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Nyheder2018oktober20

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Merging mathematical and physical models toward building a more perfect flying vehicle

When designing flying vehicles, there are many aspects of which we can be certain but there are also many uncertainties. Most are random, and others are just not well understood. University of Illinois Professor Harry Hilton brought together several mathematical and physical theories to help look at problems in more unified ways and solve physical engineering problems.

10h

Danmark dominerer rummet: Her er fem store missioner med dansk deltagelse

Danmark er det land i verden, der har mest udstyr med ombord på flest rummissioner.

11h

Dansk Crispr-projekt: Genredigering skal redde patienter med sjældne immun-sygdomme

Aarhus-forskere gør sig klar til at redigere gener i stamceller fra patienter med medfødte defekter i immunsystemet. Målet er kliniske test om få år.

8h

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Immunterapi er sikkert til kræftpatienter med HIV

Nyt studie viser, at immunterapi også er sikkert at benytte til kræftpatienter, som er smittet med HIV-virus.

27min

Dansk selskab inviterer til ’onko-dating’ på ESMO

Dansk Selskab for Klinisk Onkologi har i år for første gang en stand på ESMO.

27min

Regelmæssig træning kan gavne alle kræftpatienters behandling

Træning som en del af et kræftbehandlingsforløb kan signifikant forbedre patienters symptomer, livskvalitet og helbred under og efter behandlingen.

27min

Forskere finder ingen sammenhæng mellem biomarkør og sygdomsudvikling

Danske forskere har undersøgt biomarkør med henblik på yderligere individualisering af behandling for kræft i æggestokken, men succesen udeblev i første omgang.

27min

Skepsis og social sårbarhed står i vejen for kræftscreening

Social sårbarhed er sammen med skepsis over for sygehusvæsnet og læger en stor hæmsko i forhold til at få screenet folk for fire forskellige former for kræft.

27min

Single algae cells can help deliver targeted medicine

Scientists in Germany have found a potential improvement on the idea of bacteria delivering medicine. This kind of microtargeting could be useful in cancer treatments. The microswimmers are biodegradable and easy to produce. None Metin Sitti and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute in Germany recently demonstrated that tiny drugs could be attached to individual algae cells and that those algae

42min

The Secret to Dinosaur Hip Shape

A new analysis asks whether eating plants or different ways of breathing influenced the shape of dinosaur hips — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Letter: Gary Hart Was Not Set Up

Was Gary Hart Set Up? What are we to make of the deathbed confession of the political operative Lee Atwater, newly revealed, that he staged the events that brought down the Democratic candidate in 1987? In The Atlantic ’s November issue, James Fallows asked what alternate courses history might have taken. My name is James Savage and I was the Miami Herald ’s investigations editor who helped repor

1h

Stacey Abrams Hopes Medicaid Expansion Can Be a Winning Issue in Rural Georgia

By framing expansion as a pragmatic business move, Ms. Abrams, the Democratic candidate for governor, is hoping to siphon some traditionally Republican rural votes.

1h

Immune-Based Treatment Helps Fight Aggressive Breast Cancer, Study Finds

Combining immunotherapy and chemotherapy can help women with an aggressive type of breast cancer and should become their new standard of care.

1h

Grim’s Haunted Carnival: Trivia

Phew. You need a bit of a break from carving away mergers on the carousel! Walking back down the midway to stretch your legs (and mind!), you notice an enticing tent dripping with rich fabrics, lit from within by a mesmerizing glow. The sign above it reads FORTUNE TELLER . It seems irresistible; you can’t help wandering over and stepping through the drapes to see what awaits within. As it happens

1h

First immunotherapy success for triple-negative breast cancer

New research led by Queen Mary University of London and St Bartholomew's Hospital has shown that by using a combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy the body's own immune system can be tuned to attack triple-negative breast cancer, extending survival

2h

DNA differences are linked to having same-sex sexual partners

Genetic differences are associated with choosing same-sex partners in both men and women.

2h

Blood tales: the magic liquid that keeps us alive

It travels 60,000 miles around our body providing energy and healing powers – so why is blood such a taboo? I go running around a lake and brambles scratch me. The wounds should heal quickly on my legs, but they don’t, because I scratch the scratches, and I scratch and scratch. I have always been this brutal with healing injuries, but usually my skin healed them fine. Now that I am menopausal, an

2h

Allergies: the scourge of modern life?

