unity in India, “Sculpture by the Sea” in Australia, artwork in Bangkok, a Napoleonic-battle reenactment in Spain, marijuana legalization in Canada, fall colors in Japan and Europe, Ironman championships in Hawaii, a Wushu Festival in China, and much more.

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MSU pioneers new course: Digital introduction to biology, evolution

Michigan State University researchers have improved an introductory biology class to make it more accessible for students not majoring in life sciences. The new course, 'Integrative Biology: From DNA to Populations,' features Avida-ED, a digital evolution software program that allows populations of digital organisms, aka Avidians, to undergo actual, not simulated, evolutionary change.

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Insight into how nanoparticles interact with biological systems

Personal electronic devices are a growing source of the world's electronic waste. Many of these products use nanomaterials, but little is known about how nanoparticles interact with the environment. Now chemists have discovered that when certain coated nanoparticles interact with living organisms it results in new properties that cause the nanoparticles to become sticky. Nanoparticles with 5-nanom

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Study points to new method to deliver drugs to the brain

Researchers have discovered a potentially new approach to deliver therapeutics more effectively to the brain. The research could have implications for the treatment of a wide range of diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, ALS, and brain cancer.

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Three artificial intelligence and tech tools trying to boost people's mental health

Technology Apps and software that aim to help you feel better. From chatbots to call centers, AI and other tech is focusing on our emotions.

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Making the case for a comprehensive national registry for pediatric CKD

In a commentary published by the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Sun-Young Ahn, M.D., and Marva Moxey-Mims, M.D., explain that pediatric chronic kidney disease can contribute to growth failure, developmental and neurocognitive defects, and impaired cardiovascular health.

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Canine Virus, Parasites Kill 24 Endangered Lions in India

Diseases threaten the pride's existence and wildlife experts recommend relocating some lions to a sanctuary, but Gujarat state has refused.

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Ancient Andeans Had Novel Genetic Advantages to Adapt to Altitude

Unlike other populations living at high altitude, Andeans didn’t rely on hypoxia-related genes.

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Pushing the (extra cold) frontiers of superconducting science

Scientists have developed a method to measure magnetic properties of superconducting and magnetic materials that exhibit unusual quantum behavior at very low temperatures in high magnetic fields.

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New cell movement process key to understanding and repairing facial malformations

The embryonic stem cells that form facial features, called neural crest cells, use an unexpected mechanism of moving from the back of the head to the front to populate the face, finds a new study.

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Allergy research: Test predicts outcome of hay fever therapies

Allergen-specific immunotherapy can considerably improve everyday life for allergy sufferers. It is unclear, however, what exactly happens during this treatment. A team investigated the processes taking place in the body over the course of a three-year allergen-specific immunotherapy. The researchers found clues as to why the allergy immunization takes so long and how the chances of success can be

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Advanced sequencing technology provides new insights into human mitochondrial diseases

Researchers have for the first time been able to investigate the abundance and methyl modifications of all mitochondrial tRNAs in patients suffering from one of the most common inherited mitochondrial tRNA mutations. The analysis pipeline revealed quantitative changes that had dramatic effects on protein synthesis within mitochondria.

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A little bit of skin cream is OK before radiation

Advances in radiation therapy have made warnings about skin cream increasing the radiation delivered at the skin surface obsolete, according to new research. Radiation therapy for different kinds of cancer can damage the skin, so patients undergoing such treatment often use creams or ointments to help relieve any resulting pain and inflammation. Radiation oncologists, however, have long told pati

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Geneticists Criticize Use of Science by White Nationalists to Justify ‘Racial Purity’

In a statement, the American Society of Human Genetics said “there can be no genetics-based support of claiming one group as superior to another.”

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What Is Inflammation?

Inflammation is the body's response to injury. It works to help heal wounds, but it can also play a role in some chronic diseases.

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‘Master switches’ could make plant cell walls extra useful

New research shows how scientists could manipulate plant walls in the future to change the way we produce biofuels, bioplastics, and other biomaterials Plants produce walls on a daily basis and these walls support many essential aspects of life. In the search for sustainable materials, these day-to-day structures of plants could help replace polluting materials and plastics with ones that are les

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Cy Adler, Pied Piper of Manhattan’s Piers, Is Dead at 91

Mr. Adler, an environmentalist, started the Great Saunter, an annual 32-mile walk that reawakens New York City residents to the greenbelt that encircles them.

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Preparing future explorers for a return to the Moon

To train future explorers to support NASA's mission to return to the Moon's surface, scientists use similar environments found on the Earth. Last week, a group of domestic and international students traveled to Barringer Meteorite Crater, Arizona (aka Meteor Crater) to learn necessary skills that could help NASA implement its plans for human and robotic missions to the lunar surface.

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Spain backs new tax on internet giants in budget plan

Spain's socialist government approved Friday a new tax on big internet companies as part of its 2019 budget, hoping to raise up to 1.2 billion euros ($1.4 billion) next year.

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The Republican Party Moves Beyond Hypocrisy

“Democrats have become the party of crime,” President Donald Trump declared on Thursday night at a rally in Missoula, Montana. At the same rally, Trump praised as “my kind of guy” a member of Congress who violently attacked a reporter, choked him, and then lied to the police about his crime. Just a week before, Trump had praised his party as the party of “law and order and justice.” And only a we

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Turkey Is Treating the Khashoggi Affair Like It’s Must-See TV

Most Americans don’t know it, but Turks are masters of serialized television. Long before Netflix, Hulu, and the addictive golden-age TV shows that dominate the small screen now, Turks were pumping out popular programs dubbed or subtitled in Arabic, Persian, Spanish, Russian, and English. Set the story at exotic locales, like posh Istanbul villas with stunning views. Throw in an ill-fated romance

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Nu begynder syv år lang mission til Merkur: Dansk teknologi rejser med

Det bliver en ekstra krævende tur, siger en af hovedpersonerne bag dansk teknologi, som skal sætte strøm på rejsen til solsystemets inderste, brandvarme planet.

