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Nyheder2018oktober25

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Farvel til engangsbestik, vatpinde og sugerør af plast: EU nærmer sig forbud

Europa-Parlamentet har godkendt Kommissionens forslag til forbud mod en række plastprodukter. Næste skridt er en afstemning i Ministerrådet.

12h

Tesla Finally Makes a Profit While Increasing Model 3 Production, and Promises to Keep Doing It

Elon Musk's electric car company is pulling out of Model 3 production hell, and starting to make money.

16h

Trump is wrong – millions of Americans breathe badly polluted air

President Trump claims the US has the world’s cleanest air, but he is ignoring urban pollution data while actively dismantling regulations that protect air quality

38min

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Ørelægens rolle er ikke dobbelt

Jeg honoreres for både forundersøgelse og behandling. Jeg følger patienten lige fra første undersøgelse og til en eventuel behandling. Er det en dobbeltrolle? Eller er det omsorg for vores patienter at følge dem hele vejen?

3min

OU meteorologist expects severe drought and heavy rain events to worsen globally

A University of Oklahoma meteorologist, Elinor R. Martin, expects severe drought and long-lasting rainfall events to worsen in the future. In Martin's new study just published, she determines how frequent, intense and long lasting these types of events will be in the future. Martin looks at both severe drought and rain events, but it is the first time extended heavy rain events have been studied.

7min

Researchers observe novel bat behavior in Panama

According to a new report from researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) who studied Peters' tent-making bats (Uroderma bilobatum), mothers prod their young with their forearms, perhaps encouraging them to fledge and wean.

7min

Scientists discover biological ultraviolet protection 'timer'

Tel Aviv University Prof. Carmit Levy and her team have discovered a critical 48-hour cycle responsible for synchronizing the biological mechanisms that protect our skin from sun damage.

7min

GPM Satellite shows powerful super Typhoon Yutu hitting Northern Marianas

NASA's GPM Core observatory satellite captured an image of Super Typhoon Yutu when it flew over the powerful storm just as the center was striking the central Northern Mariana Islands north of Guam.

7min

Tooth loss can indicate malnutrition, Rutgers study says

Older adults are at risk for both impaired oral health and malnutrition, according to a study by Rutgers University researchers.

7min

At last, a simple way to solve the complex mysteries of the microbiome

Understanding how the microbes in the microbiome interact — and how they influence human health — is a gargantuan task, akin to counting the grains of sand on a beach.

7min

Parent-child bond predicts depression, anxiety in teens attending high-achieving schools

Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have found the quality of the parent-child relationship steadily declined starting in grade 6, and levels of alienation, trust and communication in middle school predicted depressive symptoms and anxiety in grade 12.

7min

Successful leaders prioritize their moral compass

Leaders who value morality outperform their unethical peers, regardless of industry, company size, or role, according to new research. But because we all define a “moral leader” differently, leaders who try to do good may face unexpected difficulties. The research team examined more than 300 books, essays, and studies on moral leadership from 1970 to 2018. They discovered that leaders who priorit

14min

Artificial intelligence controls quantum computers

Researchers present a quantum error correction system that is capable of learning thanks to artificial intelligence.

15min

Genome-wide study confirms six tiger subspecies

Fewer than 4,000 free-ranging tigers remain in the wild. Efforts to protect these remaining tigers have also been stymied by uncertainty about whether they represent six, five or only two subspecies. Now, researchers who've analyzed the complete genomes of 32 representative tiger specimens confirm that tigers indeed fall into six genetically distinct groups.

15min

Where Are the "Hotspots" for Europa's Purported Plumes?

Scientists are seeking—and not finding—thermal evidence for geysers on the Jovian moon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15min

Bombs sent to Joe Biden and Robert De Niro, latest in string of attempted attacks

Two bombs were sent to Biden, one to De Niro. Nobody was injured. So far, 10 people, all Democrats or critics of President Donald Trump, have been targeted in this week's string of attempted bombings. Trump denounced the attempted bombings but also suggested the media is partly to blame. Authorities intercepted packages containing what appeared to be pipe bombs addressed to former Vice President

19min

Dark tourism: Inside a new, morbid kind of travel

A new form of tourism that focuses on visiting sites associated with death and tragedy is growing in popularity. Some call it exploitative, and some call it respectful. Still others consider it to be far too dangerous for reasonable people. In any case, dark tourism showcases humanity's irresistible fascination with death. None Maybe you've saved your vacation time up for a while and are looking

19min

Would you pay $4,000 to work out at home?

The home fitness industry has reached $14b valuation, part of the $595b fitness industry. A new survey shows that while home fitness is growing, obstacles, such as having enough space, exist. Companies like Peloton and Mirror continue to gain new advocates, shifting the emphasis from gym to living room. None In a few months I'll be celebrating 15 years teaching group fitness, 14 of those at Equin

19min

Photo Ark: See dazzling images of the Earth’s animals

The Photo Ark by photographer Joel Sartore and National Geographic brings the viewer face to face with our planet's fellow travelers. It's predicted that half of earth's species may be lost before 2100. This collection of images is beautiful and profound. You've probably seen some of Joel Sartore's remarkable photos of animals. He's an award-winning regular contributor to National Geographic Maga

19min

European Parliament Approves Ban on Single-Use Plastics

The ban must still be approved by the E.U.’s member states, but it would join a global shift as environmentalists seek to halt the use of materials detrimental to the planet.

26min

Trump Made a Forgotten Political-Scandal Movie Timely Again

When Fair Game hit theaters in October 2010, it made barely a splash and was quickly forgotten. A dramatization of the Valerie Plame leak scandal by Doug Liman, a director best known for action films like The Bourne Identity and Mr. and Mrs. Smith , the movie debuted at the Cannes Film Festival to mild plaudits but no awards. Critics noted that Plame (Naomi Watts) , a CIA officer whose cover was

27min

Race Day with Alex Rossi | In the Pit

In the pit with Indy 500 winner, Alex Rossi, and his pit crew on race day. Stream Full Episodes of In the Pit: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/in-the-pit/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Discovery

29min

Trump's Personal iPhone Would Be a National Security RiskTrump iPhone China

By using a personal iPhone instead of secured lines, President Trump makes it entirely too easy for China and Russia to spy.

29min

The FDA just approved the first new flu drug in 20 years. Here’s what you need to know.

Health Xofluza can help thousands of people this flu season, but it's not for everyone. Our arsenal in the endless, roving, ever-evolving battle against the influenza virus just got slightly larger.

29min

People overestimate benefits, and underestimate risks, of medical interventions

From major heart surgery to a course of minor drugs, people overestimate the benefits and underestimate the risks of a variety of medical procedures, according to new research.

30min

Efficient electrochemical cells for carbon dioxide conversion

Scientists have developed electrochemical cells that convert carbon monoxide derived from carbon dioxide into commercially viable compounds more effectively and efficiently than existing technologies. Their research provides a new strategy for capturing carbon dioxide and converting it into chemical feedstocks.

30min

Discovery of new superconducting materials using materials informatics

Scientists have succeeded in discovering new materials that exhibit superconductivity under high pressures using materials informatics (MI) approaches (data science-based material search techniques). This study experimentally demonstrated that MI enables efficient exploration of new superconducting materials. MI approaches may be applicable to the development of various functional materials, inclu

30min

Why relationships — not money — are the key to improving schools

Strong relationships between teachers, parents and students at schools has more impact on improving student learning than does financial support, new research shows. The study found that social capital had a three- to five-times larger effect than financial capital on reading and math scores in Michigan schools.

30min

Heat, weekends, aggression and Chicago summer shootings

In a new study, researchers sifted through data on almost six million reported crimes in Chicago between 2001 to 2014 to try to tease out factors that might promote or suppress various types of crime by time of year, time of day, weekday and even holidays.

30min

Zapping liquid metal makes it move in a way that can power wheels

A small metal droplet can propel a wheeled robot forward, paving the way for larger robots that can trundle like tumbleweeds through unfriendly terrain

38min

Memory special: What happens to your memories while you sleep?

As you slumber, the brain is a whir of activity sorting and storing your memories. How does it know which to choose, and how can you game the system?

38min

5 Major Crops In The Crosshairs Of Climate Change

The plants that nourish us won't disappear entirely. But they may have to move to higher, cooler latitudes. Some places may find it harder to grow anything at all, because there's not enough water. (Image credit: Mary Mathis and Heather Kim/NPR)

38min

Research shows pretend porpoise sounds are helping conservation efforts

In a first study of its kind, Dr. Hanna Nuuttila, currently at Swansea University's College of Science—together with scientists from the German Oceanographic Museum, the University of St Andrews and Bangor University—revealed how playing back porpoise sounds to an acoustic logger can be used to assess the detection area of the device, a metric typically required for effective monitoring and conser

41min

Research shows pretend porpoise sounds are helping conservation efforts

An examination into the detection of harbour porpoises is helping to give new understanding of effective monitoring of species under threat from anthropogenic activities such as fisheries bycatch and coastal pollution.

43min

Researchers find gene that makes some susceptible to middle ear infections

Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found multiple genetic variants within the FUT2 gene that makes some people especially susceptible to middle ear infections.

43min

Probiotics are not always 'good bacteria'

Researchers from the Cockrell School of Engineering were able to shed light on a part of the human body – the digestive system — where many questions remain unanswered. Using their 'gut inflammation-on-a-chip' microphysiological system, the research team confirmed that intestinal barrier disruption is the onset initiator of gut inflammation.

43min

Systematic review of clinical studies suggests newer shingles vaccine far more effective

A systematic review of clinical studies involving more than two million patients aged 50 years and older suggests the newer shingles vaccine Shingrix was far more successful in preventing the painful condition compared to the older vaccine Zostavax.

43min

Do neonicotinoids inhibit the development of anti-predatory behaviors in wood frogs?

Wood frogs are a bit more sluggish when exposed to neonicotinoids. This small behavioral change could have an impact on wood frog populations.

43min

Head and neck cancer survivors at increased risk of suicide

Despite improved survival rates among cancer patients, the risk of death by suicide remains high, especially among those treated for head and neck cancers.

