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Nyheder2018oktober26

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Mail Bomb Suspect Cesar Sayoc Used Twitter to Threaten Targets

Cesar Sayoc allegedly was active on Twitter under the name "Cesar Altieri," where he posted menacing tweets about Maxine Waters, Joe Biden, and others.

6h

New driverless car technology could make traffic lights and speeding tickets obsolete

New driverless car technologies could lead to a world without traffic lights and speeding tickets. Researchers also hope the innovations will bring about the development of driverless cars that use 19 to 22 percent less fuel.

5h

Nephrologists may need more training in women's health issues

Nephrologists often lack confidence in managing women's health issues that may be related to kidney disease.Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

6h

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Stil uret tilbage: Er du faldet for myterne om de kolde og mørke måneder?

Her er tre myter – og gode råd – der skal forberede dig og din krop på at komme igennem den mørke vinter.

1h

What is Titanic II, and will it set sail?

Titanic II has reportedly resumed construction. The project has been resurrected after its failed attempt to begin construction in 2012. If the project leaves the conceptual phase, the new ship is set to follow the same route as the original Titanic as one leg of its voyage. Construction of Titanic II is reportedly resuming following a years-long financial dispute. The Australian-based company be

1h

Leonardo da Vinci could visually flip between dimensions, neuroscientist claims

A neuroscientist at the City University of London proposes that Leonardo da Vinci may have had exotropia, allowing him to see the world with impaired depth perception. If true, it means that Da Vinci would have been able to see the images he wanted to paint as they would have appeared on a flat surface. The finding reminds us that sometimes looking at the world in a different way can have fantast

1h

Whales are perpetually stressed. Here's how 9/11 showed us this.

September 11th, 2001, offered researchers a unique opportunity to study whales' behavior in the absence of commercial shipping. Their findings contribute to a growing understanding of how hostile an ocean filled with ships can be for whales. As humanity continues to expand in the ocean, it seems unlikely that conditions will ever improve for whales. None On September 11th, 2001, two planes struck

1h

Financial education key to reducing student loan stress

It is estimated that a quarter of American adults currently have student loans to pay off, and most do not have the financial literacy to manage debt successfully. The average student in the Class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt.

4h

Cappuccino made with jackfruit seed flour has chocolate aroma

A study conducted in Brazil shows that flour made from roasted jackfruit seeds can replace cocoa powder in a mixture of milk and coffee used to make cappuccino.

4h

Testing cells for cancer drug resistance

Biophysicists have demonstrated that Raman microscopy can be used to detect the resistance of tumor cells to cancer drugs. Unlike conventional approaches, this method does not require any antibodies or markers. It detects the response of cells to administered drugs and therefore could determine the effect of drugs in preclinical studies.

4h

Link between what we see and how we remember 'breaks' as we get older

Forgetfulness and age-related memory lapses are a common complaint among older adults, but what is still not understood is what causes these changes. Recent research brings us a step closer to uncovering the answer, which could help with distinguishing signs of dementia earlier.

5h

Study explains why tall individuals are more prone to cancer

For most cancers, risk increases dramatically with age. But what about the effect of having more cells in the body? Might taller people be more prone to cancer because they have more cells? Yes, according to an evolutionary biologist who examined data from four large-scale surveillance projects on 23 cancer categories.

5h

Fruit fly study challenges theories on evolution and high-carb diets

Fruit fly research challenges neutral theory of molecular evolution and suggests one day we may be prescribed diets according to our genes.

5h

Humans help robots learn tasks

With a smartphone and a browser, people worldwide will be able to interact with a robot to speed the process of teaching robots how to do basic tasks.

5h

Tampering with cellular fats holds great promise

Researchers have found a way to engineer the lipid composition of cell membranes. The method makes it easier to investigate how cells are regulated by their membrane composition. This could lead to optimized cell factories and better understanding of the role of lipids in metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes.

5h

Brainwave activity reveals potential biomarker for autism in children

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects children's social and intellectual development. Conventional diagnostic methods for ASD rely on behavioral observation. Researchers have now identified a potential quantifiable biomarker for diagnosing ASD. Using magnetic brainwave imaging, they correlated altered gamma oscillation with the motor response of children with ASD, which is consistent with previou

5h

How Canadian and Californian rainbow trout respond to higher temps

Natural variation may help decide which rainbow trout strains are likely to survive worldwide global warming, according to a new study.