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The Noma Guide to Fermentation: A Cure for Kitchen Boredom

A new cookbook from the chefs at the famed Copenhagen restaurant explores all things pickled, cured, brined, and fermented.

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Khashoggi crisis shines light on Saudi ties to Silicon ValleyJamal Khashoggi SA

The crisis surrounding the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, and concerns that he may have been killed in the Saudi consulate in Turkey, has highlighted the role of the Middle East kingdom in the US economy, especially in Silicon Valley.

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New drug could sustain oxygen-starved hearts

In new studies conducted at UC San Francisco, a novel oxygen-delivery therapeutic restored the function of oxygen-starved heart tissue in an animal model of global hypoxia. Unlike its experimental predecessors, the new drug does not appear to cause systemic side effects or overcorrect with excessive blood oxygenation, which can itself be toxic. Instead, the new drug delivers its precious oxygen ca

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Daimler cuts 2018 profit forecast on diesel woes

German luxury automaker Daimler on Friday again cut its profit outlook for 2018, warning that costs related to polluting diesel engines would drag down earnings.

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US existing home sales drop in September as mortgage rates rise

With mortgage rates on the rise, sales of US existing homes dropped sharply last month to the lowest rate in three years, the National Association of Realtors said Friday.

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12-pound lunar meteorite sells for more than $600,000

A 12-pound (5.5 kilogram) chunk of the moon that fell to the Earth as a lunar meteorite has been sold at auction for more than $600,000.

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People who commute through natural environments daily report better mental health

People who commute through natural environments report better mental health. This is the main conclusion of a research based on questionnaires answered by nearly 3,600 participants from four European cities.

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Female chimpanzees know which males are most likely to kill their babies

Researchers examined the behavior of female chimpanzees in the Budongo Forest, Uganda, where chimpanzees (at least in the study community) are particularly prone to committing and suffering infanticide.

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New therapies pack a triple-drug punch to treat cystic fibrosis

In testing, a triple-drug therapy significantly improved lung function in cystic fibrosis patients with the most common disease-causing mutation.

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PTSD symptoms improve when patient chooses form of treatment, study shows

A study led by the University of Washington is the first large-scale trial of hundreds of PTSD patients, including veterans and survivors of sexual assault, to measure whether patient preference in the course of treatment impacts the effectiveness of a type of cognitive behavioral therapy and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, a type of antidepressant often prescribed for PTSD.

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Sleep apnea more deadly when patients experience short interrupted breaths

Patients with sleep apnea who have short interruptions in breathing while they sleep are at higher risk for death than those with longer interruptions, according to a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. The finding could help doctors better prevent long-term mortality associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

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Mike Pompeo’s Worldview? Do As Trump Does.

Even when they are thousands of miles apart, President Donald Trump and his secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, act in symbiosis. As Trump speculated from Washington this week that “rogue killers” rather than Saudi leaders might have targeted the missing Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, Pompeo smiled with the crown prince in Riyadh and sidestepped mounting evidence that Khashoggi was murdered by th

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This Hunk of Metal Fell From Space and Landed in California

Iridium 70 fell out of orbit Oct. 10. A few days later, one of its fuel tanks caused a stir in central California.

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Producing defectless metal crystals of unprecedented size

Researchers have developed a new method to convert inexpensive polycrystalline metal foils to single crystals with superior properties. It is expected that these materials will find many uses in science and technology.

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Polluted city neighborhoods are bad news for asthmatic children

Children with asthma who grow up in a New York City neighborhood where air pollution is prevalent need emergency medical treatment more often than asthmatics in less polluted areas.

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Computer Security: Preventing attacks made possible by Meltdown/Spectre

Researchers have developed a new security system that has been shown to outperform Intel's own approach at preventing so-called 'timing attacks' made possible by vulnerabilities like Meltdown and Spectre.

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Outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis undetected by standard tests

Amid a plan announced by the United Nations to eradicate tuberculosis by 2030, a new study has revealed the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of the disease which go undetected by WHO-endorsed tests.

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‘Fingerprints’ could trace 3D-printed guns to their source

Scientists have figured out how to accurately trace a 3D-printed object to the machine it came from. The advancement, which the researchers call PrinTracker, could ultimately help law enforcement and intelligence agencies track the origin of 3D-printed guns, counterfeit products, and other goods. “3D printing has many wonderful uses, but it’s also a counterfeiter’s dream. Even more concerning, it

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Asteroid mining might actually be better for the environment

The first study of its environmental impact suggests that extracting resources such as platinum from asteroids might be cleaner than doing so on Earth.

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Here's How Researchers Made Mice with 2 Dads

Mice with two dads are harder to make than mice with two moms.

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EPA Postpones Decision on Rule to Restrict Scientific Input

It will be more than a year before the agency institutes or rejects the controversial changes proposed by former EPA head Scott Pruitt.

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In a first, scientists spot what may be lungs in an ancient bird fossil

Possible traces of lungs preserved with a 120-million-year-old bird fossil could represent a respiratory system similar to that of modern birds.