43min

Late night snacker? Make it cottage cheese

Researchers found that consuming 30 grams of protein about 30 minutes before bed appears to have a positive effect on muscle quality, metabolism and overall health. And for those who have sworn off eating at night, there is no gain in body fat.

43min

New role for protein could lead to novel treatments for cancer and vascular disease

Researchers at York University have found a new role for a well-known protein in the body that may explain, in part, what goes wrong in certain cancers, as well as vascular and neurological disorders.Beta-catenin, a wide-ranging and important protein for the regulation of cell function from the embryonic stage to adulthood, has already been implicated in the development of certain cancers, includi

43min

DNA 'dances' in first explanation of how genetic material flows through a nucleus

DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. The finding is the first large-scale explanation of genetic material moving within a working cell. The dancing DNA may play a role in gene expression, replication and remodeling.

43min

Targeted Facebook ads shown to be highly effective in the 2016 US Presidential electionFacebook US Child TikTok

Intensive, micro-targeted Facebook adverts increased Republican turnout by up to 10 per cent among key voter groups, according to a new study. The study raises important questions about whether more regulation or transparency is needed. The paper was produced in collaboration with ETH Zurich and the University Carlos III in Madrid.

44min

Studying Pluto orbiter mission

Astronomers have made several discoveries that expand the range and value of a future Pluto orbiter mission. The breakthroughs define a fuel-saving orbital tour and demonstrate that an orbiter can continue exploration in the Kuiper Belt after surveying Pluto.

44min

How spider eyes work together to track stimuli

Using a specially designed eye-tracker for use with spiders, biologists report that their tests in jumping spiders show a secondary set of eyes is crucial to the principal eyes' ability to track moving stimuli.

44min

Cannabis pain relief without the 'high'

In the wake of cannabis legalization, a team of scientists have delivered encouraging news for chronic pain sufferers by pinpointing the effective dose of marijuana plant extract cannabidiol (CBD) for safe pain relief without the typical 'high' or euphoria produced by the THC.

44min

Elephant trunks form joints to pick up small objects; research could translate to robotics

Understanding how elephants use their trunks to pick up small objects could lead to robots designed with flexible hands or grippers, according to a new study.

44min

Cluster of factors could help predict C. diff

A cluster of factors may help predict which patients are likely to develop Clostridioides difficile, a potentially life-threatening disease commonly known as C. difficile or C. diff, a new study has found. And that could help in efforts to prevent infection, according to the researchers.

44min

New devices to test retinal cells

Researchers have developed new devices to better understand the triggers of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by mechanically stressing cells.

44min

Do neonicotinoids inhibit the development of anti-predatory behaviors in wood frogs?

In a recent study published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, scientists investigated the effects of popular agricultural insecticides—neonicotinoids—on wood frogs. Neonicotinoids are highly water soluble and can be easily carried via storm water to end up in streams and lakes. While the effect of these insecticides on growth and reproduction of wood frogs has been shown to be

47min

Fighting mosquitoes in your backyard with scientists' help

Thanks to an innovative mosquito control approach developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, residents in several Maryland neighborhoods reduced populations of invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes by an impressive 76 percent, on average.

47min

How sleeping mammary stem cells are awakened in puberty

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty.Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according to the research that was published today in the journal Developmental Cell.

47min

TechEdge: Single-Cell Sequencing & Analysis

SCS is a powerful tool in the scientist’s arsenal for linking genetic variation to disease and pathogenesis. Designing the right SCS protocol will take careful consideration of experimental and technical variables. Finding the right instrument is pivotal for obtaining the data you want!

47min

Video: Do astronauts need sunscreen?

Space is full of potentially dangerous radiation. Here on Earth, our atmosphere and magnetic field protect us from the worst of it.

53min

Government ranks 18 US volcanoes as 'very high threat'

Government scientists are classifying 18 U.S. volcanoes as a "very high threat" because of what's been happening inside them and how close they are to people.

53min

Migrant Caravans Might Become Even More Common

It seems as though overnight, the words “migrant caravan” have become embedded in the nation’s vocabulary. The term is splashed across television networks’ chyrons and national newspapers. President Donald Trump has raised the ongoing caravan at rallies as a threat to the United States and cited it as a reason for an overhaul of the country’s immigration laws. But migrant caravans aren’t new—and

1h

Letters: ‘Acting Like This Is a Boundless Battle for Wokeness Is Somewhat Absurd’

Taylor Swift Succumbs to Competitive Wokeness “In the uppermost echelons of the culture industries,” Reihan Salam wrote earlier this month , “woke liberalism is de rigueur and departures from it are stigmatized.” In this environment, he argued, making a show of social liberalism is increasingly the only option. The idea that the political convictions held by young people are not sincere, but rath

1h

Dark tourism: Inside a new, morbid kind of travel

A new form of tourism that focuses on visiting sites associated with death and tragedy is growing in popularity. Some call it exploitative, and some call it respectful. Still others consider it to be far too dangerous for reasonable people. In any case, dark tourism showcases humanity's irresistible fascination with death. None Maybe you've saved your vacation time up for a while and are looking

1h

Why whistleblowing is the loneliest and most courageous act in the world

Living with integrity means being able to fall asleep at night having asked and answered these questions: Did I treat other people well today? Did I uphold the principles that I really care about? Did I take care of injustice? If you feel you need to call out bad behavior or blow the whistle on injustice, Alice Dreger offers this advice: "Can you get other people to do it with you? That will ofte

1h

Left has lost contact with 'working-class people,' argues philosopher Slavoj Žižek

Slavoj Žižek and British political writer Owen Jones recently spoke about American politics, the left and global capitalism. Žižek sees the success of President Donald Trump as proof that the left needs a major overhaul. Žižek said one positive aspect of Trump's presidency could be the rise of a new movement on the left. The crucial battle in American politics today is what's happening within the

1h

Wearable tech becomes top fitness trend for 2019, says survey of health and fitness professionals

Fitness trackers, smart watches, and other wearable technology are the number one fitness trend for 2019, according to an annual survey of health and fitness professionals published in the November issue of ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal®, an official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

1h

The ghost of Cassiopeia

About 550 light-years away in the constellation of Cassiopeia lies IC 63, a stunning and slightly eerie nebula. Also known as the ghost of Cassiopeia, IC 63 is being shaped by radiation from a nearby unpredictably variable star, Gamma Cassiopeiae, which is slowly eroding away the ghostly cloud of dust and gas. This celestial ghost makes the perfect backdrop for the upcoming feast of All Hallow's E

1h

Do astronauts need sunscreen? (video)

Space is full of potentially dangerous radiation. Here on Earth, our atmosphere and magnetic field protect us from the worst of it. Astronauts on a deep-space mission would need other forms of protection. In collaboration with National Chemistry Week, this Reactions video is all about chemistry in space.

1h

Fighting mosquitoes in your backyard with scientists' help

Thanks to an innovative mosquito control approach developed at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, residents in several Maryland neighborhoods reduced populations of invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes by an impressive 76 percent, on average. The Rutgers-led project, called Citizen Action through Science (Citizen AcTS), mobilizes neighbors guided by scientists to address local problems, according to a s

1h

How sleeping mammary stem cells are awakened in puberty

Australian researchers have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty.Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according to the research that was published today in the journal Developmental Cell.

1h

New epigenetic drug strategy to treat cancer

A team led by researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University has discovered that inhibiting CDK9, a DNA transcription regulator, reactivates genes that have been epigenetically silenced by cancer. Reactivation leads to restored tumor suppressor gene expression and enhanced anti-cancer immunity. It is the first time this particular kinase has been linked to gene silencing in

1h

Scientists discover a new lead for mechanism of action of diabetes drug metformin

Canadian and British researchers are able to see how frontline diabetes drug metformin alters cell glucose uptake using new technology that probes how drugs act on all cellular functions.

1h

Local hormone production is root of issue for plant development

Plant roots rely on local production of a key hormone that controls many aspects of development and response to environmental changes, according to new research from North Carolina State University. Specifically, local auxin production is required to keep plants healthy.

1h

Mind's quality control center found in long-ignored brain area

The cerebellum, once thought to be limited to controlling movement, is involved in every aspect of higher brain function, according to a new study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

1h

Hallucinations associated with brain hyperactivity in people with macular degeneration

New research from The University of Queensland has shown for the first time that visual hallucinations in people with macular degeneration are associated with abnormally heightened activity in the visual cortex of the brain. The findings, published in the journal Current Biology, could improve diagnosis of such hallucinations.

1h

Clues to the link between obesity and liver cancer-and identification of a new risk group

New research has found a previously overlooked group of obese people may be at risk of developing deadly liver cancer. Most obese individuals who develop liver cancer first develop non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and then the more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. This can lead to cirrhosis and liver failure. However, this research reveals pathways to the development of liver cancer in obes

1h

Study opens new therapeutic avenue for mitochondria malfunction

Jefferson scientists identify key interaction controlling calcium's access to the cell's powerhouse.

1h

Three proteins may play key roles in female fertility and cancer biology

Three proteins regulate each other with surprising twists and turns in female mouse eggs, a finding that may play an important role in female fertility and cancer biology, according to Rutgers-led research.

1h

Just a few drinks can change how memories are formed

Researchers at Brown found that alcohol hijacks a conserved memory pathway in the brain and changes which versions of genes are made, forming the cravings that fuel addiction.

1h

Mouse and human skin cells produce melanin on a 48-hour cycle

Researchers have discovered that mouse skin and skin cells from humans produce pigmentation in response to sunlight on a 48-hour cycle. They observed that exposing skin to ultraviolet light every two days yielded darker pigmentation with less radiation damage than daily exposure. The findings appear Oct. 25 in the journal Molecular Cell.

1h

Efficient electrochemical cells for CO2 conversion

Scientists at Stanford University have developed electrochemical cells that convert carbon monoxide (CO) derived from CO2 into commercially viable compounds more effectively and efficiently than existing technologies. Their research, published Oct. 25, 2018, in the journal Joule, provides a new strategy for capturing CO2 and converting it into chemical feedstocks.

