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Nyheder2018oktober22

 

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Collaboration yields possible treatment for rare neurodegenerative disorder

Read how a discovery in bacteria in the 1980s led to a promising new class of compounds for treatment of PKAN, a progressive neurodegenerative disease.

9h

 

'Magisk uge' i graviditeten sænker markant risikoen for brystkræft

På sigt kan forskerne måske udvikle en pille, der beskytter kvinder mod brystkræft, forklarer forsker.

14h

 

Gamer-piger vælger ofte naturvidenskab og teknologi

Når piger bruger mange timer om ugen på computerspil, er der stor sandsynlighed for, at de vælger en STEM-uddannelse, viser britisk undersøgelse.

8h

 

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8min

 

Cemeteries are the perfect spot to track our planet’s demise

Environment In a changing climate, cemeteries make great laboratories. Between the headstones at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Massachusetts, citizen scientists record data on changing plant, animal, and insect behavior.

14min

 

How to mass produce cell-sized robots

MIT researchers have discovered a way to mass produce tiny, cell-sized robots that could be used for industrial or biomedical monitoring.

18min

 

SPIE journal publishes first known English translation of 1918 Schottky paper

SPIE Journal of Micro/Nanolithography, MEMS, and MOEMS (JM3) today publishes an open-access English translation of Walter H. Schottky's key 1918 Annalen der Physik article 'Über spontane Stromschwankungen in verschiedenen Elektrizitätsleitern.' The English text, 'On spontaneous current fluctuations in various electrical conductors,' was translated from the original German by Martin Burkhardt, a JM

18min

 

Scientists capture images of antibodies working together against malaria

Scientists investigating how the human immune system defends against malaria have uncovered a rare phenomenon: antibodies working together to bind to a vulnerable spot on the parasite.

18min

 

Houston Methodist scientists create device to deliver immunotherapy without side effects

Houston Methodist scientists have developed a nanodevice to deliver immunotherapy without side effects to treat triple-negative breast cancer. Inserted straight into a tumor, this device makes it possible to deliver a one-time, sustained-release dose that would eliminate the need for patients to undergo several IV treatments over time. Alessandro Grattoni chairman of nanomedicine at the Houston Me

18min

 

New laser advances

Lasers are poised to take another step forward: Researchers at Case Western Reserve University, in collaboration with partners around the world, have been able to control the direction of a laser's output beam by applying external voltage.

18min

 

Measuring immigrant integration

Researchers at the Immigration Policy Lab at Stanford University and ETH Zurich developed a new pragmatic survey tool to measure immigrant integration. The IPL Integration Index provides researchers, policymakers, and service providers with quick and easy to implement survey modules to measure various dimensions of integration. The measure is available in a 12-item short form (IPL-12) and 24-item

18min

 

First study of its kind identifies differences in pediatric mortality after MVCs

The first study to map the incidence of motor vehicle collisions resulting in deaths of children at the local level may shed light on the need for, and current state of access to, trauma centers for injured children.

18min

 

Does putting the brakes on outrage bottle up social change?

While outrage is often generally considered a hurdle in the path to civil discourse, a team of psychologists suggest outrage — specifically, moral outrage — may have beneficial outcomes, such as inspiring people to take part in long-term collective action.

39min

 

Study explores infant body position and learning

A developmental psychologist at UC Riverside, has completed a study that is the first to measure how often infants spend time in different body positions over the first year of life. The study aims to understand how the physical context of infants' everyday experiences – in particular, how much time they spend in different body positions – changes over the course of the first year and how these ch

39min

 

Biomarkers can predict whether women with endometriosis will respond to the first-line treatment

Biomarkers can predict whether women will respond to the first-line treatment for endometriosis, an extremely painful condition in which the tissue usually found inside the uterus grows in places it shouldn't, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

39min

 

Soil Takes Decades to Catch Up to Climate Changes

Soil Takes Decades to Catch Up to Climate Changes Soil bacteria often take 50 years or more to react to changes in climate. soil-pile.jpg Image credits: Arild Finne Nybø via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Earth Tuesday, October 23, 2018 – 13:45 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Soil bacteria respond dramatically to changes in climate, but the full impacts aren't felt for at l

40min

 

Facebook’s new Messenger design is a rare simplification

Technology Instagram and Facebook are more chaotic than ever, but Messenger is cutting back. Instagram and Facebook are more chaotic than ever, but Messenger is determined to simplify.

43min

 

Tsetse fly out of Zimbabwe's hot Zambezi valley

The tsetse fly—an insect that transmits trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness—could soon die out in Zimbabwe's Zambezi Valley due to rising temperatures, a study said Tuesday.

45min

 

Strong Indian monsoons steer Atlantic hurricanes towards land, study finds

Strong monsoons in the Indian Ocean can induce easterly winds that push Atlantic Ocean hurricanes westward, increasing the likelihood they'll make landfall in the Americas, according to new research.

45min

 

Yahoo to pay $50M, other costs for massive security breach

Yahoo has agreed to pay $50 million in damages and provide two years of free credit-monitoring services to about 200 million people in the U.S. and Israel whose email addresses and other personal information were stolen as part of the biggest security breach in history.

45min

 

What Is Lithium?

Lithium is a metal used in manufacturing, electronics and mental health.

53min

 

Football players' concussions linked to dyslexia gene

A gene associated with dyslexia, a learning disorder, may make some athletes less susceptible to concussions, reports a new study. This is believed to be the first time that this gene has been implicated in concussion or mild traumatic brain injury in athletes of a high-impact sport.

53min

 

Family acceptance of LGBT identity linked to reduced stress

Ohio University Associate Professor of Psychology Dr. Peggy Zoccola has determined that those who identify as LGBT and have come out to their family carry less stress hormones than those who have not come out, which may ultimately benefit their health.

53min

 

Strong Indian monsoons steer Atlantic hurricanes towards land, study finds

Strong monsoons in the Indian Ocean can induce easterly winds that push Atlantic Ocean hurricanes westward, increasing the likelihood they'll make landfall in the Americas, according to new research.

53min

 

CU researchers: Home care for knee replacement patients aids in recovery

A team of physical therapy researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have conducted one of the first full-scale studies to assess the effectiveness of in-home physical therapy care for patients who have had knee replacement surgery. The study analyzes Medicare home health care claims for patients treated with total knee arthroplasty in 2012 who received home health care servic

53min

 

How Facebook's Messenger Got Its New Look in a New Jersey Basement

Today Facebook is revealing its Messenger app's redesign, which has a bubbly vibe that a former intern dreamed up at his parents' house.

54min

 

Compound targets ‘undruggable’ prostate cancer cells

A new type of molecule blocks the action of genes that drive the growth of therapy-resistant prostate cancer, according to a new study. “Rather than continue making compounds that are just like older drugs, the focus of our work has been to rethink the definition of what a drug-like molecule can be,” says corresponding author Susan K. Logan, associate professor in New York University Langone’s ur

55min

 

3D printing method produces magnetic parts

Researchers have developed a method that uses 3D printing to create products containing magnets. When Kai von Petersdorff-Campen decided to make an artificial heart pump using 3D printing, he didn’t expect that his project would attract so much attention. The piece of plastic that he took from the printer after 15 hours was of very low quality. But as the ensuing test showed, it worked—and that w

55min

 

ALMA maps Europa's temperature

Jupiter's icy moon Europa has a chaotic surface terrain that is fractured and cracked, suggesting a long-standing history of geologic activity.

57min

 

Saturn’s moon Dione has stripes like no others in the solar system

Icy moon Dione has long, thin, bright lines at its equator that run surprisingly parallel to each other for tens to hundreds of kilometers.

1h

 

8 out of 8 people in study have ingested microplastic

All subjects selected for a pilot program had microplastics in their stools. The types of microplastics found implicate both food and non-food sources. Boutique water may be healthier, but its bottles not so much. It was just a small study from a team of researchers led by gastroenterologist Philipp Schwabl of the Medical University of Vienna, but all eight people selected as subjects in the warm

1h

 

Complex causes of premature and low-birthweight babies in India

Women in India who spend more time fetching water, use a shared latrine, and endure harassment from others are more apt to give birth to a pre-term or low-birthweight baby.

1h

 

Harmful pesticides lurking in New York State homes

Despite the existence of chemical-free methods to eradicate pests, Americans use more than a billion pounds of pesticides per year. These chemicals are mostly out of sight and out of mind to unsuspecting homeowners, who are typically unaware of how to prevent potential harm – something new research is addressing.

1h

 

Sockeye carcasses tossed on shore over two decades spur tree growth

Hansen Creek, a small stream in southwest Alaska, is hard to pick out on a map. It's just over a mile long and about 4 inches deep. Crossing from one bank to the other takes about five big steps.

1h

 

NASA eyes powerful Hurricane Willa affecting western Mexico

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Hurricane Willa as it continued moving toward landfall in western Mexico on Oct. 23. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at the extent and structure of the storm. Willa is expected to bring life-threatening storm surge, wind, and rainfall to portions of west-central and southwestern Mexico.

1h

 

An Introduction to CAR T-Cell Production

Learn about T-cell receptor-mediated cancer cell killing, constructing CAR-T cells, producing CAR-T cells, and manufacturing CAR-T cells for the clinic with this eBook!

1h

 

NASA eyes powerful Hurricane Willa affecting western Mexico

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Hurricane Willa as it continued moving toward landfall in western Mexico on Oct. 23, 2018. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible look at the extent and structure of the storm. Willa is expected to bring life-threatening storm surge, wind, and rainfall to portions of west-central and southwestern Mexico.

1h

 

Sockeye carcasses tossed on shore over two decades spur tree growth

In a 20-year study, researchers have found that nearly 600,000 pounds of sockeye salmon carcasses tossed to the left side of a small, remote stream in southwest Alaska, helped trees on that side of the stream grow faster than their counterparts on the other side.

1h

 

Canada to impose carbon tax on provinces bucking climate action

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Tuesday his government will impose a federal carbon tax on four out of 10 Canadian provinces that have failed to plan to curb climate pollution.

1h

 

Suspiria Is a Bewitching, Bloody, and Admirably Daring Remake

Dario Argento’s 1977 horror classic Suspiria is a feast of color, a bloody thrill ride set in a ballet school where rooms glow red with demonic vibrancy. A breakout film for the master of the Italian giallo genre, it has the capacity to thrill and bewitch despite a barely functioning plot, serving as the ultimate example of a horror movie where atmosphere matters more than plausibility. Luca Guad

1h

 

The Real Horror in The Haunting of Hill House

When Eleanor Vance first encounters the eponymous mansion in Shirley Jackson’s 1959 novel, The Haunting of Hill House , it seems to consume her before she even enters it. The house is “vile,” she thinks, “it is diseased.” It looms over her, “enormous and dark,” twisting her stomach and chilling the air around her. As Eleanor stands on the veranda of Hill House, it comes “around her in a rush,” en

1h

 

Ultra-close stars discovered inside a planetary nebula

Astronomers have discovered two stars in a binary pair that complete an orbit around each other in a little over three hours, residing in the planetary nebula M3-1. Remarkably, the stars could drive a nova explosion, an entirely unexpected event based on our current understanding of binary star evolution.

1h

 

Philosophy of mind: In touch with reality?

When faced with ambiguous information we apparently trust our fingertips more than our eyes. Philosophers are investigating the special status of touch.

1h

 

Walmart makes improvements to third-party marketplace

Walmart says it will work with third-party sellers to make millions of items available for free two-day shipping on orders over $35.

1h

 

Motley crews of bacteria cleanse water at huge oceanic Georgia Aquarium exhibit

Sea creatures need to go to the bathroom, too, and in aquariums, that creates the task of cleaning the water of waste like ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. Good bacteria break down nitrogen compounds at Georgia Aquarium, and in a new study, some bacterial communities there emulated those found naturally in oceans surprisingly well.

1h

 

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite catches Typhoon Yutu strengthening, Guam on alert

Tropical Storm Yutu continued strengthening as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead. On Oct. 23, Yutu was a strengthening typhoon east of Guam.

1h

 

New study scrutinizes time and effort it takes to vote in each state

Wide variations among the 50 states when it comes to the ease of casting a ballot are impacting the quality of democracy in the United States, a new study shows.