5h

Mutations in yeast and alcohol

Alcohol has been celebrated for all of history. The Ancient Greeks worshipped Dionysus for their spirits, while the Chinese recognized Yidi as the creator of libertine drink. Of course, unknowingly, both were actually servants of the true alcohol master, yeast. In Japan, some of the best sake are the result of a single mutation in yeast.

5h

Oxford-Cambridge Arc: Row over central England mega-plan

The transport secretary says the government will back major development on the Oxford-Cambridge arc.

6h

The Atlantic Daily: When Careful Plans Meet With the Messiness of Life

What We’re Following What Do You Call It: “Political violence,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said of a series of attempted bomb attacks sent through the U.S. mail this week to prominent liberal figures. Why wasn’t the now-apprehended Florida man charged with sending these mailings, charged with terrorism? Meanwhile, President Donald Trump flirted with the fringe conspiracy that these attempted

6h

Proinflammatory diet linked to higher risk of kidney disease progression

Among patients with chronic kidney disease, individuals with pro-inflammatory diets had a higher risk of developing kidney failure. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

6h

Researchers examine prescription opioid use in patients with chronic kidney disease

Individuals with kidney disease have a higher likelihood of using prescription opioids, and the prevalence of prescription opioid use in the chronic kidney disease population has increased in recent years. Certain factors are associated with opioid drug use in patients with chronic kidney disease. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Conventi

6h

Frequent home hemodialysis linked to lower mortality risk vs. traditional hemodialysis

Within one year after initiating dialysis, patients on more frequent home hemodialysis were 23 percent less likely to die compared with patients receiving traditional in-center hemodialysis. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

6h

Estrogens in cows' milk are unlikely to pose a threat to adult health

Estrogens found naturally in cows' milk are likely to be safe for consumption in adults, according to a new review published in the European Journal of Endocrinology. The review brings together scientific evidence in rodent and human studies that examined the effects of ingesting estrogen-containing cows' milk on fertility and the risk of cancer development. The findings suggest that the levels of

7h

'Red Dead Redemption 2' Early Impressions: A Game Too Big for Just One Review

While we continue to lose ourselves in Rockstar Games' open-world behemoth, we've got some thoughts.

8h

We can save coral reefs by putting them on ice

Environment Without even giving them freezer burn. The new research suggests we could preserve diverse coral larvae for decades.

8h

What the approval of the new flu drug Xofluza means for you

Xofluza, the first flu antiviral to be approved in 20 years, works differently from other flu drugs.

8h

Grim’s Haunted Carnival: Awards

All good things must come to an end; Grim’s Haunted Carnival has to pack up and move on to its next mysterious locale. But the spirit of Grim’s most important holiday stays with us here at Eyewire, and we are most proud of everyone’s achievements over the last week! Here is the summary of competition awards, but you can also view the full results (including @susi swag details) here . Until next H

8h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: One Rally After Another

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Authorities arrested Cesar Sayoc of Florida in connection with several explosive devices mailed this week to high-profile critics of President Donald Trump. Officials discovered three more bombs, intended for Senator Cory Booker, Senator Kamala Harris, and former Director of National Intelli

9h

Researchers observe how Canadian and Californian rainbow trout respond to higher temps

Natural variation may help decide which rainbow trout strains are likely to survive worldwide global warming, according to a new study. The findings will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integration conference in New Orleans.

9h

Military Mystery Solved: Two Guys Out-Googled Google for an Image of Secretive US Base

An engineer and writer noticed a secretive military base in Nevada hadn't been updated on Google Maps for 8 years. They took care of that without any Google help.

9h

The best new cameras and photography gear from Photo Plus 2018

Gadgets The biggest camera show in the U.S. has some impressive new models. All the best new gear that we saw during the New York City show.

9h

Sex, drugs and estradiol: Why cannabis affects women differently

Sex differences in cannabis use are beginning to be explained with the aid of brain studies in animals and humans.

