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Nyheder2018oktober23

 

Rise, fall and suspense: bitcoin's wild first decade

From its birth in an anonymous, academic style paper to one of the world's most volatile and closely watched financial instruments, bitcoin has lived through a tumultuous first 10 years.

11h

 

China opens mega-bridge linking Hong Kong to mainland

China on Tuesday opened the world's longest sea-crossing bridge linking Hong Kong to the mainland, a feat of engineering carrying immense economic and political significance.

11h

 

Stepping Into an Amazon Store Helps It Get Inside Your HeadAmazon Go NYC WTC SF

The retailer can learn a lot about shoppers' habits from its growing line of cashier-less Amazon Go convenience stores.

11h

 

A Call for Caution on Antioxidant Supplementation

Antioxidants have gotten a lot of press here on SBM; this post digs a little deeper into the basic science of antioxidants, and the importance of understanding more than just one part of a complex biological system before you interfere with it.

11h

 

Black men have higher rates of recidivism despite lower risk factors: study

People of color are incarcerated at disproportionately higher rates than White people, and men of all races have higher rates of recidivism. A new study that estimated the effects of risk factors for Black and White men and women found that Black men were reincarcerated more often and more quickly than all others, despite having lower risk scores on nearly all of the variables on a standardized to

11h

 

World's oldest intact shipwreck discovered in Black Sea – video

Archaeologists have found what they believe to be the world’s oldest intact shipwreck at the bottom of the Black Sea, where it appears to have lain undisturbed for more than 2,400 years. A documentary team have made a two-hour film about the discovery that is due to be shown at the British Museum on Tuesday World's oldest intact shipwreck discovered in Black Sea Continue reading…

11h

 

New technology encodes and processes video orders of magnitude faster than current methods

Computer scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new technology that can encode, transform and edit video faster—several orders of magnitude faster—than the current state of the art.

12h

 

The secret to being more likeable on first dates and job interviews revealed

People who need to make a good impression on dates or in job interviews should concentrate on communicating the hard work and effort behind their success, rather than just emphasising their talent, new research from Cass Business School has found.

12h

 

Overuse of antibiotics 'risks return to dark ages of life-threatening surgery'

Warning comes as report shows 3 million common surgical procedures could be hazardous if infections become resistant to antibiotics We face a return to the dark ages of life-threatening surgery unless we can preserve the infection-killing powers of antibiotics, according to England’s chief medical officer. Dame Sally Davies made her remarks as Public Health England (PHE) published a report showin

13h

 

København dropper P-scannerbiler: Teknologien er for ringe

Center for Parkering i Københavns Kommune parkerer nu permanent sine tre scannerbiler, som de seneste knap to år har været en del af den digitale parkeringskontrol i Københavns Kommune. Teknologien er for dyr, og effekten er udeblevet. Håndholdte scannere har i stedet vist sig effektive.

13h

 

Is gratitude the secret of happiness? I spent a month finding out

It has become a hugely popular concept in positive psychology and self-help, but is feeling grateful really a panacea? One writer sets aside her scepticism and opens up her gratitude journal A memory came to mind recently of opening presents after my seventh or eighth birthday party – the thrill of the smooth, sharp-edged wrapping paper as I ripped it open, the breathless discovery of the gift co

13h

 

New technology encodes and processes video orders of magnitude faster than current methods

Computer scientists at the University of California San Diego have developed a new technology that can encode, transform and edit video faster–several orders of magnitude faster–than the current state of the art.

14h

 

Motion sickness vs. cybersickness: Two different problems or the same condition?

Contrary to previous research, severe motion sickness and cybersickness — a type of motion sickness that stems from exposure to virtual reality — may be considered the same clinical condition, according to researchers. The findings, the first to study both conditions in the same group of people, are published ahead of print in the Journal of Applied Physiology.

14h

 

Black men have higher rates of recidivism despite lower risk factors

A new study that estimated the effects of risk factors for black and white men and women found that black men were reincarcerated more often and more quickly than all others, despite having lower risk scores on nearly all of the variables on a standardized tool that assesses risk.

14h

 

The role of the Atg2 protein in tethering pre-autophagosomal membranes to the endoplasmic reticulum

Postdoctoral Researcher Tetsuya Kotani, Associate Professor Hitoshi Nakatogawa, Honorary Professor Yoshinori Ohsumi and colleagues at Tokyo Tech have analyzed the Atg protein Atg2, whose function had been completely unknown, and have discovered that Atg2 tethers the pre-autophagosomal membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum during autophagosome formation.

14h

 

32 dødsfald på ti år: Danmark har stadig 314 livsfarlige jernbaneoverkørsler

Efter to dødsfald i en jernbaneoverkørsel tidligere på året oplyste myndighederne, at 119 af landets jernbaneoverkørsler stadig ikke er sikret mod ulykker. Men tallet er næsten tre gange så højt, når man regner lokalbanerne med, viser en ny opgørelse.

15h

 

The secret to being more likeable on first dates and job interviews revealed

People who need to make a good impression on dates or in job interviews should concentrate on communicating the hard work and effort behind their success, rather than just emphasising their talent, new research from Cass Business School has found.

18h

 

Monsanto trial: judge rejects bid to overturn landmark cancer verdict

Dewayne Johnson originally won $289m after finding Roundup weedkiller caused illness, but judge reduces financial award A California judge has rejected Monsanto’s appeal to overturn a landmark jury verdict which found that its popular herbicide causes cancer. The judge’s ruling on Monday largely sided with Dewayne “Lee” Johnson, a father of three and former school groundskeeper, who won a $289m a

18h

 

How a Turkish Airlines Jet Flew an Extra 800 Miles and Landed on Time

Turkish Airlines Flight 800 went over Greenland on its way from Panama City to Istanbul, a testament to the power of the jet stream.

19h

 

The Atlantic Daily: Taking Some of the Sheen Off

What We’re Following Federal Registry : A Department of Health and Human Services memo reportedly seeks to “define sex as either male or female, unchangeable, and determined by the genitals that a person is born with.” Such a binary definition draws from an unscientific understanding of developmental biology, writes James Hamblin: Implausibility aside, “this is a federal agency proposing widespre

19h

 

How rants on social media can come back to haunt you

Cognitive scientist used millions of chat room messages to study how positive and negative messages reflected back to their senders.

19h

 

Mystery of how black widow spiders create steel-strength silk webs further unravelled

Researchers have better unraveled the complex process of how black widow spiders transform proteins into steel-strength fibers. This knowledge promises to aid scientists in creating equally strong synthetic materials. Utilizing state-of-the-art techniques, the research team was able to more closely see inside the protein gland where the silk fibers originate, revealing a more complex, hierarchical

19h

 

This Very Good Dog Is Defending America Against African Swine Fever

An airport detector dog named Hardy is earning praise for sniffing out the bacon, so to speak.

20h

 

Dead Sea Scroll Fragments in Museum of the Bible Are Fake

These aren't ancient pieces of the biblical text but rather modern forgeries.

20h

 

Anatomy Does Not Determine Gender, Experts Say

Efforts by the Trump administration to narrowly define gender as determined by genitals defy medical and scientific knowledge.

20h

 

Trilobites: Microplastics Find Their Way Into Your Gut, a Pilot Study Finds

Researchers looked for microplastics in stool samples of people from eight countries. “The results were astonishing,” they said.

20h

 

Microplastics Are Everywhere — and That Likely Includes Your Poop

That's right. The tiny plastic particles have made their way into our poop.

20h

 

Does gut microbiota hold the key to improved diagnosis and treatment of esophageal cancer?

Researchers from Italy directed by Professor Cammarota have found a unique pattern of microbes living in the esophagus of people with esophageal cancer or Barrett's esophagus, which could potentially be used to identify at-risk individuals and pave the way for new types of treatment in the future.

20h

 

Watch NASA dump 450,000 gallons of water in less than a minute

Space Launching a big rocket? You'll need to get wet. Space is hard, and it's not always glamorous getting there. Sometimes NASA blows us away in mundane ways—like by shooting about 450,000 gallons of water 100 feet into…

20h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump to Stump

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Turkey released images from a surveillance camera inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul that show a man leaving the consulate dressed in the late journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s clothes. The footage seemed to suggest that he was part of a ploy by the Saudi

20h

 

5 communication pitfalls that are preventing people from really hearing what you're trying to say

If you identify as being a socially conscious person in today's age of outrage , you've likely experienced the bewildering sensation when a conversation that was once harmless, suddenly doesn't feel that way anymore. Perhaps you're out for a quick bite with family, friends, or coworkers when the conversation takes a turn . Someone's said something that doesn't sit right with you, and you're unsur

20h

 

Want to win Mega Millions' $1.6 billion jackpot? Consider these 3 facts first.

The next Mega Millions drawing is scheduled for Oct. 23 at 11 pm E.T. The odds of any one ticket winning are about 1 in 300 million. This might be a record-setting jackpot, but that doesn't mean you have a better chance of winning. The Mega Millions jackpot has soared to a record-setting $1.6 billion after Friday's drawing yielded no winners. Now, thousands of people are snatching up $2 tickets a

20h

 

Will China’s green energy tipping point come too late?

China leads the world in numerous green energy categories. CO2 emissions in the country totaling more than all coal emissions in the U.S. have recently emerged. This seems to be an administrative-induced blip on the way towards a green energy tipping point. None China nearly emits as much C02 per year as the U.S. and the E.U. combined. The C02 emitted by China constitutes nearly 11% of all C02 em

20h

 

The value of owning more books than you can read

Many readers buy books with every intention of reading them only to let them linger on the shelf. Statistician Nassim Nicholas Taleb believes surrounding ourselves with unread books enriches our lives as they remind us of all we don't know. The Japanese call this practice tsundoku , and it may provide lasting benefits. I love books. If I go to the bookstore to check a price, I walk out with three

20h

 

How to raise a non-materialistic kid

Keeping a gratitude journal caused children to donate 60 percent more to charitable causes. Other methods suggested by researchers include daily gratitude reflection, gratitude posters, and keeping a "gratitude jar." Materialism has been shown to increase anxiety and depression and promote selfish attitudes and behavior. None The new Netflix drama The Kindergarten Teacher offers viewers a complex

20h

 

Stephen Hawking's Thesis, First Wheelchair to Be Auctioned Off

One of Hawking's earliest surviving wheelchairs and his groundbreaking doctoral thesis are up for auction in London.

20h

 

Bowel cancer on the rise among young people in Europe

Rate among people aged 20-39 rose 7.4% a year between 2008 and 2016, researchers say Bowel cancer is on the increase among young people in Europe, researchers have discovered, with expanding waistlines thought to play a role in the rise. The condition is most common in the elderly, but some research suggests it is more aggressive in young people. According to recent figures, it is the second most

20h

 

Netflix Hiring Guillermo del Toro to Make 'Pinocchio' Isn't About Kids—It's About Oscars

Netflix knows what it's doing hiring the master of macabre to tell the story of everyone's favorite puppet-turned-boy.

20h

 

Brain wave device enhances memory function

The entrainment of theta brain waves with a commercially available device not only enhances theta wave activity, but also boosts memory performance, according to new research.

20h

 

Mars: Oxygen-rich, life-supporting liquid water?

Given the right circumstances, water on Mars could hold more oxygen than previously believed, theoretically enough to support aerobic respiration, new research suggests.

20h

 

Microplastics Are Turning Up Everywhere, Even In Human Excrement

A very small study shows that microplastics are in human waste in many parts of the world. While it's not entirely clear what that means for our health, it might be a sign that we need to pull back. (Image credit: Desiree Martin/AFP/Getty Images)

20h

 

Your Poop Is Probably Full of Plastic

A new study suggests that microplastics routinely show up in our food—and our digestive tracts.

20h

 

Antibodies linked to heart attacks

Levels of antiphospholipid antibodies, which are associated with rheumatic diseases, are also elevated in myocardial infarction without any autoimmune co-morbidity, a study reports.

21h

 

35 top prize winners warn Brexit will damage science

Thirty-five Nobel and top mathematics prize winners have warned British Prime Minister Theresa May and European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker that scientific research will suffer a serious setback without a good Brexit deal.

21h

 

Study shows volunteering benefits those with lupus

Conventional wisdom has it that volunteering is good for you, and a study at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) shows that to be true for people with lupus volunteering in a peer support and education program.

21h

 

Mexico braces for 'potentially catastrophic' Hurricane Willa

Mexico braced for the worst Monday as Hurricane Willa—upgraded to a maximum Category 5 storm—bore down on the Pacific coast, where it is expected to produce life-threatening wind and flooding.

21h

 

Dangerous Hurricane Willa probed By NASA and Japan's GPM satellite

Hurricane Willa is a major hurricane threatening western Mexico. Forecasters were able to see the rate of rainfall occurring within the powerful storm when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM's core satellite passed overhead and provided that data.

21h

 

Children as young as seven suffer effects of discrimination, study shows

A new UC Riverside study finds children are sensitive to and suffer the impacts of discrimination as young as 7 years old.

21h

 

Peter Jackson made Hobbits look so tiny with this mind trick

Head Trip Forced perspective takes control over the way our brains interpret size. Hobbits appearing doll size, tourists pinching a tiny Eiffel Tower, and beachgoers standing atop a body of water are all made possible by forced perspective.

21h

 

How rants on social media can come back to haunt you

We all know that those angry rants on social media can come back to hurt you—and sooner than you think. "Good," positive chat resonates for a few seconds, generally, but negative chat, even in a chat room where exchanges happen more immediately than on Facebook or Twitter, persists for many minutes, new UC Davis research suggests.

21h

 

Huge lottery prizes due to simple math, with a few surprises

For all the anticipation about whether someone will finally snag the gigantic Mega Millions and Powerball jackpots, the games come down to two things: simple math—and very long odds.

21h

 

Young climate activists say their lawsuit should go to trial

Young activists who are suing the U.S. government in a high-profile climate change lawsuit say the case poses important constitutional questions that should fully be evaluated at trial next week.