1h

 

Researchers connect the current mix of soil bacteria to climate conditions from 50 years ago

Scientists expect climate change influences the geographical distribution of microbes in the soil, but few studies have dug deeply into that relationship. A study published this week in mSystems suggests the connection can drag across decades. After sequencing soil samples from North American and the Tibetan plateau, and comparing those to historical climate records, an international team of resea

1h

 

Erdogan’s Big Reveal That Wasn’t

Saudi Arabia has for weeks put out contradictory stories on the fate of Jamal Khashoggi. The Saudi journalist has variously been free, missing, and accidentally killed by a band of overzealous officials. On Tuesday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan took direct aim at those contrasting narratives, announcing that Khashoggi had been killed in a “planned operation.” Erdogan’s remarks not only

1h

 

Predicting how native plants return to abandoned farm fields

Movement is one of the most common processes in all biology—mice forage for food and geese migrate with the seasons. While plants may be rooted in one spot for most of their lives, movement also plays a key role in their ecology—especially when it comes to seeds.

1h

 

Climate change, rising sea levels a threat to farmers in Bangladesh

Rising sea levels driven by climate change make for salty soil, and that is likely to force about 200,000 coastal farmers in Bangladesh inland as glaciers melt into the world's oceans, according to estimates from a new study.

1h

 

Bringing Americans together on the issue of affordable housing

A lack of affordable housing is linked with many health problems, including asthma, stress and alcoholism. Penn State researchers found that while some Americans may be less aware of this link, there may be ways to communicate this connection in a way that resonates with those groups.

1h

 

Best headphones for an open-plan office

Gadgets Keep the office noise out and your music in. PopSci's list of the best headphones for an open-plan office that will help keep your office noise out and your music in.

1h

 

Earlier puberty linked to mother's smoking during pregnancy

If the mother smokes during pregnancy, there is a risk of her children going into puberty earlier.

1h

 

Genomic analysis helps in discovery of unusual new bird species from Indonesia

A research team has described an unusual new songbird species. The bird was named the Rote Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus rotiensis after the island of Rote where it is found.

1h

 

Tortoise evolution: How did they become so big?

The evolution of giant tortoise might not be linked to islands, as had been previously thought. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers present the most comprehensive family tree of extinct and extant tortoises so far. Analyzing genetic and osteological data from living species and fossil tortoise they rewrite the evolution of tortoise: Giant size evolved on multiple occasions on the mainland.

1h

 

Noble metal-free catalyst system as active as platinum

The industry has been traditionally deploying platinum alloys as catalysts for oxygen reduction, which is for example essential in fuel cells or metal-air batteries. Expensive and rare, that metal imposes strict restrictions on manufacture. Researchers have discovered an alloy made up of five elements that is noble metal-free and as active as platinum.

1h

 

Reading between the lines: Are we as savvy as we'd like to think when it comes to reviews?

New research suggests we are willing to blindly trust hotel reviews when they conform to our preconceived ideas.

1h

 

Short seller changes mind: 'Tesla is destroying the competition'

Tesla shares were up 10% at one point on the day Left issued his report. Left argues that Tesla has no real competition, and that many concerns Tesla skeptics have are unfounded. Despite this, Left is still suing both Tesla and CEO Elon Musk for alleged stock manipulation resulting from a tweet written by Musk in August. Andrew Left of Citron Research had been one of Tesla's most notable short se

1h

 

Honey, I shrunk the cell culture

From "Fantastic Voyage" to "Despicable Me," shrink rays have been a science-fiction staple on screen. Now chemists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a real shrink ray that can change the size and shape of a block of gel-like material while human or bacterial cells grow on it. This new tool holds promise for biomedical researchers, including those seeking to shed light on how to g

1h

 

Invasive species in an ecosystem harm native organisms but aid other invasive species

The presence of an invasive species in an ecosystem makes native organisms more susceptible to pollutants and may encourage the spread of additional invasive species, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

1h

 

'Mushrooms' and 'brushes' help cancer-fighting nanoparticles survive in the body

For a number of innovative and life-saving medical treatments, from organ replacements and skin grafts to cancer therapy and surgery, success often depends on slipping past or fending off the body's immune system. In a recent development, aimed at aiding cancer detection and treatment, Drexel University researchers might have found the ideal surface texture for helping microscopic, medical helpers

1h

 

To Find New Fans (and Their Money), Patreon Partners With Reddit

By partnering with Reddit, Patreon hopes it can convert more Redditors into patrons, helping them discover and support creators on the platform.

1h

 

Hubble Space Telescope Almost Back in Action

The famed orbital observatory has recovered from a glitch that suspended its operations earlier this month — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

Motley crews of bacteria cleanse water at huge oceanic Georgia Aquarium exhibit

Good bacteria cleaning water in Georgia Aquarium's huge oceanic exhibit delivered a nice surprise to researchers. The aquarium wanted to know which bacteria were at work, so Georgia Tech oceanic biochemists analyzed them: The bacterial colonies raised eyebrows because they were virtually indistinguishable from those found in natural settings.

1h

 

'Himalayan gold' on the brink

Stanford researchers show how warmer winters and booming demand for one of the world's most expensive medicinal species may hurt ecosystems and communities in the Himalayas.

1h

 

What are the determinants associated with fasting hyperglucagonemia in type 2 diabetes?

A new study examined the relationship between fasting hyperglucagonemia — which can negatively affect glucose metabolism in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) — and several biochemical and glycemic factors in subjects with T2D or in a nondiabetic control group.

1h

 

Racial differences in colorectal cancer incidence not due to biology

A systematic review and meta-analysis from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine has found that, in spite of the higher incidence and death rate of colorectal cancer in blacks, no difference exists in the overall prevalence of advanced, precancerous polyps between average-risk blacks and whites who underwent a screening colonoscopy. These findings suggest that the age

1h

 

Where deep learning meets metamaterials

Breakthroughs in the field of nanophotonics—how light behaves on the nanometer scale—have paved the way for the invention of "metamaterials," man-made materials that have enormous applications, from remote nanoscale sensing to energy harvesting and medical diagnostics. But their impact on daily life has been hindered by a complicated manufacturing process with large margins of error.

1h

 

Researchers connect the current mix of soil bacteria to climate conditions from 50 years ago

Scientists expect climate change influences the geographical distribution of microbes in the soil, but few studies have dug deeply into that relationship. A study published this week in mSystems suggests the connection can drag across decades. After sequencing soil samples from North American and the Tibetan plateau, and comparing those to historical climate records, an international team of resea

1h

 

VR New York gives future social workers a new way to train

A new virtual reality simulation of New York City is helping social work students practice in the virtual world before heading into the real thing. “It’s convenient but it’s also a safe way to explore the area,” says Nikki Vega, a student at the New York University’s Silver School of Social Work. Nicholas Lanzieri, a clinical assistant professor of social work at NYU, created the virtual training

1h

 

Ja, dine bedsteforældre har stadig sex

Den største myte om ældres sexliv er, at de ikke har et, lyder det fra forfatter.

2h

 

Facebook’s ex security boss: Asking Big Tech to police hate speech is “a dangerous path”

Alex Stamos on the risks of giving his former employer and other giant platforms the power to determine what people can—and can’t—say online.

2h

 

Hey Portal, Facebook might want to cut the losses now on the video device

Imagine the politician who gets caught in a scandal, breaching the public's trust, whether that be of a sexual nature, misspending taxpayer money or just doing something dumb.

2h

 

Optimizing winglets for minimum drag, more efficient flight

Although, winglets have been around since the mid-1970s, there is still a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and angles. Analyzing winglets to find the optimal characteristics to result in the lowest net drag for an aircraft was the goal of University of Illinois researchers Phillip Ansell, Kai James, and graduate student Prateek Ranjan.

2h

 

Honey, I shrunk the cell culture

A new 'shrink ray' can change the size and shape of a block of gel-like material while human or bacterial cells grow on it. This tool holds promise for biomedical researchers, including those seeking to shed light on how to grow replacement tissues and organs for implants.

2h

 

Avoiding the hippocampus during whole-brain radiotherapy prevents cognitive side effects

Whole-brain radiotherapy can be delivered more safely to patients with brain metastases by avoiding the hippocampus according to a randomized phase III NRG Oncology trial presented at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Annual Meeting

2h

 

New combination treatment flips the switch on melanoma cells

Navitoclax plus A-1210477 not only killed melanoma cells, but also killed the melanoma initiating cells (aka cancer stem cells) that often resist therapy.

2h

 

Nerve-on-a-chip platform makes neuroprosthetics more effective

Scientists have developed a miniaturized electronic platform for the stimulation and recording of peripheral nerve fibers on a chip. By modulating and rapidly recording nerve activity with a high signal-to-noise ratio, the platform paves the way to using chips to improve neuroprosthetic designs.

2h

 

Climate change and African trypanosomiasis vector populations in Zimbabwe's Zambezi Valley

A new article looks at the impact of climate change on the vectors of sleeping sickness in Africa.

2h

 

Bad boss? You may be making things better — or worse!

Bosses who are disagreeable, dishonest and careless can mean bad outcomes for companies and teams. However, new research shows employees also play a major role in this. Employee anxiety, self-esteem and how leadership behavior is perceived can all affect the influence that leaders can have. These findings can help organizations identify those leaders and employees with undesirable traits or behavi

2h

 

New self-healing technology makes robots more human-like

Scientists are creating robots that can heal themselves Ability to heal is important for soft robots Soft robots can perform delicate operations but can damage easily None One of the great things about being human is our ability to heal after injuries. If we couldn't regrow skin or mend broken bones, we wouldn't last too long in a world full of hazards. Now researchers are developing self-healing

2h

 

2h

 

Portrait 'Painted' by A.I. Up for Auction at Christie's in NYC

A.I. portraiture is taking the art world by storm.

2h

 

Painkillers during pregnancy can bring forward puberty in girls

The more weeks a women takes pain-reliving medication during pregnancy, the earlier their daughters enter puberty. This is shown by a new study. As the first in the world, researchers have examined the correlation between the intake of the analgesic paracetamol during pregnancy and girls and boys pubertal development.

2h

 

Aspirin alone a good clot buster after knee surgery

When it comes to preventing blood clots after a knee replacement, good old aspirin may be just as effective as newer, more expensive drugs, such as rivaroxaban (Xarelto), according to a orthopedics study.

2h

 

AI doctor could boost chance of survival for sepsis patients

Scientists have created an artificial intelligence system that could help treat patients with sepsis.

2h

 

Journalism study evaluates emotions on the job

A study investigating the emotional labor involved in reporting traumatic news events finds key differences between how male and female journalists cope.

2h

 

Rating movies based on fear pheromones in the cinema

The isoprene concentration in the air is an objective indicator for setting the age rating of films.

2h

 

Revealing the molecular mystery of human liver cells

A map of the cells in the human liver has been created, revealing for the first time differences between individual cells at the molecular level which can have a profound impact on their behavior in tissue, tumors and disease.

2h

 

Where deep learning meets metamaterials

A new Tel Aviv University study uses 'deep-learning' computer networks inspired by the layered and hierarchical architecture of the human brain to design basic nanophotonic, metamaterial elements for energy harvesting and medical diagnostics.

2h

 

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite catches Typhoon Yutu strengthening, Guam on alert

Tropical Storm Yutu continued strengthening as NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead. On Oct. 23, 2018, Yutu was a strengthening typhoon east of Guam.

2h

 

Invasive species in an ecosystem harm native organisms but aid other invasive species

The presence of an invasive species in an ecosystem makes native organisms more susceptible to pollutants and may encourage the spread of additional invasive species, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

2h

 

Neurons reliably respond to straight lines

Single neurons in the brain's primary visual cortex can reliably detect straight lines, even though the cellular makeup of the neurons is constantly changing, according to a new study by Carnegie Mellon University neuroscientists, led by Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra Kuhlman. The study's findings, published in Scientific Reports on Oct. 16, 2018, lay the groundwork for future s

2h

 

Yes, your pet can tell time

A new study from Northwestern University has found some of the clearest evidence yet that animals can judge time. By examining the brain's medial entorhinal cortex, the researchers discovered a previously unknown set of neurons that turn on like a clock when an animal is waiting.

2h

 

Actin cytoskeleton remodeling protects tumor cells against immune attack

Cancer cells have evolved multiple escape strategies to circumvent the body's immune defenses such as the attack by Natural Killer (NK) cells which normally swiftly kill abnormal cells by releasing cytotoxic products. While studying breast cancer cell lines, Dr. Clément Thomas' research team at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) uncovered a previously unknown mechanism that leaves tumor cell

2h

 

Closing the gender gap in competitiveness with a psychological trick

The degree of willingness among men and women to assert themselves in competition can be balanced out.