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This part of the brain may shape our food choices

Researchers have discovered a brain region strongly connected to food preference decisions that help us select what to heap on our plates at potluck dinners or holiday buffets. Working with rats, the researchers found robust neural activity related to food choice in a previously overlooked part of the brain. The finding suggests this brain area could be key to developing therapies and treatments

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Can You Ever Forgive Me? Is a Perfect Showcase for Melissa McCarthy

The early-1990s Manhattan of Can You Ever Forgive Me? is a far cry from the stressful, bustling tourist trap that it is today. The director Marielle Heller has an eye for period details, which helped the chaotic vibe of mid-’70s San Francisco pop in her debut film, The Diary of a Teenage Girl . But the bygone New York spirit that Heller has captured so well in this follow-up is the sense of lonel

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A Trove of Facebook Data Is a Spammer's Dream and Your Nightmare

A new report suggests that spammers, not nation states, may have been behind the Facebook hack. That could be even worse news.

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Good spatial memory? You're likely to be good at identifying smells too

People who have better spatial memory are also better at identifying odors, according to a study published this week in Nature Communications. The study builds on a recent theory that the main reason that a sense of smell evolved was to aid in navigation, since most animals rely primarily on smell to find food and avoid predators.

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Scientists Are Learning the Power of Outreach

Progress in conveying science to the public needs to continue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Video doorbell firm Ring says its devices slash crime—but the evidence looks flimsy

Amazon paid $1 billion for the security company. Our data analysis questions the claims that purchase was based on.

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Relationship hack: Why class clowns make better partners

New research looks at how partners' attitudes toward humor affects the overall quality of a relationship. Out of the three basic types of people, people who love to be laughed at made for better partners. Fine-tuning your sense of humor might be the secret to a healthy, happy, and committed relationship. None It should come as no surprise that we tend to look for a sense of humor in our romantic

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42 percent of new cancer patients lose their life savings

62 percent of cancer patients report being in debt due to their treatment. 55 percent accrue at least $10,000 in debt, while 3 percent file for bankruptcy. Cancer costs exceed $80 billion in America each year. None Rebecca Meyer was diagnosed with glioblastoma when she was 5 years old. She fought bravely for 10 months before dying on her 6th birthday. The total cost of of her treatments during th

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Radio Atlantic: The Politics of Ancestry

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Senator Elizabeth Warren recently shared results of a genetic analysis to back up her family’s story of Cherokee ancestry, hoping to blunt a favorite Republican attack line. The move backfired. A DNA result does not confer a Cherokee heritage. And in general, efforts to link our genetics with our ethnic or cultural ide

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Trump Hits the Panic Button

President Donald Trump is never more comfortable than when attacking those who cannot respond in kind. Whether rocketing to victory in the Republican presidential primary by scapegoating religious and ethnic minorities who lacked sufficient representation in the GOP to impose a political price , attacking survivors of sexual assault , smearing refugees , separating immigrant children from their p

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Letters: ‘What Hope Does an Ordinary Black Man Have?’

What the Black Men Who Identify With Brett Kavanaugh Are Missing Many black men, Jemele Hill observed last week, see themselves in the embattled Supreme Court justice. But, she argued, when they do so, they’re not seeing the bigger picture. These men have “every right to be frustrated,” she wrote, “but that’s not because they’ve so often been treated like Kavanaugh—it’s because they so rarely hav

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Father's nicotine exposure may cause problems in future generations of his children

A new Florida State University College of Medicine study in mice produced results that suggest nicotine exposure in men could lead to cognitive deficits in their children and grandchildren. Further studies will be required to know if the same outcomes seen in mice would apply to humans.

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How do pelvic floor muscle exercises reduce overactive bladder symptoms?

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common form of urinary incontinence that is widely treated with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training. A new laboratory study lends insights into how PFM training works: by reducing contractions of the detrusor muscle of the bladder, reports the American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, the official journal of the?Association of Academic Physiatrists. The j

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Recent survey provides updated national estimate of doctors' financial ties to industry

Since 2013, gifts and payments to doctors by pharmaceutical and medical device companies have been publicly reported. Some medical centers, employers, and states have banned or restricted detailing visits, physician payments or gifts. In order to better understand the effects of these changes, a team of researchers from Harvard Medical School, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical

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Cleveland Clinic shows better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life

Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic fitness. Researchers retrospectively studied 122,007 patients who underwent exercise treadmill testing at Cleveland Clinic between Jan. 1, 1991, and Dec. 31, 2014, to measure all-cause mortality relating to the benefits of exercise and fitness. The paper was p

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When and how did dinosaurs go extinct?

Science It's asteroid versus volcano. Scientists still debate what killed off all the dinosaurs 66 million years ago. Was it an asteroid strike, or a giant volcanic eruption?

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Patients at risk of coverage denial

Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital analyzed a national sample of Emergency Department visits between 2011-15 to determine what proportion of them could be denied coverage if commercial insurers across the US adopted the policy of a large national insurer, Anthem Inc., to potentially deny coverage, after the visit, based on ED discharge diagnoses.

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Link found between chronic inflammation and risk for Alzheimer's disease

While it is widely shown that possessing the ApoE4 gene is the major genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), not all ApoE4 carriers develop AD. For the first time, researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have shown that ApoE4 linked with chronic inflammation dramatically increases the risk for AD. This can be detected by sequential measurements of C-reactive protein, a

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Pod-based electronic cigarette use among California youth

Adolescents and young adults who used new pod-based electronic cigarettes commonly did so along with other e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes.

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Juul e-cigarettes pose addiction risk for young users, Stanford study finds

Teens and young adults who use Juul brand e-cigarettes are failing to recognize the product's addictive potential, despite using it more often than their peers who smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

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Discovering a previously unknown role for a source of magnetic fields

Magnetic forces ripple throughout the universe, from the fields surrounding planets to the gasses filling galaxies, and can be launched by a phenomenon called the Biermann battery effect. Now scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found that this phenomenon may not only generate magnetic fields, but can sever them to trigger magnetic rec

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Invasive forage grass leads to grassland bird decline

The prairies of North America once covered vast stretches of land, with towering grasses creating ideal nesting and forage habitat for grassland birds. But the deep, rich soil and treeless expanse also represented the ideal conditions for farming—both row crops and cattle grazing—in the eyes of settlers. Today, largely thanks to agricultural conversion, a mere 1 percent of tallgrass prairie remain

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Italy’s Oldest Instrument Hints at Sounds of Prehistoric Rome

The music of the ancient world is largely lost, but recent findings and recreations of antique instruments can give a taste.