9h

Climate change impact in Mediterranean region

As the Mediterranean Basin is experiencing the impact of climate change more than ever, an international network of scientists has worked together to synthesize the effects of climate change and environmental problems, as well as the incurred risks, in the region, to facilitate decision-making in addressing the issues.

9h

Five out of five? Study reveals psychological influences in online reviews

A new study reveals how psychological factors affect the ratings people provide and how they describe their experiences when posting online reviews. Researchers found the length of time between product or service consumption and posting affects the review given.

9h

Saudi Arabia’s Shifting Narrative on Jamal Khashoggi’s Killing

First they said he left unharmed. Then that he had disappeared. Then that he died accidentally in a fistfight. Now, Saudi authorities say that Jamal Khashoggi was killed—and that his death was premeditated. The changing narratives, complemented by the steady drip of leaks about the killing from Turkish officials, have succeeded in keeping the Khashoggi story in the news weeks after the journalist

9h

The Pet Cemetery

Filmmaker Sam Green was just about to fly out of Columbus, Ohio when his friend offered to make a quick detour. “She asked if I wanted to see a little pet cemetery that's across the street from the airport,” Green told The Atlantic . Armed with his camera, Green captured the tombstones of a menagerie of dearly departed animals, some dating back to the early twentieth century. His short film, Juli

9h

Trilobites: A Volcanic Eruption on Mars? Nope.

It’s just a cloud. A very long cloud.

9h

Ecologists ask: Should we be more transparent with data?

Researchers highlight the importance of adapting to, providing, and using data sets that are open to and usable by the public and investigators in ecology and other field research.

9h

Highly efficient wet-processed solar cells with molecules in the same orientation

Researchers document a new method for controlling the orientation of conducting molecules in organic solar cells that results in the enhanced light adsorption and performance of the cells.

9h

Bioactive novel compounds from endangered tropical plant species

Biologists have isolated 17 secondary metabolites, including three novel compounds from the valuable endangered tropical plant species Alangium longiflorum. A newly isolated compound, 8-hydroxytubulosine, showed growth inhibitory effects at submicromolar levels against several human tumor cell lines except for drug transporter-overexpressing cells. Compound 1 caused accumulation of sub-G1 cells wi

9h

Sales staff recommend more round-shaped products for obese customers

Findings from a new study suggest that sales employees are more likely to recommend round products for customers that are overweight or obese, but there is no evidence that these customers prefer round products.

9h

Turning cells against pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is infamously resistant to treatment options because the tumor is often surrounded by cells which are "tricked" into protecting it. Now, researchers have identified the special signals that encourage some of these cells to either help the cancer, or–ideally–hinder it.

9h

Location of large mystery source of banned ozone depleting substance uncovered

Researchers from the University of Bristol have found significant ongoing emissions of a potent ozone-depleting substance from eastern China.

9h

Shielded quantum bits

A theoretical concept to realize quantum information processing has been developed by a team of physicists.

9h

Large cells for tiny leaves

Scientists identify protein that controls leaf growth and shape.

9h

California Will Pause Net Neutrality Law for Federal SuitCalifornia FCC Net

The delay could stretch into years, while a lawsuit challenging the FCC's order repealing net neutrality rules is resolved.

9h

A Landmark Study On BPA Leaves Scientists at Odds

Conceived as a way to resolve differences between government regulators and academics over the chemical’s effects, the CLARITY-BPA collaboration instead highlights divisions.

9h

Why the Mail Bomber Wasn’t Charged With Terrorism

Donald Trump condemned a spate of attempted mail bombings this week as “terrorizing acts.” And his Justice Department today charged a suspect with five federal crimes, including interstate transportation of an explosive and threats against former presidents. Announcing the charges against Cesar Sayoc of Florida, Attorney General Jeff Sessions characterized the mailings, which were directed at pro

9h

Trump's Condemnations of Violence Aren’t Convincing His Supporters

Since the beginning of his presidential campaign, Donald Trump has weaponized his insincerity and the bad faith of his supporters in order to deny his own accountability for the things he does and believes. If critics took at face value Trump’s praise for mass deportations or internment camps , they were guilty of taking Trump too literally. If Trump praised violence against the media, or called

9h

How Feds Tracked Down Mail Bomb Suspect Cesar Sayoc

At a press conference Friday, officials detailed how they identified and found Cesar Sayoc, who has been arrested in connection with a series of mail bombs targeting prominent liberals and CNN.