1h

A single genetic switch changes butterfly wing color

New research by scientists from the University of Chicago shows how just one gene controls whether a certain species of butterfly has white or yellow spots on its wings.

1h

Genome-wide study confirms 6 tiger subspecies

Fewer than 4,000 free-ranging tigers remain in the wild. Efforts to protect these remaining tigers have also been stymied by uncertainty about whether they represent six, five or only two subspecies. Now, researchers who've analyzed the complete genomes of 32 representative tiger specimens confirm that tigers indeed fall into six genetically distinct groups. The findings are reported in Current Bi

1h

The Science of Stuttering

A special thank you to Kaja Bajc and Jaymie Horak for their incredibly helpful personal input. How is it that someone can sing fluidly but struggle to introduce herself? Or smoothly imitate a foreign accent without trouble, but get stuck on words when speaking without pretense? Stuttering is a communication disorder characterized by disruptions (“disfluencies”) … Continue reading "The Science of S

1h

The fear making Chinese women reluctant to have more children

I was waiting in a fashionable café for Tang Xiaohe (Names have been changed to protect anonymity) in the Dongzhimen district in Beijing. Every bit of the décor in the café signalled the prosperity of China's capital city. So did the price of a cup of cappuccino.

1h

Can tiny doses of magic mushrooms unlock creativity?

The use of minute doses of magic mushrooms and truffles containing psychedelic substances could induce a state of unconstrained thought that may produce more new, creative ideas. 'Microdosing' in this way may allow people to experience the creative benefits of psychedelic drugs without the risk of the so-called 'bad trips' that often come with high doses of such substances.

1h

Can we limit global warming to 1.5 °C?

Efforts to combat climate change tend to focus on supply-side changes, such as shifting to renewable or cleaner energy. Researchers now argue that demand-side approaches can play a crucial role given the aspirational target outlined in the Paris Agreement.

1h

Trust in others predicts mortality in the United States

Do you trust other people? It may prolong your life. People who trust others live longer — Those who do not increase their risk of a shortened life.

1h

Stress can impair memory, reduce brain size in middle age

Stress may be causing impaired memory and brain shrinkage in middle-age adults, even before symptoms of Alzheimer's or other dementia begin, according to a new study.

1h

Binary bias distorts how we integrate information

When we evaluate and compare a range of data points — whether that data is related to health outcomes, head counts, or menu prices — we tend to neglect the relative strength of the evidence and treat it as simply binary, according to new research.

1h

Secret shared by comets and sand crabs

Researchers have found a mechanical connection between sand crab burrow widths and widths of cometary pits using a simple granular experiment.

1h

The (Imaginary) Numbers at the Edge of Reality

Have you ever sat in a math classroom and wondered “When will I ever use this?” You might have asked yourself this question when you first encountered “imaginary” numbers, and with good reason: What could be less practical than a number described as imaginary? But imaginary numbers, and the complex numbers they help define, turn out to be incredibly useful. They have a far-reaching impact in phys

1h

To get a deeper tan, don’t sunbathe every day

Skin cells make protective melanin on a 48-hour cycle.

1h

Neural networks enable learning of error correction strategies for quantum computers

Quantum computers could solve complex tasks that are beyond the capabilities of conventional computers. However, the quantum states are extremely sensitive to constant interference from their environment. The plan is to combat this using active protection based on quantum error correction. Florian Marquardt, Director at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light, and his team have now prese

1h

Genome-wide study confirms six tiger subspecies

Fewer than 4,000 free-ranging tigers remain in the wild. Efforts to protect these remaining tigers have also been stymied by uncertainty about whether they represent six, five or only two subspecies. Now, researchers who've analyzed the complete genomes of 32 representative tiger specimens confirm that tigers indeed fall into six genetically distinct groups. The findings are reported in Current Bi

1h

Local hormone production is root of issue for plant development

Plant roots rely on local production of a key hormone that controls many aspects of development and response to environmental changes, according to new research from North Carolina State University.

1h

Efficient electrochemical cells for CO2 conversion

Scientists at Stanford University have developed electrochemical cells that convert carbon monoxide (CO) derived from CO2 into commercially viable compounds more effectively and efficiently than existing technologies. Their research, published October 25 in the journal Joule, provides a new strategy for capturing CO2 and converting it into chemical feedstocks.

1h

A single genetic switch changes butterfly wing color

Heliconius butterflies are a diverse and colorful group of species that live throughout tropical regions of Central and South America. Many of them have wing patterns and colors that mimic other species to protect themselves from predators, and new research by scientists from the University of Chicago shows that in one species, Heliconius cydno, just one gene controls whether the butterfly has whi

1h

Three proteins may play key roles in female fertility and cancer biology

Three proteins regulate each other with surprising twists and turns in female mouse eggs, a finding that may play an important role in female fertility and cancer biology, according to Rutgers-led research.

1h

These spear points may be North America’s oldest weapons

Scientists believe newly-discovered, 15,500-year-old spear points are the oldest weapons ever found in North America. The findings raise new questions about the settlement of early peoples on the continent. As reported in Science Advances , scientists found numerous weapons—about 3-4 inches long—while digging at the Debra L. Friedkin site, named for the family who owns the land about 40 miles nor

1h

Borexino experiment: analysis of ten years of neutrino signals

Researchers from the Borexino collaboration have published the hitherto most comprehensive analysis of neutrinos from the Sun's core processes. The results confirm previous assumptions about the processes inside the sun.

1h

Surprising network activity in the immature brain

Developing brain networks act locally to build globally.

1h

People overestimate benefits, and underestimate risks, of medical interventions

From major heart surgery to a course of minor drugs, people overestimate the benefits and underestimate the risks of a variety of medical procedures, according to new research. led by the University of Plymouth, UK.

1h

Students in health enrichment programs benefit from early team-based exposure

A study conducted by LSU Health New Orleans researchers provides new evidence that early exposure to multiple health disciplines in pipeline programs targeting underserved/underrepresented students interested in health professions reduces the development of traditional role and leadership stereotypes about professional health care teams and practice.

1h

Artificial intelligence controls quantum computers

Neural networks enable learning of error correction strategies for computers based on quantum physics

1h

Trumpism Is ‘Identity Politics’ for White People

After Democrats lost the 2016 presidential election, a certain conventional wisdom congealed within the pundit class: Donald Trump’s success was owed to the Democratic abandonment of the white working class and the party’s emphasis on identity politics . By failing to emphasize a strong economic message, the thinking went, the party had ceded the election to Trump . That explanation ignored the u

1h

Mexico's 2017 Tehuantepec quake suggests a new worry

Last September's magnitude 8.2 Tehuantepec earthquake happened deep, rupturing both mantle and crust, on the landward side of major subduction zone in the Pacific Ocean off Mexico's far south coast. It's unanticipated location suggests a potential new threat for Central America's coastline.

1h

The US pushes to build unhackable quantum networks

The fiber-optic cables carrying data across the internet are vulnerable to hacking. Two US initiatives aim to fix that by creating super-secure quantum transmissions.

1h

Søren Overgaard får gigtforeningens forskerpris

Mange års forskning i slidgigt blev hædret, da professor Søren Overgaard fra Odense Universitetshospital modtog Dronning Ingrids Forskerpris

1h

My quest to defy gravity and fly | Elizabeth Streb

Over the course of her fearless career, extreme action specialist Elizabeth Streb has pushed the limits of the human body. She's jumped through broken glass, toppled from great heights and built gizmos to provide a boost along the way. Backed by footage of her work, Streb reflects on her lifelong quest to defy gravity and fly the only way a human can — by mastering the landing.

1h

Business this week

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1h

Politics this week

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1h

KAL’s cartoon

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1h

Weird Rectangular Iceberg in Antarctica Isn't Alone, NASA Photos Show

A NASA scientist actually spotted two sharp-cornered icebergs during a recent research flight over Antarctica.

1h

Gas får ny rolle i fjernvarmeproduktionen

Dansk Fjernvarme og HMN Naturgas er i dag indgået i et samarbejde om at afdække, hvilken rolle natur- og biogas skal spille i den danske fjernvarmeproduktion.

1h

Sundhedsplatformen printer forkert dosis på medicinglas: Kan have skadet patienter

Patientsikkerhedsteam i Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland mener, at det kan blive nødvendigt at gennemgå af recepter et år tilbage for at finde fejlbehæftede af hensyn til patientsikkerheden.

1h

Bacteria: Protein researchers decipher resistance mechanism

Worldwide, resistance to antibiotics is on the rise. In order to understand why bacteria are becoming immune to previously well-functioning drugs, scientists are penetrating ever deeper into the molecular structure of cells. A research group at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has succeeded in isolating a membrane protein from the E. coli bacterium and shed light on its molecular st

1h

Non-invasive stent monitoring techniques tested

Barcelona researchers develop a probe to detect and monitor metallic stents.

1h

Hurricanes destroy beachside homes, but not this one

Environment The engineering that helped one Mexico Beach, Florida, house outlast Hurricane Michael. On October 10, Hurricane Michael spun Category 4 winds around the upper reaches of the Sunshine State, but one structure withstood the storm, despite its front step…

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The ghost of Cassiopeia

About 550 light-years away in the constellation of Cassiopeia lies IC 63, a stunning and slightly eerie nebula. Also known as the ghost of Cassiopeia, IC 63 is being shaped by radiation from a nearby unpredictably variable star, Gamma Cassiopeiae, which is slowly eroding away the ghostly cloud of dust and gas. This celestial ghost makes the perfect backdrop for the upcoming feast of All Hallow's E

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Flemming Møller Mortensen afsporer principiel debat

Det socialdemokratiske forslag om tvungen værnepligt i almen praksis for nyuddannede læger er så ukvalificeret, at partiets sundhedsordfører er nødt til at afspore debatten.

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Why relationships — not money — are the key to improving schools

Strong relationships between teachers, parents and students at schools has more impact on improving student learning than does financial support, new research shows. The study found that social capital had a three- to five-times larger effect than financial capital on reading and math scores in Michigan schools.