21h

 

NASA's first image of Mars from a CubeSat

NASA's MarCO mission was designed to find out if briefcase-sized spacecraft called CubeSats could survive the journey to deep space. Now, MarCO — which stands for Mars Cube One — has Mars in sight.

21h

 

'Himalayan Viagra' under threat from climate change: researchers

A prized caterpillar fungus that is more valuable than gold and is nicknamed "Himalayan Viagra" in Asia, where it is seen as a wonder drug, is becoming harder to find due to climate change, researchers said Monday.

21h

 

Oculus co-founder Brendan Iribe joins exodus from Facebook

A co-founder of Facebook's virtual-reality division is joining the exodus of executives to leave the company after striking it rich in lucrative sales of their startups.

21h

 

Brain wave device enhances memory function

The entrainment of theta brain waves with a commercially available device not only enhances theta wave activity, but also boosts memory performance, according to new research from the Center for Neuroscience at UC Davis, published recently in the journal Cognitive Neuroscience.

21h

 

Antibodies linked to heart attacks

Levels of antiphospholipid antibodies, which are associated with rheumatic diseases, are also elevated in myocardial infarction without any autoimmune co-morbidity, a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in The Annals of Internal Medicine reports.

21h

 

Gravitational waves could soon provide measure of universe's expansion

Twenty years ago, scientists were shocked to realize that our universe is not only expanding, but that it's expanding fasterover time.

21h

 

Drug Cocktail Slows Progress of Aggressive Breast Cancer

Checkpoint inhibition combined with chemotherapy gives patients with triple-negative metastatic breast cancer about two months more time without significant tumor growth, a study finds.

21h

 

Mind: What’s Life Like After Depression? Surprisingly, Little Is Known

Most research on depression focuses on the afflicted, a new paper argues, overlooking a potentially informative group: people who have recovered.

21h

 

For some young adults, the 2016 US election was a 'traumatic experience'

A new study shows that for 25 percent of young adults given a psychological assessment, the 2016 US presidential election race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton caused symptoms often seen in those with post-traumatic stress disorder.

22h

 

Reliable Collection of High-Quality Fecal Samples for Gut Microbiome Studies

Check out this white paper from DNA Genotek to see how OMNIgene•GUT allows for reliable and reproducible self-collection of fecal samples.

22h

 

Can Saliva Replace Blood for DNA Collection and Analysis?

Check out this white paper from DNA Genotek to examine why saliva is a viable alternative to blood draws for obtaining DNA samples.

22h

 

Children as young as seven suffer effects of discrimination, study shows

A new UC Riverside study finds children are sensitive to and suffer the impacts of discrimination as young as seven years old. Previous studies have shown children can identify racism at that age, but the study is the first to study the impacts on children under 10 years old. The study also suggests that a strong sense of ethnic-racial identity is a significant buffer against these negative effect

22h

 

Researchers wake-up DNA from soil bacteria to discover novel acid antibiotic

Scleric Acid has been discovered by capturing and engineering a DNA fragment from soil bacteria Streptomyces sclerotialus, and could help fight bacterial infections.

22h

 

Plants engineered to always be on alert don’t grow well

Scientists bred a type of weed to lack proteins that help stem the production of bitter chemicals used to ward off insect attacks.

22h

 

More than just anatomy: Sex differences in lower urinary tract

The biological differences between women and men go beyond basic anatomy. Researchers must consider sex differences down to the cellular level in order to discover crucial information about the varied development, function, and biology between women and men.

22h

 

Pancreatic cancer genetic marker may predict outcomes with radiation therapy

scientists find that a gene involved in the immune system called IDO2 plays a significant role in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common type of pancreatic cancer. The discovery may help physicians provide better treatment options for patients.

22h

 

In 5 to 10 years, gravitational waves could accurately measure universe's expansion

In a new paper published in Nature, three University of Chicago scientists estimate that given how quickly LIGO researchers saw the first neutron star collision, they could have a very accurate measurement of the rate of the expansion of the universe within five to ten years.

22h

 

How rants on social media can come back to haunt you

Cognitive scientist Seth Frey used millions of chat room messages to study how positive and negative messages reflected back to their senders.

22h

 

Why you shouldn’t help your coworkers unless they ask

When it comes to offering your expertise, it’s better to keep it to yourself or wait until you’re asked, according to new research. Building upon previous findings that showed how helping colleagues slows one’s success, management professor Russell Johnson looked more closely at the different kinds of help in which people engage at work—and how that help was received. “…it’s not necessarily the b

23h

 

Model maps ‘domino effect’ of Alzheimer’s protein misfolding

A new computer simulation shows how clumps of defective proteins in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease can stealthily spread through the brain over as long as 30 years. “We hope the ability to model neurodegenerative disorders will inspire better diagnostic tests and, ultimately, treatments to slow down their effects,” says Ellen Kuhl, a mechanical engineer at Stanford University

23h

 

In kids with autism, short questionnaire may detect GI disorders

Though they can be difficult to detect, gastrointestinal disorders are common in kids with autism, sometimes causing anger, aggression, and other behavior problems.

23h

 

New mechanism of action in a first-line drug for diabetes

Researchers have discovered a mechanism of action underlying a widely used diabetes drug, which may expand its indications for use, as well as open new inroads in pharmaceutical development.

23h

 

Heredity matters: Ancestral protease functions as protein import motor in chloroplasts

Researchers identified a large novel protein complex in the inner chloroplast membrane that functions as a motor to import proteins into the chloroplast. Components of the complex evolved from a protein of the endosymbiont cyanobacterium-like ancestor of chloroplasts that lost its protein-degrading function but retained its motor ability. These findings solve a longstanding mystery surrounding thi

23h

 

Social stigma contributes to poor mental health in the autistic community

Stress related to social stigma may be the reason why autistic people experience more mental health problems than the general population, dispelling past theories that the condition itself is the origin of such distress.

23h

 

New drug combination destroys chemo-resistant blood cancer

Researchers have developed a promising targeted strategy to treat chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and a diagnostic test to determine which AML patients would most likely benefit from this treatment. In a mouse model, the experimental treatment eliminated all signs of disease (complete remission) in 100 percent of animals, while those that received the standard treatment all die

23h

 

Fish give up the fight after coral bleaching

Researchers found that when water temperatures heat up for corals, fish 'tempers' cool down, providing the first clear evidence of coral bleaching serving as a trigger for rapid change in reef fish behavior. Researchers show how the iconic butterflyfish, considered to be sensitive indicators of reef health, can offer an early warning sign that reef fish populations are in trouble.

23h

 

Ancient enzymes the catalysts for new discoveries

New research recreating 450 million-year-old enzymes has resulted in a biochemical engineering 'hack' which could lead to new drugs, flavors, fragrances and biofuels.

23h

 

23h

 

When flying into a hurricane won't work, meteorologists use these high-tech alternatives

Science Satellites provide a safe and accurate alternative. Today, meteorologists have mountains of information to use as they track a hurricane. This amount of data was only a dream a couple of decades ago, but now it’s crucial…

23h

 

Playing Birdsongs to Save Trees

Playing Birdsongs to Save Trees Researchers call in feathered helpers to spread the seeds of endangered plants. JapaneseWhiteEye_topNteaser.jpg A Japanese white-eye clings to a flower on Kauai. Though not native to Hawaii, these birds may help spread the seeds of threatened Hawaiian plants. Image credits: Mike's Birds via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Creature Monday, October 22, 2018 – 14

23h

 

For the brokenhearted, grief can lead to death

Grief can cause inflammation that can kill, according to new research from Rice University.

23h

 

Lawrence Krauss to Retire From Arizona State After Sexual Misconduct Accusations

The university found that Dr. Krauss, a prominent theoretical physicist professor, grabbed a woman’s chest in 2016. He denied he “harassed or assaulted anyone.”

23h

 

In Africa, ‘Paper Parks’ Are Starved for Cash

In a unique analysis, researchers put a price on protecting Africa’s wildlife: at least $1.2 billion each year.

23h

 

How Many Space Stations Does This Planet Need?

The Trump administration wants to shift to a capitalist free-for-all in orbit. But the readiness of commercial space outposts to take NASA’s place is far from certain.

23h

 

23h

 

Scientists Help Robots 'Evolve.' Weirdness Ensues

Algorithms design robot legs tailored to walk on specific surfaces. The results are at once logical, counterintuitive, and bizarre.

23h

 

Sex Redefined: The Idea of 2 Sexes Is Overly Simplistic

Biologists now think there is a larger spectrum than just binary female and male — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

23h

 

Khashoggi’s Disappearance Is a Test for Britain

LONDON —When news broke this year that the former Russian spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia had come into contact with the deadly nerve agent Novichok in the English city of Salisbury, the United Kingdom acted fast. Within a week, Prime Minister Theresa May had pointed a finger at Moscow, triggering a coordinated response against Russia’s “unlawful use of force” with the largest expulsion

23h

 

Photos of the Central American Immigrant Caravan

On October 13, a group of hundreds of people gathered together to flee their impoverished home country of Honduras in a caravan headed toward the United States, seeking a better life for themselves and their families. That caravan quickly swelled to approximately 7,000 Central American immigrants as it passed north through Guatemala. As of today, most of these men, women, and children have just e

23h

 

New target of alcohol in the brain

When alcohol enters the brain, it causes neurons in a specialized region called the ventral tegmental area, or VTA — also known as the "pleasure center" — to release dopamine, a neurotransmitter that produces those feel-good sensations, and tells the brain that whatever it just experienced is worth getting more of.

23h

 

Availability of nitrogen to plants is declining as climate warms

Researchers have found that global changes, including warming temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are causing a decrease in the availability of a key nutrient for terrestrial plants. This could affect the ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and reduce the amount of nutrients available for the creatures that eat them.

23h

 

Common genetic link in lung ailments

An international research team has identified a genetic connection between rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

23h

 

Drug cocktail almost doubles lifespan of worms

A research team has discovered a combination of drugs that increases healthy lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. The team administered combinations compounds targeting different ageing pathways to C. elegans. Results showed that two drug pairs extended the mean lifespan of the worms synergistically, and combined with a third compound almost doubled mean lifespans, an effect larger than any lifespa

23h

 

When you are unhappy in a relationship, why do you stay? The answer may surprise you

Why do people stay in unsatisfying romantic relationships? A new study suggests it may be because they view leaving as bad for their partner. The study, being published in the November 2018 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, explored the possibility that people deciding whether to end a relationship consider not only their own desires but also how much they think their part

23h

 

Would you zap your brain to improve your memory?

Individuals were more willing to use a hypothetical brain stimulation device on others than on themselves, specifically to improve 'core functions,' like kindness and self-confidence.

23h

 

In kids with autism, short questionnaire may detect GI disorders

Though they can be difficult to detect, gastrointestinal disorders are common in kids with autism, sometimes causing anger, aggression, and other behavior problems.

23h

 

Radiation/cisplatin combination established as standard of care for HPV+ oral cancer

Combinations of radiation and chemotherapy drugs have been shown to cure HPV-related head and neck cancer with a high success rate. A new phase III trial has now determined that cisplatin chemotherapy, combined with radiation therapy, produces the best results and should be considered the standard of care. Findings will be presented in a news briefing Tuesday at 3 p.m. ET from the American Society

23h

 

Structure of spherical viruses aren't as perfect as we thought

Flaviviruses, such as Dengue and Zika, were assumed to be symmetrical icosahedrons (shapes with 20 identical faces) based on data from microscopes. But these icosahedral viruses might not be perfectly symmetrical after all.

23h

 

Overspending on defense arsenal bankrupts a plant's economy

The MSU-DOE Plant Research Laboratory has genetically tuned a plant to become highly resistant to insect attacks. But becoming such a fortress compromises its growth and procreative capabilities.

23h

 

Mystery of how black widow spiders create steel-strength silk webs further unravelled

Northwestern University and San Diego State University researchers have better unraveled the complex process of how black widow spiders transform proteins into steel-strength fibers. This knowledge promises to aid scientists in creating equally strong synthetic materials. Utilizing state-of-the-art techniques, the research team was able to more closely see inside the protein gland where the silk f

23h

 

The World’s Most Valuable Parasite Is in Trouble

Ten years ago, Kelly Hopping was driving through a Tibetan mountain pass when her Chinese colleague stopped the car, hopped out, walked to a roadside stall, and returned with what looked like a bag of Cheetos on sticks. Each orange lump was, in fact, a dead caterpillar whose body had been overrun by a fungus (the stick). Hopping’s colleague, whose mother had cancer, had bought them for their medi

23h

 

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels' shells

Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites.

23h

 

Genetic profile for a section of Aspergillus fungi

Aspergillus is an important fungal genus, with roles in agriculture, biotechnology, human health, enzyme production and food fermentation. Scientists now present the first large analysis of an Aspergillus fungal subgroup, section Nigri.

23h

 

Antipsychotics ineffective for treating ICU delirium

A large multi-site study has found that critically ill patients are not benefiting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades.

23h

 

Childhood obesity the major risk factor for serious hip disease

New research suggests that rising childhood obesity rates are causing more adolescents to develop a debilitating hip disease requiring urgent surgery.

23h

 

Cells that change jobs to fight diabetes

Diabetes is characterized by persistent high blood sugar levels that occur when certain cells in the pancreas — the insulin-producing cells — are destroyed or are no longer able to secrete insulin. Researchers have now succeeded in showing how part of the pancreatic cells, which usually produce other hormones, can take over from the damaged cells by starting to produce insulin. These results lea

23h

 

Nanosized ferroelectrics become a reality

Using ferroelectricity instead of magnetism in computer memory saves energy. If ferroelectric bits were nanosized, this would also save space. But conventional wisdom dictates that ferroelectric properties disappear when the bits are made smaller. Reports that hafnium oxide can be used to make a nanoscale ferroelectric have not yet convinced the field. Physicists have now gathered evidence that co

23h

 

Losing control of gene activity in Alzheimer's disease

Pioneering research into the mechanisms controlling gene activity in the brain could hold the key to understanding Alzheimer's disease and might help identify effective treatments in the future.