9h

NASA's IMERG reveals Hurricane Willa's rainfall

NASA uses satellite data to calculate the amount of rainfall generated from tropical cyclones, and used that capability for the Eastern Pacific Ocean's Hurricane Willa.

9h

Neuromonster Coloring Contest Gallery

The Neural Reef by Oreliel Congratulations to The Neural Reef for winning the Halloween Neuromonster Coloring Contest ! This coloring by Anna-Marie features the Axonal Angler. 1st place : Neural Reef by Oreliel 2nd place : Onhyro’s Axonal Angler 3rd place : SpookyGrowly’s Glia Monster We also have a few honorable mentions. Neuromonster Republic : Atani Won for most creative coloring and best non-

9h

There Are 18 Volcanoes That Pose a 'Very High Threat' to American Life

These 18 volcanoes in the U.S. could lead to mass death and destruction.

9h

Should Self-Driving Cars Have Ethics?

To design a "moral machine," researchers updated a classic thought experiment for the autonomous vehicle age. But do we really want artificial intelligence making decisions on who lives or dies? (Image credit: Andreas Arnold/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

9h

Thousands of Hours of Newly Released Audio Tell the Backstage Story of Apollo 11 Moon Mission

Thousands of Hours of Newly Released Audio Tell the Backstage Story of Apollo 11 Moon Mission A team of engineers spent years giving new life to old NASA tapes. apollo11_0.jpg Astronaut Buzz Aldrin carrying two components of the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package during the Apollo 11 mission. Image credits: NASA Space Friday, October 26, 2018 – 15:30 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Scie

10h

Trump Wants to Be President of a One-Party State

The vain hope of Donald Trump “becoming presidential” is by now not only a punch line , but a stale one. Yet Trump still awakes each day as commander in chief. This week has shown the dramatic problems caused by Trump’s confusion of his public roles as president of the United States and as a candidate and the leader of the Republican Party. Trump’s response to an attempt to bomb a series of Democ

10h

Stem cells can differentiate into neurons and may be useful post-stroke therapeutics

Researchers have performed a careful comparison between locally generated, ischemia-induced, multipotent stem cells (iSCs) and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) in an effort to determine which cell type has greater central nervous system (CNS) repair capacity.

10h

Do neonicotinoids inhibit the development of anti-predatory behaviors in wood frogs?

Wood frogs are a bit more sluggish when exposed to neonicotinoids. This small behavioral change could have an impact on wood frog populations.

10h

Gene makes some susceptible to middle ear infections

Researchers have found multiple genetic variants within the FUT2 gene that makes some people especially susceptible to middle ear infections.

10h

Meteorologist expects severe drought and heavy rain events to worsen globally

Meteorologists expect severe drought and long-lasting rainfall events to worsen in the future. Researchers have determined how frequent, intense and long lasting these types of events will be in the future.

10h

A Review of Flipping The Script: Parents Fight Back

Jeff Witzeman has released a new documentary on cancer, Flipping the Script: Parents Fight Back . It is terrible and dangerous.

10h

Iran's New Facebook Trolls Are Using Russia's PlaybookFacebook Iran US UK

Facebook took down another Iranian-based network of phony accounts Friday. This new campaign focused on American politics—and it was successful.

10h

Eyewire Release Report 10/26/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. We’ve released several more updates and improvements to Scythe Complete . In summary: Scythe reap will not nuke Scythe Complete if there is We’ve fixed a couple of problems like a certificate error and the Hunt cell not fully locking promoted players out of I

10h

Blow flies help us solve murders—but climate change is forcing them out

Nexus Media News Rising temperatures are driving these crime-fighting insects from their homes. Blow flies are showing up in the Midwest, where they never used to be. Climate change explains why this species is on the move.

10h

Mouse study suggests vaccine strategy for immunocompromised patients

A study led by Som Nanjappa at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine identifies a cellular target that may improve efficacy in vaccines designed to protect immunocompromised individuals from potentially deadly opportunistic infections.

10h

Surprising network activity in the immature brain

Scientists have identified spontaneous activity in the visual cortex that serves as a template for the subsequent development of the long-range neural connections.