2h

 

Research brief: Predicting how native plants return to abandoned farm fields

Tracking how seeds move–or disperse–can be difficult because of a seed's small size. However, in a study published in Ecology, researchers at the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences found a solution for tracking seed movement by using electrical engineering and mathematical models.

2h

 

SBRT considered safe treatment option for patients with multiple (2-4) metastases

The NRG Oncology clinical trial BR001 tested the hypothesis that stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) could be used safely in oligometastatic patients with multiple metastases.

2h

 

Schadenfreude sheds light on darker side of humanity

Psychologists propose a novel framework to systematically explain schadenfreude, a common, yet poorly understood, emotion.

2h

 

Bringing Americans together on the issue of affordable housing

A lack of affordable housing is linked with many health problems, including asthma, stress and alcoholism. Penn State researchers found that while some Americans may be less aware of this link, there may be ways to communicate this connection in a way that resonates with those groups.

2h

 

New study scrutinizes time and effort it takes to vote in each state

In a new study, a Cost of Voting Index was developed and used to rank each state according to the time and effort it took to vote in each presidential election year from 1996 through 2016.

2h

 

New radiation treatment for brain cancer offers better preservation of cognitive function

When it comes to radiation therapy to treat brain cancer, hippocampal-avoidance whole-brain radiotherapy in conjunction with the drug memantine better preserved patients' cognitive function and demonstrated similar cancer control outcomes, compared to traditional whole-brain radiotherapy with memantine.

2h

 

Genetic flaw causes problems for many with hypothyroidism

Nearly 120 million prescriptions for a thyroid medicine called levothyroxine are filled each year, but many patients with hypothyroidism never get the benefit. A new study pinpoints a consistent inherited mutation that prevents the only current treatment from doing its job.

2h

 

Protein found in patients with severe asthma can help identify who would benefit from targeted drugs

In a novel study, researchers succeeded in identifying patients with a form of severe asthma (type 2 endotype) by measuring periostin concentrations in their airways. These patients with the type 2 (T2) endotype may benefit from newly developed targeted treatments that have the potential to transform their quality of life.

2h

 

A topical gel to protect farmers from lethal effects of pesticides

Researchers have developed a nucleophilic polymer, which formulated into a topical gel can be applied on the skin before spraying of pesticides.

2h

 

New protein sequencing method could transform biological research

Researchers have demonstrated a new way to sequence proteins that is much more sensitive than existing technology, identifying individual protein molecules rather than requiring millions of molecules at a time. The advance could have a major impact in biomedical research, making it easier to reveal new biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases, as well as enhance our understanding

2h

 

Unge kræftpatienter udelukkes fra kliniske forsøg

Unødvendige aldersgrænser betyder, at unge kræftpatienter ikke kan deltage i kliniske forsøg for hverken børn eller voksne, og de unge patienter får dermed ikke samme adgang til innovative lægemidler som andre aldersgrupper, viser fransk forskning.

2h

 

Why the Trump Administration’s New Gender Definition Worries Doctors

Just a few years ago, the federal government was cracking down on health providers that made transgender people feel uncomfortable. Under President Barack Obama, a branch of the health department called the Office for Civil Rights would occasionally investigate complaints of discrimination because of gender identity, and in some cases it forced doctors, insurers, and hospitals to change how they

2h

 

New clues to unravelling link between pregnancy and breast cancer risk

Women are less likely to get breast cancer if they give birth before the age of 30. Now we know the effect kicks in specifically after 33 weeks of pregnancy

2h

 

Bone hormone released during exercise may lead to new memory-loss drug

Age-related memory loss might be reversed by boosting the effects of a hormone released by bones during exercise

2h

 

This cloud-zapping laser could help scientists create a quantum internet

A powerful fast-pulsing laser can bust through clouds to make quantum communication via satellite easier.

2h

 

A String of Italian Earthquakes Hints at Forecasts for One Type of Quake

The geology governing “sequence” quakes suggests scientists could, in theory, forecast the follow-up quakes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

"Eat your greens, children are starving in Europe"

Exactly a century ago, a massive U.S. relief effort kept Europe – including Communist Russia – from starving to death This map shows the areas worst affected by famine, but ignores the food emergency in Germany Drawn up between the Armistice and the Treaty of Versailles, it also shows a few intriguing countries and borders, never seen since What a difference a century makes. On December 1st, this

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Is technology corrupting humanity? History says no.

"Every time that there's a new technology, particularly around media, there's a set of outcries around how that media is corrupting culture or how it's destroying certain aspects of our life," says entrepreneur and author Elad Gil. In some cases there are real concerns, but taking a historical view can quell unnecessary panic. Progress and cynicism work in a cyclical fashion. New tech is unveiled

2h

 

The evolution of homosexuality: A new theory

Standard evolutionary theory may not tell the full story of human sexuality, says Yale professor Richard Prum. Same-sex attraction may have evolved to contribute to female alliances, and male-male sexual attraction may have also evolved to enhance female freedom of choice, posits Prum. Richard Prum is the author of The Evolution of Beauty: How Darwin's Forgotten Theory of Mate Choice Shapes the A

2h

 

Are You Pregnant? 12 Early Signs of Pregnancy

A woman's body goes through a number of changes in the earliest stages of pregnancy. Here are 10 clues to help a woman figure out whether she's pregnant.

2h

 

Trying to Conceive: 10 Tips for Men

There are several things a man can do to increase the chances that he will get a woman pregnant.

2h

 

Mærsk vil pumpe milliardbeløb i aarhusiansk geotermi

A.P. Møller Holding Invest og Aarhus Kommune har underskrevet en forhåndsaftale om at begynde udviklingen af Danmarks største geotermianlæg i Aarhus.

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Grim’s Haunted Carnival: The Skelethon

Uh oh, that last ride went longer than you thought! Supposedly the park should be closed by now. And yet… now might be when Grim’s carnival minions really come out to play. Some of the lights are still on, though they’re dimmer, with stranger colors, and you can sense cold, ghostly beings passing you by. Ahead of you sits a ride that you could have sworn wasn’t there before: a decrepit minecart r

2h

 

College Sports Are Affirmative Action for Rich White Students

Quick, think of a college athlete. Chances are, the person that comes to mind is a football or basketball player at a powerhouse Division I school like Louisiana State or the University of Kentucky. Maybe the player resembles, say, Joel Embiid, who turned a chiseled, seven-foot frame into a full-ride scholarship at the University of Kansas before ascending to NBA stardom. But the typical student

3h

 

Is big-city living eroding our desire to be nice?

A new study of anonymous interactions suggests that humans switch off their automatic inclination to share in dealings with strangers.

3h

 

Memory-steel — A new material for the strengthening of buildings

A new building material is about to be launched on the market: 'memory-steel' can not only be used to reinforce new, but also existing concrete structures. When the material is heated (one-time), prestressing occurs automatically.

3h

 

First immunotherapy success for triple-negative breast cancer

New research has shown that by using a combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy the body's own immune system can be tuned to attack triple-negative breast cancer, extending survival.

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Mineral discoveries in the Galapagos Islands pose a puzzle as to their formation and origin

The Galapagos archipelago is one of the most famous groups of islands in the world. Many of the animal and plant species are unique because of the islands' isolated location in the Pacific, 1,000 kilometers off of the coast of Ecuador.

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Biodiversity for the birds

Can't a bird get some biodiversity around here? The landscaping choices homeowners make can lead to reduced bird populations, thanks to the elimination of native plants and the accidental creation of food deserts.

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Study analyzes complex causes of premature and low-birthweight babies in India

Women in India who spend more time fetching water, use a shared latrine, and endure harassment from others are more apt to give birth to a pre-term or low-birthweight baby, according to a new study from the University of Iowa.

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New study finds harmful pesticides lurking in NYS homes

Despite the existence of chemical-free methods to eradicate pests, Americans use more than a billion pounds of pesticides per year. These chemicals are mostly out of sight and out of mind to unsuspecting homeowners, who are typically unaware of how to prevent potential harm – something new Cornell University research is addressing.

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Biomarker blood test confirms remission in patients with HPV+ oral cancer

A highly sensitive blood test that detects minute traces of cancer-specific DNA has been shown to accurately determine whether patients with HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) are free from cancer following radiation therapy. Findings will be presented today at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

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Climate change, rising sea levels a threat to farmers in Bangladesh

Rising sea levels driven by climate change make for salty soil, and that is likely to force about 200,000 coastal farmers in Bangladesh inland as glaciers melt into the world's oceans, according to estimates from a new study.

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If the Dodgers Win the World Series

Tuesday evening, the Los Angeles Dodgers will open the 2018 World Series in Fenway Park against the Boston Red Sox, extending what has been, by some measures, one of the more successful runs in recent MLB history. The Dodgers have reached the postseason in each of the past six years, the longest current streak in baseball, and have done so each time by winning their division, avoiding the one-gam

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Changes in snow coverage threatens biodiversity of Arctic nature

Many of the plants inhabiting northern mountains depend on the snow cover lingering until late spring or summer. Snow provides shelter for plants from winter-time extreme events but at the same time it shortens the length of growing season, which prevents the establishment of more southern plants. This is why the reduced snow cover may be an even larger threat to the Arctic plants than rising temp

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For a lower climate footprint, vegetarian diet beats local

A new study provides a more comprehensive accounting of the greenhouse gas emissions from EU diets. It shows that meat and dairy products are responsible for the lion's share of greenhouse emissions from the EU diet.

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There's plastic in your poop, but we have no idea how dangerous that is

Health Microplastics are showing up everywhere. Like the water microplastics float in, these tiny bits of polymer infiltrate almost everywhere, wrapping around the globe before we even realized how far they’d spread.

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Nasa 'fixes' Hubble malfunction

Nasa believes it has fixed a malfunction with the Hubble telescope which threatened to limit the orbiting observatory's performance.

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'Mushrooms' and 'brushes' help cancer-fighting nanoparticles survive in the body

For a number of innovative and life-saving medical treatments, from organ replacements and skin grafts to cancer therapy and surgery, success often depends on slipping past or fending off the body's immune system. In a recent development, aimed at aiding cancer detection and treatment, Drexel University researchers might have found the ideal surface texture for helping microscopic, medical helpers

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Study sheds light on differences between male and female fat tissue, and health

New research from York University on fat tissue is providing an important clue as to how females stay healthier than males, even as their body fat increases.

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Study confirms association between breastfeeding and lower risk of maternal hypertension

A new systematic review of the literature not only confirmed that breastfeeding for as short as 1-4 months can have a protective affect against high blood pressure in women, but that lactation also can protect women across an extended follow-up of years to decades.

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Philosophy of mind: In touch with reality?

When faced with ambiguous information we apparently trust our fingertips more than our eyes. Philosophers at LMU Munich are investigating the special status of touch.

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Mutation in common protein triggers tangles, chaos inside brain cells

A pioneer in the study of neural cells revealed today how a single mutation affecting the most common protein in a supporting brain cell produces devastating, fibrous globs. These, in turn, disturb the location of cellular processing units, harm the flow of energy and signals through the brain, and reduce the formation of myelin, an essential insulator for neurons.

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Medical crowdfunding for treatments unsupported by evidence or potentially unsafe

Medical crowdfunding is using social media to appeal for help in paying for medical care. These campaigns can fill insurance gaps but they can also raise money for scientifically unsupported, ineffective or potentially dangerous treatments. This study examined crowdfunding activity for five such treatments since November 2015 and identified more than 1,000 campaigns that raised nearly $6.8 million

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Study examines long-term rate of mesh sling removal, reoperation

Treatment for women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI) can include inserting a mesh sling to support the urethra. An estimated 250,000 midurethral mesh sling (MUS) operations were performed in 2010 in the United States. There is concern that some women experience pain, persistent urinary incontinence and other issues but little clinical trial evidence exists about these longer-term outcomes.

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USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for intimate partner violence, elder abuse, and abuse of vulnerable adults

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends clinicians screen women of reproductive age for intimate partner violence and then connect women who screen positive to ongoing support services. However, current evidence is insufficient regarding screening older or vulnerable adults for abuse and neglect.

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Covert tactics used by bacteria to trick human immune system

Comparing two strains of Salmonella — one that causes disease in humans and the other in reptiles — researchers discovered a covert way that the human-affecting bacteria essentially tricks the immune system into not attacking.