7h

Grim’s Haunted Carnival: Carousel Hunt

All right: having tried your luck on the midway and warmed yourself up for something bigger, you set off toward a truly classic ride for any carnival. What else but the carousel? It looks like a delightfully spooky one, too, with not just horses to ride but also bats, spiders, and unidentifiable creepy-crawlies. But alas! Just before you can take a seat, one of Grim’s zombie minions shambles out

7h

Meet the Illustrator Diversifying Airbnb's Image

Airbnb rolls out a set of new illustrations to better reflect its users—and the world.

7h

KAL’s cartoon

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7h

Researchers suggest new model for measuring growth in students' proficiency in MOOCs

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and KU Leuven have developed a method of measuring growth in students' proficiency in digital learning environments. It helps to see the progress of online course participants in dynamics, i.e., to understand how students study and how the course works. The results of the study have been published in the journal Behaviour Research Methods.

7h

Surprise finding: Discovering a previously unknown role for a source of magnetic fields

Feature describes unexpected discovery of a role the process that seeds magnetic fields plays in mediating a phenomenon that occurs throughout the universe and can disrupt cell phone service and knock out power grids on Earth.

7h

Invasive forage grass leads to grassland bird decline

In a recent study published in Landscape Ecology, University of Illinois researchers and others found that a common cattle forage grass, tall fescue, is associated with nest failure in dickcissels, small grassland birds similar to sparrows.

7h

Tiny Island Nation to Host World's Largest Microgrid

Palau, under threat from sea level rise, wants to have 70 percent renewable energy by 2050 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

US air pollution deaths nearly halved between 1990 and 2010

Air pollution in the U.S. has decreased since about 1990, and a new study conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill now shows that this air quality improvement has brought substantial public health benefits. The study, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, found that deaths related to air pollution were nearly halved between 1990 and 2010.

7h

The Books Briefing: The People Who Give, and Receive Little in Return

Welcome back to the Books Briefing. This week’s edition focuses on characters who spend their time taking care of other people—a role that sometimes renders their own needs invisible. In the novels below, the sometimes beautiful, sometimes fraught dynamics of giving and receiving care are brought to life. One family reckons tragically with how little they knew their nanny; another comes together

7h

Adding refined fiber to processed food could have negative health effects, study finds

Adding highly refined fiber to processed foods could have negative effects on human health, such as promoting liver cancer, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University and the University of Toledo.

7h

Advantages of DNA immunization platform for eliciting mAbs in multiple species

Researchers have taken advantage of the benefits of DNA immunization over traditional protein-based immunization to elicit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against challenging targets in three species — mouse, rabbit, and human models.

7h

Facebook hires British ex-deputy PM as global affairs headFacebook Nick Clegg

British former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, a leading anti-Brexit advocate, said on Friday he would be starting a job at Facebook, as the US giant faces up to regulatory pressures.

7h

Shark washes up dead on Florida shore with old hat wrapped around head

The body of a shark was found washed ashore in Florida with the remains of an old hat wrapped around its body.

7h

What does the universe sound like? A musical tour | Matt Russo

Is outer space really the silent and lifeless place it's often depicted to be? Perhaps not. Astrophysicist and musician Matt Russo takes us on a journey through the cosmos, revealing the hidden rhythms and harmonies of planetary orbits. The universe is full of music, he says — we just need to learn how to hear it.

7h

Trump Sees Khashoggi’s Disappearance Mostly as a PR Problem

President Donald Trump is slowly coming around to the probable reality of Jamal Khashoggi’s murder by Saudi Arabia. But he isn’t happy about it. Not the assassination itself, although he does seem at least displeased about that (he calls it “bad, bad stuff”), and has promised “severe” repercussions if the allegations prove true. The president’s biggest beef seems to be that it’s been a public-rel

7h

Src regulates mTOR, a major player in cancer growth

A team of researchers at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital has revealed a connection between mTORC1 and Src, two proteins known to be hyperactive in cancer. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that Src is necessary and sufficient to activate mTORC1 and offers the possibility to develop novel approaches to control cancer growth.

7h

A call to add a well-being index to national economic measures

A trio of economists is suggesting that it is time to add a well-being index to national economic measures. Carol Graham with the Brookings Institution, Kate Laffan with the London School of Economics and Sergio Pinto with the University of Maryland have published a Perspective piece in the journal Science outlining their arguments for adding measurements such as degree of happiness to economic in

7h

Taxes and caps on carbon work differently but calibrating them poses the same challenge

Virtually everything most people on earth do these days involves, either directly or indirectly, the combustion of oil, gas and coal. Burning these fossil fuels is generating carbon emissions, which accumulate in the atmosphere, contributing to global warming.

7h

Clapping Music app reveals that changing rhythm isn't so easy

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London have developed an app to understand why some rhythms are more difficult to perform than others.

7h

European Commission launches online tool to measure how well Europe and Asia are connected

The ASEM Sustainable Connectivity Portal offers insights into the state of connectivity between 30 European countries, 19 Asian countries, Australia and New Zealand, together representing the ASEM countries.