Our ancestors didn’t suffer from hay fever and food allergies were extremely rare even a few decades ago. What is causing the steep rise in their incidence now? To anyone from Generation X or older, it often feels like food allergies are far more common today than in their youth. While they remember them being rare or nonexistent in their school days, their own children will have classmates with

2h

Se drone smadre flyvinge: Så farlige er de vildfarne robotter for lufttrafikken

I forhold til fugle gør droner langt større skade på fly. Det skyldes, at dronens motor og batteri bliver som projektiler, siger dansk ekspert.

2h

Make your phone and computer team up to get more done

DIY Five ways to link your devices. Don't keep your phone and your computer apart. If you let them sync with each other, they can help you out in surprising ways.

3h

Hypershock Gets Grounded | BattleBots: Resurrection

Team Hypershock has their robot completely gutted in the battlebox. As they race to repair it before the next fight, Kraken can't get its sea legs in its first match and soon finds itself drowning in repairs. Stream Full Episodes of BattleBots: Resurrection: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/battlebots-resurrection/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: ht

3h

Mystery of Mercury Levels in Arctic Animals Gets Solved

In the Canadian Arctic, a mystery has troubled scientists and local communities for decades: Why do marine animals in the western Arctic have higher mercury levels than those in the east?

3h

Exoplanet Hunters Have a New Plan to Spot Hidden 'Migrating' Worlds

There's a telescope that can see thick rings of dust in distant star systems. And researchers want to use its data in a new way to spot hidden and migrating exoplanets.

3h

Heart patients advised to move around every 20 minutes to prolong life

Heart patients are being advised to move around every 20 minutes in a bid to prolong life following a study presented at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress (CCC) 2018.

3h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvor mange mennesker befinder sig i fly over jorden lige nu?

En læser er nysgerrig efter at vide, hvor mange mennesker der sådan cirka befinder sig om bord på en flyvemaskine lige nu. Det ved Naviair.

3h

Photo Gallery: Pulsars Beam Like Lighthouses in the Cosmos

Their spin rate is so consistent that people who navigate spacecraft around our solar system use them as mile markers to know exactly where they are.

3h

Apple Data Downloads, A Dating App for Trump Fans, and More Security News This Week

North Korean bitcoin theft, Fake FCC complaints, and more security news this week.

3h

Dungeons & Dragons Art Is Finally Getting the Respect It Deserves

It's no longer just valued in game stores and comics shops.

3h

What’s Missing From the Saudis’ Khashoggi Story

Seventeen days after the disappearance of U.S.-based Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, authorities in Riyadh finally confirmed his death. According to the Saudi version of what happened, Khashoggi died after a fist fight between him and several men at the consulate in Istanbul. Authorities announced the arrest of 18 Saudi nationals, as well as the dismissal of top officials, including an adviser

3h

Can You Quantify Awe?

Researchers attempt to capture the full richness of the awe experience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Are Extreme Weather Events Linked to Climate Change?

Can we attribute a single extreme weather event, like a particular heat wave or wildfire or flood, to climate change? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Transferring An Organ From An HIV-Positive Donor

Surgeons in South Africa transplanted part of a liver from an HIV-positive mother to her uninfected daughter — a medical first. Scott Simon talks to Dr. Harriet Etheredge, a medical bioethicist.

4h

A Climate Scientist On 'Slaying The Climate Dragon'

Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at Columbia University and NASA, talks to NPR's Scott Simon about her fairy tale on climate change and reads passages from the story.

4h

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending October 20, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

4h

Gary Shteyngart: reality catches up to dystopian fiction

riding the Greyhounds of hell, from New York to El Paso the alternate reality of hedge fund traders None Gary Shteyngart 's new novel Lake Success is the evil doppelgänger of the Simon and Garfunkel song ' America '. In what is surely destined to become one of those legendary novel openings, right up there with "it was the best of times, it was the worst of times," we meet Barry Cohen, "a man wit

4h

14 Awesome Game, Console, Headset, and Controller Deals

New console bundles, discounted wireless headsets, and a bunch of game sales are happening now.

4h

To Curb Terrorist Propaganda Online, Look to YouTube. No, Really.

