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Nyheder2018oktober21

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'Super-sized' mice threaten seabird colonies with extinction

Overgrown mice are killing millions of chicks on the remote Gough Island in the South Atlantic.

54min

Superior navigators are good at picking out smells, too

People who have better spatial memory are also better at identifying odors, according to a new study. The findings build on a previous theory that the main reason we evolved a sense of smell was to help us with navigation, since most animals rely primarily on smell to find food and avoid predators. Researchers hypothesized that if this were indeed the case, there would be a strong link between na

1h

Labrador retrievers at risk of various health problems

Labrador retrievers, the second most popular dog breed in the UK, are vulnerable to a number of health conditions, according to a study published in the open-access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.

16min

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A dog's color could impact longevity, increase health issues

New research led by the University of Sydney has revealed the life expectancy of chocolate Labradors is significantly lower than their black and yellow counterparts.

16min

Bird brains light up near the right ‘voice coach’

New research digs into how young male zebra finches learn to sing by finding the right teacher. The zebra finches must learn to copy the song of an adult tutor in order to ultimately attract a mate. Researchers already knew that juveniles don’t copy songs played through a loudspeaker or sung by other species of birds. Now, scientists have shown how the juvenile birds identify the right teacher. “

1h

Cannabis improves symptoms of Crohn's disease despite having no effect on gut inflammation

In a randomized, placebo-controlled study, researchers from Israel have shown that cannabis can produce clinical remission in up to 65 percent of individuals after eight weeks of treatment, but that this improvement does not appear to result from a dampening down of the underlying inflammatory process.

2h

Are you a Boltzmann Brain? Why nothing in the Universe may be real

Boltzmann Brains are hypothetical disembodied entities with self-awareness. It may be more likely for a Boltzmann Brain to come into existence than the whole Universe. The idea highlights a paradox in thermodynamics. The paradox of the Boltzmann Brain can really pull the rug from under you if you follow it to all of its logical and illogical extents. This mind-churning idea proposes that the worl

3h

What is kalsarikänni? The Finnish art of being "pantsdrunk"

Päntsdrunk is the latest trend to come out of Northern Europe and it involves drinking alone at home. Finnish writer Miska Rantanen outlines the philosophy in his newest book titled: Pantsdrunk: Kalsarikanni: The Finnish Path to Relaxation. Kalsarikänni is a word in Finnish that literally means "drinking at home and alone in your underwear." It seems like you can always count on the Nordic people

3h

Climate fund approves $1B for projects in poor countries

A U.N.-backed fund has approved more than $1 billion for 19 new projects to help developing countries tackle climate change, officials said Sunday.

3h

Starwatch: moonlight bright enough to hunt by

This week’s full moon is the hunter’s moon, giving light autumn evenings to hunters keen to stock up the larder for winter This month’s full moon occurs on 24 October. It is the second full moon since the autumnal equinox, and is known as the hunter’s moon. It follows late September’s full moon, called the harvest moon. It is said that the light from the harvest and hunter’s moons is used to gath

4h

Fight Night With LeBron

T he Lakers have played home games at Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles for nearly two decades and in that time, bronze statues have popped up, like mushrooms, on the pavement surrounding the arena. The first and best depicts Magic Johnson on the first dribble of a fast break. His eyes are fixed down court, looking for openings in a shifting geometry of backpedaling defenders. His left hand

4h

Clapping Music app reveals that changing rhythm isn't so easy

Scientists have developed an app to understand why some rhythms are more difficult to perform than others.

4h

New finding could unmask blood doping in athletes

Autologous blood doping, in which an athlete is transfused with their own stored red blood cells to increase their oxygen capacity for competition, might be detectable now with the use of a microRNA marker of blood aging. An 18-nucleotide miRNA called miR-720 is produced in a predictable pattern as blood ages, which would allow sports officials to detect this kind of blood doping for the first tim

4h

Adding refined fiber to processed food could have negative health effects, study finds

Adding highly refined fiber to processed foods could have negative effects on human health, such as promoting liver cancer, according to a new study.