7h

US air pollution deaths nearly halved between 1990 and 2010

Air pollution in the US has decreased since about 1990, and a new study conducted at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill now shows that this air quality improvement has brought substantial public health benefits. The study, published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, found that deaths related to air pollution were nearly halved between 1990 and 2010.

7h

Large regional differences in endoscopic sinus surgery in Finland

According to recent research, there are large differences in the frequency of endoscopic sinus surgery performed due to chronic rhinosinusitis between hospital districts in Finland.

7h

Researchers suggest new model for measuring growth in students' proficiency in MOOCs

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and KU Leuven have developed a method of measuring growth in students' proficiency in digital learning environments. It helps to see the progress of online course participants in dynamics, i.e., to understand how students study and how the course works. The results of the study have been published in the journal Behaviour Research Methods.

7h

Dena Haritos Tsamitis secures $5 million NSF award for CyberCorps Scholarship for Service program

At a time when demand for cybersecurity expertise has never been higher, Carnegie Mellon University has just been awarded a $5 million renewal of its National Science Foundation CyberCorps Scholarship for Service program through 2023. Led by Dr. Dena Haritos Tsamitis, the Barbara Lazarus Professor in Information Networking and director of Information Networking Institute, the SFS@CMU program provi

7h

HER2+ early breast cancers where shorter-course trastuzumab could be an option

Women with HER2-positive early breast cancer with small tumours have similar disease-free survival and lower risk of cardiac toxicity with a nine-week course of adjuvant trastuzumab compared to those treated for one year, according to a subgroup analysis of the Short-HER trial reported at ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

7h

'Halloween' Review: A Slasher Gem That Annihilates the Weak Sequels That Came Before It

It's the first to recapture the unfussy rigor of John Carpenter’s 1978 original.

8h

8h

Facebook does, indeed, want to track your calls on device

Facebook wants to you to spend $199 to $349 to install its version of a connected, talking video speaker—such as Amazon's Echo—into your home. It has a camera that follows you as you move for video calls and the ability to track what you're doing.

8h

Water woes as drought leaves Germany's Rhine shallow

Months of drought have left water levels on Germany's Rhine river at a record low, exposing a World War II bomb and forcing ship operators to halt services to prevent vessels from running aground.

8h

Trump administration asks Supreme Court to stop teenagers' climate lawsuit

WASHINGTON—President Donald Trump's administration asked the U.S. Supreme Court stop a novel and sweeping lawsuit pressed by children and teenagers seeking to force the federal government to take steps against climate change.

8h

Environmental groups file suit to block waivers for Texas border wall

A coalition of environmental groups has sued to stop the Trump administration from speeding construction of the first phase of southern border wall construction by waiving dozens of landmark environmental laws meant to protect air and water quality, public lands and wildlife.

8h

Fusty Ol' Scientific Texts Get a Gorgeous, Pricey Makeover

Arty versions of science classics are mostly a gift for your midcentury modern coffee table—but crack them open, and you might learn a thing or two about science too.

8h

Rockstar's 'Red Dead Redemption 2' Crunch Controversy and the Rest of the Week in Games

You thought the industry's labor problem was under control? Good luck with that!

8h

Monkeys do not start to resemble their parents before puberty

Most of us would acknowledge that family members often resemble one another, particularly in the face. Indeed, humans are good at picking out pairs of close relatives amongst the faces of unfamiliar adults. We are also more likely to trust and help hypothetical partners whose faces have been subtly manipulated to resemble our own in computer experiments. Furthermore, in natural populations perceiv

8h

New study may provide clues to how birds began to fly

For the first time, researchers have measured what is known as the ground effect of flying animals—and it turns out that they save a lot more energy by flying close to the ground than previously believed. The study from Lund University in Sweden supports one of the theories on how birds began to fly.

8h

8h

Securing access to optimal cancer care through innovation, integration and sustainability

Securing access to optimal cancer care for all patients can only be achieved through integrated, sustainable translation of today's scientific advances into tomorrow's treatments, reinforced by a clear understanding of the magnitude of clinical effects and accurate identification of patients most likely to benefit.

8h

The neurobiology of social aggression

Bullying and aggression carry heavy societal costs. For the first time, Duke-NUS researchers have found a signalling mechanism in the brain that shapes social behaviour — specifically a growth factor protein, called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), which affects social dominance. This novel discovery has implications for a deeper un

8h

New study may provide clues to how birds began to fly

For the first time, researchers have measured what is known as the ground effect of flying animals — and it turns out that they save a lot more energy by flying close to the ground than previously believed. The study from Lund University in Sweden supports one of the theories on how birds began to fly.

8h

Elucidating cuttlefish camouflage

Computational image analysis of behaving cuttlefish revealsprinciples of control and development of a biologicalinvisibility cloak.

8h

Monkeys do not start to resemble their parents before puberty

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Leipzig presented experienced human raters with digital images of rhesus macaques of different ages and asked them to identify related individuals. They found that although infant rhesus macaque faces are individually distinguishable, only just before they reach puberty can offspring be matched correctly

8h

A single missing gene leads to miscarriage

A single gene of the mother plays such a crucial role in the development of the placenta that its dysfunction leads to miscarriages. Researchers from the Medical Faculty of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have observed this in so-called knockout mice that were specifically modified for this purpose. These mice lack the gene for the transcription factor Math6. By conducting further analyses, the rese

8h

New moon: China to launch lunar lighting in outer space

China is planning to launch its own 'artificial moon' by 2020 to replace streetlamps and lower electricity costs in urban areas, state media reported Friday.

8h

S.Africa divers risk all to poach marine delicacies for China diners

One Saturday night in August, Deurick van Blerk, 26, climbed into his small boat off the coast of Cape Town on another of his illegal fishing expeditions. He never returned.