Opinion: Despite YouTube’s crackdown, extremist groups are still exploiting other Google platforms.

4h

Saber-toothed Cats May Have Roared like Lions

Small throat bones from the prehistoric feline Smilodon suggest it used fearsome vocalizations to communicate — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Family Weekly: ‘Uber for Kids’ and the Future of How Children Get Around

This Week in Family For parents who are too busy to drive their kids to school or soccer practice, popular ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft aren’t an option—minors can’t ride without an accompanying adult. A new spate of kid-focused start-ups are trying to fill in the gap , writes the Atlantic staff writer Joe Pinsker. These apps have the potential to make some parents’ lives easier, but

5h

How Kelly Rowland Fell in Love With Color

Kelly Rowland makes jewel tones shine. In reds , oranges , and emeralds , she is resplendent. The singer, who has been a dynamic entertainment mainstay for more than two decades, has of late carved out a bold space for herself as a style icon. Embracing a bevy of rich hues, Rowland radiates a striking confidence. For Rowland, an aesthetic defined by bright, color-blocked tones is an intentional s

5h

What Entrepreneurs Can Learn From Paul Allen's Second Act

The Microsoft cofounder never replicated his early success in business, but carved a path in research and philanthropy.

5h

Shane Dawson’s Jake Paul Documentary Shows the Price of Giving People What They Want

We may not all be wildly successful, wildly problematic YouTubers, but we all live inside (and contribute to) the system that created them.

5h

Skip Scooters Get a Latch So They Don’t Junk up the Sidewalks

It’s an engineering fix designed to make the vehicles more attractive to officials and regulators.

5h

Containerskibe venter i dagevis på at komme ind til havnen: »Det er vanvid«

Sådan skal rederier og havne slippe af med de enorme køer.

6h

These Two Could Soon Be the First Muslim Women to Serve in Congress

R ashida Tlaib will become the first Muslim American and Palestinian woman elected to the House of Representatives in November—but she’d rather talk about the heavy-duty trucks that roll through her neighborhood in Detroit. Industrial pollution permeates the air and poses serious health risks to her constituents. “My activism was birthed in many ways because of my Palestinian heritage,” says Tlai

6h

The Bizarre Beat of Yoko Ono’s Drum

“People of America, please listen to your soul!” That’s Yoko Ono, telling us what to do on her new album Warzone . And what if our soul—collectively, Joseph Campbell-esquely—sounded like Yoko Ono? Which is to say: wizened, innocent, fearlessly strange, offensively artless, and rather peremptory. Warzone finds Ono revisiting and refashioning 13 of her own songs/pieces, from 1970’s “Why” to 2009’s

6h

What I Learned as an EMT at the Border Wall

The call came in around 10:45 a.m. Over the loudspeaker, the city’s 911 dispatcher instructed Medic 1 and Engine 3 to respond to the area west of the Mariposa port of entry for a 30-year-old female with traumatic injuries from a fall. As an EMT and a paramedic, I had treated many injuries, whether from vehicle rollovers or drive-by shootings, but this was the first patient I saw as a volunteer em

6h

How lifelong learning makes you shine in the job market

Learning agility is the ability to learn new things quickly and be aware of the trends that are emerging in your industry. It's the most important job skill hiring managers should be looking for and job seekers should be putting forward, says Kelly Palmer. Want to test your learning agility? Answer this practice interview question: "What did you learn last week?" Hiring people based on the school

6h

Tesla introduces new Model 3 at $45,000

Tesla's new version of the Model 3 costs $45,000 and can travel 260 miles on one charge. The Model 3 is the best-selling luxury car in the U.S. Tesla still has yet to introduce a fully self-driving car, even though it once offered the capability as an option to be installed at a future date. Tesla is now offering a cheaper version of its Model 3 sedan at a starting price of $45,000. CEO Elon Musk

6h

Inside China's plan to put an 'artificial moon' in orbit

Chinese state media announced plans to put an artificial moon in orbit by 2020. Just like the real moon, the artificial moon will reflect sunlight onto the Earth in order to cut down on electricity consumption. If the mission is a success, there are plans to launch three other artificial moons in 2022. None Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan province in China, may soon have a second moon. In an inte

6h

Red Moon review: History lessons power great new lunar future novel

According to the new book by science-fiction author Kim Stanley Robinson, China's long past makes its domination of the moon inevitable

7h

SE LISTEN: Her er de satellitter, der får din hverdag til at hænge sammen

De kan veje flere tons eller få kilo. Du tænker ikke på dem, men satellitter er blevet en uvurderlig del af vores hverdag.