5h

Link found between chronic inflammation and risk for Alzheimer's disease

While it is widely shown that possessing the ApoE4 gene is the major genetic risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), not all ApoE4 carriers develop AD. For the first time, researchers have shown that ApoE4 linked with chronic inflammation dramatically increases the risk for AD. This can be detected by sequential measurements of C-reactive protein, a common clinical test which can be could be done

5h

For preterm infants, skin-to-skin contact affects hormone levels — and may promote parental engagement

For premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), skin-to-skin contact with parents influences levels of hormones related to mother-infant attachment (oxytocin) and stress (cortisol) — and may increase parents' level of engagement with their infants.

5h

Against a Federal Registry of Genitals

Life might be more orderly and easy to understand if biology worked just like this: People come in one of two sexes, male or female. This is determined by chromosomes, and XX means female, and XY means male. Males have penises and testicles—which are all similar in appearance and curvature and size—that secrete testosterone in similar proportions. This testosterone is metabolized and functions si

5h

Invasive forage grass leads to grassland bird decline

Researchers found that a common cattle forage grass, tall fescue, is associated with nest failure in dickcissels, small grassland birds similar to sparrows.

5h

Surprise finding: Discovering a previously unknown role for a source of magnetic fields

Feature describes unexpected discovery of a role the process that seeds magnetic fields plays in mediating a phenomenon that occurs throughout the universe and can disrupt cell phone service and knock out power grids on Earth.

5h

'Rapid-onset gender dysphoria' is a poisonous lie used to discredit trans people | Liz Duck-Chong

The anti-trans lobby is using bad science to attack vulnerable young people If you were to understand two facts about transgender people, I’d want it to be these: 1) that we have always existed, and 2) that we have always been under attack for existing. Despite our many footholds throughout history, especially outside of the western colonial gaze, the narrative that we are a new phenomenon has be

5h

Legendary team's 1921 Everest album

Newly digitised pictures shine light on the first British reconnaissance trip to Everest, in 1921.

5h

The Impact of Politics on Workplace Productivity

The always-on media cycle means political news is at our fingertips. What does this mean for employers? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

Two of six critically endangered black rhinos have died of unknown causes five months after being flown from South Africa to Chad in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals, officials said Sunday.

6h

Interview with Fortnite UX team

submitted by /u/dezignguy [link] [comments]

6h

Space travel is not a matter of genius | Letters

Richard Branson is just aiming to emulate what Nasa managed nearly 60 years ago, writes Michael Carley . Bryn Hughes says slave labour played a key role in Nazi Germany’s work on space flight John Harris rightly points out the way in which space travel is increasingly driven by an anti-public ideology which claims that “the masses” have never “brought about innovation” ( We once marvelled at Neil

8h

Danske forskere åbner ny dør for personlig medicin

Ny metode kan gøre det muligt at finde frem til den bedste behandling til den enkelte tarmkræftpatient ved hjælp af skånsomt indhentede prøver fra metastaser, som dyrkes og testes i en tredimensionel laboratoriekultur.

8h

PARP-hæmmer effektiv mod kræft i æggestokkene

To års behandling med PARP-hæmmer leder til substantiel forbedring af progressionsfri overlevelse blandt nydiagnosticerede patienter med kræft i æggestokkene.

8h

Bedre overlevelse for ikke-forsøgsegnede patienter med modermærkekræft

Overlevelsen for ikke-forsøgsegnede patienter med modermærkekræft er blevet forbedret de senere år. Der er dog behov for yderligere studier af behandlingseffekt for gruppen af patienter, der ikke lever op til almindelige inklusionskriterier, mener forsker.

8h

Lokal radioterapi forbedrer overlevelsen blandt patienter med prostatakræft

Radioterapi til behandling af kræft i prostata forbedrer overlevelsen for mænd med nydiagnosticeret, metastaserende prostatakræft, viser nyt studie.

8h

Nødvendigt med tidligere opsporing af kræft i bugspytkirtlen

Overlevelsen for kræft i bugspytkirtlen, som bliver opdaget sent, er så lav, at det er nødvendigt at diagnosticere sygdommen tidligere. Ellers vil det i 2030 være en af de mest dødelige kræftformer i Danmark.

8h

Kombination forbedrer progressionsfri overlevelse for nyrekræft-syge

Patienter med nyrekræft kan måske med fordel behandles med immun checkpoint-blokkeren avelumab og tyrosin-kinase-hæmmeren axitinib, der i et nyt studie signifikant forbedrede den progressionsfrie overlevelse.