8h

For abused teen girls, suicidal thoughts linked to bond with mom

A new study links high degrees of mother-daughter conflict to suicide risk in abused teenage girls. Among adolescents who suffered maltreatment as children, not all entertain suicidal thoughts. So what can we learn about those who do? Researchers have found an answer by looking at the relationships between teenage girls and their mothers. The study, which appears in the journal Suicide and Life T

8h

Keep your home's temperature up and the heating bill down

DIY Stop fighting over the thermostat. When the leaves turn, the battle over the thermostat begins. This year, skip the debate over the ideal temperature. Here's how to keep warm without blasting the heat.

8h

8h

Breaching dams to save Northwest orcas is contentious issue

Calls to breach four hydroelectric dams in Washington state have grown louder in recent months as the plight of critically endangered Northwest orcas has captured global attention.

8h

Europe, Japan ready spacecraft for 7-year journey to MercuryBepiColombo Mercury

Final preparations were underway Friday for the launch of a joint mission by European and Japanese space agencies to send twin probes to Mercury, the closest planet to the sun.

8h

Louisiana university gives Smithsonian crustacean collection

A Louisiana university is giving the Smithsonian Institution a huge collection of crustaceans that has, among other things, been used to identify seafood mislabeled as coming from the Gulf of Mexico.

8h

The stress-free way to listen to your unborn baby's heart

Checking the heartbeat of babies in the womb is set to become more accurate and less stressful for expectant mothers thanks to research by the University of Sussex.

8h

Human Brain Project Open Day

HBP Summit host – Prof. Rainer Goebel – takes a look back at an exciting HBP Open Day 2018 which took place in Maastricht, Netherlands From: HumanBrainProject

8h

Knife crime and homicide figures reveal the violence of austerity

The latest crime figures from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) offer a grim outlook on the state of criminal justice in England and Wales. Almost as if to head off criticism, the bulletin starts: "Over recent decades, we've seen continued falls in overall levels of crime but in the last year the trend has been more stable". Isn't that an odd way of introducing a rise in serious violent off

8h

Tough laws prevent gun deaths

A major global report confirms gun-related homicides, suicides and accidents are falling in Australia after the introduction of anti-gun laws, and that the effect of such tough laws is similar elsewhere.

9h

Should I see a doctor about my dreams?

When I was younger, I was terrified they would make me lose my mind. Now, I embrace them which I think is a sure sign of maturity I have been told, by a sleep professional no less, that I am a “vivid dreamer”. I remember my dreams often, the twilight theatrics of my unconscious seared into memory by their intensity. Sometimes my dreams upset me, rehashing painful memories and serving them up with

9h

Modified optical centrifuge has potential to open up new ways for the study of superrotors

Using corkscrew-shaped laser pulses, scientists at DESY have devised a sophisticated optical centrifuge that can make molecules rotate rapidly about a desired molecular axis. The innovative method opens up new ways to control and study super fast spinning molecules, called superrotors. Until now, optical centrifuges can make molecules rotate about one specific axis only. The new scheme lets scient

9h

New way of thinking about work-life balance is needed

In a paper published in leading academic journal, Human Resource Management Journal, Cranfield School of Management expert, Professor Clare Kelliher, argues that there is a need to review how we think about work-life balance.

9h

This Is What an Alien Encounter Might Look Like

Jill Tarter and Maggie Turnbull discuss Trappist-1, the Fermi paradox, and Fast Radio Bursts at WIRED25

9h

With the right help, bears can recover from the torture of bile farming

Bear bile farms, which exist in some Asian countries like Vietnam and China, are a terrible reality for Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus).

9h

Scientists report technique to prolong lifespan of perovskite solar cells

A group of chemists at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania, together with the physicists from Vilnius University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL), have uncovered one of the possible reasons behind the short lifespan of perovskite solar cells and have offered solutions. According to the scientists, hole transporting materials used in perovskite solar cells

9h

How we solved an Arctic mercury mystery

In the Canadian Arctic, a mystery has troubled scientists and local communities for decades: Why do marine animals in the western Arctic have higher mercury levels than those in the east?

9h

Plastic recycling firms accused of abusing market

The Environment Agency is probing claims exporters are abusing the recycled plastics market.

9h

Oregon Zoo shares animal X-rays

Oregon zoo posted images taken during routine health checks.

9h

Exotic Matter Made in Space Could Boost the Hunt for Gravitational Waves

Off-world Bose–Einstein condensates might measure spacetime ripples better than any ground-based technique — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry

Scientists studying a valuable, but vulnerable, species of poplar have identified the genetic mechanism responsible for the species' inability to resist a pervasive and deadly disease. Their finding, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to more successful hybrid poplar varieties for increased biofuels and forestry production and protect native trees against

9h

Eating leafy greens could help prevent macular degeneration

A new study has shown that eating vegetable nitrates, found mainly in green leafy vegetables and beetroot, could help reduce your risk of developing early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

9h

Regionspolitikere kritiserer afskaffelse af mellemvagtslag på sygehus

Thisted Sygehus dropper mellemvagtslaget om natten for at spare penge. Det bekymrer regionspolitikerne, der frygter, det vil skabe problemer for rekrutteringen.

9h

Nyt program skal udvikle fremtidens forskningsledere

Novo Nordisk Fonden har afsat 600 mio. kr. over fem år til etablering af et klinisk forskningslederprogram, der skal kombinere forskning og klinisk arbejde.