7h

Satellit med dansk udstyr sendt af sted med succes mod Merkur

Den europæiske satellit BepiColombo, der er udstyret med dansk strømforsyning, blev sendt af sted i nat.

9h

Albatrosses to spy out illegal fishing

Fishermen illegally trawling the Indian Ocean might soon find they have more to worry about than the proverbial albatross around their neck—real bad luck might now lurk in the form of one of the birds spying on them from the sky.

10h

Brazil recovers ancient human fossil fragments from burnt Rio museum

Brazilian officials said Friday they have recovered pieces of a 12,000-year-old fossil of a neolithic woman that was among the prized artifacts in Rio de Janeiro's burnt down National Museum.

10h

Despite talk of equality, women bosses still rare in the US

This year was touted as the year of women in politics in the United States, but in the business world, female bosses remain few and far between.

10h

Researchers find genomic evidence of rapid adaptation of invasive Burmese pythons in Florida

Florida has become a haven for invasive species in the United States, but perhaps the most well-known of the State's alien residents is the Burmese python. These giant snakes, native to Southeast Asia, have become well-established over the past few decades and even flourish in their new environment.

10h

A new way to measure nearly nothing: Ultracold trapped atoms to measure pressure

Many semiconductor fabricators and research labs are under increasing pressure from, of all things, vacuum. These facilities need to remove greater amounts of gas molecules and particles from their setups as new technologies and processes demand lower and lower pressures. For example, the vacuum chambers in which microchip manufacturers lay down a series of ultrathin layers of chemicals step by st

10h

Poralia rufescens jellyfish spotted off coast of California

The Poralia rufescens is swimming off the coast of southern California in the Pacific Ocean.

10h

Elena Ferrante: why am I always the last to leave a party?

Separating from people seems like a blast of cold air. I suppose I feel the anguish of loss I belong to that category of people who, after a dinner, after a party, are the last to leave. It’s hard to say why – it’s not clear even to me. I know that my hosts are tired and would like to go to sleep. I’m well aware that, even if I left right away, it would still take them an hour or so to straighten

10h

Nobel laureate Donna Strickland: ‘I see myself as a scientist, not a woman in science’

The Canadian professor is only the third female recipient of the physics prize in its 118-year history, but she is nonplussed by the focus on her gender When you win a Nobel prize, you can expect a fair bit of attention. When you are a woman and you win the prize in physics, as the Canadian professor Donna Strickland did earlier this month , you can expect the level of attention to be overwhelmin

10h

Moon chunk that fell to Earth lands $600,000 at auction

A lunar meteorite considered one of the most significant ever found has been sold by a Boston auction house A chunk of the moon that fell to the Earth as a lunar meteorite has been sold at auction for more than $600,000. Boston-based RR Auction announced the $612,500 winning bid for the meteorite, composed of six fragments that fit together like a puzzle, came from a representative working with t

11h

'Fake moon'

The sci-fi plan would use giant mirrors in space to light city streets, but scientists are sceptical.

12h

Country diary: my baby and I move through different landscapes

Airedale, West Yorkshire: My six-week-old daughter still can’t see very well, but her sense of smell is fierce, and we can both hear the magpies, which are everywhere She’s only six weeks old but I’m sure she can smell the smothering perfume of the rosebay willowherb that crowds the lake edge. A new baby’s senses develop lopsidedly, out-of-sync: our daughter’s eyesight is still finding focus – sh

12h

High stroke impact in low- and middle-income countries examined at 11th World Stroke Congress

Less wealthy countries struggle to meet greater need with far fewer resources.

12h

Sleep apnea more deadly when patients experience short interrupted breaths

Patients with sleep apnea who have short interruptions in breathing while they sleep are at higher risk for death than those with longer interruptions, according to a new study. The finding could help doctors better prevent long-term mortality associated with obstructive sleep apnea.