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Targeted Facebook ads shown to be highly effective in the 2016 US Presidential election

Intensive, micro-targeted Facebook adverts increased Republican turnout by up to 10 per cent among key voter groups, according to a new study published by the University of Warwick. The study raises important questions about whether more regulation or transparency is needed.The paper was produced in collaboration with ETH Zurich and the University Carlos III in Madrid.

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Novel combination therapy promotes wound healing

By incorporating a gene-suppressing drug into an over-the-counter gel, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and their colleagues cut healing time by half and significantly improved healing outcomes compared to control treatments. Results from the combination therapy, which was tested in mice, were published online today in Advances in Wound Care.

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Why relationships—not money—are the key to improving schools

Strong relationships between teachers, parents and students at schools has more impact on improving student learning than does financial support, new research shows.

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Overhype and 'research laundering' are a self-inflicted wound for social science

Earlier this fall, Dartmouth College researchers released a study claiming to link violent video games to aggression in kids. The logic of a meta-analytic study like this one is that by combining many individual studies, scientists can look for common trends or effects identified in earlier work. Only, as a psychology researcher who's long focused on this area, I contend this meta-analysis did not

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Targeted Facebook ads shown to be highly effective in the 2016 US Presidential electionFacebook US Child TikTok

Donald Trump's campaign is said to have spent 44 million dollars on Facebook, running 175,000 variations of political adverts during the election campaign, compared to a spend of 28 million dollars by Hillary Clinton's campaign. Was this money well-spent?

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A robust AI-centric indoor positioning system

In modern airport terminals, hospital complexes, office buildings, sports arenas, university campuses, and retail outlets, there is a growing market for convenient and easy-to-use applications for navigating indoors. With an expected growth rate of 30% by 2022, according to a MarketWatch Report, this demand is accelerated by the presence of advanced sensors in modern smartphones like magnetometers

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Spread of self-driving cars could cause more pollution – unless the electric grid transforms radically

The world is on the cusp of dramatic changes in the ways people own, operate and power their means of transportation.

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Yes, eating meat affects the environment, but cows are not killing the climate

As the scale and impacts of climate change become increasingly alarming, meat is a popular target for action. Advocates urge the public to eat less meat to save the environment. Some activists have called for taxing meat to reduce consumption of it.

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Thousands of dogs have been killed unnecessarily due to misguided ideas about breeds

Thousands of dogs, regardless of their behaviour, have been unnecessarily killed as a result of misguided UK legislation introduced in 1991. Although this sad state of affairs has been known of by campaigners for many years, only now have MPs recognised the issue in a recent statement on the Breed Specific Legislation, which aims to protect the public from dangerous dogs. After consulting dog beha

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Researchers measure effects of congestion on access to jobs by car

Annually updated research from the Accessibility Observatory at the University of Minnesota estimates the impact of traffic congestion on access to jobs for the 50 largest (by population) metropolitan areas in the United States.

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Mite detectives can unravel crimes by locating stolen goods

Some of the world's biggest heists, involving huge bundles of cash or stolen goods, could be solved by one of nature's smallest creatures.

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Tiny diamond invention could help launch rockets into space

Scientists at ANU have invented tiny diamond electronic parts that could outperform and be more durable than today's devices in high-radiation environments such as rocket engines, helping to reach the next frontier in space.

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Why removing sex from birth certificates matters to gender diverse people

,Next month, Tasmania's parliament will consider a bill that would remove sex from birth certificates. If it passes, it would be the first state in Australia to take such a step.

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Can your actions really save the planet? 'Planetary accounting' has the answer

The climate is changing before our eyes. News articles about imminent species extinctions have become the norm. Images of oceans full of plastic are littering social media. These issues are made even more daunting by the fact that they are literally global in scale.

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Scientists should use their clout to get a less bad Brexit for all

Europe’s scientific elite say a hard Brexit will damage science. They should be supporting those who face much worse consequences, says Ehsan Masood

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Why Many College Dropouts Are Returning to School in North Carolina

The college-affordability crisis can at times feel like one with a million responses but no clear solution. Students often graduate with thousands of dollars in debt, or, even worse, they drop out of college and are still left with debt to pay off. As the student-debt bubble continues to grow—now estimated at more than $1.5 trillion —policymakers are poking around for that solution. One that has

2h

Your job might disappear, but don't blame artificial intelligence for that

When we talk about the jobs at risk, artificial intelligence is often seen as the main threat. However, this technology is still at its very beginning, while a lot of jobs are already transforming and even disappearing. Conversely, other jobs seem to resist, even if technologies already exist to replace them.

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Biomarkers facilitate early detection of glaucoma

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have identified new potential biomarkers that may facilitate early detection of glaucoma in patients. Moreover, they ascertained that the mutation of a certain gene in mice causes intraocular pressure elevation. This, in turn, is one of the main risk factors for glaucoma.

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The formation of large meteorite craters is unraveled

About 66 million years ago, a meteorite hit the Earth of the Yucatan Peninsula in what is now Mexico. This event triggered a mass extinction that eradicated approximately 75 percent of all species and ended the era of dinosaurs. Like Prof. Dr. Ulrich Riller of the Institute of Geology of the University of Hamburg and co-workers report in 'Nature', the hitherto mysterious formation of the crater an

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Scientists Back Efforts to Pull CO2 from the Atmosphere

A new report from the National Academics calls for concerted research into “negative emissions technologies” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Region Sjælland vil flytte rundt på sengeafsnit

Regionspolitikerne i Sjælland skal tage stilling til fire strukturelle ændringer, der skal spare penge. Det kan bl.a. få konsekvenser for onkologien i Næstved og udrykningen af Ringsted Sygehus’ afdelinger.

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Tusindvis af ordinationer er ramt af ny fejl i Sundhedsplatformen

Region Hovedstaden har opdaget en fejl i Sundhedsplatformen, som optræder, når en recept på et lægemiddel bliver fornyet, fordi lægen har ændret på dosis. Tilliden til systemet er væk, siger politiker.

2h

Biologists gain new insights into surface, acoustic behaviors of right whales

In response to the dwindling number of North Atlantic right whales, researchers in the College of Arts and Sciences (A&S) have conducted a major study of the surface and acoustic behaviors of right whale mother-calf pairs.

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Scientist champions conservation of neglected predators

Some of the world's most threatened rays and sharks could be one step closer to being saved.

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Trust in others predicts mortality in the United States

Do you trust other people? It may prolong your life. According to a study by researchers from Lund University and Stockholm University, people who trust others live longer — Those who do not increase their risk of a shortened life. The study is published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Scientists uncover why knee joint injury leads to osteoarthritis

The mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis are not known. Currently, it is not possible for a physician examining a patient to predict future joint condition and possible development of osteoarthritis. In the future, however, this may be possible, as a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Massachusetts Institute of Technology now shows that articular cartilage degenerates specificall

2h

Repeated interferon stimulation creates innate immune memory

The innate immune system may be able to be trained to react to viral infections more efficiently by repeated exposure to anti-viral signaling molecules.

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Keeping phosphorus under control to improve the quality of patients with renal failure

A University of Cordoba research team, Cordoba's Maimonides Institute of Biomedical Research and Queen Sofia University Hospital link phosphorus normalization in blood to a decrease in a hormone that damages the heart.

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Halvlederproducenter kæmper for at følge med Moores lov

Intel må endnu engang udskyde lanceringen af den længede ventede 10 nanometer-teknologi, mens GlobalFoundries helt har kastet håndklædet ringen.

2h

Umklapp scattering in superlattices found to degrade high-temperature mobility of graphene's charge carriers

A team of researchers from the U.K., Japan and the U.S. has found that Umklapp scattering in moiré superlattices can degrade the intrinsic high-temperature mobility of its graphene's charge carriers. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes their study of superlattices made with graphene and using hexagonal boron nitride as a substrate, and what they found.

2h

Can we limit global warming to 1.5 degrees C?

Efforts to combat climate change tend to focus on supply-side changes, such as shifting to renewable or cleaner energy. In a Special Issue in the Energy Efficiency Journal that follows the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 ˚C, researchers argue that demand-side approaches can play a crucial role given the aspirational target outlined in the Paris Agreement.

2h

New AI-based video system helps seniors stay safe and independent

An autonomous intelligence system is helping seniors stay safe both at home and in care facilities, thanks to a collaboration between University of Alberta computing scientists and software technology company Spxtrm AI.

2h

Egyptian archaeologists find parts of pharaoh's booth

Egypt says archaeologists have uncovered parts of a booth with a seat that belonged to famous pharaoh Ramses II, one of the longest ruling pharaohs in antiquity.

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Endangered fin whale washes up on Belgian beach

An 18-metre (60-foot) fin whale washed up overnight on a Belgian beach after dying offshore, in what the Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences called a rare event.

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Twitter surges on profit, revenue growth

Twitter shares flew higher Thursday after reporting a record quarterly profit that helped investors look past a drop in the number of users due to the weeding out of fake and abusive accounts.

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Russian rocket puts satellite into orbit, 1st since failure

A Russian Soyuz rocket put a military satellite in orbit on Thursday, its first successful launch since a similar rocket failed earlier this month to deliver a crew to the International Space Station.

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Mexico's 2017 Tehuantepec quake suggests a new worry

Last September's magnitude 8.2 Tehuantepec earthquake happened deep, rupturing both mantle and crust, on the landward side of major subduction zone in the Pacific Ocean off Mexico's far south coast.

2h

How we discovered a new species of the 'missing link' between dinosaurs and birds

Perhaps one of the world's best known fossils is Archaeopteryx. With its beautifully preserved feathers, it has long been regarded as the first bird in the fossil record, and is often called "the icon of evolution". Only a handful of specimens have ever been found, its elusivity adding to its fascination.

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The world's largest campodeid dipluran named after the mythological giant Daidarabotchi

Amongst the fauna thriving in the subterranean spaces below the surface of the earth's crust, the insect-like diplurans and, precisely, those in the campodeid family are one of the best-known groups, currently comprising almost 150 species. However, not a single subterranean member of the family had been known from Japan until very recently.