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How to reverse memory loss in old mice

A Columbia study in mice has revealed new details of how a naturally occurring bone hormone reverses memory loss in the aging brain. These findings about the hormone, called osteocalcin, stand to spur further investigations into the molecular machinery that underlies memory — and how that machinery can be manipulated to improve it. The research also lends new insight into how lifestyle changes th

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Don't offer co-workers help unless asked

New workplace research found that when it comes to offering assistance at work, it's better to keep to yourself or wait until you're asked.

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Kombination af lægemidler viser effekt på fremskreden brystkræft

Nyt studie viser, at kombinationen af proteinkinasehæmmeren Ibrance og fulvestrant kan forbedre overlevelsen for patienter med fremskreden brystkræft.

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Unik metode kan føre til ny model for tumorprogression

Forskere mener med ny metode at kunne afsløre mekanismer involveret i tumorudvikling.

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How nationalism and globalism can coexist | Wanis Kabbaj

Why do we have to choose between nationalism and globalism, between loving our countries and caring for the world? In a talk with lessons for avowed nationalists and globalists alike, Wanis Kabbaj explains how we can challenge this polarizing, binary thinking — and simultaneously be proud citizens of both our countries and the world.

3h

 

White House Pressured EPA on Changes to Methane Leak Rule

The proposed changes would create costs savings for fossil fuel companies while increasing methane emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

 

Macron urges Apple chief to boost investment in France

French President Emmanuel Macron on Tuesday urged Apple's chief executive Tim Cook to invest more in his country, even as Paris pursues a new EU tax on the revenues of technology giants.

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MoviePass to be jettisoned by parent companyMoviePass Company HMNY

MoviePass, the struggling discount movie ticket subscription service, is being spun off by the company that owns it.

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Wildlife on the highway to hell: Roadkill in the largest wetland, Pantanal region, Brazil

Having systematically monitored wild animals killed on the Brazilian federal highway BR-262, which passes through the Pantanal region, a research team from the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, published their data concerning birds and reptiles in the open access journal Check List.

3h

 

Ultra-close stars discovered inside a planetary nebula

An international team of astronomers have discovered two stars in a binary pair that complete an orbit around each other in a little over three hours, residing in the planetary nebula M3-1. Remarkably, the stars could drive a nova explosion, an entirely unexpected event based on our current understanding of binary star evolution.

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CityLab Detroit: Global Cities Summit to be Held in Detroit Oct. 28-30

October 23, 2018—Next week CityLab Detroit , the preeminent global cities summit organized by the Aspen Institute, The Atlantic, and Bloomberg Philanthropies to address the most urgent urban issues, will be held in Detroit from October 28-30. This is the first time the sixth annual event will take place in a heartland city—prior summits were hosted by Paris, Miami, London, Los Angeles, and New Yo

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Politics interferes with the ability to assess expertise

Learning about someone's political beliefs interferes with a person's ability to assess expertise, as people judge like-minded peers as being more expert in fields completely unrelated to politics, finds a new UCL-led study.

4h

 

Professional, not personal, familiarity works for virtual teams

Knowing that your colleague on a project once owned a business, earned a specialized degree, or is a technology genius can foster improved working partnerships.

4h

 

Cheetahs: The Fastest Land Animals

Cheetahs are the most unique members of the cat family, with bodies built for acceleration and short bursts of incredible speed.

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Adaptive behavior, markets, and what it means for curing cancer

MIT Sloan finance professor Andrew Lo is working to solve global issues through his studies of financial markets. He's also applying his research on risk to a problem that's not quite as conventional for a financial scholar: curing cancer.

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E-cigarettes and a new threat—how to dispose of them

The two largest global brands of capsule coffee, Nespresso and Keurig, are regarded by many as environmental nightmares. Billions of the throwaway nonrecyclable plastic products currently clutter waste dumps, waterways and city streets. Both inventor of the "K-cups" John Sylvan and former Nespresso CEO Jean-Paul Gaillard have publicly bemoaned the environmental consequences of the products they on

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A Proof About Where Symmetries Can’t Exist

Success for Robert Zimmer is defined differently these days. As the president of the University of Chicago since 2006, he’s made headlines for landing nine-figure financial gifts and writing op-eds in defense of campus free speech . But before Zimmer was a university president he was a mathematician. And long after he left serious research behind, the research plan he set in motion is finally pay

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Zambezi Valley may soon be too hot for tsetse flies

Researchers from the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM), the South African Centre of Excellence for Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis (SACEMA) at Stellenbosch University, and the Natural Resources Institute at the University of Greenwich, developed a mathematical model, which showed that recent increases in temperature could account for the simultaneous decline of tsetse. The result

4h

 

Professional, not personal, familiarity works for virtual teams

Researchers surveyed 363 people, from 68 teams, asking them about their colleagues' professional and personal lives.

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Genomic analysis helps in discovery of unusual new bird species from Indonesia

A joint research team from the National University of Singapore and Indonesian Institute of Science has described an unusual new songbird species. The bird was named the Rote Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus rotiensis after the island of Rote where it is found.

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Earlier puberty linked to mother's smoking during pregnancy

If the mother smokes during pregnancy, there is a risk of her children going into puberty earlier. This is shown by a major study from Aarhus University which has just been published in the international journal American Journal of Epidemiology.

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The smell of lavender is relaxing, science confirms

A new review reveals how lavender mellows us out — and why some day psychiatrists and surgeons might be prescribing patients a whiff of the purple stuff.

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Breakthrough test screens for all known bacterial infections

Scientists have developed the first diagnostic platform that can simultaneously screen for all known human pathogenic bacteria as well as markers for virulence and antibiotic resistance. A study provides details on the performance of the BacCapSeq platform.

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Gut microbiota of infants predicts obesity in children

Evaluating the gut microbiota of infants may help identify children who are at risk for becoming overweight or obese. The research revealed that gut microbiota composition at two years of life is associated with body mass index (BMI) at age 12. In addition, the BMI at age two was not significantly higher in children who later became overweight/obese, indicating that gut microbiota composition may

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Parent educational tools on pain relief help reduce babies' vaccination distress

Information provided to new parents in hospital about how to alleviate pain for their babies during vaccination resulted in more frequent use of pain interventions at future infant vaccinations.

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For the brokenhearted, grief can lead to death

Grief can cause inflammation that can kill, according to new research.

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'Soil probiotics' promise bigger, healthier crops, but there's a downside

More than half the world's plant-derived energy intake comes from just three crops: rice, wheat and maize. These crops, like most land plants, live in an evolutionarily ancient partnership with a certain type of fungus, called arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

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Is that new doll spying on your kids?

What if strangers are using one of your child's toys to spy on them? In the new world of connected toys, truth can be spookier than fiction.

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You really can die from a broken heart

Grief brought on by the loss of a spouse can cause inflammation that can lead to major depression, heart attack, and even premature death. For a new study, researchers examined the effect grief has on human health by conducting interviews with 99 people whose spouses had recently died. They also examined their blood. They compared people who showed symptoms of elevated grief—such as pining for th

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The Caravan Is a Challenge to the Integrity of U.S. Borders

Short of an election-eve exoneration by Robert Mueller, it would be hard to imagine a nicer October surprise for Donald Trump than an attempt by thousands of unauthorized immigrants to force the borders of the United States. It dramatizes every one of his themes, but none more spectacularly than this: his claim that his opponents will not defend the borders of the United States. On Sunday, some t

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Cancer-causing toxicants found in a tributary of South Africa's second largest river

A new study has established that sharptooth catfish found in the Klip River which feeds into the Vaal River, South Africa's second largest river, contains banned pesticides which can cause cancer when consumed by humans.

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Apple offers a range of iPhones, from $450 to $1,100

Apple's new iPhone XR has most of the features found in the top-of-the-line iPhone XS Max, but not its $1,100 price tag. The XR offers the right trade-offs for just $750.

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Requiem or renewal? This is how a tropical city like Darwin can regain its cool

On my way to work, I walk across the intersection of Knuckey and Wood streets. Most days a homeless man on his haunches is mouthing bureaucratic platitudes: "Let's workshop this? We need to have meeting about this! Can you give me the heads-up on this? Do we have numbers on this? Has a C/B been done?"

4h

 

How to Capitalize on Your Team's Diversity

Research demonstrates the power of “cultural brokers” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Painkillers during pregnancy can bring forward puberty in girls

The more weeks a women takes pain-reliving medication during pregnancy, the earlier their daughters enter puberty. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University. As the first in the world, researchers from Aarhus University have examined the correlation between the intake of the analgesic paracetamol during pregnancy and girls and boys pubertal development.

4h

 

Memory-steel — A new material for the strengthening of buildings

A new building material developed at Empa is about to be launched on the market: 'memory-steel' can not only be used to reinforce new, but also existing concrete structures. When the material is heated (one-time), prestressing occurs automatically. The Empa spin-off re-fer AG is now presenting the material with shape memory in a series of lectures.

4h

 

Wildlife on the highway to hell: Roadkill in the largest wetland, Pantanal region, Brazil

Having systematically monitored wild animals killed on the Brazilian federal highway BR-262, which passes through the Pantanal region – the world's largest wetland, a research team from the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, published their data concerning birds and reptiles in the open access journal Check List. Apart from information crucial for future conservation activities, the

4h

 

Politics interferes with the ability to assess expertise

Learning about someone's political beliefs interferes with a person's ability to assess expertise, as people judge like-minded peers as being more expert in fields completely unrelated to politics, finds a new UCL-led study.

4h

 

ASU team unravels key mysteries of spider silk

Scientists at ASU are celebrating their recent success on the path to understanding what makes the fiber that spiders spin — weight for weight — at least five times as strong as steel. One of the fundamental mysteries of spider silk which has limited scientists' ability to produce artificial silks of the quality of natural silks has just been explained by researchers in ASU's School of Molecular

4h

 

Is big-city living eroding our nice instinct?

Lead author William H.B. McAuliffe, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology at the University of Miami, and senior author Michael E. McCullough, professor of psychology, say their study published October 22 in the journal Nature Human Behavior, supports the theory that our ingrained cooperative spirit is a remnant of our evolutionary past.

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Is technology corrupting humanity? History says no.

Technology has helped millions out of poverty, says author Elad Gil. Due to the spread of communication, bad news we wouldn't normally have heard of becomes more prevalent. Which can make things feel more negative overall. It takes time for us to master new technology: "Every time we have a new form of media we make the argument that that form of media is the thing that's going to destroy our soc

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Hubble moving closer to normal science operations

NASA took great strides last week to press into service a Hubble Space Telescope backup gyroscope (gyro) that was incorrectly returning extremely high rotation rates. The backup gyro was turned on after the spacecraft entered safe mode due to a failed gyro on Friday, Oct. 5. The rotation rates produced by the backup gyro have since reduced and are now within an expected range. Additional tests wil

4h

 

How can we reduce the environmental cost of cement?

Look around you and you will likely see cement in use. That is, unless you are reading this on a mobile device out in an entirely natural landscape – in which case, stop and enjoy your surroundings!

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Progressives Rooting for a Latino Surge Might Be Disappointed

DALLAS—In the Los Altos neighborhood in the western part of this city, people recognize the name Beto O’Rourke. They just don’t know exactly who he is. “I’ve heard good things …” said 30-year-old Joaquin Ramirez, his voice trailing off, as he stood in his front yard. I listened while Ramirez talked with David Villalobos, a staffer for the Texas Organizing Project, or TOP , about the upcoming midt

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More in depth data is required to reveal the true global footprint of fishing

There has been a lot of debate recently on the extent of the global fishing footprint. A recent paper claimed that fishing affects 55% of the world's oceans. Given that many people in the developing world rely on fish as their main source of protein, and the increasing preference for luxury fish products in countries such as China, such statistics might seem plausible.

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Non-native plants in homeowners' yards endanger wildlife, researchers report

Human-dominated landscapes are one of the most rapidly expanding and least-understood ecosystems on Earth. Historically, in urban areas, landowners convert native plant communities into habitats dominated by non-native species. While less susceptible to pest damage and demanding less maintenance, non-native plants are extremely poor at supporting insects—critical food for higher order consumers li

4h

 

Electric cars are a hazard for blind people

Electric cars are good for the environment – but not for people who cannot see. They have problems detecting the silent vehicles. However, Norwegian research scientists are working on a solution.