23h

 

Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI

MIT engineers have devised a new technique to detect either electrical activity or optical signals in the brain, using a minimally invasive technique based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

23h

 

Inside Europe’s quest to build an unhackable quantum internet

An ambitious project in the Netherlands aims to use quantum technology to foil hackers who try to spy on data flowing through the internet’s pipes.

23h

 

Mystery of how black widow spiders create steel-strength silk webs further unravelled

Researchers at Northwestern University and San Diego State University (SDSU) have better unraveled the complex process of how black widow spiders transform proteins into steel-strength fibers. This knowledge promises to aid scientists in creating equally strong synthetic materials.

23h

 

Overspending on defense arsenal bankrupts a plant's economy

Defend or grow? Can plants do both at the same time? Michigan State University scientists might be inching closer to answering these questions. The answers matter. They could someday help us understand natural ecosystems or help farmers increase yields, without increasing dependence on chemicals to resist pests.

23h

 

Structure of spherical viruses aren't as perfect as we thought

Determining the structure of a virus is an important step in understanding and treating viral disease. For decades, structural biologists have been using cryo-electron microscopy to create increasingly accurate pictures of biomolecules, but one of the assumptions they've been relying on could be wrong.

23h

 

Researchers uncover new target of alcohol in the brain

Now, researchers in the Center for Alcohol Research in Epigenetics at the University of Illinois at Chicago report in the journal Neuropharmacology, that alcohol blocks a potassium channel called KCNK13 that sits within the membrane of dopamine-releasing neurons in the VTA. When the potassium channel gets blocked, the neurons increase their activity and release more dopamine.

23h

 

New tool gives deeper understanding of glioblastoma

Researchers have developed a new tool to study genetic 'switches' active in glioblastoma tumors that drive growth of the cancer. In a new article, they identified key switches in different types of tumors, including switches linked to how long a patient survives.

1d

 

New agent against anthrax

Researchers have developed an innovative strategy for preventing the anthrax bacterium from absorbing iron, which is crucial for its survival. It does so by neutralizing a special iron complexing agent produced by the bacterium. Because the anthrax pathogen only spreads in the body when it receives access to the essential element, this is expected to provide an effective treatment against the life

1d

 

Wishful thinking is rewarded

The reward system in the brain affects our judgements.

1d

 

Asian elephants could be the math kings of the jungle

Asian elephants demonstrate numeric ability which is closer to that observed in humans rather than in other animals, according to new research.

1d

 

Why do we get goosebumps?

Science Happiness and fear are more similar than you might think. Scientists are not entirely sure why we get goosebumps, though they think they are likely a hand-me-down survival mechanism from our ancestors.

1d

 

This Man Got a Seemingly Harmless Bug Bite. It Turned Into a Flesh-Eating Infection.

What started as a simple bug bite on a young man's knee soon turned life-threatening when the itchy bump developed into an infection with "flesh-eating" bacteria.

1d

 

Liver transplant survival rate sees improvement among older adults

To learn more about older adults and liver transplants, a team of researchers studied information recorded by the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) from 2003 to 2016. The team's study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

1d

 

Elon Musk's high-speed test tunnel will give free rides on Dec. 11

The prototype tunnel is about 2 miles long and contains electric skates that travel at top speeds of around 150 mph. This is the first tunnel from the company that will be open to the public. If successful, the prototype could help the company receive regulatory approval for much bigger projects in L.A. and beyond. As a first step toward fulfilling its vision of constructing a massive underground

1d

 

Cancer researcher says keto is not a fad diet

The low-carbohydrate group in a recent Lancet study were typically middle-aged, obese, sedentary, diabetic smokers. The study was not a randomized, controlled, double-blind experiment. Harper has been in ketosis for six years, and says it has profound effects on cancer patients, among other chronic ailments. None Here we go again. For nearly three years I've written about varying aspects of the k

1d

 

Dangerous Hurricane Willa probed By NASA and Japan's GPM satellite

Hurricane Willa is a major hurricane threatening western Mexico. Forecasters were able to see the rate of rainfall occurring within the powerful storm when the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM's core satellite passed overhead and provided that data.

1d

 

For some young adults, the 2016 US election was a 'traumatic experience'

A new study shows that for 25 percent of young adults given a psychological assessment, the 2016 US presidential election race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton caused symptoms often seen in those with post-traumatic stress disorder.

1d

 

Bizarre 'Headless Chicken Monster' Drifts Through Antarctic Deep

Meet the real-life "chicken of the sea."

1d

 

Breathing through the nose aids memory storage

The way we breathe may affect how well our memories are consolidated (i.e. reinforced and stabilized). If we breathe through the nose rather than the mouth after trying to learn a set of smells, we remember them better.

1d

 

New human cell structure discovered

A new structure in human cells has been discovered. The structure is a new type of protein complex that the cell uses to attach to its surroundings and proves to play a key part in cell division.

1d

 

Scientists make new 'green' electronic polymer-based films with protein nanowires

A team has produced a new class of electronic materials that may lead to a 'green,' more sustainable future in biomedical and environmental sensing. Scientists say the work shows it is possible to combine protein nanowires with a polymer to produce a flexible electronic composite material that retains the electrical conductivity and unique sensing capabilities of protein nanowires.

1d

 

Modern conflict: Screen time vs. nature

Even rural kids today spend more time in front of screens and less time outdoors, according to a new study of middle-school students in South Carolina. Researchers found that gaps between screen time and outdoor time were most pronounced for girls, African American students, and eighth graders.

1d

 

Mars likely to have enough oxygen to support life: study

Salty water just below the surface of Mars could hold enough oxygen to support the kind of microbial life that emerged and flourished on Earth billions of years ago, researchers reported Monday.

1d

 

Giant mice threaten rare seabirds on remote British island

Mice brought to a remote South Atlantic island by sailors in the 19th century are threatening seabirds including the critically endangered Tristan albatross, a British charity said on Monday.

1d

 

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels' shells

Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites, according to researchers from Penn State and Union College.

1d

 

Letters: “The Term ‘Political Correctness’ Primes People to Respond Negatively”

Americans Strongly Dislike PC Culture Earlier this month, Yascha Mounk explored the results of a new study on polarization in America. A large majority of Americans, the study found, believe that “political correctness is a problem in our country.” The article written by Yascha Mounk sums up exactly the problems with political correctness. PC creates fear and resentment in those who are constantl

1d

 

When Crime Is a Family Affair

When kids choose a profession, they tend to follow in their parents’ footsteps : Doctors’ children often become doctors, lawyers produce lawyers, and plumbers beget plumbers. So, after 15 years of covering crime and criminal justice for The New York Times , I was fascinated by studies—conducted in cities across the United States and in London, England, with near-identical results—showing that cri

1d

 

NASA tracks Tropical Storm Yutu, warnings posted

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Yutu as warnings were posted. A typhoon watch is in force for Tinian and Saipan and a tropical storm watch is in force for Rota.

1d

 

NASA sees tiny Tropical Storm Vincente near southwestern Mexico's coast

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of the small tropical storm named Vincente.

1d

 

Study finds availability of nitrogen to plants is declining as climate warms

Researchers have found that global changes, including warming temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are causing a decrease in the availability of a key nutrient for terrestrial plants. This could affect the ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and reduce the amount of nutrients available for the creatures that eat them.

1d

 

Special journal issue looks for new clues about old life

Hundreds of millions of years before there was a chicken or an egg to debate, the first complex animals were evolving in parallel with Earth's rising oxygen levels.

1d

 

The New Health Care: The Problem With Probiotics

There are potential harms as well as benefits, and a lot of wishful thinking and imprecision in the marketing of products containing them.

1d

 

NASA tracks Tropical Storm Yutu, warnings posted

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Yutu as warnings were posted. A typhoon watch is in force for Tinian and Saipan and a tropical storm watch is in force for Rota.

1d

 

Fracking wastewater accumulation found in freshwater mussels' shells

Elevated concentrations of strontium, an element associated with oil and gas wastewaters, have accumulated in the shells of freshwater mussels downstream from fracking wastewater disposal sites, according to researchers from Penn State and Union College.

1d

 

NASA sees tiny Tropical Storm Vicente near southwestern Mexico's coast

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of the small tropical storm named Vicente.

1d

 

CU researchers find common genetic link in lung ailments

An international research team led by members of the University of Colorado School of Medicine faculty has identified a genetic connection between rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The findings are published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

1d

 

Study finds availability of nitrogen to plants is declining as climate warms

Researchers have found that global changes, including warming temperatures and increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are causing a decrease in the availability of a key nutrient for terrestrial plants. This could affect the ability of forests to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and reduce the amount of nutrients available for the creatures that eat them.

1d

 

1d

 

Facebook posts with these words can predict depression

Researchers have created an algorithm that analyzes social media posts to find linguistic markers for depression. In any given year, depression affects more than six percent of the adult population in the United States—some 16 million people—but fewer than half receive the treatment they need. Analyzing social media data that consenting users shared across the months leading up to a depression di

1d

 

Last week in tech: Photoshop on the iPad, Palm’s tiny smartphone, and a new waterproof Kindle

Technology Check out the latest episode of our podcast! Get all caught up on the most recent tech news.

1d

 

Anti-plastic focus 'dangerous distraction' from climate change

Riverford vegetable box boss says more focus should be on cutting carbon, not demonising plastic.

1d

 

Yes, the 'Blob' Is Back. No, It Won't Wreak Havoc on East Coast Weather.

No, "the blob" will not cause a wonky winter.

1d

 

Special journal issue looks for new clues about old life

What came first — animals or oxygen? That question is the central theme of a special issue of Emerging Topics in Life Sciences published Sept. 28 by Portland Press. Titled "Early Earth and the Rise of Complex Life," the issue was edited by UC Riverside's Timothy Lyons.

1d

 

Hot baths could improve depression as much as physical exercise

Taking a hot bath twice a week may help relieve mild depression. It may work by resetting circadian rhythms, which are often disrupted in people with depression

1d

 

Satellites in orbit can save sharks in the ocean

Satellite technology could make shark sanctuaries—an ambitious attempt to protect huge areas of ocean space to curtail the overfishing of sharks—even more effective, according to a new study. When researchers first set out to follow grey reef sharks around the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), they intended to survey their movement in the protected waters there. What they found was a distur

1d

 

Weight-Loss Supplements Contain Dangerous Stimulants Years After Being Prohibited

Some sports and weight-loss supplements still contain experimental stimulant drugs years after the FDA prohibited them.

1d

 

Study gives new insight into how our brain perceives places

Experiments using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) showed that the brain's parahippocampal place area responded more strongly to a scene recognition task while the occipital place area responded more to a navigation task.

1d

 

How we remember what we read

The results of two human experiments published in eNeuro reveal patterns of brain activity associated with successful memory of a just-read text. The research provides new insight into the memory processes involved in natural reading.

1d

 

Distinct systems for recognizing, navigating places

Our abilities to recognize places and find our way through them engage different parts of the brain, according to new findings from a neuroimaging study reported in JNeurosci. The research suggests humans process their environment like the objects within them, through distinct 'what' and 'how' systems in the brain.

1d

 

Nose breathing enhances memory consolidation

Breathing through the nose may improve the transfer of experience to long-term memory, finds a study of human adults published in JNeurosci. The findings add to growing evidence for the influence of respiration on human perception and cognition.

1d

 

Mouse study supports stem cell therapy for cerebral palsy

Neural stem cells can repair damaged parts of the brain and restore motor impairments in mice that display features of cerebral palsy, according to new research published in eNeuro. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using stem cells to address the underlying brain injuries responsible for this group of common movement disorders.

1d

 

Poor access to trauma center linked to higher death rates in more than half of US States

States with poor access to a comprehensive trauma center have more deaths occurring before injured patients' arrival at a hospital, contributing to higher overall trauma-related mortality.

1d

 

New approach to neonatal sepsis in developing nations could save thousands of lives

Sepsis is a major cause of preventable death among newborn children in tropical countries. Now the antibiotic ceftriaxone, which has been available only as an injectable, can be administered through rectal delivery. This method could annually save the lives of several hundred thousand newborns with sepsis. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the America

1d

 

‘Waste removal system’ could deliver drugs to brain

A new approach to delivering therapeutics more effectively to the brain could have implications for the treatment of a wide range of diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s, ALS, and brain cancer. Many promising therapies for diseases of the central nervous system have failed in clinical trials because of the difficulty in getting enough of the drugs into the brain to be effective. T

1d

 

Hurricane Michael could sour Florida's tupelo honey harvest

Hurricane Michael toppled beehives and stripped flowering plants across Florida's Panhandle, threatening tupelo honey production in a tiny community that is the primary source of the sweet delicacy.

1d

 

Netflix to borrow another $2B to pay its programming bills

Netflix plans to borrow another $2 billion to help pay for the exclusive series and movies that its management credits for helping its video streaming service reel in millions of new subscribers during the past five years.

1d

 

Musk says LA Hyperloop tunnel to be unveiled December 10

Elon Musk's Hyperloop ultra high-speed transport system will be unveiled in Los Angeles in early December with free test rides to the public, the entrepreneur announced.

1d

 

Ryanair's Dutch-based cabin crews to strike Tuesday

Ryanair's Dutch-based cabin crews Monday announced a last minute 24-hour strike to protest the Irish budget airline's decision to close its base in the southern city of Eindhoven.