10h

New driverless car technology could make traffic lights and speeding tickets obsolete

New driverless car technologies developed at a University of Delaware lab could lead to a world without traffic lights and speeding tickets. Researchers also hope the innovations will bring about the development of driverless cars that use 19 to 22 percent less fuel.

10h

Study explains why tall individuals are more prone to cancer

For most cancers, risk increases dramatically with age. But what about the effect of having more cells in the body? Might taller people be more prone to cancer because they have more cells? Yes, according to Leonard Nunney, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Riverside, who examined data from four large-scale surveillance projects on 23 cancer categories.

11h

Cappuccino made with jackfruit seed flour has chocolate aroma

A study conducted in Brazil shows that flour made from roasted jackfruit seeds can replace cocoa powder in a mixture of milk and coffee used to make cappuccino.

11h

Link between what we see and how we remember 'breaks' as we get older

Forgetfulness and age-related memory lapses are a common complaint among older adults, but what is still not understood is what causes these changes. Recent research published by scientists at Baycrest's Rotman Research Institute (RRI) brings us a step closer to uncovering the answer, which could help with distinguishing signs of dementia earlier.

11h

Megyn Kelly’s Inevitable Downfall

Scarcely 24 hours after stepping on a land mine that she herself had planted, news broke that Megyn Kelly had recently parted ways with her agent, Matt DelPiano of Creative Artists Agency. It wasn’t exactly sporting, because that guy was the hardest-working man in show business. He’s the one who got her $23 million a year for doing a job she’d never done before, and at which she was clearly going

11h

Iranian Propaganda Targeted Americans With Tom Hanks

Facebook announced its latest takedown of what the company calls “ coordinated inauthentic activity ”—and this time, the propaganda network didn’t originate in Russia à la the 2016 election, but in Iran. About a million people followed one of 82 suspicious pages, groups, and accounts on Facebook or Instagram. One of the largest, “No racism no war,” had more than 400,000 page likes before Facebook

11h

Retraction Watch Launches Its Database of Papers

It includes more than 18,000 papers and conference materials that have been retracted since the 1970s.

11h

Lawmaker sued for banning 2 constituents from Facebook page

A Washington state lawmaker has been sued by two constituents who argue their First Amendment rights are being violated because they've been banned from commenting on the state lawmaker's Facebook page.

11h

What are we like? 10 psychology findings that reveal the worst of human nature

It's a question that's reverberated through the ages – are we humans, though imperfect, essentially kind, sensible, good-natured creatures? Or deep down are we wired to be bad, blinkered, idle, vain, vengeful and selfish? There are no easy answers and there's clearly a lot of variation between individuals, but this feature post aims to shine some evidence-based light on the matter. Here in the fi

11h

Man arrested in connection with attempted bombings

The arrest occurred in South Florida after officials reportedly tracked the suspect's cell phone. On Friday, suspected explosives were discovered at addresses associated with Sen. Cory Booker and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. The Justice Department is scheduled to hold a press conference at 2:30 p.m. E.T. Federal authorities have arrested a man in connection with the mul

11h

What people smuggle onto airplanes and why

32.4% American travelers try to sneak forbidden items onboard. 87.7% of them succeed. It's mostly about recreational drugs, but also about explosives, poisons, and infectious items. If you travel by air these days, odds are your opinion of the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) agents you meet on security lines aren't exactly neutral. They're there to make us feel more secure on airplan

11h

FilmStruck Is the Latest Casualty of the Streaming Wars

The AT&T/Time Warner merger has claimed another victim—a result that’s to be expected when we appoint technocrats as our cultural gatekeepers.

11h

Facebook blocks Iran-linked bid to sway US, British politicsFacebook Iran US UK

Facebook said Friday it had taken down accounts linked to an Iranian effort to influence US and British politics with posts about charged topics such as immigration and race relations.