8h

Behandlinger til kvinder med brystkræft virker også på mænd

Nyt studie viser, at prognosen for mænd og kvinder med brystkræft er ens, hvilket retfærdiggør den nuværende kliniske praksis, siger en af forskerne bag.

8h

Antiwar Movement Spreads among Tech Workers

Engineering students join Google and Microsoft workers in protesting the tech-industry's enabling of U.S. militarism — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Probiotika kan reducere kemo-diarre

Multistammet probiotika kan reducere kemoterapi-induceret diarre hos kræftpatienter.

9h

An Election in Poland’s Capital Could Shape the Future of Populism

WARSAW—On a chilly Friday evening in Poland’s capital, mayoral candidate Patryk Jaki took the stage in Praga Park to make a final pitch to voters. The location had symbolic resonance: Warsaw’s Praga district is home to many low-income residents who feel stigmatized and left behind by their increasingly prosperous and cosmopolitan city. This, in turn, helps makes it friendly territory for Jaki’s L

9h

Restrictive abortion laws in Northern Ireland affect women's health, study shows

New research finds that Northern Ireland's strict abortion laws have negative consequences for women's health and well-being, suggesting a public-health rationale to decriminalize abortion.

9h

Critical cancer immunity genes identified using new genetic barcoding technology

Scientists have developed a novel way to barcode and track different CRISPRs by utilizing synthetic proteins built from combinations of smaller proteins, called epitopes. By being able to mark each CRISPR with a unique identifier, the protein barcodes, or Pro-Codes for short, enable hundreds of CRISPRs to be used together to knockout a multitude of genes.

9h

Recent survey provides updated national estimate of doctors' financial ties to industry

Since 2013, gifts and payments to doctors by pharmaceutical and medical device companies have been publicly reported. Some medical centers, employers, and states have banned or restricted detailing visits, physician payments or gifts. In order to better understand the effects of these changes, a team of researchers conducted a national survey of internal medicine doctors.

9h

Tough laws prevent gun deaths, global report finds

A major global report confirms gun-related homicides, suicides and accidents are falling in Australia after the introduction of anti-gun laws, and that the effect of such tough laws is similar elsewhere.

9h

Virtual reality kan gøre dig mere empatisk overfor hjemløse

Du kan få mere empati for hjemløse, hvis du lærer om dem gennem virtual reality fremfor medier som artikler og tv, viser forskning.

9h

Prostate cancer: radiotherapy could extend thousands of lives, study finds

Use alongside traditional treatment in advanced cases ‘could benefit 3,000 men in UK’ Radiotherapy could increase the chances of survival for thousands of men with prostate cancer that has already spread by the time they are diagnosed, new research suggests. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer to affect men in the UK. About 47,000 are diagnosed every year and around 11,500 die. Significant

10h

Good spatial memory? You're likely to be good at identifying smells too

People who have better spatial memory are also better at identifying odors, according to a new study. The study builds on a recent theory that the main reason that a sense of smell evolved was to aid in navigation, since most animals rely primarily on smell to find food and avoid predators.

10h

US air pollution deaths nearly halved between 1990 and 2010

Air pollution in the US has decreased since about 1990, and a new study now shows that this air quality improvement has brought substantial public health benefits. The study found that deaths related to air pollution were nearly halved between 1990 and 2010.

10h

Cancer Research to cut funding for scientists who bully colleagues

UK charity cracks down on harassment after recent high-profile accusations Britain’s largest cancer charity has announced new rules to crack down on bullying and harassment. Cancer Research UK (CRUK) said scientists who bullied or harassed colleagues would face sanctions that could include being prevented from supervising PhD students, losing funding from the charity or being barred from applying

10h

Establishing an AI code of ethics will be harder than people think

Ethics are too subjective to guide the use of AI, argue some legal scholars.

11h

'Headless chicken sea monster' filmed swimming off East Antarctica

A deep-sea swimming sea cucumber has been filmed in the Southern Ocean off East Antarctica for the first time.