9h

The Complexity of Black Girlhood Is at the Heart of The Hate U Give

This story contains spoilers for The Hate U Give . Starr Carter slides her feet into her favorite pair of Air Jordans—black retro Space Jam XIs— before hopping into her mother’s car and making the long trek to school. They pass the black-owned grocery stores, restaurants, barber shops, and “project” apartment buildings that line the weathered streets of Garden Heights. As they travel to the subur

9h

Mineral discoveries in the Galapagos Islands pose a puzzle as to their formation and origin

The Galapagos archipelago is one of the most famous groups of islands in the world. Many of the animal and plant species are unique because of the islands' isolated location in the Pacific, 1,000 kilometers off of the coast of Ecuador. Thanks to a recently-signed special cooperation agreement, geoscientists based at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in Germany will have the opportunity in

9h

New simulations confirm efficiency of waste-removal process in plasma device

Just as fire produces ash, the combining of light elements in fusion reactions can produce material that eventually interferes with those same reactions. Now, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have found evidence suggesting that a process could remove the unwanted material and make the fusion processes more efficient within a type of fus

9h

Understanding enzyme could help produce frost-resistant crops

Researchers from The University of Western Australia have found that an enzyme in plants, ATP Synthase, plays a critical role in how plants respond to the cold.

9h

New data tool can help scientists use limited funds to protect the greatest number of endangered species

A large majority of Americans strongly support the goal of preventing the extinction of endangered wildlife and plants. Today, over 1,600 U.S. species are listed under the Endangered Species Act, and more are added every year. The list includes well-known species like the manatee, grizzly bear and green sea turtle, as well as hundreds of imperiled plant species, and more than 400 species in the Ha

9h

Chandra and ALMA measure speed of sloshing gas in galaxy cluster

Almost all galaxy clusters experience mergers. While a merger takes place, a specific spiral pattern can often be observed in X-ray images. Such a spiral feature is due to the motion of the sloshing gas induced by a merger. Observing a phenomenon similar to sloshing gas in the daily life is easy: When you swirl a wine glass containing liquid, you will see how the water rotates along with the glass

9h

Parents with more education spend more on health care

Parents who have educations beyond the high school level spend more on family health care, reducing the likelihood of adverse medical conditions despite differences in family income and health insurance, a new study shows. Researchers examined the association between parental education and family health care spending in single-mother and two-parent families based on data from the 2004 to 2012 Med

9h

FAKTATJEK: Er der medicinrester i dine svinekoteletter?

Fælles grænseværdier i EU sørger for, at resterne af medicin i kød er meget små. Og ifølge forsker er det sjældent, de overhovedet finder rester i maden.

9h

Courts treat intoxicated women twice as harshly as men facing same assault charges

Women are twice as likely as men to receive harsher sentences for assault offences when alcohol is a contributory factor, according to new research from the University of Liverpool.

9h

Researchers study interactions in molecules using AI

Researchers from the University of Luxembourg, Technische Universität Berlin, and the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society have combined machine learning and quantum mechanics to predict the dynamics and atomic interactions in molecules. The new approach allows for a degree of precision and efficiency that has never been achieved before.

9h

Chemist obtains a nanocatalyst base from rice husk

A chemist from RUDN has developed a method to obtain high-porosity silicium dioxide, a base for nanocatalysts used in different types of organic reactions, from rice husks. The results of the study were published in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

10h

Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry

Scientists studying a valuable, but vulnerable, species of poplar have identified the genetic mechanism responsible for the species' inability to resist a pervasive and deadly disease. Their finding, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could lead to more successful hybrid poplar varieties for increased biofuels and forestry production and protect native trees against

10h

Chemists develop method to obtain catalyst-, surfactant- and template-free polymeric nanoparticles

A chemist from RUDN proposes a simple technology for producing polymeric nanoparticles from only two organic substances. By changing the temperature of the reaction and the ratio of initial substances, the scientists can obtain particles of any given size. The new method was described in Macromolecules.

10h

From peaceful coexistence to potential peril: The bacteria that live in and on us

Bacteria are everywhere, including in and on our bodies. There are estimated to be as many bacteria in a human body as there are human cells.

10h

Uheldsramt Soyuz-raket: Mistanke om fejl ved afkobling af hjælpemotor

Opsendelsen af astronauter til ISS gik galt på grund af en fejl ved separationen af en hjælpemotor, lyder det fra Roscosmos-chef før offentliggørelse af rapport.

10h

Predictability limit for tropical cyclones over the western North Pacific

For an atmospheric system, there exists a limit to how far ahead one can make predictions. This is referred to as atmospheric predictability. Within this limit, however, the weather forecast will still contain some uncertainty. Given that numerical models are "perfect," the predictability of tropical cyclones (TCs) is limited by the chaotic nature of the system itself. How long, then, is the TC pr

10h

Image of the Day: Clubbing

Mantis shrimps' remarkably swift kicks come from springs built into their dactyl clubs.

10h

Drive.ai Brings Its Self-Driving Cars to Dallas Cowboy Fans

The startup is launching a service that will cart the public around Arlington, Texas, including to and from AT&T Stadium.

10h

Lime's New Scooter Is Hardier, Heavier, and Built for Life on the Streets

More range, more robust, more stable, more waterproof. Lime thinks its "Gen 3" scooter is ready to take on the worst the world can do to it.

10h

Shhh … The Ice in Antarctica Is 'Singing'

The Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica has a haunting voice.

10h

Producing defectless metal crystals of unprecedented size

A research group at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), has published an article in Science describing a new method to convert inexpensive polycrystalline metal foils to single crystals with superior properties. These materials have many applications in science and technology.

10h

Study shows gender preferences differ more in countries that are more affluent and gender equal

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Bonn, the other the University of California, has found evidence that shows gender preferences differ more in countries that are more affluent and gender equal than in countries that are not. In their paper published in the journal Science, Armin Falk and Johannes Hermle describe their study, which involved analyzing data from an international poll

10h

Adding the third dimension to marine conservation

A new approach to tackle conservation decisions in 3-D marine environments could lead to better conservation outcomes.