2h

Machine learning identifies antibiotic resistance genes in tuberculosis-causing bacteria

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed an approach that uses machine learning to identify and predict which genes make infectious bacteria resistant to antibiotics. The approach was tested on strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis—the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) in humans. It identified 33 known and 24 new antibiotic resistance genes in these bacteria.

2h

AI designed these Halloween masks and they are absolutely terrifying

Artificial intelligence has learned to create spine-tingling Halloween masks after being fed 5000 photos of scary or funny costume masks

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The GOP Is Suddenly Playing Defense on Health Care

In one of many tweets last week, President Donald Trump declared: “All Republicans support people with pre-existing conditions, and if they don’t, they will after I speak to them. I am in total support.” His statement probably puzzled Americans who remember what happened in May 2017, when Trump and House Republicans met in the Rose Garden to celebrate their votes to repeal Obamacare—which guarant

3h

Antibiotika fjerner gavnlige tarmbakterier i mere end seks måneder

Antibiotika påvirker tarmbakterierne et halv år efter en kur, viser nyt dansk studie. Det er grund til bekymring, mener lederen af studiet.

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Layered core could be key to longer-lasting fuel cells

Researchers have developed a new alloy catalyst that both reduces platinum use and holds up well in fuel cell testing. One factor holding back the widespread use of eco-friendly hydrogen fuel cells in cars, trucks, and other vehicles is the cost of the platinum catalysts that make the cells work. One approach to using less precious platinum is to combine it with other cheaper metals, but those al

3h

Video: feathers not included

Inspired by the beauty and flying ability of birds, Leonardo da Vinci strived centuries ago to create a human-powered flapping-wing flying machine. But his designs, which da Vinci explored in his Codex on the Flight of Birds, were never developed in any practical way. Even today, mimicking bird flight still presents challenges due to the physiological complexity of a bird's flapping wings.

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Ecolabelling no help in sustainable seafood sales

How does labelling products and putting up signs in stores affect consumer choices, especially toward encouraging consumers to buy sustainable seafood? When researchers tested how ecolabels for sustainably harvested seafood would affect shopping choices in Germany and Norway, they found that customers bought significantly more seafood overall—including options that were not sustainably harvested.

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Discovery of new superconducting materials using materials informatics

A NIMS-Ehime University joint research team succeeded in discovering new materials that exhibit superconductivity under high pressures using materials informatics (MI) approaches (data science-based material search techniques). This study experimentally demonstrated that MI enables efficient exploration of new superconducting materials. MI approaches may be applicable to the development of various

3h

Weight loss surgery for obese women prevents womb cancer

A study of women who had gastric sleeve or bypass surgery for obesity has found that precancerous tissue in their womb reverted to normal tissue when they lost weight.

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The incidence of gastrointestinal disease increases with heat and cold

In Spain, hospital admissions related to these infections increase by 21 percent at high temperatures and 7 percent at cold temperatures.

3h

Can we limit global warming to 1.5 °C?

Efforts to combat climate change tend to focus on supply-side changes, such as shifting to renewable or cleaner energy. In a Special Issue in the Energy Efficiency Journal that follows the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees C, researchers argue that demand-side approaches can play a crucial role given the aspirational target outlined in the Paris Agreement.

3h

Can tiny doses of magic mushrooms unlock creativity?

The use of minute doses of magic mushrooms and truffles containing psychedelic substances could induce a state of unconstrained thought that may produce more new, creative ideas. 'Microdosing' in this way may allow people to experience the creative benefits of psychedelic drugs without the risk of the so-called 'bad trips' that often come with high doses of such substances.

3h

Want to nudge others to install solar? Actions speak louder than words

Over the past several years, a Yale-led investigation has illustrated the key role of social networks—particularly of trusted community leaders—in promoting the adoption of solar technologies.

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Chemists disprove the universal nature of the mercury test

The mercury test of catalysts that has been used and considered universal for 100 years turns out to be ambiguous. This conclusion was reached by a group of scientists including a RUDN chemist. The group confirmed that the test required additional control experiments to verify its results. The study might lead to the reconsideration of the existing experimental data and improving catalysis mechani

3h

Why we need more than just data to create ethical driverless cars

What do we want driverless cars to do in unavoidable fatal crashes?

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NASA's InSight will study Mars while standing still

You don't need wheels to explore Mars.

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Geographers draw up an ice thickness map of Svalbard

Global sea levels are rising constantly. One factor contributing to this rise is the melting of the glaciers. Although the surface area of the glaciers has been well mapped, there is often no information regarding their thickness, making it impossible to calculate their volume. As a result, researchers cannot accurately calculate the effects on sea levels.

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Natural material discovered that exhibits in-plane hyperbolicity

An international team of researchers has discovered a natural material that exhibits in-plane hyperbolicity. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their work with molybdenum trioxide and what they found. Thomas Folland and Joshua Caldwell with Vanderbilt University offer a News and Views piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue.

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Enhanced oil recovery with nanoparticles

A mixture of nanoparticles and water can be used in the nano-water alternating gas approach (NWAG) to enhance oil recovery from an oil field. Now, the wettability of rock, relative permeability curves, and the interfacial tension has been analysed by a team from Oman with a view to improving the process.

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Wildebeests' super-efficient muscles allow them to walk for days without drinking

A team of researchers with the University of London, University College London and the University of Botswana has found that the wildebeest has extremely efficient muscles. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the researchers describe their study of the migrating animal and what they found.

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Emissions-free hydrogen production edges closer with new pilot site in Denmark

An EU initiative will facilitate the production, storage and supply of hydrogen for a wide range of end users. It will help integrate green power into the energy system in a flexible way.

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MixedEmotions: open-source toolbox for emotion analysis

A European team of researchers, including Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, has developed an open-source toolbox to assess emotions in texts, audios and videos.

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New giant protocluster of galaxies discovered at high redshift

An international team of astronomers reports the discovery of a new giant protocluster of galaxies. The newly found protocluster was identified at a redshift of 5.7, when the universe was about 1 billion years old. The finding is detailed in a paper published October 15 on the arXiv pre-print server.

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A new process for full utilization of softwood bark

In the Finnish mechanical and chemical forestry industry, three million tonnes of softwood bark are produced annually, presently mainly used for energy production. Using a method developed by VTT, a high yield of pure tannins can be extracted from the bark for use as a raw material for resins used in wood products. The residual fibre fraction can be used to produce sugar as a raw material for ferm

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Invention opens the door to safer and less expensive X-ray imaging

Medical imaging, such as X-ray or computerised tomography (CT), may soon be cheaper and safer, thanks to a recent discovery made by chemists from the National University of Singapore (NUS).

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How to Pick the Best Roku: A Buying Guide of All Rokus (2018)

There are 7 Rokus for sale, and the differences between them are confusing. We break down exactly which Roku is best for your TV.

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Pixar Cofounder Ed Catmull's Retirement Is an Opportunity, Not a Loss

The animation legend's departure from the studio opens the doors for new innovators.

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'Suspiria' Review: A Horror Gem—Just Don't Watch the Original First

It's blasphemous to say, but if you haven’t seen it, don't watch Dario Argento's original horror classic.

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Trump's Attacks on the Environment Are Mostly Failing

The administration's attempts to remove environmental regulations have made very little headway—though that may soon change.

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Asian catfish genome decoded

The striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus makes its home in the legendary Mekong River, the longest river in Southeast Asia and largest inland fishery in the world. Vietnam stands as the leading producer of the species, culturing an estimated 1.1 million tons of the fish in a single year. But unlike other commercial fish, such as the Atlantic cod or channel catfish, little genomic data exist

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Crises can lead to new opportunities

Crises can have a positive outcome for companies. When they see the challenges and changes in the environment as a new normal, they can use it as an opportunity to engage in more ambitious innovation efforts.

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Why DNA tests for Indigenous heritage mean different things in Australia and the US

Last week, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren released a video strongly suggesting two things: she is running for US president in 2020, and she has Native American ancestry.

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Gut bacteria influence movement in flies

Warm, protected, and full of nutrients—the tiny intestines of a fruit fly are a perfect habitat for some bacteria. These bacteria, in turn, help the fly break down and digest food, keeping the insect's metabolism running smoothly. Now, Caltech researchers have shown that gut bacteria's influence on their hosts is not confined to metabolism—they also influence the fly's locomotion and movement. Thi

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Astronomers find a universal correlation that could unify the study of star formation

Star formation is one of the most important research fields in astrophysics. This process, in which gravitational instabilities cause the collapse of gas to form more compact structures and finally stars, encompasses a broad range of physical scales. These include star-forming galaxies on the large scale, individual young stars with envelopes and circumstellar disks on the smaller scale, and inter

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U.S. Hunter Kills Goat in Scotland, and Gets Butted on Social Media

Larysa Switlyk’s Instagram image of the carcass with the words “fun hunt!!” drew wide condemnation, including from the mother of the Scottish tennis star Andy Murray.

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Invention by NUS chemists opens the door to safer and less expensive X-ray imaging

Professor Liu Xiaogang from the National University of Singapore led a team to develop novel lead halide perovskite nanocrystals that are highly sensitive to X-ray irradiation.

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The body's defence mechanisms: Teamwork is key for cancer-fighting proteins

A new study published in Nature Communications shows that a molecular symbiosis between BAP1 and ASXL2 proteins can suppress cancerous tumors.

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The world's largest campodeid dipluran named after the mythological giant Daidarabotchi

Two new to science dipluran species were discovered in touristic caves in the southern Japanese islands. Amongst them is the largest member of the campodeid family, aptly named after the giant Japanese yökai creature Daidarabotchi. They belong to a genus so far known exclusively from a few caves scattered across the easternmost continental parts of Asia. The species are described in the open-acces

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Machine learning identifies antibiotic resistance genes in tuberculosis-causing bacteria

Researchers have trained a machine learning algorithm to identify and predict which genes make infectious bacteria resistant to antibiotics. The approach was tested on strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) in humans. It identified 33 known and 24 new antibiotic resistance genes in these bacteria. The approach could be used to predict resistance in other

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Asian catfish genome decoded

For the first time, scientists decipher the entire genome of the striped catfish, paving the way for better breeding of the critical commercial species.