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Sound and vibrations let smart devices know where they are

Methods that analyze sounds and vibrations can make smart devices more aware of their surroundings, according to new research. “A smart speaker sitting on a kitchen countertop cannot figure out if it is in a kitchen, let alone know what a person is doing in a kitchen,” says Chris Harrison, assistant professor in Carnegie Mellon University’s Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII). “But if the

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Device pinpoints tumors to make lumpectomies more precise

Many women diagnosed with breast cancer choose to have a lumpectomy, but the procedure may leave behind trace cancer cells. A new device may increase the odds of getting it all on the first try. More than 300,000 women in the United States receive a breast cancer diagnosis each year and most of those who get a diagnosis of early-stage disease choose either a lumpectomy or breast-conserving surger

4h

 

Wine's origin might affect acceptable price more than taste study shows

Taste might have less to do with what consumers are willing to pay for wine than you think.

4h

 

Institutional investors boost a company's social performance, a new study finds

Since institutional investors own the bulk of the world's equity capital, it is important to understand how they affect the behavior of the companies they invest in. A study of over 3,000 firms across 41 countries by Hannes Wagner (Professor of Finance, Bocconi University) and colleagues, published in the Journal of Financial Economics shows that they are a force for good, boosting companies' envi

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Bad boss? You may be making things better — or worse!

Bosses who are disagreeable, dishonest and careless can mean bad outcomes for companies and teams. However, new research shows employees also play a major role in this. Employee anxiety, self-esteem and how leadership behavior is perceived can all affect the influence that leaders can have. These findings can help organizations identify those leaders and employees with undesirable traits or behavi

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Noble metal-free catalyst system as active as platinum

The industry has been traditionally deploying platinum alloys as catalysts for oxygen reduction, which is for example essential in fuel cells or metal-air batteries. Expensive and rare, that metal imposes strict restrictions on manufacture. Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung have discovered an alloy made up of five elements that is noble metal-f

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Climate change and African trypanosomiasis vector populations in Zimbabwe's Zambezi Valley

LSTM's Dr Jennifer Lord is first author on a paper looking at the impact of climate change on the vectors of sleeping sickness in Africa.

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Reading between the lines: Are we as savvy as we'd like to think when it comes to reviews?

New research suggests we are willing to blindly trust hotel reviews when they conform to our preconceived ideas.

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Tortoise evolution: How did they become so big?

The evolution of giant tortoise might not be linked to islands, as had been previously thought. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers from Argentina and Germany present the most comprehensive family tree of extinct and extant tortoises so far. Analysing genetic and osteological data from living species and fossil tortoise they rewrite the evolution of tortoise: Giant size evolved on multiple o

4h

 

Nerve-on-a-chip platform makes neuroprosthetics more effective

EPFL scientists have developed a miniaturized electronic platform for the stimulation and recording of peripheral nerve fibers on a chip. By modulating and rapidly recording nerve activity with a high signal-to-noise ratio, the platform paves the way to using chips to improve neuroprosthetic designs.

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Mussel-inspired defect engineering enhances the mechanical strength of graphene fibers

Researchers demonstrated the mussel-inspired reinforcement of graphene fibers for the improvement of different material properties. A KAIST research group applied polydopamine as an effective infiltrate binder to achieve high mechanical and electrical properties for graphene-based liquid crystalline fibers.

4h

 

Vaccine shows promise against widespread chicken disease

A new vaccine strategy could offer protection to millions of chickens threatened by a serious respiratory disease, research shows.

4h

 

Testing an undersea robot that can detect and map oil spills

In late September 2018, MBARI engineers demonstrated a new use for MBARI's long-range autonomous underwater vehicles (LRAUVs)—detecting and tracking oil spills. Working with the US Coast Guard and collaborators at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), MBARI engineers outfitted an LRAUV with special instruments (fluorometers) that can detect oil in water. For the recent test in Monterey Bay,

4h

 

Study of tree rings offers more evidence of poleward migration of tropical storms

An international team of researchers has found evidence in tree rings that backs up prior research suggesting tropical cyclones (typhoons in the east, hurricanes in the west) are migrating slowly toward the Earth's poles. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of tree ring samples taken from sites in northeastern Asia and wh

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These kids and young adults want their day in court on climate change

Humanity must rapidly decrease greenhouse gas emissions to avoid catastrophic levels of global warming, climate scientists have warned for decades. But America's president has both feet on the fossil fuel accelerator.

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Do mussels reveal the fate of the oceans?

More than 10 million tons of plastic debris enter the oceans every year and are found in nearly every oceanic layer. They start out as large floating items and eventually break down into much smaller pieces called microplastics. These particles are pervasive and have been found in the digestive tracts of more than 100 different species, posing physical, chemical and even potential biological harm

4h

 

This image has exactly 12 dots, but it’s impossible to see them all at once

Head Trip Our entire visual field is not made the same. When our eyes dart around the entire scene, the black dots move into and out of our visual field, making them seem as if they are flickering on and off.

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Smartphone app brings atoms and molecules to life like never before

A new smartphone app that enables people to see how atoms and molecules move in the world around them in unprecedented detail has been developed by scientists at the University of Sheffield.

5h

 

Ultra-close stars discovered inside a planetary nebula

An international team of astronomers have discovered two stars in a binary pair that complete an orbit around each other in a little over three hours, residing in the planetary nebula M3-1. Remarkably, the stars could drive a nova explosion, an entirely unexpected event based on our current understanding of binary star evolution. The team, led by David Jones of the Instituto Astrofisica de Canaria

5h

 

Seagrass meadows—an underwater time capsule for archaeology

The most beautiful meadows are to be found along the world's sandy coasts: Seagrass.

5h

 

Quiescent British Columbia fault capable of producing large earthquakes

A Canadian fault scientists thought was inactive may actually be capable of producing large-magnitude earthquakes, a new study finds. The results suggest residents of British Columbia on Canada's west coast have a higher risk of experiencing a damaging earthquake than previously thought, according to the study's authors.

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Edible crabs won't cope with the effects of climate change on seawater – new study

We are only just beginning to learn how aquatic organisms will respond to climate change, and the effect that this will have on their communities and ecosystems. One way to find out more is to look at whether species will be able to compensate for changes in their environment. Particularly if they can survive any immediate fluctuations in temperature, and reductions in ocean pH brought about by in

5h

 

Scientists warn of insect pest outbreaks and reduced wheat yields

Climate-warming affects farmlands by increasing pests but not their natural predators, resulting in reduced crop yields, new research has revealed.

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Green spaces help combat loneliness – but they demand investment

Urban green spaces – including parks, woodlands, riverbanks, and gardens – are an essential part of a web of physical and mental well-being. They provide spaces to socialise and opportunities to connect with the natural world. They are restorative enclaves in stressful cities.

5h

 

More antimicrobial resistance in pigs than in broilers in Europe

In the largest metagenomics study of production animals to date, the Technical University of Denmark has found more antimicrobial resistance in pigs than in broilers, but a greater diversity of resistance genes in broilers.

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Genomic analysis helps in discovery of unusual new bird species from Indonesia

A joint research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Indonesian Institute of Science has described an unusual new songbird species. The bird was named the Rote Leaf-Warbler Phylloscopus rotiensis after the island of Rote where it is found. The discovery was published in the journal Scientific Reports on 23 October 2018.

5h

 

Artificial intelligence will make you smarter

The future won't be made by either humans or machines alone – but by both, working together. Technologies modeled on how human brains work are already augmenting people's abilities, and will only get more influential as society gets used to these increasingly capable machines.

5h

 

For a lower climate footprint, vegetarian diet beats local

A new study provides a more comprehensive accounting of the greenhouse gas emissions from EU diets. It shows that meat and dairy products are responsible for the lion's share of greenhouse emissions from the EU diet.

5h

 

No assembly required: Self-assembling silicone-based polymers

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, RIKEN and Tohoku University have developed a silicone polymer chain that can self-assemble into a 3D periodic structure. They achieved this by using their recently reported self-assembling triptycene molecules to modify the ends of the polymer chains.

5h

 

Changes in snow coverage threatens biodiversity of Arctic nature

Many of the plants inhabiting northern mountains depend on the snow cover lingering until late spring or summer. Snow provides shelter for plants from winter-time extreme events but at the same time it shortens the length of growing season, which prevents the establishment of more southern plants. This is why the reduced snow cover may be an even larger threat to the Arctic plants than rising temp

5h

 

A molecular sensor for in-situ analysis of complex biological fluids

A KAIST research group presented a molecular sensor with a microbead format for the rapid in-situ detection of harmful molecules in biological fluids or foods. As the sensor is designed to selectively concentrate charged small molecules and amplify the Raman signal, no time-consuming pretreatment of samples is required.

5h

 

Study shows equality frees women to follow traditional gender choices – or does it?

If you want gender equality, get rich. Research shows that men and women tend to be more equal in more developed countries. You might expect that the more equal opportunities in these countries might reduce other differences between the genders, such as what kind of jobs people are more likely to have, or personality traits such as kindness or a tendency for risk-taking. But a new study published

5h

 

From the Archives: Rita Levi-Montalcini

Dana Alliance member Piergiorgio Strata has just published “Rita Levi-Montalcini and her major contribution to neurobiology” in Rendiconti Lincei; its English version is open-access for reading via Springer Publishing. Its 17 pages are filled with family and science-family photos, including as she entered medical school and when she was awarded a Nobel Prize, and her major scientific collaborator

5h

 

Bonobos make themselves appear 'smaller' than they actually are

Although bonobos and chimpanzees are similar in size, bonobo calls sound an octave higher than chimpanzee calls. Researchers explain this discrepancy with the fact that the vocal folds of bonobos are only half as long as those of chimpanzees of the same age. Whether or not other factors have contributed to this discrepancy is subject to further research.

5h

 

Ferroelectricity: An 80-year-old mystery solved

Only now in 2018 have researchers successfully demonstrated that hypothetical 'particles' that were proposed by Franz Preisach in 1935 actually exist. Scientists now show why ferroelectric materials act as they do.

5h

 

Brain training app helps reduce OCD symptoms

A 'brain training' app could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) manage their symptoms, which may typically include excessive handwashing and contamination fears.

5h

 

Inexpensive chip-based device may transform spectrometry

An advance could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful as their benchtop counterparts but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes.

5h

 

New technology encodes and processes video orders of magnitude faster than current methods

Computer scientists have developed a new technology that can encode, transform and edit video faster — several orders of magnitude faster — than the current state of the art.

5h

 

Motion sickness vs. cybersickness: Two different problems or the same condition?

Contrary to previous research, severe motion sickness and cybersickness — a type of motion sickness that stems from exposure to virtual reality — may be considered the same clinical condition, according to researchers.

5h

 

The composition of gut bacteria almost recovers after antibiotics

The use of antibiotics has long been linked to deprivation of gut bacteria. Now, a new study from University of Copenhagen shows that the composition and function of gut bacteria can recover after antibiotic treatment in healthy people. But after six months, the gut still lack nine common beneficial bacterial species.

5h

 

Deformation of nanotubes to control conductivity

Scientists from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Inorganic Nanomaterials together with their international colleagues have proved it possible to change the structural and conductive properties of nanotubes by stretching them. This can potentially expand nanotubes' application into electronics and high-precision sensors such as microprocessors and high-precision detectors. The research article has been

5h

 

Heated tobacco product claims by tobacco industry scrutinized by UCSF researchers

Claims by the tobacco industry that heated tobacco products (HTPs) are safer than conventional cigarettes are not supported by the industry's own data and are likely to be misunderstood by consumers, according to research published in a special issue of Tobacco Control.

5h

 

Wine's origin might affect acceptable price more than taste study shows

Taste might have less to do with what consumers are willing to pay for wine than you think. In fact, issues like a wine's country and region of origin sometimes had more impact on a person's willingness to pay more for a wine than taste.

5h

 

Do mussels reveal the fate of the oceans?

Prior research has suggested that mussels are a robust indicator of plastic debris and particles in marine environments. A new study says that's not the case because mussels are picky eaters and have an inherent ability to choose and sort their food. Instead, the researchers have discovered that marine aggregates also called "marine snow," play a much bigger role in the fate of the oceans when it

5h

 

At 63, I Threw Away My Prized Portrait of Robert E. Lee

On a Sunday morning in 2017 I took down his picture, and by afternoon it was in the alley with other rubbish awaiting transport to the local landfill for final burial. Hardly a hero’s end. The painting had no monetary value; it was really just a print of an original overlaid with brushstrokes to appear authentic. But 40 years earlier it had been a gift from a young Army wife to her lieutenant hus

5h

 

Europa plume sites lack expected heat signatures

The study of two potential plume sites on Jupiter's moon Europa has shown a lack of expected hotspot signatures, unlike Enceladus where plumes have a very clear and obvious temperature signature, research by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Julie Rathbun shows.