1d

 

Spotlighting differences in closely-related species

There are millions of fungal species, and those few hundred found in the Aspergillus genus play important roles in areas ranging from industrial production to agricultural plant pathogens. Reported October 22, 2018, in Nature Genetics, a team led by scientists at the Technical University of Denmark, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Faci

1d

 

Asocial Octopuses Become Cuddly on MDMA

Octopuses react to MDMA much like humans do. And not surprisingly, given their anatomy, the animals are excellent huggers. Annie Sneed reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

How a ‘mysterious’ creature moves with no muscles or neurons

New research examines how a simple marine creature moves using ultra-fast cellular contractions that are so quick they should break its cells apart. Almost eight years ago, bioengineer Manu Prakash was looking for a way to watch every cell in an adult living, behaving animal in elaborate detail. He searched the catalog of life and happened upon the simple marine animal Trichoplax adhaerens —or Tp

1d

 

Horror Cinema Has a Gatekeeping Problem

The biggest name in horror filmmaking is indisputably the producer Jason Blum. That’s a fact only reinforced by the staggering opening weekend of his newest movie, Halloween , which made $77.5 million in its first three days—a record for the 40-year-old franchise. Blum’s company, Blumhouse Productions, finances small-budget genre films and gives directors full creative control; it has been behind

1d

 

Research finds NJ numerical nutrient criterion used to protect streams is too high

A new way of measuring the relative habitability of freshwater environments for fish and aquatic insects suggests that New Jersey's water monitoring and treatment standards could use a boost.

1d

 

Spionchips: Apple vil have kritisk artikel trukket tilbage

I stort interview angriber Apples direktør Tim Cook amerikansk medie, der skrev om kinesiske spionchips.

1d

 

Scientists make new 'green' electronic polymer-based films with protein nanowires

An interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has produced a new class of electronic materials that may lead to a "green," more sustainable future in biomedical and environmental sensing, say research leaders microbiologist Derek Lovley and polymer scientist Todd Emrick.

1d

 

Salty Martian groundwater may have enough oxygen to support life

Mars gets its red colour from oxygen rusting its surface, and it may be hiding even more oxygen in underground brine, which could help microorganisms survive

1d

 

Spotlighting differences in closely related species

Aspergillus is an important fungal genus, with roles in agriculture, biotechnology, human health, enzyme production and food fermentation Reported in Nature Genetics, a team led by scientists at the Technical University of Denmark, the US Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a DOE Office of Science User Facility, and the Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI), a DOE Bioenergy Researc

1d

 

Rising temperatures and human activity are increasing storm runoff and flash floods

Researchers have demonstrated for the first time that runoff extremes have been dramatically increasing in response to climate and human-induced changes. Their findings show a large increase in both precipitation and runoff extremes driven by both human activity and climate change. They also found that storm runoff has a stronger response than precipitation to human-induced changes (climate change

1d

 

What ice cores tell us about ancient storms

Science Digging up the particles trapped in layers of Arctic ice. At the poles, falling snow doesn't melt; it collects in layers that stretch back in time. Particles trapped in this ice can reveal ancient climate secrets.

1d

 

Trump Administration Places Want Ads for Climate Scientists

Five positions are open to lead centers aimed at studying regional climate change effects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Skin: The Human Body's Largest Organ

Skin is the body's largest organ and is the first line of defense against harm.

1d

 

How have textbooks portrayed climate change?

Back in 2007, the world's foremost body charged with assessing climate change stated with "very high confidence" that humans were a primary driver of climate change.

1d

 

New in the Hastings Center Report, September-October 2018

Questions about conscience protections for health care providers, how bioethics can shape artificial intelligence, a special report on citizenship and justice in aging societies, and more in the (September-October 2018 issue https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/1552146x/2018/48/5).

1d

 

Modern conflict: Screen time vs. nature

Even rural kids today spend more time in front of screens and less time outdoors, according to a new study of middle-school students in South Carolina. Researchers at North Carolina State University and Clemson University found that gaps between screen time and outdoor time were most pronounced for girls, African American students, and eighth graders.

1d

 

Preliminary evidence for use of board games to improve knowledge in health outcomes

Board games can engage patients in play and fantasy, and by enabling face-to-face interaction, can help educate patients on health-related knowledge and behaviors.

1d

 

Scientists make new 'green' electronic polymer-based films with protein nanowires

A team at UMass Amherst has produced a new class of electronic materials that may lead to a 'green,' more sustainable future in biomedical and environmental sensing, say research leaders microbiologist Derek Lovley and polymer scientist Todd Emrick. They say the work shows it is possible to combine protein nanowires with a polymer to produce a flexible electronic composite material that retains th

1d

 

More than one in ten heavy cannabis users experience withdrawal after quitting cannabis

As the number of Americans who regularly use cannabis has climbed, so too has the number of those experiencing cannabis withdrawal symptoms. A new study finds that 12 percent of frequent marijuana smokers experienced Cannabis Withdrawal Syndrome (CWS), which includes emotional, behavioral and physical symptoms.

1d

 

High-dose, high-precision radiation therapy safe, effective for solitary kidney cancer patients with only one kidney

Treatment of renal cell carcinoma with stereotactic radiation therapy is as safe and effective for patients with one kidney as it is for those who have two, according to an analysis of the largest-ever, international dataset of solitary kidney patients to receive this emerging treatment. Findings will be presented in a news briefing today at 12 p.m. from the American Society for Radiation Oncology

1d

 

Men with low-/intermediate-risk prostate cancer benefit from fewer, higher-dose radiation treatments

Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is a safe and effective treatment for men with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer, according to a long-term, multi-institutional study. The study clears the way for patients who may wish to shorten their course of treatment without fear of increasing their risk for severe, adverse side effects. Findings will be presented in a news briefing today a

1d

 

Radiation therapy outcomes better for African-American than Caucasian prostate cancer patients

While popular beliefs and population data suggest that African-American men are at higher risk of dying from prostate cancer than Caucasian men, a new analysis of genetic data from a large prospective registry and clinical data from several randomized trials indicates that African-American patients may have comparatively higher cure rates when treated with radiation therapy. Findings will be prese

1d

 

Pelvic lymph node radiation provides significant benefit for prostate cancer patients

The first report of a large international clinical trial shows that, for men who show signs of prostate cancer after surgical removal of their prostates, extending radiation therapy to the pelvic lymph nodes combined with adding short-term hormone therapy to standard treatment can extend the amount of time before their cancer spreads. Findings will presented in a news briefing today at 12 p.m. fro

1d

 

Extinct starfish gets ‘virtually dissected’ in 3D

Researchers have used advanced digital imaging to ‘virtually dissect’ the extinct Derwent River Seastar, confirming it as a new but extinct species without harming remaining precious specimens. It was prickly, slimy, and had no backbone or eyes. It used its five spiny arms to cling to the sides of a muddy river bank, where it hunted by pushing its stomach out of its mouth, engulfing its prey, and

1d

 

Did you solve it? Cutting the perfect slice

The answers to today’s puzzles In my puzzle column earlier today I set you the following puzzles: 1. Can you cut the shape below into two identical parts using one single line? The line does not have to be straight. Continue reading…

1d

 

Patienter med lang uddannelse har bedre chancer for at komme med i kræftforsøg

Ressourcestærke patienter med lang uddannelse og høj indkomst er overrepræsenterede i fase 1-forsøg på Rigshospitalet end ressourcesvage patienter, viser dansk forskning.

1d

 

Danske forskere undersøger ny model for kemoterapi

Et nyt dansk forsøg undersøger muligheden for at give kemoterapi på en ny måde, som forhåbentligt både er mere skånsom og har en bedre effekt end den traditionelle facon.

1d

 

Would you zap your brain to improve your memory?

Individuals were more willing to use a hypothetical brain stimulation device on others than on themselves, specifically to improve 'core functions,' like kindness and self-confidence.

1d

 

Protein found in patients with severe asthma can help identify who would benefit from targeted drugs

In a novel study, researchers succeeded in identifying patients with a form of severe asthma (type 2 endotype) by measuring periostin concentrations in their airways. These patients with the type 2 (T2) endotype may benefit from newly developed targeted treatments that have the potential to transform their quality of life, report researchers in the journal CHEST®.

1d

 

Researchers have discovered a new cell structure

A new structure in human cells has been discovered by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden in collaboration with colleagues in the UK. The structure is a new type of protein complex that the cell uses to attach to its surroundings and proves to play a key part in cell division. The study is published in the journal Nature Cell Biology.

1d

 

Refugee girls gain from effort to teach life skills

A yearlong program for adolescent girl refugees in Sub-Saharan Africa successfully promoted healthy transitions to adulthood within the evaluation period, according to the results of randomized controlled trials in Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The studies, which appear in BMJ: Global Health, were led by researchers in the Program on Forced Migration and Health at Columbia Univers

1d

 

Research finds NJ numerical nutrient criterion used to protect streams is too high

Using a standard they created for measuring potentially damaging nutrient levels in freshwater streams by measuring the prevalence of single-celled algae, called diatoms, researchers from the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University analyzed environmental data from 95 river and stream sites in six ecological regions of New Jersey. The team's findings revealed that New Jersey's current allo

1d

 

President Ozymandias

If he so desired, Donald Trump could go down in history as the man who transcended ego and ignorance by acting to limit greenhouse gas emissions. Fat chance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

World’s Oldest Fossils Now Appear to Be Squished Rocks

In August 2016, a research team claimed to have unearthed evidence of life in a remote outcrop of 3.7-billion-year-old rocks in Greenland. This bold claim not only pushed back the origin of life by at least 220 million years, it also added to a growing body of evidence that challenged the standard story of Earth’s violent beginning, as Quanta Magazine reported this year in “ Fossil Discoveries Ch

1d

 

Immunterapi forlænger livet blandt patienter med hoved-halskræft

Ifølge et nyt studie forbedrer immunterapi med pembrolizumab overlevelsen blandt patienter med tilbagevendt eller metastaserende hoved-halskræft.

1d

 

Dansk sygehus opnår ESMO-hæder

Sygehus Lillebælt er som det første i Danmark blevet hædret af ESMO for sit arbejde med at integrere onkologi og palliation.

1d

 

Immunterapi før kirurgi har effekter hos patienter med tyktarmskræft

Tidlig behandling med nivolumab og ipilimumab viser lovende resultater før kirurgisk indgreb hos patienter med tyktarmskræft.

1d

 

Mænd uden testikler har et fint sexliv

Mænd, der som følge af testikelkræft har fået fjernet begge testikler, har et lige så så godt sexliv, som mænd, der kun har fået fjernet den ene. Til gengæld er de lidt mere angste.

1d

 

Kemoradioterapi er bedst mod kræft i mundsvælget

Den rette behandling for HPV-positive patienter med kræft i mundsvælget er kemoradioterapi frem for behandling med cetuximab og radioterapi.

1d

 

Patients with HPV-positive oropharynx cancer should receive chemoradiation

Patients with human papilloma virus (HPV)-positive throat cancer should receive chemoradiotherapy rather than cetuximab with radiotherapy, according to late-breaking research reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

1d

 

Immunotherapy improves survival in metastatic or recurrent head and neck cancer

Immunotherapy with pembrolizumab improves survival in patients with head and neck cancer that has recurred or metastasised, according to late-breaking results from the KEYNOTE-048 study reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

1d

 

More than just anatomy: sex differences in the lower urinary tract

The biological differences between women and men go beyond basic anatomy. Researchers must consider sex differences down to the cellular level in order to discover crucial information about the varied development, function, and biology between women and men.

1d

 

Short-term ADT with RT improves survival over RT alone up to 10 years

The long-term follow up of the NRG Oncology trial RTOG 9408, studying the addition of short-term androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) to radiotherapy (RT) for men with early, localized prostate adenocarcinoma, indicated that RT combined with ADT is superior to RT alone for overall survival (OS) up to 10.4 years following treatment. However, when researchers assessed these results up to 18 years, the

1d

 

Elizabeth Warren Has Lost Her Way

How many times during my childhood did my father tell me that when his grandmother and her sister sailed to America, they had traveled “a class above steerage”? I was a Hula-Hooping child of the atomic age, growing strong on USDA beef and Cocoa Puffs. What did I know about steerage? But I knew my father in the complete and inchoate way that a child knows her parent, and I knew he wanted me to und

1d

 

The U.S. Loved the Saudi Crown Prince. Not Anymore.

Mohammed bin Salman’s vision for Saudi Arabia was impressive even before he became crown prince in June 2017. In the West, he quickly became known for his support of women driving, the opening of movie theaters and comedy clubs, and his plan to diversify Saudi Arabia’s economy. Criticism about his alleged role in the brutal war in Yemen, the blockade of Qatar, and the effective kidnapping of Leba

1d

 

Ancient enzymes the catalysts for new discoveries

University of Queensland-led research recreating 450 million-year-old enzymes has resulted in a biochemical engineering 'hack' which could lead to new drugs, flavours, fragrances and biofuels.

1d

 

Cellular trash cans reveal the roles of proteins in disease

If we really want to know how our body's cells work—or don't work, in the case of disease—we might need to look beyond their genes and even beyond the proteins they are made of. We may need to start going through the cellular "trash." The group of Dr. Yifat Merbl of the Weizmann Institute of Science developed a system to do just that, finding that "cellular dumpster-diving" contains information ab

1d

 

38 Baby Skulls of Weird Jurassic-Era Mammal Relative Found

About 185 million years ago, a hairy, beagle-size animal celebrated motherhood by having 38 babies in the same clutch, according to a new study of the skeletal remains of both mama and babes.

1d

 

When you are unhappy in a relationship, why do you stay? The answer may surprise you

Why do people stay in unsatisfying romantic relationships? A new study suggests it may be because they view leaving as bad for their partner.The study, being published in the November 2018 issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, explored the possibility that people deciding whether to end a relationship consider not only their own desires but also how much they think their partn

1d

 

Optoelectronic interface for stimulating neural networks in the brain

In the past few decades, research aimed at finding approaches to restoring brain function has increased exponentially. An interdisciplinary approach to the task of brain function restoration combines complementary approaches and methods of regenerative medicine, on the one hand, and those proposed by neuroengineering, on the other.

1d

 

Study: Dad's exercise before conception impacts child's lifelong health

Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center have shown that paternal exercise has a significant impact on the metabolic health of their offspring well into adulthood.

1d

 

Don't offer co-workers help unless asked

New workplace research from Michigan State University found that when it comes to offering assistance at work, it's better to keep to yourself or wait until you're asked.