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Deaths due to tainted herbal medicine under-recorded

A University of Adelaide forensic pathologist is warning that potentially harmful substances found in herbal medicines may be playing a bigger role in deaths of 'health tourists' than previously thought.

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Mexico's 2017 Tehuantepec quake suggests a new worry

Last September's magnitude 8.2 Tehuantepec earthquake happened deep, rupturing both mantle and crust, on the landward side of major subduction zone in the Pacific Ocean off Mexico's far south coast. It's unanticipated location suggests a potential new threat for Central America's coastline.

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Visualizing Science: Illustration and Beyond

Where does the illustrator end, and the infographer begin? How does data visualization fit in? And what does science have to say about the design decisions we make? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Details of protein evolution investigated

Proteins govern the biology of the cell. Through random mutation the sequences of our proteins slowly change over time, usually without affecting function. But sometimes new functions will be invented in this process. Scientists at Uppsala University have studied such a case in molecular detas. The results show how several factors conspire to shape a plastic protein-protein interaction.

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Using DNA technology to track marine life

McGill University marine ecologist Jennifer Sunday is bringing cutting-edge DNA analysis to the formidable task of tracking ocean species along Canada's Pacific coast.

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Regeringen vil øge synlighed omkring tilkøb af vacciner

Regeringen har offentliggjort sit vaccine-udspil, der bl.a. indeholder tiltag som en ny influenzavaccine og mere information omkring mulighederne for at tilkøbe vacciner.

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A closer look at antibiotic resistant genes in the air

While the issue of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in water has long been studied, relatively little attention has been paid to airborne ARGs, despite its potential to pose a significant threat to public health. A team of researchers, including Jordan Peccia, the Thomas E. Golden, Jr. Professor of Chemical & Environmental Engineering, focused on the issue in a study published in Environmental S

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Clever crows: birds use tools in same way as great apes and humans – video

New Caledonian crows have been filmed extracting a piece of food from a puzzle box by piecing together two separate rods. The birds were able to display highly flexible abilities to solve a complex problem without prior training. Until now, the ability to assemble different components had only been seen in great apes and humans Continue reading…

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New study uncovers the interaction of calcium channels

Korean researchers have identified the interactions of the combinants among calcium channel proteins that exist in nerve and heart cells. The result opened a new path of developing treatments for high blood pressure and brain diseases.

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Antarctic Ocean carbon dioxide helped end the Ice Age

A team of scientists, led by the University of St Andrews, has shown that rapid CO2 release from the ocean around Antarctica helped end the last ice age.

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A team of scholars tested a new way of skin cancer early diagnostics

A team of scholars of Samara National Research University and Samara State Medical University as well as clinic specialists of Samara Regional Oncology Centre (SROC) tested a new way of skin cancer early diagnostics with the help of original complex of three devices.

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The Big Bang–an eyewitness account

Once upon a time, almost 14 billion years ago, a spectacular event took place.

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Not all gut bacteria bounce back after antibiotics

While almost all gut bacteria recover after exposure to antibiotics, six months afterward, the gut still lacks nine common beneficial bacterial species, according to new research. The use of antibiotics has long been linked to changes in the composition and function of a person’s gut microbiota, or “gut bacteria.” The trillions of bacteria in the human gut affect our health in multiple ways, incl

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Deadly Swine Disease Spreads Among Pigs in China

Tens of thousands of hogs are being slaughtered to stop its spread.

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The Coming Clashes Between Democrats and Republicans

Win or lose, the Democratic Party has crossed a threshold in the 2018 election, one that points it toward even more explosive conflict with a Republican Party that Donald Trump is recasting around white racial anxiety. For the first time, white men do not constitute a majority of Democratic candidates in races for the U.S. House, Senate, or state legislatures this year, according to new research

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TikTok Is Cringey and That's Fine

Over the past several months, TikTok videos have begun to go viral beyond the platform, racking up millions of views on Twitter and Instagram. They’re easy to identify once you’ve seen a couple : 15-to-60-second-long clips set to music; often featuring someone lip-synching, dancing, or doing a trick; with TikTok’s logo—the letter b , styled to look like a music note—overlaid on top. And the edits

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Traces of Earth's Oldest Animals Possibly Found

Preserved chemical evidence suggests that sponges were among Earth's earliest animals.

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The Earth Breathes in Incredibly Creepy Video from Canadian Forest

What could make the Earth seem to "breathe" as it does in this startling video from Quebec, Canada?

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People with Psoriasis More Likely to Develop Certain Gut Disorders

People with psoriasis may be at greater risk of developing certain gut disorders, a new study finds.

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Robbed of Nobel, Female Physicist Blazed Her Own Amazing Trail: Watch Her Speak Tonight

Jocelyn Bell Burnell, astrophysicist extraordinaire who helped discover radio pulsars while a graduate student, tells her story tonight. Watch it live on Live Science.

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Græs, muslinger, insekter og tang: Dyrenes proteiner skal ikke længere importeres

Importeret foderprotein skal erstattes af dansk græs og muslinger, hvis det står til miljø- og fødevareministeren, der har fremlagte en ny plan for netop det.

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Black widow spiders could teach nanomaterial experts a thing or two

Science Scientists are finally unspooling how spider silk works. Black widow silk fluid features nano-sized structures, researchers have found.

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Simple, effective Earth-system modeling

To assess long-range risks to food, water, energy and other critical natural resources, decision-makers often rely on Earth-system models capable of producing reliable projections of regional and global environmental changes spanning decades.

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I Bought Used Voting Machines on eBay for $100 Apiece. What I Found Was Alarming

Opinion: The fact that voter information is left on devices, unencrypted, that are then sold on the open market is malpractice.

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To Fix the Ills of Tourism, Think Like a Traffic Engineer

Exploding global tourism is becoming a mess, and the way to fix it involves thinking about people like cars.

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How to Make Your Commute as Cheap and Fast as Possible

There's more to it than just optimizing gas mileage. Our calculator will help you figure out the most cost-effective driving speed, personalized to your commute, wages, and fuel price.

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The Black Struggle for Technology Jobs

After Atlanta made the shortlist of cities vying for Amazon’s second global headquarters, HQ2, it submitted a multibillion-dollar investment to try to seal the deal. (Other cities’ proposals were even bigger.) At stake is nothing less than the city’s economic future: HQ2 promises more than 50,000 high-tech jobs with an average salary of more than $100,000. With the tech industry looking like the

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Image of the Day: Wildebeest Fitness Tracker

Data gathered from GPS-equipped collars show the animals walk long distances over days without stopping for a drink.

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FDA Approves a Fast-Acting Flu Drug That Is Taken in a Single Dose

Xofluza is the first drug with a new mechanism of action to be approved in nearly 20 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image: Cheops in the Maxwell chamber

ESA's exoplanet-characterising Cheops satellite being prepared for electromagnetic compatibility testing inside the Maxwell chamber at ESTEC, the Agency's technical heart in Noordwijk, the Netherlands.

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NATO’s huge military exercise will test robots and autonomous vehicles

In NATO's biggest military exercise since the Cold War it will use self-driving vehicles, robots that fetch gear, and a 3D printer for printing spare parts

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Diabetesforeningen: Danskere med type 2-diabetes ved for lidt om hjerterisiko

Kun en ud tre med type 2-diabetes har talt med læge om risikofaktorer for hjerte-kar-sygdomme, viser undersøgelse.

4h

Ny direktør for psykiatri- og socialområdet i Region Midtjylland

Tina Ebler bliver ny direktør for psykiatri og socialområdet i Region Midtjylland.

4h

Research reveals secret shared by comets and sand crabs

Researchers at Nagoya University report a mechanical connection between sand crab burrow widths and widths of cometary pits using a simple granular experiment.

4h

4h

'Liquid gold': students make world's first brick out of human urine

The bio-brick created by students in Cape Town mixes urine with sand and bacteria, which they say is a world first Students in South Africa have created the world’s first brick made from human urine. The bio-brick was produced by students from Cape Town, who collected urine from specially designed male urinals at the university’s engineering building and mixed it with sand and bacteria. Continue

4h

Q&A: Finding Earth-like exoplanets requires new space telescopes

A new type of space telescope could help find life on other planets or discover other solar systems like ours, according to a report recently carried out by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering & Medicine.

4h

A novel approach to recycling construction waste

The construction industry is one of the most resource-intensive sectors of the German economy. The nation's buildings constitute a vast store of raw materials, harboring some 100 billion metric tons of materials that could be recovered and returned to the material cycle at the end of their service life. Four Fraunhofer Institutes have joined forces in the BauCycle project to kick-start recycling o

4h

East Island, Remote Hawaiian Sliver of Sand, Is Largely Wiped Out by a Hurricane

After Hurricane Walaka swept through the central Pacific this month, a sandy 11-acre island mostly disappeared into ocean water.

4h

Researchers develop small device that bends light to generate new radiation

University of Michigan physicists have led the development of a device the size of a match head that can bend light inside a crystal to generate synchrotron radiation in a lab.

4h

A different take on the causes of inequality

Before the Women's Marches and the #MeToo and Time's Up movements made headlines and brought issues of women's rights back to the forefront, Rutgers scholars had been working for decades as ardent advocates through their research, teaching and outreach. Over the next several weeks, Rutgers Today will be highlighting many of the women whose work is making a noticeable impact.

4h

New online tool shows climate change in your backyard

Climate change hits home. It's where you live. A warming world affects the Northeast region, and to demonstrate, the Cornell Institute for Climate Smart Solutions (CICSS) has developed a new online tool: Climate Change in Your County.

4h

New species of 'missing link' between dinosaurs and birds identified

Known as the 'Icon of Evolution' and 'the missing link' between dinosaurs and birds, Archaeopteryx has become one of the most famous fossil discoveries in Palaeontology.

4h

Checkmate: How plant protein Feronia protects against bacterial attackers

Plant scientists at Iowa State University have shed new light on a genetic pathway that influences both plant growth and disease resistance, making it a promising target for breeding new crop varieties that can fight pathogens without sacrificing performance.