5h

 

Nobody really knows what smoking pot does to your lungs

Health You shouldn't assume smoking a joint is harmless. Researchers are wondering about the potential public health effects of Canada's legalization move, specifically in regard to smoking a joint.

5h

 

Regeringen vil give borgere overblik over myndigheders informationer omkring dem

Borgerne skal have tillid til det offentlige. Derfor foreslår regeringen, at de skal have adgang til et samlet overblik over, hvilke data myndighederne har om dem.

5h

 

Nyt psykiatri-hospital ved Skejby får pladsproblemer

Når de psykiatriske afdelinger i Risskov flytter til Aarhus Universitetshospital i Skejby, er der ikke en arbejdsplads til hver medarbejder. Det kan skabe et logistisk kaos, mener psykiatere i Risskov.

5h

 

DF går til finanslovsforhandlinger med forslag om lægeuddannelse i Region Sjælland

Dansk Folkeparti går til finanslovsforhandlinger med en række sundhedspolitiske ønsker, hvor et af dem er en lægeuddannelse på RUC.

5h

 

Insights into the behaviour of structural materials in a molten salt environment

An international team of researchers led by ANSTO has found that cold-rolling increases the susceptibility of materials to molten salt corrosion by an increase in grain boundary length, and other microstructural defects, which typically contribute to material strengthening.

5h

 

Inside the Robot Petting Zoo, Where the Future Is Friendlier Than Advertised

At our recent 25th-birthday celebration, we convened a who's-who of approachable machines for the friendliest robot uprising imaginable.

5h

 

How to Use Netflix's Parental Controls

Even in a "Kids" profile violent content can show up when trailers autoplay. But there are ways to make it disappear.

5h

 

How to Check the $1.6B Mega Millions Results in Real Time

Win or lose, you'll know before anyone else.

5h

 

New Puffy Coats Are Being Designed to Fall Apart Faster

People generate about 70 pounds of textile trash a year, which then sits in landfills for centuries. A new fiber would decompose much, much faster.

5h

 

New definition returns meaning to information

A fish on the Great Barrier Reef continually acquires new information from its environment—the location of food, the murkiness of the water, and the sounds of distant ships, to name a few examples. But only some of that information is meaningful, in that it actually helps the fish survive. In various disciplines, from biology to artificial intelligence, identifying such meaningful, or "semantic,"

5h

 

How Good Is Tesla's "Enhanced Autopilot" Feature?

Take a ride with Tesla’s Enhanced Autopilot feature — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Financial and non-financial firms need the same strong regulations to protect economies

Researchers at IIASA and the Complexity Science Hub, Vienna, have discovered that non-financial firms, such as vehicle manufacturers and energy companies, contribute to systemic risk in financial systems in the same way as financial institutions like banks, and as such, should be regulated in the same way.

5h

 

Rapid effects of climate change on plants and their ecosystems

An international team of researchers led by two Villanova University biologists has found that climate change is dramatically altering terrestrial plant communities and their ecosystems at such a rapid pace that having a stable baseline from which to conduct experiments is becoming increasingly difficult.

5h

 

Marker found for condition that causes numerous tumors

UT Southwestern researchers have made a major advance in uncovering the biology of how thousands of disfiguring skin tumors occur in patients troubled by a genetic disorder called neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). This scientific advance could slow the development of these tumors.

5h

 

Kidneys aren't harmed when significantly lowering blood pressure

Using a novel biomarker panel to track and measure kidney function, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of California San Francisco School of Medicine report that lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mm Hg does not damage the kidney organ itself. Instead, any negative changes to clinical results are more likely due to decreased blood flo

5h

 

HPV blood test shows promise for tracking head and neck cancer after treatment

Researchers will present preliminary findings at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology in San Antonio on Tuesday, Oct. 23, from a study that evaluated a blood test for HPV-linked oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

5h

 

New definition returns meaning to information

Identifying meaningful information is a key challenge to disciplines from biology to artificial intelligence. In a new paper, Santa Fe Institute researchers propose a broadly applicable, fully formal definition for this kind of semantic information.

5h

 

Readers wonder about a hydrogen wall, pig lung transplants and more

Readers had questions about a glow at the edge of the solar system, pig lung transplants, the use of the word promiscuous and more.

6h

 

Waking up early to cover science’s biggest honor

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses how the Science News editors and reporters cover the Nobel Prizes each year.

6h

 

Nasa photographs rectangular iceberg

Nasa has released a striking photo of a rectangular iceberg floating in the Weddell Sea off Antarctica.

6h

 

Battle of the video speakers: Amazon Echo Show vs. Google Home Hub

The battle of the video speakers begins in earnest today.

6h

 

Bonobo: great ape with a tiny voice

Although bonobos and chimpanzees are similar in size, bonobo calls sound an octave higher than chimpanzee calls. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, explain this discrepancy with the fact that the vocal folds of bonobos are only half as long as those of chimpanzees of the same age. Whether or not other factors have contributed to this discrepa

6h

 

Bonobo: great ape with a tiny voice

Although bonobos and chimpanzees are similar in size, bonobo calls sound an octave higher than chimpanzee calls. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, explain this discrepancy with the fact that the vocal folds of bonobos are only half as long as those of chimpanzees of the same age. Whether or not other factors have contributed to this discrepa

6h

 

A step toward metal organic framework synthesis

Dr. Inhar Imaz and ICREA Prof. Daniel Maspoch are the brains behind a new method for metal organic framework synthesis. Their spray drying technique is expected to significantly advance the commercialisation of MOFs.

6h

 

Gas-detecting laser device gets an upgrade

University of Michigan researchers have refined a gas-sniffing device so that it can detect poisonous gases and explosives in less than half a second.

6h

 

Tuneable emissive organic platform

NUS chemists have developed design guidelines for a type of material platform which can activate and adjust the light emission ability of organic molecules for lighting and display applications.

6h

 

Record-setting transfer of 1 petabyte of data

Using a 5,000-mile network loop operated by ESnet, researchers at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) and Zettar Inc. recently transferred 1 petabyte in 29 hours, with encryption and checksumming, beating last year's record by 5 hours, an almost 15 percent improvement.

6h

 

Zooming in on Mexico's landscape

As part of a scientific collaboration with the Mexican Space Agency and other Mexican scientific public entities, ESA has combined images from the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission to produce a detailed view of the different types of vegetation growing across the entire country.

6h

 

Efter forsinkelser og falske betontests: Kina åbner verdens længste havbro

Et enormt broprojekt i Kina indvies i denne uge. Hvis du gaber på vej over broen, lyder en alarm.

6h

 

A day to celebrate chemistry's favorite unit—the mole. But what's a mole?

On Oct. 23, between 6:02 a.m. and 6:02 p.m., chemists celebrate Mole Day. Mole Day is not a day to celebrate those furry little creatures that live in the ground. Rather, it is a day to celebrate a very important idea in the sub-microscopic world.

6h

 

Study suggests over $1 billion needed annually to save Africa's lion parks

A team of researchers with members from several African countries, the U.S., Indonesia, the U.K and Australia has found that many areas in Africa meant to protect lions are failing due to lack of funds. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of protected areas in Africa and why they believe it would take an infusion of over

6h

 

Uber plans pollution levy on London faresUber London Khosrowshahi

Uber will levy a "clean air fee" on London journeys from early 2019 to help tackle pollution and part-fund electric cars for its drivers, the pioneer ride-sharing app said Tuesday.

6h

 

How Economic Inequality Harms the Environment

Power imbalances facilitate environmental degradation—and the poor suffer the consequences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

 

Why Did This Zoo Lion Murder the Father of Her Cubs?

Suri may have been defending herself against unwanted sexual advances.

6h

 

What Are Americans Most Afraid Of? Corrupt Government Officials & Global Warming.

Most Americans are most fearful of corrupt government officials and of environmental catastrophe.

6h

 

Revolutionising the Nile tilapia breeding program using DNA

Tilapia, a tropical fish, is an important aquaculture species farmed in more than 100 countries, and after carp is the second most important aquaculture species in the world accounting for 7.4 percent of global production in 2015.

6h

 

Sponges from Mars? Study suggests water on the red planet could support life

Mars has long been thought of as dry and barren – unable to harbour life. But research over the past few years indicates that there is most likely some briny water present there today, including a possible subsurface lake. This has led to new hopes that there could actually be life on the red planet after all, depending on what the conditions are like in the water.

6h

 

GFP Discoverer Osamu Shimomura Dies

The 90-year-old marine biologist won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his isolation of green fluorescent protein.

6h

 

2 brain systems team up to perceive places

The brain has two distinct systems for perceiving our environment, one for recognizing a place and another for navigating through it, according to a new study. Nearly 30 years ago, scientists demonstrated that visually recognizing an object, such as a cup, and performing a visually guided action, such as picking the cup up, involved distinct neural processes, located in different areas of the bra

6h

 

48-Million-Year-Old Fossil Owl Is Almost Perfectly Preserved

About 48 million years ago, an owl swooped down to catch its prey, not by the light of the moon but in broad daylight.

6h

 

There Is No Easy Way for Trump to Stop the Latest Caravan

President Donald Trump is fuming over a U.S.-bound migrant caravan. Over the course of the past week, he’s posted 15 tweets about the caravan, estimated to consist of as many as 7,000 people, that left from San Pedro Sula, Honduras, earlier this month and has been growing along the way. Trump has placed blame on Democrats, threatened to cut aid to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, and urged a

6h

 

How High Schools Shaped American Cities

In 2016, shortly after she was appointed to the position, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos declared American public schools a “dead end.” Instead, DeVos advocates for “school choice,” code for charter schools, vouchers, and other privatization efforts. Families who have watched their local schools struggle might agree with DeVos, but her characterization is still troubling. It reflects a d

6h

 

Drought cripples crucial German waterways

The docks are eerily quiet at Cologne's main port on the mighty River Rhine, with hundreds of containers piled up and awaiting their journey north on one of Europe's busiest commercial arteries.

6h

 

GRAFIK: Sådan skal udrulningen af ERTMS forløbe

Som det første sted i Danmark kører togene mellem Frederikshavn og Lindholm nu på det digitale signalsystem ERTMS. Nu følger en række kritiske deadlines, som skal holde, hvis det skal lykkes at få systemet i drift over hele landet i 2030.

6h

 

Canadian Startup North Made Alexa Smart Glasses That Actually Look Like GlassesNorth Focals Alexa

North think its $999 Focals are the anti-Google Glass. But can it convince people to wear them?

6h

 

Science Isn't About 'the Truth'—It's About Building Models

These are the three key things that any person should know about the nature of science.

6h

 

Image of the Day: New Tiny Frog

A newly described amphibian has such a small range in southern Brazil that it's already critically endangered.

6h

 

Plan developed to characterize and identify ocean worlds

Strategies to identify and explore ocean worlds in our Solar System should focus on a range of targets, including confirmed and unconfirmed ocean worlds, according to a new paper by a team led by Planetary Science Institute Senior Scientist Amanda R. Hendrix.

6h

 

BMW recalls over 1 mn cars over exhaust system fire risk

German high-end carmaker BMW said Tuesday it would recall more than one million additional diesel cars, citing a problem with the exhaust system that "in extreme cases can cause a fire".

6h

 

Avian neuroscientists identify new stress response component in poultry brain

Avian neuroscientists at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture probing the neural pathways for stress response have identitifed a new structure of neurons in the poultry brain.

6h

 

Changes in snow coverage threaten biodiversity of Arctic nature

Many of the plants inhabiting northern mountains depend on the snow cover lingering until late spring or summer. Snow provides shelter for plants from winter-time extreme events but at the same time it shortens the length of growing season, which prevents the establishment of more southern plants. This is why the reduced snow cover may be an even larger threat to the Arctic plants than rising temp

6h

 

Self-assembling silicone-based polymers

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology, RIKEN and Tohoku University have developed a silicone polymer chain that can self-assemble into a 3-D periodic structure. They achieved this by using their recently reported self-assembling triptycene molecules to modify the ends of the polymer chains.