1d

 

Cellular trash cans reveal the roles of proteins in disease

A novel technology for profiling protein turnover and degradation offers new insight into diagnosis and understanding the molecular basis of autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegeneration and other disorders

1d

 

Ancient enzymes the catalysts for new discoveries

University of Queensland-led research recreating 450 million-year-old enzymes has resulted in a biochemical engineering 'hack' which could lead to new drugs, flavours, fragrances and biofuels.Professor Elizabeth Gillam from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences said the study showed ancient enzymes could survive high temperatures and that this could help create chemicals cheaply and a

1d

 

AI doctor could boost chance of survival for sepsis patients

Scientists have created an artificial intelligence system that could help treat patients with sepsis.

1d

 

New tool gives deeper understanding of glioblastoma

Researchers in the lab of Charles Danko at the Baker Institute for Animal Health have developed a new tool to study genetic 'switches' active in glioblastoma tumors that drive growth of the cancer. In a new paper in Nature Genetics, they identified key switches in different types of tumors, including switches linked to how long a patient survives.

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Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI

MIT engineers have devised a new technique to detect either electrical activity or optical signals in the brain, using a minimally invasive technique based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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New protein sequencing method could transform biological research

Researchers have demonstrated a new way to sequence proteins that is much more sensitive than existing technology, identifying individual protein molecules rather than requiring millions of molecules at a time. The advance could have a major impact in biomedical research, making it easier to reveal new biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and other diseases, as well as enhance our understanding

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Losing control of gene activity in Alzheimer's disease

Pioneering research into the mechanisms controlling gene activity in the brain could hold the key to understanding Alzheimer's disease and might help identify effective treatments in the future.

1d

 

Nanosized ferroelectrics become a reality

Using ferroelectricity instead of magnetism in computer memory saves energy. If ferroelectric bits were nanosized, this would also save space. But conventional wisdom dictates that ferroelectric properties disappear when the bits are made smaller. Reports that hafnium oxide can be used to make a nanoscale ferroelectric have not yet convinced the field. University of Groningen (UG) physicists have

1d

 

Fish give up the fight after coral bleaching

Researchers found that when water temperatures heat up for corals, fish 'tempers' cool down, providing the first clear evidence of coral bleaching serving as a trigger for rapid change in reef fish behavior. Publishing in Nature Climate Change this week, researchers from Lancaster University and collaborating institutes including the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (Coral CoE), sho

1d

 

Cells that change jobs to fight diabetes

Diabetes is characterized by persistent high blood sugar levels that occur when certain cells in the pancreas — the insulin-producing cells — are destroyed or are no longer able to secrete insulin. Researchers at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, have succeeded in showing how part of the pancreatic cells, which usually produce other hormones, can take over from the damaged cells by starting

1d

 

Common use of antipsychotics shown ineffective for delirium in intensive care patients

Critically ill patients in intensive care units did not benefit from two antipsychotic drugs used to treat delirium, according to a large clinical trial funded by the National Institute on Aging, part of the National Institutes of Health.

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Community health workers can reduce hospitalizations by 65 percent and double patient satisfaction with primary care

Community health workers — trusted laypeople from local communities who help high-risk patients to address social issues like food and housing insecurity — can help reduce hospital stays by 65 percent and double the rate of patient satisfaction with primary care, according to new study results published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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Shift in types of weight-loss surgery performed among pediatric patients

This study identified a shift in the kind of metabolic and bariatric surgery (so-called MBS surgery because it can help patients achieve long-term weight loss and the resolution of coexisting metabolic conditions such as type 2 diabetes) performed among pediatric patients.

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Antipsychotics ineffective for treating ICU delirium

A large multi-site study has found that critically ill patients are not benefiting from antipsychotic medications that have been used to treat delirium in intensive care units (ICUs) for more than four decades. 'Patients who get these potentially dangerous drugs are not experiencing any improvements whatsoever in delirium, coma, length of stay or survival,' said senior author by E. Wesley Ely, M.D

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RNA thought to spread cancer shows ability to suppress breast cancer metastasis

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that a form of RNA called metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) appears to suppress breast cancer metastasis in mice, suggesting a potential new area of therapeutic investigation. The findings, published in the Oct. 22 online issue of Nature Genetics, were surprising given that MALAT1, a long

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Asian elephants could be the maths kings of the jungle

Asian elephants demonstrate numeric ability which is closer to that observed in humans rather than in other animals. This is according to lead author Naoko Irie of SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) in Japan. In a study published in the Springer-branded Journal of Ethology, Irie and her colleagues found that an Asian elephants

1d

 

How a game can move people from climate apathy to action

The latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been called a "deafening" alarm and an "ear-splitting wake-up call" about the need for sweeping climate action. But will one more scientific report move countries to dramatically cut emissions?

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This headless chicken is the deep-sea ‘monster’ of our dreams

Animals A mysterious and wonderful cuke. Enypniastes eximia, in scientific parlance, is weird and wild, but we still don’t know much about it. And that’s pretty standard for deep-sea critters.

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Antipsychotic Drugs Don't Ease ICU Delirium Or Dementia

Though widely prescribed in hospital intensive care units to treat hallucinations and other signs of delirium, Haldol and similar drugs are no better than a placebo for such patients, a study finds. (Image credit: Nehru Sulejmanovski/Getty Images)

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The Difficulty—and Importance—of Talking About Young Dead Celebrities

The Latin phrase de mortuis nil nisi bonum —“Of the dead, [say] nothing but good”—dates back thousands of years. But it echoed loudly across the hip-hop world last week. In a freestyle at the BET Hip-Hop Awards, the Chicago firebrand Vic Mensa was widely heard as dissing the late rapper XXXTentacion, and on his new album Quavo Huncho , Quavo of Migos chided a deceased drug user who many listeners

1d

 

Nanosized ferroelectrics become a reality

Using ferroelectricity instead of magnetism in computer memory saves energy. If ferroelectric bits were nanosized, this would also save space. But conventional wisdom dictates that ferroelectric properties disappear when the bits are made smaller. Reports that hafnium oxide can be used to make a nanoscale ferroelectric have not yet convinced the field, however University of Groningen (UG) physicis

1d

 

New protein sequencing method could transform biological research

A team of researchers at The University of Texas at Austin has demonstrated a new way to sequence proteins that is much more sensitive than existing technology, identifying individual protein molecules rather than requiring millions of molecules at a time. The advance could have a major impact in biomedical research, making it easier to reveal new biomarkers for the diagnosis of cancer and other d

1d

 

Fish give up the fight after coral bleaching

Researchers found that when water temperatures heat up for corals, fish 'tempers' cool down, providing the first clear evidence of coral bleaching serving as a trigger for rapid change in reef fish behaviour.

1d

 

Grim’s Haunted Carnival: Ferris Wheel vs. Roller Coaster

Following your experience in the fortune teller’s tent, you feel more enlightened about yourself, but that was a lot of brain work. It’s time for some raw, kinetic experience! Signs ahead of you point to two thrilling rides: the Ferris wheel, and the roller coaster. However, they seem to be located on opposite sides of the park, and your trial run of Grim’s Haunted Carnival won’t last forever, so

1d

 

Participation in group prenatal care may improve birth outcomes

A recent retrospective matched cohort study of more than 9,000 pregnant women found that women who received group prenatal care had a significantly lower risk of having a preterm birth or a low birth weight baby compared with women who received individual care only, after adjusting for number of individual care visits.

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Immunotherapy effective as first-line treatment for advanced head and neck cancer

Immunotherapy on its own is better than aggressive chemotherapy as a first-line treatment for advanced head and neck cancer, according to surprising new data from a major phase III clinical trial.Patients lived for longer and had far lower rates of side-effects if they took the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab than those who received an 'extreme' combination of two chemotherapies and a targeted dr

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New drug combination destroys chemo-resistant blood cancer

Researchers from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have developed a promising targeted strategy to treat chemotherapy-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and a diagnostic test to determine which AML patients would most likely benefit from this treatment. In a mouse model, the experimental treatment eliminated all signs of disease (complete remission) in 100 percent of animals, wh

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Electron microscope provided look inside the organic chemical reaction

Scientists from Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry of Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow managed to look inside an organic chemical reaction with electron microscope and recorded the occurred transformation in real time. The team from the laboratory of Prof. Ananikov applied combined nano-scale and molecular-scale approaches to the study of chemical transformation in catalytic cross-coupli

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Asian elephants could be the maths kings of the jungle

Asian elephants demonstrate numeric ability which is closer to that observed in humans rather than in other animals. This is according to lead author Naoko Irie of SOKENDAI (The Graduate University for Advanced Studies and the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) in Japan.

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A chemical criterion for rating movies

The isoprene concentration in the air is an objective indicator for setting the age rating of films.

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Revealing the molecular mystery of human liver cells

A map of the cells in the human liver has been created by University Health Network Transplant Program and University of Toronto researchers, revealing for the first time differences between individual cells at the molecular level which can have a profound impact on their behaviour in tissue, tumours and disease.

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Take the Big Think survey for a chance to win 🙂

Tell us a little bit about where you find Big Think's videos, articles, and podcasts. Be entered for a chance to win 1 of 3 Amazon gift cards each worth $100. All survey information is anonymous and will be used only for this survey. None

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Jernbanens nye digitale signalsystem går i drift i Nordjylland

Banedanmark har sat Danmarks nye signalsystem ERTMS i drift på den første strækning mellem Frederikshavn og Lindholm.

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Oxygen-Rich Liquid Water May Exist on Mars

Brines suffused with the life-giving gas could offer hope for past and even present microbes on the Red Planet, according to a new study — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cells that change jobs to fight diabetes

Diabetes is characterized by persistent high blood sugar levels that occur when certain cells in the pancreas—the insulin-producing β cells—are destroyed or are no longer able to secrete insulin. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have succeeded in showing how part of the pancreatic α and δ cells, which usually produce other hormones, can take over from the damaged β cells by starting

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Researchers wake-up DNA from soil bacteria to discover novel acid antibiotic

Scleric Acid has been discovered by capturing and engineering a DNA fragment from soil bacteria Streptomyces sclerotialus, and could help fight bacterial infections—by researchers at the School of Life Sciences and Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick.

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How conscious investors can turn up the heat and make companies change | Vinay Shandal

In a talk that's equal parts funny and urgent, consultant Vinay Shandal shares stories of the world's top activist investors, showing how individuals and institutions can take a page from their playbook and put pressure on companies to drive positive change. "It's your right to have your money managed in line with your values," Shandal says. "Use your voice, and trust that it matters."

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New algorithm can more quickly predict LED materials

Researchers have devised a new machine learning algorithm that is efficient enough to run on a personal computer and predict the properties of more than 100,000 compounds in search of those most likely to be efficient phosphors for LED lighting.

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3D bioprinting technique could create artificial blood vessels, organ tissue

Engineers have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object's firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries and organ tissue.

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A dog's color could impact longevity, increase health issues

New research has revealed the life expectancy of chocolate Labradors is significantly lower than their black and yellow counterparts.

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New technique reveals limb control in flies — and maybe robots

A new neural recording technique developed by bioengineers enables for the first time the comprehensive measurement of neural circuits that control limb movement. Tested on the fruit fly, results from the technique may inspire the development of more sophisticated robotic control approaches.

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Eye disorder may have helped Da Vinci's art: journal

A common eye disorder may help explain Leonardo Da Vinci's talent for three-dimensional representation and the sense of perspective in his mountain landscapes, according to research published in an academic journal.

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Russian physicists observe dark matter forming droplets

Researchers developed a mathematical model describing motion of dark matter particles inside the smallest galaxy halos. They observed that over time, the dark matter may form spherical droplets of quantum condensate. Previously this was considered impossible, as fluctuations of the gravity field produced by dark matter particles were ignored. The study is published in Physical Review Letters.

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Researchers wake-up DNA from soil bacteria to discover novel acid antibiotic

Scleric Acid has been discovered by capturing and engineering a DNA fragment from soil bacteria Streptomyces sclerotialus, and could help fight bacterial infections — by researchers at the School of Life Sciences and Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick.

1d

 

Wishful thinking is rewarded

The reward system in the brain affects our judgements.

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Financial and non-financial firms need the same strong regulations to protect economies

Researchers at IIASA and the Complexity Science Hub, Vienna, have discovered that non-financial firms, such as vehicle manufacturers and energy companies, contribute to systemic risk in financial systems in the same way as financial institutions like banks, and as such, should be regulated in the same way.

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Researchers discovered a new mechanism of action in a first-line drug for diabetes

Researchers have discovered a mechanism of action underlying a widely used diabetes drug, which may expand its indications for use, as well as open new inroads in pharmaceutical development.

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Industrial robots increase wages for employees

In addition to increasing productivity, the introduction of industrial robots has increased wages for the employees. At the same time, industrial robots have also changed the labour market by increasing the number of job opportunities for highly skilled employees, while opportunities for low-skilled employees are declining.

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How this researcher's risky idea could mean big things for regenerative medicine

Every cell in your body contains thousands of different proteins. These complicated molecules regulate chemical reactions, bind to invading bacteria or viruses, carry signals in and between cells, and much more. They are vital to your existence.

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A Climate Catastrophe Paved the Way for the Dinosaurs’ Reign

In Italy, the dawn of the greatest empire in the history of the world is marked, not by broken marble pediments strewn across the seven hills of Rome, but modest three-toed footprints pressed into rocks far to the north, high in the Italian Alps. They were left by coastal dinosaurs patrolling the tidal flats of a tropical lagoon over 230 million years ago, and they’re among the earliest in Earth’

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USA oplever markant nedgang i dødsfald relateret til luftforurening

Midt i glæden peger miljøprofessor dog på, at antallet af døde stadig er højt, og at der er risiko for at sætte fremgangen over styr ved at slække på miljøkravene i USA.

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The risk of 'cascading' natural disasters is on the rise

In a warming world, the dangers from natural disasters are changing. In a recent commentary, we identified a number of costly and deadly catastrophes that point to an increase in the risk of "cascading" events – ones that intensify the impacts of natural hazards and turn them into disasters.