4h

Sampling guts of live moose to understand how they break down biomass

Microbes in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants such as moose help break down recalcitrant plant biomass into carbon nutrients, but how do they do this over the course of seasons when the moose diet changes, and what microbes are involved? Now, an international research team has studied microbial communities in the rumen of live moose and gained a more holistic view of a complex microbial food

4h

New chip measures multiple cellular responses to speed drug discovery

Finding ways to improve the drug development process – which is currently costly, time-consuming and has an astronomically high failure rate – could have far-reaching benefits for health care and the economy. Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have designed a cellular interfacing array using low-cost electronics that measures multiple cellular properties and responses in real tim

5h

Artifacts exposed by Hurricane Maria lead to archeological discovery

Beach erosion from Hurricane Maria last year has led to an archeological discovery in the Caribbean island nation of Dominica.

5h

Greater diversity enhances public interest in marine habitats

Greater animal biodiversity can lead to heightened human interest in marine habitats, according to research published in Scientific Reports.

5h

Gratis online-kort bygger på frie grunddata

Geodatavirksomheden Septima har frigivet en gratis tjeneste til indlejring af adresser på et kort bygget af frie grunddata.

5h

Filmpremiere: Den første ingeniør på Månen

Ingeniøren har set filmen om Neil Armstrong sammen med NBI-fysiker Kjartan Kinch – som godt kunne ønske sig lidt mere jubel på lærredet.

5h

Memory special: Can you supercharge your memory?

Want to remember whatever you like with no effort? Superhuman enhancements in the form of memory prostheses and implants are just around the corner

5h

I Respected Scott Walker. Then I Worked for Him.

The last straw, for both of us, came in February of 2015. Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker had called me into his office ahead of my reconfirmation vote as secretary of the Department of Financial Institutions. He told me he was going to propose merging four of Wisconsin’s state agencies, including mine, into two. This was part of a long-term plan to “shrink government” in Wisconsin, Walker said,

5h

Trump’s Plea for Unity Didn’t Last Long

The political calculus of holding a Trump campaign rally in Wisconsin was never that clear to begin with. The president won the state by less than a point in 2016. Would a visit 13 days before the midterms enrage and motivate Democrats more than it energized his base? Who really knew for sure. Governor Scott Walker, down by 10 points in one recent poll and up by one in another, had a lot riding o

5h

An Ebola Outbreak in a War Zone Is About as Bad as It Gets

No amount of speedy Ebola testing and treatment can match the marauding militias currently tearing up the Democratic Republic of Congo.

5h

My Father Says He’s a ‘Targeted Individual.’ Maybe We All Are

My dad is one of thousands who believe the government is subjecting them to mind control. As a daughter and a journalist, I felt a duty to investigate his claims. Have these individuals been America’s prophets all along?

5h

11 Halloween Picks to Make Trick-or-Treating Fun for Parents

Your kids can’t go on their yearly pilgrimage to the shrine of Hershey alone. We can help.

5h

Quantum Computing Must Be a National Security Priority

Falling behind our adversaries would put U.S. and allied intelligence services at a critical disadvantage in their efforts to protect encrypted secrets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

"Stress Hormone" Cortisol Linked to Early Toll on Thinking Ability

Brain changes, visible on scans, are also associated with Alzheimer’s precursors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Saturn's moon Dione covered by mysterious stripes

Mysterious straight bright stripes have been discovered on Saturn's moon Dione, says research by Planetary Science Institute Associate Research Scientist Alex Patthoff.

5h

Researchers discover directional and long-lived nanolight in a 2-D material

An international research team reports that light confined in the nanoscale propagates only in specific directions along thin slabs of molybdenum trioxide, a natural anisotropic 2-D material. Besides its unique directional character, this nanolight propagates for an exceptionally long time, and thus has possible applications in signal processing, sensing and heat management at the nanoscale.

5h

Apple-CEO: Indfør GDPR i hele verden

Tim Cook mener, at personlige data indsamles og anvendes alt for lempeligt, og at hele verden burde implementere GDPR.

5h

How a snake named Hannibal led to a discovery about cobra cannibalism

Scientists discovered that cobras in southern Africa eat each other more often than thought. And that may be true for cobras in other places as well.

5h

U.S. desert areas to become even more arid

Geologists from the University of Innsbruck study rainfall patterns in the distant past to better understand how deserts in the southwest United States will be impacted by future climate change.

5h

Vilde, øde fuglereder flyder med plastikaffald

Plasten er især en trussel for fuglenes unger, som kan blive filtret ind i affaldet og dø.

5h

Elektrisk 'hjernehat' skal hjælpe e-sporthold til verdensmesterskab

Dansk iværksættervirksomhed har udviklet en 'hjernehat', som skal skærpe koncentrationen for et dansk hold, så de kører hurtigere under et 24 timers simuleret racerløb.

6h

Facebook fined £500,000 for Cambridge Analytica leak by data watchdog

The UK Information Commissioner's Office has fined Facebook £500,000 for the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, the maximum possible under the rules at the time

6h

Why whistleblowing is the loneliest and most courageous act in the world

Living with integrity means being able to fall asleep at night having asked and answered these questions: Did I treat other people well today? Did I uphold the principles that I really care about? Did I take care of injustice? If you feel you need to call out bad behavior or blow the whistle on injustice, Alice Dreger offers this advice: "Can you get other people to do it with you? That will ofte

6h

Initial conversations go better than people think

A new study finds that people consistently underestimate how much a new conversation partner liked them. The likability gap exists for almost everybody, but is more pronounced for the shy. It can also last for months despite regular meetings with the same person. The findings suggest we all try to play it safe with our appraisals of how much we're liked, and point the way to better conversational

6h

Three Campaign Ads That Are Putting Climate Change on the Agenda

Across the country, there’s been a small explosion of campaign ads about global warming.

6h

Bruno Latour, the Post-Truth Philosopher, Mounts a Defense of Science

He spent decades deconstructing the ways that scientists claim their authority. Can his ideas help them regain that authority today?

6h

How Russian Trolls Imitate American Political Dysfunction

Suppose you were a vast global conspiracy plotting to foster discord among Americans. How would you approach your task? You might try to spread some salacious but dubious accusations—say, that a politician is a “devotee of Bigfoot erotica.” But that particular charge would feel kind of stale, since a Democratic congressional candidate already lobbed it at her rival this summer. Maybe you could th

6h

Trump’s ‘Big Dent’ in the Opioid Crisis

Amid the Russia probe and the campaign rallies and the high-profile trade wars, the business of government grinds on. President Trump made that clear at the White House on Wednesday after condemning the person who had mailed explosives to his Democratic opponents, and then heading out to the latest Make America Great Again moment in Wisconsin. The occasion at hand: Trump signed what he called “la

6h

Jon Tester Bets the Farm

S enator Jon Tester and I are in the cab of his Case IH combine, rolling through a field on his 1,800-acre farm outside Big Sandy, Montana. I’m trying to get him to talk about identity politics and the future of the Democratic Party. He’s trying to harvest wheat. It’s a Tuesday morning in August. This year’s harvest happens to coincide with the closing weeks of one of the most closely watched Sen

6h

UK watchdog fines Facebook over users' data breachFacebook Cambridge

British regulators on Thursday slapped Facebook with a fine of 500,000 pounds ($644,000)—the maximum possible—for failing to protect the privacy of its users in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

6h

Nokia to cut costs as it waits for 5G network demand to grow

Telecom networks provider Nokia reported Thursday lower third-quarter earnings and said it would start a new cost-cutting scheme as it waits for demand for the new 5G systems to pick up.

6h

Research reveals secret shared by comets and sand crabs

Researchers at Nagoya University find a mechanical connection between sand crab burrow widths and widths of cometary pits using a simple granular experiment.

7h

Could thyroid screening make your baby smarter?

Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development, but many pregnant women do not produce enough. Thyroid testing and replacement therapy are simple and widely available — so why do countries like the UK and USA not offer screening to all newly pregnant women?

7h

Fire togproducenter i spil til at levere Danmarks nye eltog

Efter grønt lys fra Folketinget til at bruge 11 milliarder kroner på 100 nye elektriske togsæt har DSB nu prækvalificeret fire leverandører. DSB håber på at sætte de første nye togsæt i passagerdrift i 2024.

7h

Microsoft quarterly profit soars on cloud services

Microsoft on Wednesday said its profit in the recently ended quarter soared on the back of revenue from services hosted in the internet cloud and its career-focused social network LinkedIn.

8h

SK Hynix posts record profits on rising demand

South Korea's SK Hynix, the world's second-largest memory chipmaker, posted record profits in the third quarter, the company said Thursday, citing resilient global demand.

8h

Questions mount over delay after Cathay Pacific admits huge data leak

Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific came under pressure Thursday to explain why it had taken five months to admit it had been hacked and compromised the data of 9.4 million customers, including passport numbers and credit card details.

8h

Daimler profits hit by diesel scandal

German car giant Daimler reported Thursday a slump in third-quarter profits, confirming a weaker 2018 outlook as it suffered lower sales and shouldered costs for refits to polluting diesel cars.

8h

After 'historic' quarter, Tesla looks to Europe, China

Electric car maker Tesla on Wednesday reported an "historic" quarterly profit driven by demand for its mass market Model 3, as the company looks beyond its US home base to Europe and China.

8h

Hyundai Q3 profit plummets on slowing sales, currency swings

Hyundai Motor reported a 67 percent plunge in third-quarter net profit from the previous year after overseas sales slowed and currency swings hurt its bottom line in emerging markets.

8h

Ford earnings drop on weak China sales

Ford reported a drop in third-quarter profits Wednesday as weak sales in China and higher commodity costs countered the benefit of strong truck sales in North America.

8h

Aequatus—a free, open-source visualization tool enabling in-depth comparison of homologous genes

Aequatus—a new bioinformatics tool developed at Earlham Institute (EI) – is helping to give an in-depth view of syntenic information between different species, providing a system to better identify important, positively-selected, and evolutionarily-conserved regions of DNA.