6h

 

Life cycle of sulphur predicts location of valuable minerals

A team of researchers from The University of Western Australia and two Canadian universities has applied a first-of-its-kind technique that measures the long-term life cycle of sulphur, helping to explain the preferential location of high-value mineral deposits at the edges of ancient continents.

6h

 

World’s longest sea bridge opens between Hong Kong and mainland China

The world's longest sea bridge has opened, connecting Hong Kong, Zhuhai, and Macau. It is 55 kilometres or 20 times longer than the Golden Gate Bridge

7h

 

Image: Cloudlets swarm around our local supermassive black hole

This image from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) shows the area surrounding Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole that lurks at the centre of the Milky Way—highlighted here with a small circle. New research has revealed exciting evidence of interstellar gas and dust orbiting the black hole at high speeds.

7h

 

World's oldest intact shipwreck found in Black Sea

An ancient Greek trading ship dating back more than 2,400 years has been found virtually intact at the bottom of the Black Sea, the world's oldest known shipwreck, researchers said on Tuesday.

7h

 

iPhone XR makes the right trade-offs for a cheaper price

Apple offers you a simple trade-off with its new iPhone XR, the middlebrow cousin to the top-of-the-line iPhone XS.

7h

 

A nutty idea—a little stress could be good for walnuts

When it comes to watering walnuts, most California growers believe you need to start early to keep trees healthy and productive throughout the long, hot summer. But according to striking results from a long-term experiment in a walnut orchard in Red Bluff, California, growers can improve crop production if they hold off irrigation until later in the season and directly measure their trees' water n

7h

 

Student discovers slowest ever pulsar star

An approximately 14 million year old pulsar star that is the "slowest-spinning" of its kind ever identified has been discovered by a Ph.D. student from The University of Manchester.

7h

 

Tim Cook wants retraction of Chinese spy-chip story that named Apple, Supermicro

Apple CEO Tim Cook has taken the unusual step of going on the record to deny a news story, and is further asking the news agency that published it for a retraction.

7h

 

Researchers discover drug that could combat brain cell death in those with Alzheimer's disease

One of the hallmark traits of Alzheimer's disease, a debilitating disorder marked by memory deficits and general cognitive decline, is the accumulation in the brain of a protein called b-amyloid. These proteins form "plaques" and bind to unique proteins on the surface of brain cells called receptors, causing widespread cell death.

7h

 

Taking a close look at bacteria

Yong Wang, assistant professor of physics, and graduate student Asmaa Sadoon have been studying how molecules travel through bacterial cytoplasm in order to understand more about how these tiny organisms function. Using new high-tech tools, they have been able to observe certain processes inside live bacteria for the first time. They published their results in the journal Physical Review E.

7h

 

New technique promises more accurate genomes

University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new technique that will aid in a more accurate reconstruction of human genomes by determining the exact sections of the genome that come from each parent.

7h

 

Studying the hotbed of horizontal gene transfers

For over 200,000 years, humans and their gut microbiomes have coevolved into some of the most complex collections of living organisms on the planet. But as human lifestyles vary from the urban to rural, so do the bacterial diversities of gut microbiomes.

7h

 

Reading between the lines: Are we as savvy as we'd like to think when it comes to reviews?

New research suggests we are willing to blindly trust hotel reviews when they conform to our preconceived ideas.

7h

 

Highly efficient cooling using a new nanoporous solid

Heat recovery (solar energy, heat pump, air conditioning, cooling) is a key research focus toward reducing power consumption and encouraging sustainable development. Even if water recovery and release using nanoporous materials is a reliable strategy to achieve this goal, developing new energy-efficient processes remains a challenge. Researchers from the Paris porous materials Institute (CNRS, ENS

7h

 

Researchers validate 80-year-old ferroelectric theory

Researchers have successfully demonstrated that hypothetical particles that were proposed by Franz Preisach in 1935 actually exist. In an article published in Nature Communications, scientists from the universities in Linköping and Eindhoven show why ferroelectric materials act as they do.

7h

 

The role of the Atg2 protein in tethering pre-autophagosomal membranes to the endoplasmic reticulum

Postdoctoral Researcher Tetsuya Kotani, Associate Professor Hitoshi Nakatogawa, Honorary Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi and colleagues at Tokyo Institute of Technology have analyzed the Atg protein Atg2, whose function was previously unknown, and have discovered that Atg2 tethers the pre-autophagosomal membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum during autophagosome formation.

7h

 

Researchers have discovered a new cell structure

A new structure in human cells has been discovered by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in collaboration with colleagues in the U.K. The structure is a new type of protein complex that the cell uses to attach to its surroundings and proves to play a key part in cell division. The study is published in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

7h

 

Russian physicists postulate the existence of dark matter-based Bose stars

Researchers developed a mathematical model describing motion of dark matter particles inside the smallest galaxy halos. They observed that over time, dark matter may form spherical droplets of quantum condensate. Previously, this was considered impossible, as fluctuations of the gravity field produced by dark matter particles were ignored. The study is published in Physical Review Letters.

7h

 

Researchers observe organic chemical reaction with electron microscope

Scientists from Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow imaged an organic chemical reaction with an electron microscope and recorded the transformation in real time. The team from the laboratory of Prof. Ananikov applied combined nano-scale and molecular-scale approaches to the study of chemical transformation in a catalytic cross-coupling reaction. The stu

7h

 

Researchers report strategy for preventing the anthrax bacterium from absorbing iron

A team led by Professor Arne Skerra at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed an innovative strategy for preventing the anthrax bacterium from absorbing iron, which is crucial for its survival. It does so by neutralizing a special iron complexing agent produced by the bacterium. Because the anthrax pathogen only spreads in the body when it receives access to the essential element,

7h

 

Cheminformatics approaches to creating new hair dyes

Finding the next generation of safer hair dyes may be as simple as going to the library – in this case, NC State's Max Weaver Dye Library. The dye library, donated by the Eastman Chemical Company, contains nearly 100,000 unique dyes waiting to be fashioned into the products of tomorrow.

7h

 

Women most likely to leave labor force after first child, not later births

While conventional wisdom suggests women reach a "tipping point" and are more likely to leave the workforce after having a second child, new findings by a Princeton University researcher show that, in fact, they are more likely to leave after their first child regardless of how many more times they give birth. However, women who ultimately have more children are always more likely to leave, even p

7h

 

First-ever atlas of big-game migrations

The first-ever atlas of ungulate migration was released this week, detailing the ecology and conservation of migratory big-game species including mule deer, elk and pronghorn in Wyoming, the greater Yellowstone ecosystem and adjacent Western states.

7h

 

Trump Is Right to Leave This Nuclear Agreement

President Donald Trump’s national-security adviser has traveled to Moscow to withdraw the United States from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. That agreement precluded the U.S. and Russia from building or deploying ground-based conventional or nuclear missiles in the ranges from 500 to 5,500 kilometers. Because Trump announced this move at a typically unruly campaign rally, the admini

7h

 

The Pasta in Our Stars

Neutron stars exist under unfathomable conditions. For one to form, another star must grow old and die. When a giant star has burned through the fuel supply that makes it shine, its core collapses under its own weight, mashing electrons and protons together to produce neutrons. The force of the breakdown unleashes a shock wave that floods the rest of the star and shatters it. A spectacular glow e

7h

 

T: They Survived Mass Shootings. Now They Are Living With Bullets Inside Them.

Doctors routinely leave bullets or bullet fragments inside the bodies of those who survive gunshot wounds. We asked four survivors of mass shootings what that is like.

7h

 

Can Science Fiction Save the World?

James Gunn, the last surviving author of the genre’s Golden Age, believes it can help, anyway — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

En fjerdedel af danskerne lider af bakteriefattig tarm: Det kan skyldes antibiotika

Selv længe efter en antibiotikakur er flere gavnlige bakterier ikke vendt tilbage til tarmen, viser dansk forskning. Det er til gengæld et par uønskede.

8h

 

Even our own bodies now contain plastic waste. It’s time to get drastic | Gaby Hinsliff

Banning straws and cotton buds isn’t going to cut it. It won’t be easy, but our over-reliance on the stuff must end We are what we eat, and what we eat reveals something about what we are in return. So it shouldn’t be all that surprising that humans are now apparently eating plastic, given what we mostly are is thoughtless enough to have littered the planet with the stuff. A small trial at the Med

8h

 

Scientists Create Artificial Wood That Is Water- and Fire-Resistant

The synthetic material is faster to make than natural wood — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

 

Google Maps for iOS will now allow you to share real-time updates with friends

Google Maps for the iPhone is about to get a little bit better.

8h

 

USA og Europa vil smadre rumsonde ind i asteroide-måne

Resultaterne skal gøre os klogere på, hvordan vi undgår et katastrofalt meteor-nedslag.

8h

 

NASA's First Image of Mars from a CubeSat

NASA's MarCO mission was designed to find out if briefcase-sized spacecraft called CubeSats could survive the journey to deep space. Now, MarCO—which stands for Mars Cube One—has Mars in sight.

8h

 

Breakthrough test screens for all known bacterial infections

Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) in the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health have developed the first diagnostic platform that can simultaneously screen for all known human pathogenic bacteria as well as markers for virulence and antibiotic resistance. A study in the journal mBio provides details on the performance of the BacCapSeq platform.

8h

 

Gut microbiota of infants predicts obesity in children

Evaluating the gut microbiota of infants may help identify children who are at risk for becoming overweight or obese, according to results from a recent study published in mBio. The research revealed that gut microbiota composition at two years of life is associated with body mass index (BMI) at age 12. In addition, the BMI at age two was not significantly higher in children who later became overw

8h

 

Elite Universities Are Entrenching a Privileged Class. An Endowment Tax Can Fix That.

Conservatives aren’t terribly fond of America’s elite universities. Recent research from the political scientists Carlos X. Lastra-Anadón and Thomas Gift found that while liberals consider elite-educated politicians more competent than those with less illustrious pedigrees, conservatives find them considerably less appealing. Though liberals were just as inclined to back candidates educated at Iv

8h

 

Trump’s New Cold War

Many people in Washington are angry at the Trump administration’s coddling of Saudi Arabia. They’re angry at Donald Trump’s efforts to exonerate Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for Jamal Khashoggi’s murder. Outrage is spreading to America’s participation in Riyadh’s war in Yemen, where a Saudi blockade on the country’s main port has left 8 million at risk of starvation. Good. Given that the U.S.

8h

 

Trump's Closing Argument for the Midterms Is Dark and Angry

There was a moment, some 45 minutes into President Trump’s rally in Houston on Monday night, when it seemed like he wasn’t really going anywhere. The president was running through some of his standard talking points, but as with many of his more recent speeches , there wasn’t a spark. And then suddenly there was. Trump launched into the darkest, angriest section of his speech, a furious tirade at

8h

 

The Eclipse of Sectarianism

The sectarian fervor widely associated with the Middle East has recent roots. A chain of political and religious upheavals, beginning in 1979, ignited and fueled sectarian hatred and added an ethnic bent to it. The results were catastrophic: Sectarianism caused deep societal fissures and cost hundreds of thousands of lives over a sustained period of time. Almost exactly 40 years after this surge

8h

 

Teens use Juul e-cigarettes much more often than other vaping products

Such devices are more popular among youth than other e-cigarettes or regular cigarettes, a study finds.

8h

 

Ny dansk digitaliseringsstrategi: »Det er det modsatte af overvågning«

I dag præsenteres regeringens digitaliseringsstrategi. Et led i planen er at skabe en platform, hvor borgere kan få overblik over samtlige data, der er registreret om dem i det offentlige.

8h

 

The *Tetris* Effect and Our Boundaryless Digital Future

The upcoming PlayStation 4 game builds on Tetsuya Mizuguchi’s past work to get you as far out of your head—and as absorbed into the experience—as possible.

8h

 

How Hyperinflation Destroys Much More Than Just Currencies

To call hyperinflation strictly an economic problem is to overlook its wrenching cultural implications and a general collapse in a system of values.

8h

 

Why China Can Do AI More Quickly and Effectively Than the US

The US may be leading the discoveries in AI—but Chinese entrepreneurs are better at implementing them.

8h

 

The Best Sous Vide Wands: Your Turkey Deserves a Warm Bath

After using an app-powered sous vide wand to cook your Thanksgiving turkey in a temperature-controlled bath, you’ll never go back to roasting.

8h

 

3 Smart Things About Animal-Inspired Robotics

From the energy-efficient way turkeys walk to the "invincibility" of a cockroach, critters serve as models for tech.