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Major response to immunotherapy in early-stage mismatch repair deficient colon cancer

Pre-operative treatment with a combination of the immune checkpoint inhibitors nivolumab and ipilimumab achieves major pathological responses in 100 percent of early-stage colon cancers with mismatch repair deficiencies, according to results reported at ESMO 2018 from the first exploratory phase II trial to investigate this approach.

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Heredity matters: Ancestral protease functions as protein import motor in chloroplasts

Japanese researchers identified a large novel protein complex in the inner chloroplast membrane that functions as a motor to import proteins into the chloroplast. Components of the complex evolved from a protein of the endosymbiont cyanobacterium-like ancestor of chloroplasts that lost its protein-degrading function but retained its motor ability. These findings solve a longstanding mystery surrou

1d

 

Immunotherapy may become new first line treatment in some metastatic colorectal cancers

Immunotherapy with nivolumab and low-dose ipilimumab could become a new first line treatment in patients with some metastatic colorectal cancers following late-breaking results from the CheckMate-142 trial reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich. The drug combination shrank tumours and had beneficial effects on survival in patients with microsatellite instabiliy (MSI)-high metastatic colorect

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New agent against anthrax

A team led by Professor Arne Skerra at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has developed an innovative strategy for preventing the anthrax bacterium from absorbing iron, which is crucial for its survival. It does so by neutralizing a special iron complexing agent produced by the bacterium. Because the anthrax pathogen only spreads in the body when it receives access to the essential element,

1d

 

Scientist explores a better way to predict space weather

Findings recently published by a Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) space scientist shed new light on predicting the thermodynamics of solar flares and other "space weather" events involving hot, fast-moving plasmas.

1d

 

PTSD symptoms improve most when patients choose their treatment

People with post-traumatic stress disorder who are able to choose their form of treatment—whether drugs or therapy—improve more than those who simply receive a prescription for one or the other, according to a new study that compared medication and mental health counseling in the treatment of PTSD. Researchers found that both a medication—Sertraline, marketed as Zoloft—and a specific form of ther

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Mathematics as weapon against desertification

Ph.D. student Robbin Bastiaansen applies mathematics to get insight in practical problems. By comparing mathematical models with developments in existing ecosystems, he hopes to demystify the process of desertification. His research has been published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a rare achievement for a mathematician.

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Rising insurance costs may convince Americans that climate change risks are real

One of the great challenges of tackling climate change is making it real for people without a scientific background. That's because the threat it poses can be so hard to see or feel.

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In Alaska, everyone's grappling with climate change

Coastal villages are washing into the Bering Sea, trees are sprouting in the tundra and shipping lanes are opening in an ocean that was once locked in ice. In Alaska, climate change isn't a distant or abstract concern.

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The rains in Africa: How global climate influences the water cycle

While water is a precious, life-sustaining resource, too little or too much can spell trouble.

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Modern slavery and climate change are in a vicious cycle of degradation, according to experts

The relationship between climate change, environmental degradation and modern slavery needs to be better understood in order for the interconnected crisis to be tackled, according to a new report.

1d

 

A bridge to the quantum world

Monika Aidelsburger uses a special type of optical lattice to simulate quantum many-body phenomena that are otherwise inaccessible to experimental exploration. She has now been awarded an ERC Starting Grant to pursue this work.

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Gravitational waves could shed light on dark matter

Black holes colliding, gravitational waves riding through space-time – and a huge instrument that allows scientists to investigate the fabric of the universe. This could soon become reality when the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) takes up operations. Researchers have now found that LISA could also shed light on the elusive dark matter particle.

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Social stigma contributes to poor mental health in the autistic community

Stress related to social stigma may be the reason why autistic people experience more mental health problems than the general population, dispelling past theories that the condition itself is the origin of such distress.

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A topical gel to protect farmers from lethal effects of pesticides

A team of researchers at inStem (Institute for Stem Cell Science and Regenerative Medicine) has developed a nucleophilic polymer, which formulated into a topical gel can be applied on the skin before spraying of pesticides.

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Journalism study evaluates emotions on the job

A study investigating the emotional labor involved in reporting traumatic news events finds key differences between how male and female journalists cope.

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Olaparib maintenance extends PFS by estimated 3 years in advanced ovarian cancer

Two-year maintenance therapy with olaparib, a PARP (poly ADP ribose polymerase) inhibitor, olaparib, led to a substantial, unprecedented improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed patients with advanced ovarian cancer and a BRCA1 or 2 mutation, results from the phase 3 SOLO-1 trial show.

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Local radiotherapy improves survival in metastatic prostate cancer with low disease burden

Radiotherapy to the prostate improves overall survival in men newly diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer who have a low metastatic disease burden but not in those with higher burden of disease, according to results from a pre-planned analysis of a large comparison study reported at ESMO 2018.

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Avelumab plus axitinib significantly improve PFS in untreated renal cell carcinoma

A combination of the immune checkpoint blocker, avelumab, plus the tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), axitinib, significantly improves progression-free survival (PFS) in previously untreated patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in a phase 3 study, according to results presented at ESMO 2018 Congress.

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World hunger has risen for three straight years, and climate change is a cause

World hunger has risen for a third consecutive year, according to the United Nations' annual food security report. The total number of people who face chronic food deprivation has increased by 15 million since 2016. Some 821 million people now face food insecurity, raising numbers to the same level as almost a decade ago.

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Many Midwesterners will likely never believe in climate change. Here's how to encourage them to act anyway

,The number of politically conservative Americans who are climate skeptics is growing, and the evidence suggests that they're unlikely to change their opinions.

1d

 

Understanding the building blocks for an electronic brain

Computer bits are binary, with a value of 0 or one. By contrast, neurons in the brain can have all kinds of different internal states, depending on the input that they received. This allows the brain to process information in a more energy-efficient manner than a computer. Physicists are working on memristors, resistors with a memory, made from niobium-doped strontium titanate, which mimic how neu

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When fathers exercise, children are healthier, even as adults

Most parents know that the diet and exercise habits of a pregnant woman impacts the health of her baby, but little is known about how a father's health choices are passed to his children. A new study finds that lifestyle practices of fathers prior to conception may have a major impact on the lifelong health of their children.

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Home-based biofeedback therapy is effective option for tough-to-treat constipation

Biofeedback therapy used at home is about 70 percent effective at helping patients learn how to coordinate and relax bowel muscles and relieve one of the most difficult-to-treat types of constipation, investigators report.

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Web-based open source dashboard of North Pole

It's called ArcCI (or Arctic CyberInfrastructure) and promises to combine the thousands of images that have been taken along the years of the Arctic Ocean into one global database that will help scientists and the world see the physical changes occurring in the region including ice loss. The hope is that this web-based repository will allow researchers to spend more time analyzing information rath

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Yale-NUS researchers discover drug cocktail that increases lifespan

A research team led by Dr Jan Gruber from Yale-NUS College discovered a combination of drugs that increases healthy lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Dr Gruber's team administered combinations compounds targeting different ageing pathways to C. elegans. Results showed that two drug pairs extended the mean lifespan of the worms synergistically, and combined with a third compound almost doubled me

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Targeting specific genomic mutation in breast cancer improves outcomes, first study shows

Targeting a common mutation in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) HER2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer with the alpha-specific phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor alpelisib significantly improves progression-free survival, according to late-breaking results reported at ESMO 2018.

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Epigenetic therapy worth pursuing in hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer

Epigenetic therapy with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is worth pursuing in hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer, suggests a phase III trial reported today at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

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Zoledronic acid improves disease-free survival in premenopausal HR+ early breast cancer

Adjuvant treatment with the bone sparing drug zoledronic acid plus hormonal therapy with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole significantly increases disease-free survival compared to tamoxifen in premenopausal women with hormone receptor positive (HR+) early breast cancer, according to results reported at ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich. It is the first study to assess this specific combination in prem

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Radiation therapy cuts low risk of recurrence in half for patients with good risk breast cancer

A subset of patients with low-risk breast cancer is highly unlikely to seecancer return following breast conservation surgery but can lower that risk even further with radiationtherapy, finds a new long-term clinical trial report. These 12-year follow-up data from the only prospective,randomized trial to compare recurrence outcomes after treatment for low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)will b

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Interaction of pretreatment immune inflammatory state of patient outcomes following RT

Data from a validation study of NRG-RTOG 0521 suggeststhat, while there is no association between an elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and disease-free survival (DFS); higher levels of pretreatment interleukin 10 (IL-10) were linked to lower rates of DFS. These results were recently presented at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

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PROs indicate brachytherapy alone is the superior treatment

Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs) from the NRGOncology trial RTOG 0232 comparing a combined treatment of external beam therapy and brachytherapy (EBT+B) to transperineal interstitial permanent brachytherapy (B) alone indicate a significantly different clinician and patient-reported late toxicity profile between arms despite similarities in progression-free survival results. This abstract was presen

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Origami, 3D printing merge to make complex structures in one shot

By merging the ancient art of origami with 21st century technology, researchers have created a one-step approach to fabricating complex origami structures whose light weight, expandability, and strength could have applications in everything from biomedical devices to equipment used in space exploration.

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Turning 'big brother' surveillance into a helping hand to the homeless

Surveillance evokes fear of a "big brother" state watching our every move. The proliferation of closed-circuit television (CCTV) cameras in our cities and the emergence of big data have only deepened this fear. Marginalised groups such as people sleeping rough feel the impact most acutely, as their lack of shelter exposes them to constant surveillance.

1d

 

What is climate-ready infrastructure? Some cities are starting to adapt

The most recent international report on climate change paints a picture of disruption to society unless there are drastic and rapid cuts in greenhouse gas emissions.

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Secondary building units (SBUs)—the turning point in the development of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)

There is an urgent need to control materials on the molecular level to make "materials on demand." A strategy to develop such materials is in development in reticular chemistry, derived from the Latin translation "reticulum" as "having the form of a net." The strategy links discrete building units (molecules and clusters) via bonds to make large and extended crystalline structures. Metal-organic f

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Climate change: Nauru's life on the frontlines

International perceptions of the Pacific Island nation of Nauru are dominated by two interrelated stories. Until the turn of the century, it was the dramatic boom and bust of Nauru's phosphate mine, and the mismanagement of its considerable wealth, that captured global attention.

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AI changing the way scientists carry out experiments

There's plenty of speculation about what artificial intelligence, or AI, will look like in the future, but researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) are already harnessing its power.

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European-Japanese mission to investigate the smallest planet in the Solar System

The European-Japanese planetary mission BepiColombo lifted off from the European spaceport in French Guiana at 03:45 Central European Summer time on 20 October 2018 (22:45 on 19 October local time), on board an Ariane 5 launch vehicle. "Not only is the mission designed to investigate the planet Mercury, it will also deliver new insights into the Solar System," explains Walther Pelzer, Executive Bo

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Skatteminister får kritik for møde med tobaksindustrien

Professor i tobaksforebyggelse kritiserer skatteministerens møde med tobaksindustrien, mens enhedschef i Sundhedsstyrelsen ikke kan se grund til kontakt med tobaksindustrien.

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Ny topdirektør på Sygehus Lillebælt vil have landets mest tilfredse patienter

Christian Sauvr glæder sig til at fortsætte Sygehus Lillebælts udvikling og har en ambition om, at sygehuset kan blive endnu bedre, når han tiltræder som sygehusets administrerende direktør.

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Region Sjælland forventer at afskedige op til 317 medarbejdere

Alle faggrupper og både ledere og medarbejder bliver berørt, når Region Sjælland grundet økonomiske vanskeligheder må afskedige over 300 medarbejdere. Sjællands Universitetshospital bliver ramt hårdest.

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The American Economy Is Rigged

And what we can do about it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As winter approaches, here's how to wake up when it's dark outside

DIY Rise and shine! In winter, the sun rises later, which makes it twice as hard to crawl out of bed in the morning. Here's how to propel yourself into the new day.

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Young adults open to using fentanyl test strips to avoid overdose

When researchers gave rapid-acting fentanyl test strips to young adults at risk of overdose, most used the strips and many who detected fentanyl reported changing their behavior to reduce overdose risk, according to a new study. Among more than 72,000 deaths in the US last year, fentanyl—a highly potent prescription opioid often used to lace other heroin or cocaine, but hard for drug users to det

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Flint water crisis is the most egregious example of environmental injustice, says researcher

The water crisis in Flint is the most egregious example of environmental injustice in recent U.S. history, according to a founder of the movement who has studied the issue for three decades.

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Dårligt nyt: Elektronen er alt for rund

En imponerende måling af elektronens dipolmoment sender varianter af teorier for supersymmetri til tælling.

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Does your dog have a bacterial infection? This test could tell you in two minutes.

Want to know which bacteria are making your dog or cat sick? Northeastern professor Edgar Goluch has started a company to get that answer in minutes, instead of days.

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Multi-strain probiotic reduces chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea [ESMO 2018 Press Release]

A high concentration of multi-strain probiotic helps to reduce mild to moderate episodes of chemotherapy-induced diarrhoea (CID) in cancer patients, according to results of a phase II/III study in India.

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Oncologists demand more education on the use of biosimilars: ESMO takes action

Biological medicines are responsible for some of the most promising innovations in cancer treatment, including immunotherapy, targeted drugs and vaccines — but they are also expensive.

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Aspirin alone a good clot buster after knee surgery

When it comes to preventing blood clots after a knee replacement, good old aspirin may be just as effective as newer, more expensive drugs, such as rivaroxaban (Xarelto), according to a University of Michigan orthopedics study.

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Future fertility: Giving hope to men who received childhood cancer treatment

Researchers have discovered a way to grow human stem cells destined to become mature sperm in an effort to provide fertility options later in life to males who are diagnosed with cancer and undergo chemotherapy and radiation as children.