11h

Plant polymers do not always act together to make beautiful shapes

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) show in mutant plant cells that three polymers, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, are deposited at the secondary cell wall independent of each other. The discovery challenges a long-held consensus that assumed their deposition must occur in order. The discovery is expected to aid in the generation of plants that can acclimatiz

11h

Getting the most out of atmospheric data analysis

An international team has used a new approach to analyze an atmospheric data set spanning 18 years for the investigation of new-particle formation. They found that their method — based on mutual information — supported the major findings of previous work, whilst being more accurate and easier to carry out. The method is expected to provide a useful tool for analyzing other variables that influen

11h

Financial education key to reducing student loan stress

It is estimated that a quarter of American adults currently have student loans to pay off, and most do not have the financial literacy to manage debt successfully. The average student in the Class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt. Graduates from the University of Missouri have an average debt of $21,884.

11h

Unprecedented growth in the college labor market

For the ninth year in a row, the job market for college graduates is booming, according to Michigan State University's Recruiting Trends, the largest annual survey of employers in the nation.

11h

Animal migration requires both movement corridors and food

An analysis of mule deer migration routes in two areas of Wyoming documents the idea that the animals choose readily traversable pathways where they also can find food.

11h

How to Break Up Ethically, According to The Good Place

This story contains spoilers through Season 3, Episode 6 of The Good Place . Chidi Anagonye has learned the deepest truths of existence—the nature of heaven and hell, the fate he’s eventually doomed to, and the real reason for Brexit —which means he must end things with his girlfriend. Who can’t relate? In typical fashion for NBC’s unpretentiously clever sitcom-slash-existential-epic, the most re

11h

750-Year-Old Wooden Idols, Some Wearing Masks, Uncovered in Peru

Archaeologists have discovered 19 anthropomorphic wooden idols, some of them wearing beige clay masks on their faces, in the ancient city of Chan Chan, Peru, according to the country's Ministry of Culture.

11h

Gadget Lab Podcast: Openwater Founder Mary Lou Jepsen on Brain-Reading Technology

Jepsen says that her brain imaging technology could go mainstream before AR and VR do.

11h

The Best Halloween Shows and Movies for Little Kids You Can Stream Right Now

Are your kids too young for horror movies? Fire up these flicks instead.

11h

Interleukin IL-22, a new target to inhibit the progression of liver disease

Naglaa Shoukry, Ph. D., and her team have made a significant breakthrough in their research aiming to limit the progression of liver disease. They have characterized the mechanisms of action of type 3 inflammatory cytokines that are produced by the cells of the immune system, which result in a progression of hepatic scarring known as fibrosis. These research efforts have identified new potential t

11h

MEGAPIXELS: This geometric iceberg will soothe your soul

Science It doesn’t even look real. Okay so it’s not a perfect rectangle, but this floating ice sheet gets unsettlingly close. NASA scientists spotted the geometric beauty in Antarctica earlier this…

11h

Salk Institute Cofounder Melvin Cohn Dies

Cohn was a leader in gene regulation and immune system research and left a lasting legacy in La Jolla.

11h

Photos of the Week: Steam Train, Sheep Parade, Golden Rock

A sailing festival in the Persian Gulf, early preparations for Kumbh Mela in India, a vintage-plane crash in California, a German castle overlooking the Rhine, a terrible train accident in Taiwan, Central American immigrants head toward the U.S. border in Mexico, the Invictus Games under way in Australia, President Donald Trump campaigns for Ted Cruz in Texas, pumpkins for gorillas in the London

11h

The Atlantic Hires Yara Bayoumy As National Security Editor

As The Atlantic continues its newsroom expansion, editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg announced today the hiring of Yara Bayoumy as a senior editor leading national security coverage. Bayoumy joins The Atlantic from Reuters, where she has worked as a foreign correspondent—reporting extensively from the Middle East and Africa—and national security editor. She begins at The Atlantic next month, and jo

11h

Why Private Equity Is Furious Over a Paper in a Dermatology Journal

The sudden, unexplained removal of a research paper on private equity firms buying dermatology practices has raised questions about corporate influence.

11h

Tampering with cellular fats holds great promise

Researchers have found a way to engineer the lipid composition of cell membranes. The method described in Science makes it easier to investigate how cells are regulated by their membrane composition. This could lead to optimized cell factories and better understanding of the role of lipids in metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes.

12h

Humans help robots learn tasks

With a smartphone and a browser, people worldwide will be able to interact with a robot to speed the process of teaching robots how to do basic tasks.