11h

Testinstrument med filter skal fjerne toksicitet ved nanopartikler

Interregionalt samarbejde med danske og nordtyske forskningsinstitutioner samt virksomheder skal sikre udvikling af metode, der gør brugen af nanopartikler sikker i mademballage.

11h

Extraterrestrial Life Could Be Purple

Earth's early life might have been purple, suggesting the search for extraterrestrial life should scan for the color.

11h

How do pelvic floor muscle exercises reduce overactive bladder symptoms?

Overactive bladder (OAB) is a common form of urinary incontinence that is widely treated with pelvic floor muscle (PFM) training. A new laboratory study lends insights into how PFM training works: by reducing contractions of the detrusor muscle of the bladder.

11h

‘Unwanted Sex,’ 20 Years Later

Letters from the Archives is a series in which we highlight past Atlantic stories and reactions from readers at the time. Just over a year ago, the Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein was accused of decades of sexual misconduct by a slew of women in the industry. Since then, the #MeToo movement has thrust questions of sexual overreach into the public sphere. But even as the cultural conversation abo

11h

Tesla's New Model 3, Lime's New Scooter, and More This Week in the Future of Cars

Tesla makes yet another non-$35K Model 3, battery swapping somehow comes back, yet more evidence 'semi-autonomous' driving is confusing people, and more car news.

11h

Trump's Tweets (Once Again) Top This Week's Internet News Roundup

Last week, the internet spent a lot of time sorting through the fact and fictions in President Trump's Twitter feed.

11h

Be Afraid… but Only If You Want to Be

Variations in brain chemistry and what make us feel safe can be the difference between those who enjoy getting scared and those who don’t — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Review: The Updated Fitbit Charge 3 is More of the Same, but Better

If you're going to look at an advanced fitness tracker, why not just get a smartwatch?

12h

How to Stream the MLB 2018 World Series Without Cable

You don’t need cable to watch America’s pastime.

12h

Cities Are Turning Snails Yellow

Take a stroll through the coastal dunes, woodlands, or cities of Europe and you will likely find, with an observant eye, grove snails. They come in a variety of colors: coral pink, lemon yellow, lush mahogany. Sometimes, their shells are swirled with as many as five black bands. For decades in the early and mid-20th century, schoolboys collected the shells in the same way they collected bird eggs

12h

Sanders and Warren Are Heading for a Stand-off

Neither is blinking. Bernie Sanders thinks he has a lock on his supporters. Elizabeth Warren thinks she can get enough of them, and enough elsewhere to run regardless. Allies and supporters are anxious they’ll destroy both their chances, and kneecap progressive politics along the way. Some close to Sanders feel like Warren was trying to muscle him out of the race, and laugh at the idea that she w

13h

Education doesn’t happen on paper. It happens between people.

When it comes to educating, says Dr. Elizabeth Alexander, a brave failure is preferable to timid success. Fostering an environment where one isn't afraid to fail is tantamount to learning. Human beings are complicated and flawed. Working with those complications and flaws leads to true knowledge.

13h

The Titan M Chip Powers Up Pixel 3 Security

Google's latest flagship smartphone includes the Titan M, a security-focused chip that keeps users safe against sophisticated attacks.

13h

'Oumuamua Was Neither Comet nor Asteroid…So What Was It?

Last year's brief interstellar visit from a cigar-shaped thing named 'Oumuamua is confounding astronomers in new ways.

13h

Most of ‘Luzia,’ a 12,000-Year-Old Fossil, Is Recovered After Brazil Museum Fire

The museum director said that 80 percent of the fossil had been found after a huge fire ripped through the National Museum last month.

14h

Melting glacier in China draws tourists, climate worries

The loud crack rang out from the fog above the Baishui No. 1 Glacier as a stone shard careened down the ice, flying past Chen Yanjun as he operated a GPS device.

14h

Delhi holds breath as burning farms herald pollution season

Harpal Singh struck a match and watched his fields burn, the acrid smoke drifting toward New Delhi where a lethal smog cocktail is once again intensifying over the world's most polluted megacity.

14h

Germany urges global minimum tax for digital giants

German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said in an interview for publication Sunday he backed a global minimum fiscal regime for multinationals as Europe looks to levy tax notably on US tech giants.