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Some patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer live longer with immunotherapy

Immunotherapy improves survival in some patients with metastatic triple negative breast cancer, according to late-breaking results from the IMpassion130 trial reported at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

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New option for women with advanced breast cancer resistant to hormone therapy

Treatment with the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitor palbociclib achieves a clinically meaningful improvement in overall survival in patients with hormone receptor positive (HR+) human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative (HER2-) advanced breast cancer that has relapsed or progressed on hormonal therapy, according to the final analysis of overall survival results from the PALOMA-3

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Major trial shows targeted drug extends breast cancer survival

Combining a targeted drug with hormone therapy substantially extends survival for women with advanced breast cancer, a major clinical trial has found.Women taking palbociclib together with hormone therapy lived seven months longer than those on hormone treatment alone – adding to previous data showing the combination could delay the disease's progression.The drug's benefit was stronger in women wh

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Drugs for treating breast cancer in women are effective and well tolerated in men

There is growing evidence that drugs approved for the treatment of breast cancer in women are also effective and well tolerated in men, according to the largest real-life study yet to investigate treatment and outcomes in men with breast cancer and two further studies to be reported at ESMO 2018.

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Americans are not financially prepared for old age, study finds

Americans are living longer than past generations, and for many that means working longer, too. While for some this might be a choice, for many it is a financial necessity, according to a new report published Oct. 22 by the Stanford Center on Longevity.

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Study of Northeast food system advances understanding of regional potential

After seven years of analyzing a number of consumption, distribution, production, and other aspects of the Northeast U.S. food system, researchers from Penn State and 10 other universities and organizations have made significant gains in understanding the extent to which the region can increase production of certain foods, and potentially better meet the food needs of low-income populations in the

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New technique reveals limb control in flies—and maybe robots

A new neural recording technique developed by EPFL bioengineers enables for the first time the comprehensive measurement of neural circuits that control limb movement. Tested on the fruit fly, results from the technique may inspire the development of more sophisticated robotic control approaches.

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Study finds foot-binding was driven by economics, not sex and beauty

Depending on whom you ask, foot-binding was everything from a bizarre cultural fetish that placed male ideas of beauty ahead of women's health and well-being to a brutal tradition intended to keep women subservient to men.

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How do we cope with demands for water as we enter an era of scarcity?

Urban water systems in California and elsewhere face a time of reckoning, warns Richard Luthy, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Stanford.

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HD 87240 is a chemically peculiar star with an overabundance of heavy elements, study suggests

European astronomers have conducted a chemical study of the star HD 87240, a member of the open cluster NGC 3114. The new research, which determined the abundances of several elements in HD 87240's atmosphere, suggests that the object is a chemically peculiar star showcasing an overabundance of heavy elements. The finding is reported in a paper published October 10 on arXiv.org.

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Star Wars News: Here's a Buttload of Information About 'The Mandalorian'

A lot of details are starting to leak about the new streaming show.

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Erlotinib improves progression-free survival in early mutated non-small cell lung cancer

Neoadjuvant erlotinib benefits selected epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated patients who undergo complete resection of stage IIIA-N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), shows a randomised study comparing erlotinib with gemcitabine plus cisplatin as neoadjuvant treatment, presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich.

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Origami, 3D printing merge to make complex structures in one shot

By merging the ancient art of origami with 21st century technology, researchers have created a one-step approach to fabricating complex origami structures whose light weight, expandability, and strength could have applications in everything from biomedical devices to equipment used in space exploration.

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Treatment of aggressive breast cancer improved by immunotherapy-chemotherapy combination

Progression free survival in triple-negative breast cancer increased when immunotherapy-chemotherapy treatment combination is used as the first treatment option.

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Researchers switch material from one state to another with a single flash of light

Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have demonstrated a surprisingly simple way of flipping a material from one state into another, and then back again, with single flashes of laser light.

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Understanding architecture of cancer-linked BAF protein complexes provides insight into disease

In 2013, Broad Institute member Cigall Kadoch, then a postdoctoral researcher at Stanford University, discovered that approximately 20 percent of all human cancers involve mutations in a group of proteins called BAF, a complex that is also linked to intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. However, little has been known about the structure of these complexes, and how they contribute

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AI and human creativity go hand in hand

What does AI look like? You might say it looks like a robot, or flashing LEDs, or a waveform on a screen. But what would AI say AI looks like? To find out, IBM Research asked AI to draw us a picture… of itself. AI's self-portrait was published in The New York Times today and, looking at the image, I am amazed not only with the result, but also the journey we took to get there.

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Washing hands despite lack of water

Even though the water we've used for washing hands is barely contaminated, it usually goes down the drain. A newly developed system allows handwashing water to be recycled, thus not only saving water, but also helping to prevent infectious diseases in developing countries.

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How mission delays hurt young astronomers

Back in Ye Olden Times, the job of astronomer was a pretty exclusive club. Either you needed to be so rich and so bored that you could design, build, and operate your own private observatory, or you needed to have a rich and bored friend who could finance your cosmic curiosity for you. By contrast, today's modern observatories are much more democratic, offering of a wealth of juicy scientific info

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Gravitational waves could shed light on dark matter

The forthcoming Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) will be a huge instrument allowing astronomers to study phenomena including black holes colliding and gravitational waves moving through space-time. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now found that LISA could also shed light on the elusive dark matter particle.

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NASA calls for instruments, technologies for delivery to the moon

NASA has announced a call for Lunar Surface Instrument and Technology Payloads that will fly to the Moon on commercial lunar landers as early as next year or 2020. The agency is working with U.S. industry and international partners to expand human exploration from the Moon to Mars. It all starts with robotic missions on the lunar surface, as well as a gateway for astronauts in space orbiting the M

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Patienter i behandling med metformin overlever oftere mælkesyreforgiftning

Overlevelsen ved mælkesyreforgiftning er højere for personer med diabetes, der er under behandling med metformin, end den er for personer med diabetes, der er under behandling med andre antidiabetiske midler.

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Regeringen vil skrue op for indsatsen på høreområdet

I et nyt udspil lægger regeringen op til at forbedre og ensrette kvaliteten i høreapparatbehandlingen. Derudover skal ventetiden på høreapparater ned.

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Understanding the building blocks for an electronic brain

Computer bits are binary, with a value of zero or one. By contrast, neurons in the brain can have many internal states, depending on the input that they receive. This allows the brain to process information in a more energy-efficient manner than a computer. University of Groningen (UG) physicists are working on memristors made from niobium-doped strontium titanate, which mimic the function of neur

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Astronomers propose a new method for detecting black holes

A stellar mass black hole is a compact object with a mass greater than three solar masses. It is so dense and has such a powerful force of attraction that not even light can escape from it. They cannot be observed directly, but only via secondary effects—for instance, in the case of a black hole feeding on a companion star. In general, when matter falls onto a black hole it does so "quietly" by wa

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Some cybersecurity apps could be worse for privacy than nothing at all

It's been a busy few weeks for cybersecurity researchers and reporters. There was the Facebook hack, the Google plus data breach, and allegations that the Chinese government implanted spying chips in hardware components.

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Can schools of fish be identified without human intervention?

Researchers are developing an autonomous system to monitor coastal and deep waters for fish stock. Their technology could enhance marine environment protection.

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Ridding waters of plastic waste with jellyfish filters

What do microplastic filters, fertilisers and fish feed have in common? They can all be produced using jellyfish. At least, that's what one research team has set out to prove as they look into reducing the plastic waste in our oceans.

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Study describes cellular factories in greater detail

Many important natural products such as antibiotics, immunosuppressants and cancer drugs are derived from microorganisms. These natural products are often small proteins or peptides generated in the cell by NRPS enzymes similar to a modern automobile factory: At each station, additional parts are added to the basic structure until finally, a completed automobile leaves the factory. With regard to

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One more reason to love the striped bass: Antimicrobials

It's hard to think of a fish with a higher across-the-board value than the striped bass—or rockfish, as it's known in the Chesapeake Bay region.

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Itchy Dog Project extended to all breeds of dog

A popular University of Nottingham veterinary survey into the problem of itchy skin allergies in dogs is being extended to include all breeds of dog after some interesting initial results.

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Vær med på trenden: Her er de bedste tech-youtubere

En drone, der klipper dit hår. Opskriften på et ægte lyssværd. Og strengteorien forklaret med et Queen-nummer. Find de bedste tech-youtubere her.

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Kes 75—Milky Way's youngest pulsar exposes secrets of star's demise

Scientists have confirmed the identity of the youngest known pulsar in the Milky Way galaxy using data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This result could provide astronomers new information about how some stars end their lives.

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Why some earthquakes are so deadly

You feel a jolt. Was that … no, it couldn't be. Wait, it is an earthquake.

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The evolutions of religion in the workplace in France

In France, the principle of laicity is a pillar of society, and it is unusual to display one's spirituality and religiosity in the workplace. However, since the early 2010s, the succession of cases leading to court decisions both on a national international levels has contributed to the perceived complexity and conflict of this issue.

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Sharing your negative emotions with your kids is better than hiding them

Health Children learn to handle their own feelings by observing how others deal with theirs. Many parents worry that showing negative emotions in front of their children will cause them to suffer.

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Fewer Sex Partners Means a Happier Marriage

If you are on the proverbial market, as you rack up phone swipes, first dates, and—likely—new sexual partners, you might start to ask yourself, Is all this dating going to make me happier with whomever I end up with? In other words, are you actually getting any closer to finding “the one”? Or are you simply stuck on a hedonic treadmill of potential lovers, doomed like some sort of sexual Sisyphus

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Heredity matters: Ancestral protease functions as protein import motor in chloroplasts

Over 1 billion years ago, a relationship began between the ancestor of all living plants and a type of bacterium that paved the way for the evolution of life as we know it. The single-celled algal ancestor engulfed, but crucially, did not destroy, a cyanobacterium-like organism with which it established a mutually beneficial bond. This symbiotic relationship provided energy in the form of sugars d

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DNA Tests Could Help Docs Detect Infectious Diseases Like Typhus Faster

It’s still too expensive and unproven, but it has the potential to prevent antibiotic overuse and keep people healthy.

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Caavo Control Center & Universal Remote (Version 2) Review

Caavo rethinks the universal TV remote for the second time this year. Our full review of Caavo's new, much cheaper, Control Center.

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Meet Jim Allison, the Carousing Texan Who Just Won a Nobel Prize For His Cancer Breakthrough

Jim Allison is an iconoclastic scientist who toiled in obscurity for years. Then he helped crack a mystery that may save millions of lives: Why doesn’t the immune system attack cancer?

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Image of the Day: Birds of a Lung

A fossil from the Cretaceous Period shows similarities to modern avian species.

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T. rex pulverized bones with an incredible amount of force

Tyrannosaurus rex’s powerful bite and remarkably strong teeth helped the dinosaur crush bones.

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Din hund prøver måske at forstå dig, når du vrøvler

Hundens hjerne kører på højtryk, når dens ejer siger nye ord eller volapyk til den, viser forskning.

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BepiColombo Spacecraft Headed to Mercury Snaps 1st Photo, a Selfie

The European-Japanese BepiColombo mission captured its first photo on Saturday (Oct. 20), a day after lifting off from French Guiana. The image is a selfie showing a solar array and an insulation-wrapped sun sensor.

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Transcendental Meditation enhances EQ and reduces perceived stress in the workplace

School district staff who practiced the Transcendental Meditation (TM) technique for four months had significant improvements in emotional intelligence and perceived stress, according to a new randomized controlled trial published today in The Permanente Journal. These findings are consistent with past research on TM showing benefits for emotional intelligence and psychological distress. This stud

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Chocolate Labs Are Less Healthy Than Their Black and Yellow Puppy Pals

Chocolate-colored labs may be more prone to skin conditions and ear infections than other labs

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Ice Age Graveyard Holds the Bones of Mammoth Nursery Herds That Died at Watering Hole

It likely wasn't a cataclysmic flood, but rather a severe drought, that killed more than 20 mammoths 67,000 years ago.

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The evolution of homosexuality: A new theory

Standard evolutionary biology beliefs don't tell the full story of human sexuality. Same-sex attraction may have evolved due to contribute to female alliances. A situation where male-male sexual attraction occurs naturally leads to female freedom, posits Prum.

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Are you a Boltzmann Brain? Why nothing in the Universe may be real

Boltzmann Brains are hypothetical disembodied entities with self-awareness. It may be more likely for a Boltzmann Brain to come into existence than the whole Universe. The idea highlights a paradox in thermodynamics. None The paradox of the Boltzmann Brain can really pull the rug from under you if you follow it to all of its logical and illogical extents. This mind-churning idea proposes that the

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Some Presidential Lies Are Impeachable Offenses

President Trump is a committed liar, as even his most dependable supporters openly concede. The Washington Post columnist and former George W. Bush speechwriter Marc Thiessen recently wrote that “the president lies all the time,” and he included this candid assertion in a piece favorable to the president. A serious question is whether Trump’s lies have put him at risk of impeachment. Of course, p

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Kim Stanley Robinson Writes Like the Past to Warn of the Future

The novelist's sci-fi may feel old-school, but it's distinctly calibrated to make change happen now—so the future in his books doesn't come true.

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An Alternative History of Silicon Valley Disruption

Three recent books challenge the tech industry's myths of self-reliance and prescience.

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Google Home Hub Review: A Step Forward for the Smart Home, But Your Phone Still Rules

Google Assistant lives inside this smart-home controller with a seven-inch screen (and no camera).

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Please Call Me Doctor

I have a PhD, which stands for Doctor of Philosophy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI alchemists spit out the recipe for any molecule you want to make

It's a nightmarish amount of work to figure out how to build a molecule from scratch. Now machines can do it and it will mean a bounty of new drugs and materials

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Scientists Double Down on Landing Sites for Sample-Collecting Mars Rover

NASA’s Mars 2020 mission could visit two locations where microbial life may once have thrived — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Efter EU-bøde: Google vil kræve 40 dollars pr. enhed fra Android-producenter

Google må ikke tvinge Android-producenter til at installere Chrome og Search på forhånd. Men det bliver dyrt at lade være.

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Usikker byggemetode: Hundredevis af britiske højhuse i fare for at kollapse

Mere end 41.000 lejligheder i flere hundrede højhuse er bygget efter et system, der skaber alvorlig risiko for revner og sammenstyrtning. Situationen er mere alvorlig end Grenfell-hændelsen, lyder det fra eksperter.