12h

Social media for medical journals operates in 'wild west,' needs more support to succeed

In this first study to examine social media editor roles at medical journals, researchers found that while medical journals are using social media more to extend the reach of new research, the responsibilities and measures of success for these roles aren't well defined or supported. More support is needed to get the information to the public more efficiently.

12h

Weight loss success linked with active self-control regions of the brain

New research suggests that higher-level brain functions have a major role in losing weight. In a study among 24 participants at a weight-loss clinic, those who achieved greatest success in terms of weight loss demonstrated more activity in the brain regions of the lateral prefrontal cortex associated with self-control.

12h

Bioceramics power the mantis shrimp's famous punch

Researchers in Singapore can now explain what gives the mantis shrimp, a marine crustacean that hunts by battering its prey with its club-like appendages, the most powerful punch in the animal kingdom. They show that a saddle-shaped structure in the mantis shrimp's limbs, which acts like a spring to store and then release energy, is composed of two layers made of different materials.

12h

Roadmap for quantum internet development

Researchers have published a comprehensive guide towards a quantum internet. It describes six phases, starting with simple networks of qubits that could already enable secure quantum communications — a phase that could be reality in the near future. The development ends with networks of fully quantum-connected quantum computers. In each phase, new applications become available such as extremely a

12h

Wheel running measures mouse distress better

The amount of time a mouse spends running on the wheel provides an accurate and objective measure of the discomfort induced by research procedures, according to a new study. The finding may improve care and reduce suffering for animal subjects, a key goal of statutory guidelines governing animal welfare in biomedical research.

13h

Bug guts shed light on Central America Chagas disease

In Central America, Chagas disease, or American trypanosomiasis, is spread by the 'kissing bug' Triatoma dimidiata. By collecting DNA from the guts of these bugs, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have described patterns in the behavior of the bugs, the strain of parasite, and the communities of microbes that interact with the parasite.

13h

New data science method makes charts easier to read at a glance

Researchers have developed a new method — 'Pixel Approximate Entropy' — that measures the complexity of a data visualization and can be used to develop easier to read visualizations. 'In fast-paced settings, it is important to know if the visualization is going to be so complex that the signals may be obscured. The ability to quantify complexity is the first step towards automatically doing some

13h

Researchers propose CRISPR as influencer of low genetic diversity in deadly bacteria

Scientists have shed light on the evolutionary history of a soil-borne bacteria that is so dangerous to grazing animals it is kept behind lock-and-key to prevent its spread.

13h

Estimating the feeding habits of corals may offer new insights on resilient reefs

Researchers have found that corals living in more productive waters take advantage of the increased food availability. The findings reevaluate scientific understanding of how corals survive and could aid predictions on coral recovery in the face of climate change.

13h

To track how students ace the LSAT, watch their eyes

Neuroscientists are tracking eye movements to understand how practicing tough reasoning tests like the LSAT makes students smarter.

13h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Pinterest’s Evan Sharp on What Makes Good Software

The first installment of our podcast interviews taped at WIRED’s 25th anniversary festival.

16h

Expanding the optogenetics toolkit

A new molecular engineering technique has the potential to double the number of light-sensitive proteins available for studying brain circuits.

16h

MS genes formerly missing-in-action have been found

Scientists have cracked a tough nut in multiple sclerosis: where are all the genes?

16h

Making gene therapy delivery safer and more efficient

Viral vectors used to deliver gene therapies undergo spontaneous changes during manufacturing which affects their structure and function. As gene therapy approaches become more common for treating disease, managing consistency of the molecular makeup of the virus particles that deliver genes is a key concern in manufacturing on a larger scale.

16h

Brain cells called astrocytes have unexpected role in brain 'plasticity'

Researchers have shown that astrocytes — long-overlooked supportive cells in the brain — help to enable the brain's plasticity, a new role for astrocytes that was not previously known. The findings could point to ways to restore connections that have been lost due to aging or trauma.

16h

Consumers choose smartphones mostly because of their appearance

The more attractive the image and design of the telephone, the stronger the emotional relationship that consumers are going to have with the product, which is a clear influence on their purchasing decision. After analysing the data collected, the experts indicated that technical characteristics and functionality are the next factors to influence the purchase of smartphones.