14h

China-backed hydro dam threatens world's rarest orangutan

A billion-dollar hydroelectric dam development in Indonesia that threatens the habitat of the world's rarest great ape has sparked fresh concerns about the impact of China's globe-spanning infrastructure drive.

14h

Ny teori: Var cigarformet objekt i solsystemet en gravsten fra en død stjerne?

Det er ikke uinteressant at vide, om objektet ’Oumuamua var en komet eller asteroide. Måske var det en gravsten fra en død stjerne.

14h

Immigrant Stereotypes Are Everywhere on TV

In April, a Season 4 episode of Jane the Virgin sees Alba—the titular character’s grandmother—applying for her U.S. citizenship. It’s a storyline that’s been seasons in the making, as viewers watched her evolve from undocumented immigrant to green-card holder to naturalized American. When Alba passes her test with a perfect score, stars from her new country’s flag float around her head as she cel

14h

Liv på syv år udfordrer videnskaben: Kan edderkopper få hovedpine?

Edderkopper har en hjerne, så der er en sandsynlighed for hovedpine, vurderer forsker. På DR Viden tager vi børns nysgerrighed alvorligt og finder svar hos videnskaben.

15h

How to make organ transplants last

New strategies aim to help transplant recipients keep their organs healthy with fewer (or no) immune suppressing drugs.

15h

Firmaer fører pennen for forskere i kliniske forsøg

Dansk studie indikerer, at medicinalfirmaer, der sponsorerer forskning, forsøger at nedtone deres indflydelse, selv når de er involveret i design og endelig analyse.

16h

Frances Arnold: ‘To expect a Nobel prize is rather silly’

The joint winner of this year’s Nobel prize in chemistry talks about her pioneering work on enzymes and the realities of sexism in the sciences This month , Frances Arnold , professor of chemical engineering at Caltech in California , was awarded the 2018 Nobel prize in chemistry, shared with two others . She’s the fifth female chemistry laureate since the prizes first began in 1901 , and the only

17h

Five scientific predictions by Professor Stephen Hawking

From catastrophic climate change to alien invasion, the theoretical physicist’s thoughts about what might lie ahead were often far from optimistic In his recently published posthumous collection of articles and essays, Brief Answers to the Big Questions , Stephen Hawking forecast that genetic editing techniques will give rise to a breed of “superhumans” – “a race of self-designing beings who are

18h

Videnskaben slår fast: Træer kommunikerer med hinanden

Planter og træer kommunikerer både gennem kemikalier, lyd og budbringere.

18h

Forsker: Sædkvaliteten falder drastisk med alderen

Mænd med dårlig sædkvalitet bør skynde sig at få børn, lyder det.

18h

Understanding the building blocks for an electronic brain

Computer bits are binary, with a value of 0 or one. By contrast, neurons in the brain can have all kinds of different internal states, depending on the input that they received. This allows the brain to process information in a more energy-efficient manner than a computer. University of Groningen (UG) physicists are working on memristors, resistors with a memory, made from niobium-doped strontium

20h

Science News Briefs From Around the Globe

A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe, including one from Mongolia on horse dentistry. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

New, large sequence panel enables population genetics research in Africa

Geneticists have assembled the largest sets of African genomic data available to date, creating a resource that will help researchers understand the genetic structure of Africa as well as the effects of genetic variation on protein function and disease. The findings underscore the importance of including globally diverse participant cohorts in genetics research.

23h

Merging mathematical and physical models toward building a more perfect flying vehicle

When designing flying vehicles, there are many aspects of which we can be certain but there are also many uncertainties. Most are random, and others are just not well understood. Researchers brought together several mathematical and physical theories to help look at problems in more unified ways and solve physical engineering problems.

23h

New drug could sustain oxygen-starved hearts

In new studies, a novel oxygen-delivery therapeutic restored the function of oxygen-starved heart tissue in an animal model of global hypoxia. Unlike its experimental predecessors, the new drug does not appear to cause systemic side effects or overcorrect with excessive blood oxygenation, which can itself be toxic. Instead, the new drug delivers its precious oxygen cargo only to the tissues that n

23h

Genetic study improves lifespan predictions and scientific understanding of aging

By studying the effect of genetic variations on lifespan across the human genome, researchers have devised a way to estimate whether an individual can expect to live longer or shorter than average, and have advanced scientific understanding of the diseases and cellular pathways involved in aging.