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Techtopia #75: Forstå kunstig intelligens på 29 minutter

Du bruger kunstig intelligens hver dag uden at vide det. Men den kommer ikke til at tage dit job eller slå dig ihjel med en laserpistol.

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Cannabis grown from yeast: does the future of pot lie in a lab?

Much like making craft beer, some companies are now using yeast enzymes to synthetically create THC and CBD Unlike other modern high growth industries, the pot business doesn’t require a doctorate in science, or even a college degree. Much of the economic hype which surrounds the industry depends on it remaining an agricultural product. But it might not always be that way. In September, the Bosto

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Electronics giant Philips posts mixed results in Q3

Dutch electronics giant Philips, which is focusing its business on medical equipment and services, on Monday posted higher third quarter sales but profits dipped due to currency headwinds.

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'Oumuamua one year later

One year ago this week astronomers discovered an unusual object moving through space not too far from the Earth's orbit. In just a few days they realized it could not be a normal asteroid or comet – its path showed that it was not gravitationally bound to the solar system. It was, therefore, the first interstellar body ever discovered in our solar system that originated from outside it. It was giv

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‘You’ll Never Convince Me That He Didn’t Do This’

Television plays an outsize role in President Trump’s decision making. Cable pundits drive his tweets and policy directives on Fox News, where Sean Hannity reigns supreme as something close to an official adviser and Maria Bartiromo isn’t far behind in the president’s pantheon of Fox favorites. In a tweet last month, Trump called her work “MANDATORY watching.” So, less than two days after Saudi A

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Trump’s Powerful Theory of Politics

President Trump has a coherent theory about American politics that can be summed up in one sentence: Republicans will always come home. Despite the craziness coming from the Oval Office on a daily basis, the president’s decisions and rhetoric have been remarkably consistent, tuned to appeal to his supporters. Until now, that strategy has worked relatively well—allowing him to retain much of his s

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America Descends Into the Politics of Rage

Anger has a peculiar power in democracies. Skillfully deployed before the right audience, it cuts straight to the heart of popular politics. It is attention-getting, drowning out the buzz of news cycles. It is inherently personal and thereby hard to refute with arguments of principle; it makes the political personal and the personal political. It feeds on raw emotions with a primal power: fear, p

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The Problem With Pence’s New Talking Point

At a rally last week in Wichita, Kansas, as Vice President Mike Pence kicked off a swing of campaign appearances across the Midwest, he unveiled a new GOP talking point. “We’re gonna stand firm and get a farm bill that includes work requirements for people—able-bodied Americans—on food stamps so we get people back into the workforce and back enjoying the dignity of work,” Pence told the crowd gat

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The Red Sox Need a World Series Win

Fenway Park was euphoric. The Red Sox may have lumbered through the game’s first seven innings and found themselves in a five-run hole in the bottom of the eighth, but suddenly the team’s bats came alive. Out of nowhere, Christian Vazquez was hustling as fast as his catcher’s legs could take him toward home, narrowly shimmying around a tag at the plate to tie the game. And then a long fly ball wa

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A Lawsuit Tests the Limits of Anonymous Speech

Last October, amid a national reckoning with unpunished sexual misconduct in the workplace, a journalist named Moira Donegan created a shared Google spreadsheet that she titled “Shitty Media Men.” Then she invited women in her industry to add names to it. The document “collected rumors and allegations of sexual misconduct, much of it violent, by men in magazines and publishing,” she later explain

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OECD predicts unsustainable rise in use of raw materials

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development is warning that the world's consumption of raw materials will rise sharply, putting greater pressure on the environment.

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Japan firms fined $3.4 million over maglev bid-rigging

Two major construction companies were Monday ordered to pay fines totalling more than $3 million for colluding to win contracts on Japan's multi-billion-dollar maglev project.

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Fiat sells auto parts unit to Japan's Calsonic for 6.2 bn euros

Fiat Chrysler said Monday it was selling its Italian auto parts unit Magneti Marelli to Japan's Calsonic Kansei (CK) in a deal worth 6.2 billion euros.

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Japan orders Facebook to improve data protection

The Japanese government on Monday ordered Facebook to improve protection of users' personal information following data breaches affecting tens of millions of people worldwide.

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An eye disorder may have given Leonardo da Vinci an artistic edge

An analysis of portraits believed to portray Leonardo da Vinci offers evidence that the artist had exotropia, in which one eye turns outward.

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Rising temperatures and human activity are increasing storm runoff and flash floods

Hurricanes Florence and Michael in the U.S. and Super Typhoon Mangkhut in the Philippines have shown the widespread and harmful impact of weather extremes on both ecosystems and built communities, with flash floods causing more deaths, as well as property and agriculture losses than from any other severe weather-related hazards. These losses have been increasing over the past 50 years and have exc

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New algorithm can more quickly predict LED materials

Researchers from the University of Houston have devised a new machine learning algorithm that is efficient enough to run on a personal computer and predict the properties of more than 100,000 compounds in search of those most likely to be efficient phosphors for LED lighting.

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Sir Quentin Blake brings science pioneers to life

Amy Johnson is one of 20 renowned figures to feature in a new work from the much-loved illustrator.

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VIDEO: Taiwanesisk ulykkestog kørte alt for hurtigt ind i kurve

For høj fart formodes at være årsagen til, at at tog i Taiwan afporede søndag. Myndighederne kan ikke udelukke, at lokomotivføreren har slået fartkontrolsystemet fra inden ulykken.

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New algorithm can more quickly predict LED materials

Researchers from the University of Houston have devised a new machine learning algorithm that is efficient enough to run on a personal computer and predict the properties of more than 100,000 compounds in search of those most likely to be efficient phosphors for LED lighting.

1d

 

New technique reveals limb control in flies — and maybe robots

A new neural recording technique developed by EPFL bioengineers enables for the first time the comprehensive measurement of neural circuits that control limb movement. Tested on the fruit fly, results from the technique may inspire the development of more sophisticated robotic control approaches.

1d

 

Rising temperatures and human activity are increasing storm runoff and flash floods

Columbia Engineering researchers have demonstrated for the first time that runoff extremes have been dramatically increasing in response to climate and human-induced changes. Their findings show a large increase in both precipitation and runoff extremes driven by both human activity and climate change. They also found that storm runoff has a stronger response than precipitation to human-induced ch

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Poor oral health linked to higher blood pressure, worse blood pressure control

Poor oral health may interfere with blood pressure control in people diagnosed with hypertension. Periodontal disease — a condition marked by gum infection, gum inflammation and tooth damage — appears to worsen blood pressure and interferes with hypertension treatment. Study findings underscore the importance of good oral health in blood pressure control and its role in preventing the adverse ca

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Guilty until proven innocent: police perceptions jeopardize investigationsNetflix $2B Content

An investigator's belief that a person is guilty may be the reason innocent people get convicted, according to a recent study.

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Offshore wind farms to test business in deep water

As wind turbines become increasingly familiar sights along shorelines, developers of offshore floating platforms, which harness the powerful winds further out to sea, are seeking to establish their technologies as a major viable source of clean energy.

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California’s Underwater Forests Are Being Eaten by the ‘Cockroaches of the Ocean’

Climate change is ravaging California’s underwater kelp forests. That’s caused what one scientist called a “perfect storm” in the ecosystem.

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Take a Number: Fast Food: It’s What’s for Dinner. And Lunch. And Breakfast.

On any given day in America, about one-third of adults will eat fast food, according to the C.D.C.

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Ny type elfly fortsætter trods havari i Holland

Et elfly styrtede i Holland for en uge siden og brød i brand. Men flytypen får lov at fortsætte, mens undersøgelserne står på.

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Designer babies aren’t futuristic. They’re already here.

Are we designing inequality into our genes?

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Want To Keep Your Brain Sharp? Take Care Of Your Eyes And Ears

Two large studies show that age-related memory loss can be slowed significantly when older people promptly address hearing and vision loss. (Image credit: Fancy/Veer/Corbis/Getty Images)

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The Integrative Oncology Scholars Program: Indoctrinating the next generation of “integrative oncology” believers

"Integrative oncology" involves "integrating" pseudoscience, mysticism, and quackery with science-based oncology and co-opting science-based lifestyle modalities as "alternative" in order to provide cover for the quackery. Unfortunately, my alma mater, funded by the National Cancer Institute, is running a course to indoctrinate 100 health care professionals in the ways of "integrative oncology." T

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Dangerous Hurricane Willa closes in on Mexico

Hurricane Willa surged to a dangerous Category Four storm off Mexico's Pacific coast, US forecasters said Sunday, warning of a life-threatening storm surge and heavy winds and rainfall.

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Ryanair first-half profits fall 7% after widespread strikes

Ryanair's first half to September profits fell seven percent to €1.2 billion, the low-cost airline announced Monday, after widespread strike action by pilots and cabin crew disrupted operations.

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Japanese Nobel chemistry laureate Shimomura dies at 90

Japanese-born Marine biologist Osamu Shimomura, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry, has died. He was 90.

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Stephen Hawking's wheelchair, thesis for sale

Stephen Hawking was a cosmic visionary, a figure of inspiration and a global celebrity.

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Labrador retrievers at risk of various health problems

Labrador retrievers, the second most popular dog breed in the UK, are vulnerable to a number of health conditions, according to a study published in the open access journal Canine Genetics and Epidemiology.

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New treatment approach for advanced anal cancer

A new approach to treating advanced anal cancer is safer and more effective than the most widely used current treatment, according to the first ever randomized clinical trial in this group of patients.

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UTSA creates web-based open source dashboard of North Pole

It's called ArcCI (or Arctic CyberInfrastructure) and promises to combine the thousands of images that have been taken along the years of the Arctic Ocean into one global database that will help scientists and the world see the physical changes occurring in the region including ice loss. The hope is that this web-based repository will allow researchers to spend more time analyzing information rath

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Can you solve it? Cutting the perfect slice

Puzzles that will have you in pieces UPDATE: To read the solutions click here Hello guzzlers, Scalpels at the ready! Today, three dissection puzzles. Continue reading…

1d

 

‘Headless Chicken Monster’ Spotted in the Deep Sea

A sea cucumber, previously only filmed off the Gulf of Mexico, was seen floating near Antarctica.

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Nordkoreansk gruppe stjæler kryptovaluta for over tre mia. kr. på halvandet år

Store phishing-aktører kan stjæle for op til én million dollars om måneden.

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UK’s science reputation 'at risk if academic visa issues not resolved'

Wellcome Trust says ‘creaking’ immigration system augurs badly for post-Brexit research The visa problems facing foreign academics trying to attend international conferences in the UK reveal how science could be undermined after Brexit, one of the world’s largest research funds has said. The Wellcome Trust, which grants more than £1bn for research each year, said the immigration system was “not u

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Bakterien Bacillus har uventet evne: Kan bekæmpe multiresistente bakterier

Den 'gode' bakterie udsender et signalerstof, der får gule stafylokokker, heriblandt MRSA, til at forsvinde. Opmuntrende nyt, vurderer dansk forsker.

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UTSA creates web-based open source dashboard of North Pole

It's called ArcCI (or Arctic CyberInfrastructure) and promises to combine the thousands of images that have been taken along the years of the Arctic Ocean into one global database that will help scientists and the world see the physical changes occurring in the region including ice loss. The hope is that this web-based repository will allow researchers to spend more time analyzing information rath

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Home-based biofeedback therapy is effective option for tough-to-treat constipation

Biofeedback therapy used at home is about 70 percent effective at helping patients learn how to coordinate and relax bowel muscles and relieve one of the most difficult-to-treat types of constipation, investigators report.

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3D bioprinting technique could create artificial blood vessels, organ tissue

University of Colorado Boulder engineers have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object's firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries and organ tissue.

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Gravitational waves could shed light on dark matter

Black holes colliding, gravitational waves riding through space-time – and a huge instrument that allows scientists to investigate the fabric of the universe. This could soon become reality when the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) takes up operations. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now found that LISA could also shed light on the elusive dark matter particle.

1d

 

Study shows childhood obesity the major risk factor for serious hip disease

New research suggests that rising childhood obesity rates are causing more adolescents to develop a debilitating hip disease requiring urgent surgery.

1d

 

Low-income obesity patients lose weight in new study

With the help of a free phone app, low-income obese patients with signs of cardiovascular risk lost a clinically meaningful amount of weight, finds new research from Duke University. The study is among the first to report successful weight loss within a low-income population — a group that suffers from skyrocketing rates of obesity but has proven hard to treat, said lead author Gary Bennett.

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HIV-infected Hispanic adults face higher risks of HPV-related cancers

A new study reveals that Hispanic HIV-infected adults in the United States are at a higher risk of developing cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) than Hispanics from the general population.

1d

 

Effects of smoked marijuana on lung health unknown: More research is needed

Despite the legalization of marijuana on Oct. 17, the long-term effects of smoked cannabis on lung health are unknown and more research is needed, argue authors in a commentary in CMAJ.

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Parent educational tools on pain relief help reduce babies' vaccination distress

Information provided to new parents in hospital about how to alleviate pain for their babies during vaccination resulted in more frequent use of pain interventions at future infant vaccinations, reports a study published in CMAJ.

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Study: When fathers exercise, children are healthier, even as adults

Most parents know that the diet and exercise habits of a pregnant woman impacts the health of her baby, but little is known about how a father's health choices are passed to his children. A new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center finds that lifestyle practices of fathers prior to conception may have a major impact on the lifelong health of their children.

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Hele toldvæsenet moderniseres: Vigtige it-systemer forsinket til 2025

Nye EU-regler på toldområdet betyder, at EU-landenes it-systemer på området skal udskiftes. Men tidsplanen skrider både i Danmark og internationalt.

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»Hør her, voksne! Derfor orker vi ikke at blive forskere«

»En kedelig mand i hvid kittel, der sidder på kontor hele dagen.« Videointerview med elever fra 6. klasse viser, at ingeniører og forskere lider under et imageproblem. Se med her.

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