8h

 

The Case for Giving Robots an Identity

What AI might be missing is a history. Do robots need to know who they are and where they come from?

8h

 

The Risks and Rewards of Tech's Guerrilla Franchising

From Amazon to e-scooter startup Goat, more tech companies are figuring out how to provide the tools if you supply the services.

8h

 

How Teflon Went From Wartime to Dinner Time

Born way back in the atomic age, super-slippery Teflon’s impervious chemistry has stuck around.

8h

 

The Permanent State of Beta Is Ruining Consumerism

This isn't the way product releases should happen: quarter-­baked cookie dough that’s, what, just gonna finish cooking outside the oven?

8h

 

Snapchat Dysmorphia and the Real Dangers of Perceived Flaws

With flawless skin and symmetrical faces all over social media, the “beautiful people” are our peers. It’s enough to give you a complex.

8h

 

In Texas, Techies Are Trying to Turn the Red State Blue

How organizers are using Silicon Valley–style tactics to get people (read: Democrats) registered to vote.

8h

 

Paper and the Case for Going Low-Tech in the Voting Booth

When considered as a form of tech, paper has a killer feature set: It’s intuitive, it doesn’t crash, and it doesn’t need a power source.

8h

 

Brew a Perfect Pot of Coffee With Bodum Mocca's Beam Heater

Instead of butane heat sources, Bodum’s Mocca uses the red-hot glow of its 430-watt halogen Beam Heater to bring the water to just below boiling.

8h

 

The Mad Science of Fermentation's Funky Flavors

Fermented foods are products of a happy, scientific trial-­and-error process, and big-name chefs and home cooks alike are embracing this growing trend.

8h

 

Apple iPhone XR Review: A Great Choice for Cost-Conscious iPhone Buyers

The new lower-priced iPhone XR is a good buy, as long as you don’t mind making a few compromises.

8h

 

The AI Cold War With China That Could Doom Us All

Artificial intelligence could be the ultimate authoritarian tool. But one thing's for sure: Charging into an AI arms race against China is a huge mistake.

8h

 

It Started as an Online Gaming Prank. Then It Turned Deadly

A $1.50 wager on a "Call of Duty" match led to a fake 911 call reporting a violent hostage situation in Wichita. Here’s how it all went horribly awry.

8h

 

Get Yourself the Right Cookware to Maximize a Small Space

Renting a tiny room in Nob Hill for too many dollars a month? This gear can help you make space for cooking.

8h

 

Forging a Relationship With Tyler Barriss, the Internet’s Most Hated Swatter

Journalist Brendan Koerner strikes up a jail-cell correspondence with a man charged with instigating a fatal shooting. “Only by peering into the abyss of human malice can we divine how we can muster the strength to forgive the truly lost," he writes.

8h

 

What a Mouse Teaches Us About the Future of 3D Color X-Rays

The MARS scanner, armed with particle-detecting tech used in CERN’s Large Hadron Collider, lets us see so much more beyond the bone.

8h

 

Brazil museum fire: Prized 'Luzia' fossil skull recovered

It was feared that Luzia, a 12,000-year-old fossil, had been totally lost in the Brazil fire.

8h

 

Breakthrough test screens for all known bacterial infections

Scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) in the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health have developed the first diagnostic platform that can simultaneously screen for all known human pathogenic bacteria as well as markers for virulence and antibiotic resistance. A study in the journal mBio provides details on the performance of the BacCapSeq platform.

8h

 

Shipwreck found in Black Sea is 'world's oldest intact'

A Greek merchant ship dating back more than 2,400 years is found almost perfectly preserved.

9h

 

Young People Are Suing the Trump Administration Over Climate Change. She’s Their Lawyer.

Julia Olson is representing 21 young plaintiffs, who may soon get their day in court. “She has built not just a case, but a movement,” a colleague says.

9h

 

Trilobites: Lavender’s Soothing Scent Could Be More Than Just Folk Medicine

In mice, researchers found that some components of lavender odor had effects on anxiety similar to taking Valium.

9h

 

VIDEO: Nasa tester gigantisk vandfontæne til ny raket

1,7 millioner liter vand i minuttet skal der til at slukke en raketbrand.

9h

 

Hard Brexit could cripple UK science, say Nobel prizewinners

Dozens of scientists write letter to May and Juncker setting out their concerns A coalition of Nobel laureates has said a hard Brexit could cripple UK science, in a letter to Theresa May and the European commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker. The letter, signed by 29 Nobel prizewinners and six Fields medallists, says the UK “must now strive to ensure that as little harm as possible is done to

9h

 

Dyson to make electric cars in Singapore

British electric appliance pioneer Dyson said Tuesday it had picked Singapore as the site for its first electric car plant as part of a £2.5 billion (2.8 billion euro, $3.3 billion) global investment drive in new technology.

9h

 

Inexpensive chip-based device may transform spectrometry

Spectrometers—devices that distinguish different wavelengths of light and are used to determine the chemical composition of everything from laboratory materials to distant stars—are large devices with six-figure price tags, and tend to be found in large university and industry labs or observatories.

9h

 

Brain training app helps reduce OCD symptoms, study finds

A 'brain training' app developed at the University of Cambridge could help people who suffer from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) manage their symptoms, which may typically include excessive handwashing and contamination fears.

9h

 

Ferroelectricity — an 80-year-old mystery solved

Only now in 2018 have researchers successfully demonstrated that hypothetical 'particles' that were proposed by Franz Preisach in 1935 actually exist. In an article published in Nature Communications, scientists from the universities in Linköping and Eindhoven show why ferroelectric materials act as they do.

9h

 

Inexpensive chip-based device may transform spectrometry

An advance by MIT researchers could make it possible to produce tiny spectrometers that are just as accurate and powerful as their benchtop counterparts but could be mass produced using standard chip-making processes.

9h

 

New kind of compound shows early promise against prostate cancer

A new type of molecule blocks the action of genes that drive the growth of therapy-resistant prostate cancer.

9h

 

The smell of lavender is relaxing, science confirms

A new review reveals how lavender mellows us out — and why some day psychiatrists and surgeons might be prescribing patients a whiff of the purple stuff.

9h

 

We need a fossil fuel non-proliferation treaty – and we need it now | Andrew Simms and Peter Newell

Climate breakdown is an imminent threat to humanity. But an international treaty could avert calamity How did government respond to the recent scientific conclusion that only “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes in all aspects of society” can deliver the globally agreed target for stopping climate breakdown? In the UK, fracking for fossil fuels was given the green light, plans were annou

9h

 

Genes I wish they would find

Enough with the useless genes. Here are some that would actually come in handy.

9h

 

Editor’s letter: The precision medicine issue

Precision medicine has led to incredibly effective treatments for cancer and inherited disease. But not everyone gets treated.

9h

 

Finally, the drug that keeps you young

Anti-aging pioneer Judith Campisi explains how a recent breakthrough could ward off age-related disease.

9h

 

Six things to do with your data before you die

How to make sure your loved ones can get into all your accounts. Or, alternatively—how to cover your tracks.

9h

 

Need medical help? Sorry, not until you sign away your privacy

When you’re sick, you’re vulnerable—and that’s when your doctor pressures you into participating in a data-gathering experiment.

9h

 

Look how far precision medicine has come

Skeptics say drugs based on genetic insights have underdelivered. But look carefully and they’re everywhere.

9h

 

Profiles in precision medicine

Advances in DNA testing and gene editing have given people choices that would have been impossible a few decades ago. Here, in their own words, are the stories of four people confronted with these dilemmas.

9h

 

The skeptic: What precision medicine revolution?

The benefits of genomic drugs are exaggerated, hurting patients and the practice of medicine, says one high-profile oncologist.

9h

 

AI can’t replace doctors. But it can make them better.

A machine can collate environmental data, genetic data, and patient history way better than I can.

9h

 

Gavnlige tarmbakterier kan tage varig skade af antibiotika

Forskere fra KU har identificeret en række tarmbakterier, som stadig mangler i tarmen et halvt år efter en kras kur. Dansk professor understreger vigtigheden af sparsomt brug.

9h

 

Your genome, on demand

How your detailed genetic profile can predict your risk of diseases and improve your health.

9h

 

Sociogenomics is opening a new door to eugenics

New ways of using your genetic data could bolster scientific racism and encourage discrimination.

9h

 

Two sick children and a $1.5 million bill: One family’s race for a gene therapy cure

One day, gene therapy may help with the rarest of diseases. Some parents aren’t waiting.

9h

 

The U.S. Used to Criticize Countries That Didn’t Allow Their Citizens to Leave

President Donald Trump said on Twitter on Monday that the United States was cutting off aid to Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador because they hadn’t stopped “people from leaving their country and coming illegally to the U.S.” The remarks are significant: For decades, the United States criticized totalitarian regimes that didn’t allow their citizens to leave in violation of international norms.

10h

 

HTC Exodus 1 Blockchain Phone: Price, Specs, AvailabilityHTC Exodus 1 Blockchain

HTC's long-hyped blockchain smartphone is finally on sale—but for now it's still experimental.

10h

 

Tiny supercomputers could be made from the skeleton inside your cells

Building a computer out of the skeletons that hold our cells together could make them smaller and far more energy efficient

10h

 

Lovende forsøg med stamceller kan hjælpe mænd med rejsningsproblemer

Forskerne håber at kunne hjælpe op mod 80 procent af patienterne.

10h

 

Plague of caterpillars threatening food crisis may be halted with safe pesticides

Study suggests biopesticides should be trialled to control the march of armyworm that’s destroying crops across the continent Experts have identified safer, effective pesticides they believe can control a plague of caterpillars that is devastating crops across Africa. Many farmers are attempting to control armyworm – a pest that feasts on maize, rice and sugarcane – through the use of highly haza

10h

 

Hvem fortjener sit eget frimærke?

Frimærkeprisen hædrer sundhedssektorens fyrtårne. Nu skal de næste fem prismodtagere udpeges. Kandidater efterlyses: Frist for indstilling er fredag 14. december 2018.

10h

 

Immunterapi måske førstevalg ved nogle former for tyktarmskræft

Et nyt studie peger på, at immunterapi med nivolumab og ipilimumab måske skal være førstebehandling til nogle patienter med metastaserende tyktarmskræft.

10h

 

ScienceTake: Drifting Dandelion Seeds Produce a Vortex Never Before Seen

The air flowing through the bristly tufts of dandelion seeds creates a vortex scientists had never viewed in nature.

10h

 

How a Vortex Helps Dandelions Fly

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh have discovered the secret to dandelion flight: a vortex of air previously unseen in nature.

10h

 

Digital misinformation: Hvordan virker det egentlig?

Mis- og disinformation på sociale medier er et væsentligt samfundsproblem, der er med til…

11h

 

Tarmbakteriernes sammensætning gendannes næsten efter antibiotika

Anvendelse af antibiotika har længe været forbundet med nedbrydning af tarmbakterier. Nu…

11h

 

Judge slashes award but upholds verdict in Monsanto cancer trial

A San Francisco judge on Monday upheld a jury verdict that found Monsanto liable for not warning a groundskeeper that its weed killer product Roundup might cause cancer, but slashed the damages award.

11h

 

Snapcrap app steps in to take on public poop

A freshly launched Snapcrap app is out to turn San Francisco smartphone users into poop-spotters.

11h

 

Cryptocurrency bitcoin marks 10 years

October 31, 2008 marked the birth of bitcoin. Ten years on, the world's first cryptocurrency is at the forefront of a complex financial system viewed warily by markets and investors.

11h

 

'Dinosaur country': fossil hunters' S. African paradise

The sun rises over the South African bush as scientists laden with backpacks climb a hillside.

11h

 

Q&A: What is bitcoin?

Bitcoin has carved out a name for itself as the world's most popular cryptocurrency since arriving on the scene ten years ago.

11h

 

Wall Street greets bitcoin with interest and worry

Bitcoin may be the fraud of the century, depending on whom you believe, or it could be a gold mine for early adopters.

11h

 

Facebook closes 'spam' pages, accounts helping Brazil presidential candidate

Social media platform Facebook has closed 68 pages and 43 accounts linked to a marketing group believed to be promoting the chances of Brazilian right-wing presidential candidate Jair Bolsonaro.

11h

 

Moscow cryptocurrency 'boutique' in legal grey area

First you ring, then push through heavy doors past a suspicious security guard before arriving at Moscow's pioneering cryptocurrency store—a physical portal to the virtual realm of bitcoin.

11h

 

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