16h

New way to prevent heart disease in type 1 diabetes

Research shows metformin, a commonly prescribed drug for type 2 diabetes prevents heart disease in patients with type 1 diabetes.

16h

Stalking the Elusive Central Park Squirrel

I thought volunteering for New York’s squirrel census would be a walk in the park. I was wrong, kind of.

16h

16h

The Atlantic Daily: “Other People Don’t Want to Stand Up to It”

What We’re Following Remote Control: Why does Turkey seem to be treating the release of information over the alleged murder of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi as if it were must-see television? (And if there are recordings of the murder, Turkish officials should release them, urgently , Graeme Wood writes.) Meanwhile: U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s method of handling of the affair in

17h

A new way to measure nearly nothing

Scientists have designed a vacuum gauge, based on ultracold trapped atoms, is small enough to deploy in commonly used vacuum chambers.

17h

Genomic evidence of rapid adaptation of invasive Burmese pythons in Florida

New researchers set out to determine whether pythons could have adapted to an extreme Florida freeze event in 2010. They generated data for dozens of samples before and after the freeze event. By scanning regions of the Burmese python genome, they identified parts of the genome that changed significantly between the two time periods, providing clear evidence of evolution occurring over a very shor

17h

Medicating distress: Risky sedative prescriptions for older adults vary widely

A new study shows wide variation in prescriptions of sedative drugs, called benzodiazepines, to people with Medicare coverage. Some counties, especially in southern and rural western states, had three times the level of sedative prescribing as others. The study also highlights gaps at the level of individual prescribers: Some primary care providers prescribed sedatives more than six times more oft

17h

High stakes decision-making causes a little more cheating, a lot less charity

The age old adage of virtue being its own reward may not hold true in the corporate world — in fact, honorable acts could lead workers to behave more selfishly later on, new research has shown.

17h

Increased mortality in children with inflammatory bowel disease

Children who develop inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease) have an increased risk of death, both in childhood and later in life, a study reports. It is therefore important that patients who are diagnosed as children are carefully monitored, argue the researchers behind the study.

17h

Distinguishing fatal prostate cancer from 'manageable' cancer now possible

Scientists have found a way of distinguishing between fatal prostate cancer and manageable cancer, which could reduce unnecessary surgeries and radiotherapy.

17h

Genomic analysis offers insight into 2018 Nigeria Lassa fever outbreak

A surge in Lassa fever cases in Nigeria in 2018 doesn't appear to be linked to a single virus strain or increased human-to-human transmission, according to genomic analysis.

17h

Independence tests should ask more of seniors

A psychology researcher says the bar is too low for 'functional independence' in older adults, and should be aligned with skills younger adults must conquer.

17h

Fentanyl test strips prove useful in preventing overdoses

A study found that many young adults who tried fentanyl test strips reduced overdose risk by using less, going slower or using with someone else present.

17h

Tesla’s New 'Mid-Range' Model 3 Is the iPhone XR of Cars

Elon Musk's unexpected version of the Model 3 will offer 260 miles of range for around $45,000, and carves out a new niche in an expanding product line.

17h

Restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland affect women's health, study shows

Despite a policy change to provide free abortion services for women traveling from Northern Ireland to clinics in Great Britain, Northern Irish women still experience multiple barriers accessing care. The study also found that some women preferred to use medication from online telemedicine services to self-manage their own abortions at home, but that the experience is dominated by fear and isolati

17h

Modern birds might have dinosaur lungs to thank for their existence

Animals Researchers found the evidence of lungs for the first time in an avian dinosaur fossil. A newly described fossil found in China shows that birds evolved one of these notable features very, very early–while they were still dinosaurs, in fact. A team of…

18h

DOJ Says Russian Trolls Are Interfering Online With the Midterms

The Russian conspirators waging an ongoing disinformation and propaganda campaign targeting American voters directed their trolls on social media to call the late Senator John McCain of Arizona an “old geezer” and Special Counsel Robert Mueller “a puppet of the establishment.” President Donald Trump, the trolls were told to say, “deserves a Nobel Peace Prize” for meeting with the North Korean lea

18h

Validating a new definition for respiratory failure in children

According to a first-of-its-kind international study, a new definition of Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (PARDS) results in a more accurate diagnosis of many more children with the rapidly progressive disease than the widely used adult definition.

18h

END OF FEED

 


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