23h

Electronic medical records show promise in reducing unnecessary testing

Upon implementing electronic medical record-based interventions, Boston Medical Center reduced unnecessary diagnostic testing and increased the use of postoperative order sets.

23h

PTSD symptoms improve when patient chooses form of treatment

A new study is the first large-scale trial of hundreds of PTSD patients, including veterans and survivors of sexual assault, to measure whether patient preference in the course of treatment impacts the effectiveness of a type of cognitive behavioral therapy and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, a type of antidepressant often prescribed for PTSD.

23h

With a microbe-produced toxin, bacteria prove old dogs can learn new tricks

In the ongoing chemical battles among bacteria and their microbial neighbors, a new toxin has been uncovered. This unfamiliar toxin behaves in a familiar way. Its actions against other bacteria resemble the mechanisms of cholera, pertussis and diphtheria toxins. Some bacteria deploying this toxin have safeguards against self-poisoning.

23h

Does herpes cause Alzheimer's?

Herpes is the dreaded 'gift that keeps on giving'. But could it also be taking our memories? Decades of research show a striking correlation between Alzheimer's disease risk and infection with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1) in people carrying a specific gene. Now, newly-available epidemiological data provide a causal link between HSV1 infection and senile dementia — raising the tantalizing prospec

23h

A single missing gene leads to miscarriage

A single gene of the mother plays such a crucial role in the development of the placenta that its dysfunction leads to miscarriages. Researchers have observed this in so-called knockout mice that were specifically modified for this purpose. These mice lack the gene for the transcription factor Math6. By conducting further analyses, the research team is now hoping to gain new insights into the role

23h

How schools can optimize support for children with ADHD

New research gives the clearest guidance yet on how schools can best support children with ADHD to improve symptoms and maximize their academic outcomes.

23h

Molecular memory can be used to increase the memory capacity of hard disks

Scientists have taken part in research where the first molecule capable of remembering the direction of a magnetic above liquid nitrogen temperatures has been prepared and characterized. The results may be used in the future to massively increase the storage capacity of hard disks without increasing their physical size.

1d

How to avoid raising a materialistic child

If you're a parent, you may be concerned that materialism among children has been on the rise. But there's some good news. A new study suggests that some parenting tactics can curb kids' materialistic tendencies.

1d

En route to custom-designed natural products

Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to industrial assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists have now been able to discover how these enzymes interact with each other. This brings them one step closer to their goal of engineering the production of such peptide natural products.

1d

Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry

Scientists studying a valuable, but vulnerable, species of poplar have identified the genetic mechanism responsible for the species' inability to resist a pervasive and deadly disease. Their finding could lead to more successful hybrid poplar varieties for increased biofuels and forestry production and protect native trees against infection.

1d

Eating leafy greens could help prevent macular degeneration

A new study has shown that eating vegetable nitrates, found mainly in green leafy vegetables and beetroot, could help reduce your risk of developing early-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

1d

The stress-free way to listen to your unborn baby's heart

Checking the heartbeat of babies in the womb is set to become more accurate and less stressful for expectant mothers thanks to research.

1d

Clues to how birds began to fly

For the first time, researchers have measured what is known as the ground effect of flying animals — and it turns out that they save a lot more energy by flying close to the ground than previously believed. The study supports one of the theories on how birds began to fly.

1d

The neurobiology of social aggression

Bullying and aggression carry heavy societal costs. For the first time, researchers have found a signalling mechanism in the brain that shapes social behavior — specifically a growth factor protein, called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB), which affects social dominance. This novel discovery has implications for a deeper understandin

1d

New fly species found in Indiana may indicate changing climate

A new type of blow fly spotted in Indiana points to shifting species populations due to climate change. Researchers have observed the first evidence of Lucilia cuprina in Indiana, an insect previously known to populate southern states from Virginia to California.