8h

China building boom uncovers buried dinosaurs, makes a star

At the end of a street of newly built high-rises in the northern Chinese city of Yanji stands an exposed cliff face, where paleontologists scrape away 100 million-year-old rock in search of prehistoric bones.

8h

Study identifies factors that predict opposition to the Black Lives Matter Movement

Fatal police shootings of blacks receive considerable media attention, along with debate about the merits of the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement. Media coverage can be divisive, reflecting views held by the American public. Yet few studies have examined why some groups of people oppose BLM. A new study looked at a nationally representative sample of Americans to identify factors related to indiv

8h

Aequatus — a free, open-source visualization tool enabling in-depth comparison of homologous genes

Aequatus — a new bioinformatics tool developed at Earlham Institute — is helping to give an in-depth view of syntenic information between different species, providing a system to better identify important, positively selected, and evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA.

8h

Ingeniørens rejse fra 70'ernes skurk til dagens helt

ANALYSE: Næsten dobbelt så mange unge som for syv år siden gennemfører en lang eller mellemlange tekniske uddannelser. Tag med på ingeniørens rejse fra nørd til helt.

8h

Plump songbirds more likely to survive migration over Gulf of Mexico

A kilometer above Fort Morgan, Alabama, small migratory birds face a critical decision. Ahead lies a thousand kilometers of open water, the Gulf of Mexico, and a 22- to 24-hour flight without rest or food. On the other side, if they make it, they'll continue the journey to their South American winter habitat. For some, the journey will end in the waters of the Gulf.

8h

Good news for immersive journalism: Look at your audience

Immersive journalism uses virtual reality (VR) to put the viewer directly into a news event. But how can you help someone to personally engage and interact with a story, when they cannot alter the narrative?

8h

Quantum network to test unhackable communications

As the number of hacks and security breaches rapidly climbs, scientists say there may be a way to make a truly unhackable network by using the laws of quantum physics.

8h

Facial exercise speeds Botox's wrinkle-reducing effects

For people who can't wait the three or four days for the wrinkle smoothing effects of botulinum toxin (Botox) injections to kick in, a new study shows facial exercise after the injections speeds the change in appearance by one day. This is the first time facial exercise has been rigorously tested in Botox. Faster time is important to patients who leave Botox for last minute before social event.

9h

Study of 500,000 people clarifies the risks of obesity

Elevated body mass index (BMI) — a measure of weight accounting for a person's height — has been shown to be a likely causal contributor to population patterns in mortality, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol using measurements and mortality data from 500,000 people.

9h

Reality Check

Caroline Lucas MP says that onshore wind energy is the cheapest. What are the figures behind her claim?

9h

Terrific Active Safety Tech Can Lead to Terrible Car Repair Bills

A new AAA report finds that when cars with active safety features like automatic emergency braking do crash, they can cost thousands of dollars to fix.

10h

Server-flytning tvang en af Danmarks mest læste nyhedssider i knæ

En flytning fra et fysisk server-setup i Tyskland til en cloud-løsning hos Amazon gav sved på panden hos udviklerne på Danmarks største fodboldsite, bold.dk. Det tog 12 dage at få sitet tilbage på ret kurs.

10h

A ‘People’s Pig’ in China Could Be Headed to Upstate New York

Their farm threatened by a modernization drive, four specimens of a rare breed of swine need a new home. A Rockefeller scion may save them.

10h

Candidates with STEM Backgrounds Running in the Midterm Elections

We've compiled a list of political hopefuls on the ballots in state and federal races in November.

10h

Energiforlig blokerer for at udnytte overskudsvarme fra datacentre

Udfasning af tilslutningspligt skaber usikkerhed om kundeunderlaget, og man vil ikke kunne få nogen til at investere i de nødvendige rør og varmepumper.

11h

FTC settles deceptive advertising claims against amniotic stem cell clinics

An FTC settlement may kill "amniotic stem cell" treatments, but a plethora of other stem cell clinics flourish without regulatory oversight.

11h

Norsk virksomhed udvikler hundedyr teknologi til genkendelse af lakse-ansigter

Nordmænd træner kunstig intelligens til at kende forskel på 200.000 laks, så de opdrættede fisk kan scannes for sygdom og lus.

11h

Recording of mother's voice more effective than smoke alarm, study finds

Sleeping children three times more likely to wake to voice recording than to loud beeping, research finds It’s every parent’s worst nightmare: there’s a fire in the house, the alarms are beeping, but the children are sleeping on oblivious. Now scientists say they have found a better way to rouse slumbering youngsters. Researchers in the US have discovered that playing a child a recording of their

11h

Mum's voice makes better smoke alarm for children

Many more children woke up to a voice-based alarm than a traditional one, a study found.

12h

Binary bias distorts how we integrate information

When we evaluate and compare a range of data points — whether that data is related to health outcomes, head counts, or menu prices — we tend to neglect the relative strength of the evidence and treat it as simply binary, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

12h

Tetris: It could be the salve for a worried mind

The venerable video game Tetris was used in a recent experiment to create a state of 'flow' — the term psychologists use to describe a state of mind so engaged it makes the rest of the world fall away, and time pass more quickly. UCR researcher Kate Sweeny and her team have found that state of perfect disengagement may improve the otherwise-emotionally unpleasant experience of awaiting uncertain

12h

Good news for immersive journalism: Look at your audience

A joint study by the BBC, UCL and the University of Barcelona shows that in virtual reality news experiences, basic interactivity can increase buy-in without compromising faithful reporting.

12h

Ecolabelling no help in sustainable seafood sales

When researchers tested how ecolabels for sustainably harvested seafood would affect shopping choices in Germany and Norway, they found that customers bought significantly more seafood overall — including options that were not sustainably harvested.

12h

Survey: Few women told by doctor that breastfeeding can reduce cancer risk

With many infant formulas on the market promising the same benefits as breast milk, more women may forgo breastfeeding. However, when making that decision, women may not be considering the benefits breastfeeding has on their own health. Research has shown that women who breastfeed greatly lower their risk of developing breast cancer, but a new study by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cance

12h

Smoke alarms using mother's voice wake children better than high-pitch tone alarms

In a study published online today in the Journal of Pediatrics, researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Sleep Disorders Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital examined characteristics of four different smoke alarms to determine which ones worked best to wake children. The researchers found that a sleeping child was about three times more likely to be awakened by one of t

12h

Study identifies factors that predict opposition to the Black Lives Matter Movement

A new study looked at a nationally representative sample of Americans to identify factors related to individuals (e.g., political affiliation, gender) and states (e.g., voting patterns) that predict opposition to Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement.

12h

Flu virus could evolve resistance to pandemic drug

The influenza virus can evolve resistance to an anti-flu drug currently in development for use in pandemics but only if there are multiple genetic mutations, a study has found.

12h

Denmark Plans a Fence to Stop a Pig Disease. Will It Work?

The problem, African swine fever, is serious, but critics say Denmark’s answer is not, and infected wild boar will find their way in from Germany.

12h

Why Netflix Features Black Actors in Promos to Black Users

Netflix says it does not track users' race or ethnicity. But in customizing promotions based on users' past viewing history, it can achieve a similar effect.

16h

Climate change: Five cheap ways to remove CO2 from the atmosphere

A new US study says that several low-cost technologies can be deployed right now to limit global warming.

16h

Dinosaur fossil may be a whole new species of the first birds

A fossil of the dinosaur Archaeopteryx is so unlike any other specimens that it belongs to a new species – and could confirm that the animals were early birds

16h

The Atlantic Daily: Sowing Fear Far Beyond Immediate Targets

What We’re Following Midterms Check-In: These Democrats running in California are counting on their districts’ changing demographics and the overall strong opposition to President Trump across the nation’s most populous state to unseat Republican Representatives. And a gubernatorial race in Georgia is bringing to the fore systemic issues around voter suppression, in its many forms. The Opioid Cri

16h

Kurtis Baute: Scientist leaves airtight dome after 15 hours

Kurtis Baute spent 15 hours in an airtight dome to raise awareness about climate change.

17h

New study shows advertizing for alcohol is prevalent in UK television

A new study in the Journal of Public Health indicates that advertising for alcohol is common in British television, and may be a potential driver of alcohol use in young people.

17h

Experts call for health system change to tackle the challenge of multimorbidity in the NHS

The number of people with multiple long-term conditions, known as multimorbidity, is rising internationally, putting increased pressure on health care systems, including the NHS. Researchers from the 3D Study — the largest ever trial of a person-centered approach to caring for patients with multimorbidity in primary care — are hosting a conference today to discuss the challenges facing general p

17h

Plump songbirds more likely to survive migration over Gulf of Mexico

A kilometer above Fort Morgan, Alabama, small migratory birds face a critical decision. Ahead lies a thousand kilometers of open water, the Gulf of Mexico, and a 22- to 24-hour flight without rest or food. On the other side, if they make it, they'll continue the journey to their South American winter habitat. For some, the journey will end in the waters of the Gulf.

17h

17h

The Lancet: Rates of premature mortality are two times higher in the most deprived areas of England, compared to most affluent

Half of all premature deaths in the UK are linked to risk factors including tobacco, diet, alcohol and drug use, obesity and high blood pressure. Study reveals huge burden of disability from low back and neck pain, anxiety and depression.Areas of London and Birmingham performed better on health indicators compared to areas with similar levels of deprivation in Manchester and Liverpool.

17h

New guidance recommends minimal oxygen use for most people in hospital

Routine oxygen therapy is not recommended for hospital patients because the benefit is uncertain and there are clear harms, say a panel of international experts in The BMJ today.

17h

A healthy lifestyle cuts stroke risk, irrespective of genetic profile

People at high genetic risk of stroke can still reduce their chance of having a stroke by sticking to a healthy lifestyle, in particular stopping smoking and not being overweight, finds a study in The BMJ today.

17h

Certain blood pressure drugs linked to increased risk of lung cancer

Use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor drugs (ACEIs) to lower blood pressure is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer compared with use of another group of blood pressure drugs called angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), finds a study in The BMJ today.

17h

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