10h

Visualizing Specific Impacts of Climate Change Could Change Behavior

People asked to imagine how flooding or droughts would affect particular people or places were more likely to engage in environmentally friendly actions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Prince William shows conservation still has a problem with 'white saviours'

Prince William recently spoke at one of the largest illegal wildlife summits ever held in London. He said, "Poaching is an economic crime against ordinary people and their futures."

10h

Image: Launching the Galileo mission

Space Shuttle Atlantis deployed the Galileo spacecraft six hours, 30 minutes into the flight on Oct. 18, 1989. In this image, Galileo, mounted atop the inertial upper stage, is tilted to a 58-degree deployment position in Atlantis's payload bay with the Earth's limb appearing in the background.

10h

Nanodiamonds as photocatalysts

Climate change is in full swing and will continue unabated as long as CO2 emissions continue. One possible solution is to return CO2 to the energy cycle: CO2 could be processed with water into methanol, a fuel that can be easily transported and stored. However, the reaction, which is reminiscent of a partial process of photosynthesis, requires energy and catalysts. Developing light-active photocat

10h

Scientists solve 3-D structure of cystic fibrosis protein in active, inactive states

Scientists at the UNC School of Medicine in collaboration with researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have resolved the three-dimensional molecular structure of the protein that's defective in people with cystic fibrosis in the protein's active and inactive state. The discovery, published in the journal Biochemistry, could open up new research avenues and help drug developers create enh

10h

Live for de morgenfriske: Se missionen til Merkur blive sendt afsted

Kl. 03:45 i morgen tidlig er der raket-tv for de morgenfriske. ESA sender live fra Fransk Guyana, når Europa og Japan drager mod Merkur.

10h

Dansk virksomhed har udviklet mobil og miljøvenlig autolakeringskabine

Den danske virksomhed Carheal satser på at nå en milliard­omsætning med en mobil nulemissions-auto­lakeringskabine. Indbygget Internet of Things-løsning er afgørende for dokumentation af, at grænseværdierne overholdes.

10h

Climate change the likely killer of Australian marsupial lion

Scientists believe Thylacoleo carnifex was probably a victim of the drying out of Australia, which began about 350,000 years ago, rather than from the impact of humans.

10h

How plants bind their green pigment chlorophyll

Chlorophyll is the pigment used by all plants for photosynthesis. There are two versions, chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b. These are structurally very similar to one another but have different colors, blue-green and yellowish green, respectively. Both pigments fulfill different jobs during photosynthesis and are therefore bound very selectively by the proteins of the photosynthesis apparatus in pl

10h

Advanced sequencing technology provides new insights into human mitochondrial diseases

The ability to translate the genetic code into proteins is an essential step in all living organisms. A cornerstone of this molecular process is the ability of transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules to couple recognition of the genetic code with the cognate amino acid, which are the building blocks of proteins. Chemical modification of individual tRNAs is a critical step for the decoding process during pro

10h

Sculpting bacteria into extreme shapes reveals the rugged nature of cell division

What do watermelons and bacteria have in common? Just like the tasty fruit, microbes can be molded into unusual shapes, a study in Nature Communications has shown. The paper, produced by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has modified the structure of bacterial cells from simple rods into elaborate shapes not seen in nature, showing just how

10h

Supercharged geothermal energy could power the planet

The next generation of geothermal plants will unlock more of Earth's bountiful, underground energy and could allow the technology to finally fulfil its promise

10h

10h

From Egg to Grave: Clues Reveal How Baby Pterosaurs Grew Up

An astonishingly detailed picture of pterosaurs, describing their lives from wee-flapling to aged-flyer stages, has emerged, thanks to a variety of new fossils discovered in recent years.

10h

What Is the Future of Getting Kids to Soccer Practice?

If only children were allowed to drive, they could get from home to school to piano lessons and back home again without their parents’ help. Alas, they are not. In recent years, though, a slew of relatively small companies have stepped in to correct for this unfortunate fact, offering a service that, from the perspective of an overstressed parent, has a similar effect: They sell dependably safe,

11h

Trump's NASA Administrator: ‘No Reason’ to Dismiss U.N. Climate Report

The crew, an American astronaut and a Russian cosmonaut, were only minutes into their flight when a red warning light started flashing and alarms began to blare. Within seconds, their small capsule fired its engines and began hurtling away, trying to put as much distance as possible between the crew and the rocket that was supposed to propel them into orbit but had instead malfunctioned. The 30-m

11h

Pakistan’s Pivot to Asia

Just a few years ago, the news out of Pakistan would have sent official Washington into a tailspin. But with cable TV broadcasting Trump nonstop, few bothered to even note that a champion cricketer turned populist firebrand, Imran Khan, won the election as prime minister this summer. Nor did many pause over the fact that Khan won that election with the backing of an increasingly pro-Chinese milit

11h

Netflix Is Finally Canceling Shows. Good

It's time to make room for new content.

11h

Google Wants China. Will Chinese Users Want Google?

If it wins government approval to offer its search engine in China, Google won't have some typical assets, like rich user data and integration with its browser.

11h

When AI Misjudgment Is Not an Accident

Intentional bias is another way artificial intelligence could hurt us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The Return of the Miscellany of Medical Malarkey Strikes Back

The flu season is upon us, as is the first pediatric death. A polio-like illness is spreading, and experts are baffled. Kids probably shouldn't be around giant spinning metallic blades. Magic tape! You guessed it, another miscellany of medical malarkey has risen from the grave.

11h

11h

When Times Are Good, the Gender Gap Grows

A study shows growing national wealth and gender equality accentuates differences in the types of choices men and women make — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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