1d

Why some cancers affect only young women

Among several forms of pancreatic cancer, one of them affects specifically women, often young, even though the pancreas is an organ with little exposure to sex hormones. This pancreatic cancer, known as 'mucinous cyst,' has strange similarities with another mucinous cancer, affecting the ovaries. By conducting large-scale analyses of genomic data, researchers have provided an answer: both tumors o

1d

Scientists find brain signal that might help us judge the holiday buffet

Neuroscientists have found a brain region that appears to be strongly connected to food preference decisions, like what to choose from a buffet line or potluck table.

1d

Securing access to optimal cancer care through innovation, integration and sustainability

Securing access to optimal cancer care for all patients can only be achieved through integrated, sustainable translation of today's scientific advances into tomorrow's treatments, reinforced by a clear understanding of the magnitude of clinical effects and accurate identification of patients most likely to benefit.

1d

Denmark has the flattest work hierarchy in the world

Denmark may be the birthplace of the Lego tower, but its workplace hierarchy is the flattest in the world. According to the World Economic Forum's Global Competitiveness Report 2018 , the nation tops an index measuring "willingness to delegate authority" at work, beating 139 other countries. This will come as no surprise to foreign workers who can find the country's egalitarian approach a culture

1d

Barriers to early clinical trial access for adolescents and young adults still exist

Young cancer patients at the crossroads of childhood and adulthood seem to be stuck in a treatment impasse. A study to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, has highlighted the existence of barriers to the inclusion of 12 to 25-year-olds in both adult and paediatric early phase clinical trials, suggesting a need for more tailored approaches to give this patient population better access

1d

Bioelectronic medicine treatment effective for lupus, pilot clinical trial shows

Results shared at ACR/ARHP annual meeting highlight non-invasive therapy reduces pain and fatigue associated with lupus.

1d

Immune therapy generates promising results in hard-to-treat ankylosing spondylitis

Results from a phase 3 clinical trial indicate that patients who have not benefited from standard therapy for ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by back pain and sacroiliac-joint damage, may have another treatment option in the biologic drug ixekizumab.

1d

New, large sequence panel enables population genetics research in Africa

Geneticists have assembled the largest sets of African genomic data available to date, creating a resource that will help researchers understand the genetic structure of Africa as well as the effects of genetic variation on protein function and disease. The findings underscore the importance of including globally diverse participant cohorts in genetics research, and were presented in a plenary ses

1d

Most Initial Conversations Go Better Than People Think

We're largely overestimating how much our feelings are on display to others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

The surprising psychology of sex with your ex

In the first study of its kind, researchers have found sex with an ex didn't prevent people from getting over their relationship. Instead of feeling worse about their breakup after a hookup, the new singles who attempted sexual contact with their ex reported feeling better afterwards. The findings suggest that not every piece of relationship advice is to be taken at face value. It seems like a ru

1d

Magic Mushroom Drug Evolved to Mess with Insect Brains

For that matter, so did most natural recreational drugs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Genetic study improves lifespan predictions and scientific understanding of aging

By studying the effect of genetic variations on lifespan across the human genome, researchers have devised a way to estimate whether an individual can expect to live longer or shorter than average, and have advanced scientific understanding of the diseases and cellular pathways involved in aging. Their findings were presented at the American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) 2018 Annual Meeting in

1d

Witches, goblins and the quest to solve the mystery of dark matter

This Halloween, scientists across the globe will celebrate the mysterious material they believe holds the universe together Lovers of the dark and the unseen will soon have a new cause to celebrate. They will be able to honour, on Halloween, the hunt for dark matter, the mysterious, invisible material that is thought to permeate space and hold galaxies together. Across Britain, the US and Europe,

1d

Ny metode finder tilbagefald hos patienter med blærekræft tidligere

Danske forskere har som de første vist, at man kan med analyser af cirkulerende tumor-DNA kan opdage tilbagefald hos blærekræftpatienter 100 dage tidligere end med de hidtidige CT-scanninger.

1d

Nogle patienter med triple-negativ brystkræft lever længere med immunterapi

Immunterapi forbedrer overlevelsesmulighederne for PD-L1-positive patienter med metastaserende triple-negativ brystkræft, viser nyt studie.

1d

Skrøbelige ældre kan have gavn af ny tilgang til behandling af spredt tarmkræft

En reduceret kombinationsbehandling er bedre end den monoterapi, som man i dag ofte giver til ældre patienter med metastatisk tarmkræft, viser nyt studie.

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