12h

Financial education key to reducing student loan stress

It is estimated that a quarter of American adults currently have student loans to pay off, and most do not have the financial literacy to manage debt successfully. The average student in the Class of 2016 has $37,172 in student loan debt. Graduates from the University of Missouri have an average debt of $21,884.

12h

3D 'organ on a chip' could accelerate search for new disease treatments

Researchers have developed a three-dimensional 'organ on a chip' which enables real-time continuous monitoring of cells, and could be used to develop new treatments for disease while reducing the number of animals used in research.

12h

Fruit fly study challenges theories on evolution and high-carb diets

UNSW fruit fly research challenges neutral theory of molecular evolution and suggests one day we may be prescribed diets according to our genes.

12h

Climate change: Low cost, low energy cooling system shows promise

"Water cooler moment" as greener cooling idea is scaled up to help chill homes and buildings.

12h

A black bear playbook: Conservationists predict bear/human conflict hot-spots in new study

A new study uses long term data on bear mortality to map high-probability hot-spots for human-bear conflicts.

12h

'Navigator' neurons play critical role in sense of smell

Researchers have identified 'navigator' neurons that are key to setting up connections in the system responsible for the sense of smell. The new study builds on a breakthrough 2014 report which showed a critical period in olfactory wiring using mice as a model system.

12h

A new therapeutic avenue for treating insomnia

Insomnia is one of the major sleep problems all over the world. However, the most widely prescribed medicines for the treatment of insomnia are plagued by a wide range of adverse effects. Researchers have succeeded in identifying the first positive allosteric modulator for adenosine A2A receptors and found that it induces sleep without affecting cardiovascular function, unlike classic receptor ago

12h

Tooth loss can be a sign of malnutrition in older adults

Older adults are at risk for both impaired oral health and malnutrition, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed the health records of 107 community-dwelling senior citizens who received treatment at the Rutgers School of Dental Medicine clinic between 2015 to 2016. The findings show that more than 25 percent of the patients had malnutrition or were at risk for malnutrition. The researcher

12h

Facebook Groups as Therapy

It was Christopher’s therapist who suggested he look for help online. His wife had cheated on him, and he had been struggling since their divorce, but the $25 copays were adding up. His therapist proposed an online support group—free, discreet, available 24/7. So he went, naturally, to Facebook, where a search turned up multiple private groups for people dealing with a partner’s infidelity. (Chri

12h

How Do Bomb Squads Assess a Suspicious Package?

Explosives experts use a combination of x-ray scans, chemical swabs and other tools to evaluate the parcel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

New composite material that can cool itself down under extreme temperatures

A cutting-edge material, inspired by nature, that can regulate its own temperature and could equally be used to treat burns and help space capsules withstand atmospheric forces is under development.

12h

Easier treatment for blinding eye disease shows promise in clinical trial

A new study shows that an implantable delivery system for a widely used medication to treat a blinding eye disease has enabled some patients to go 15 months in between treatments. This represents a vast improvement over the typical regimen of nearly monthly eye injections.

12h

Animal migration requires both movement corridors and food

Stopover sites are critical locations for mule deer migrations in two areas of Wyoming, researchers have documented.

12h

Patient care in chemical and biological attacks

The neurologic effects and treatment options for exposure to biologic and chemical agents are outlined in a newly published article by neurologists.

12h

You are the company you keep — A new screening method detects direct biomolecule interactions

Researchers have developed a new high-throughput screening method to detect direct biomolecule interactions. Such screening techniques are required to reveal how cellular building blocks are connected, which is crucial for understanding how cells function or dysfunction in the case of diseases. The method was designed to be inexpensive and doable, making it accessible for every standard biomedical

12h

Earth's dust cloud satellites confirmed

Astronomers and physicists may have confirmed two elusive clouds of dust, in semi-stable points just 400,000 kilometers from Earth. The clouds, first reported by and named for Polish astronomer Kazimierz Kordylewski in 1961, are exceptionally faint, so their existence is controversial.

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Not all Twitter bots are bad

Technology An ode to the best of the automated accounts. Twitter is cracking down on bots—and for good reason. But not all bots are bad.

12h

How horror movies turn fear into fun

There’s a lot of thought behind a good scare in our favorite horror movies, according to film expert Jason Middleton. A scholar and experimental filmmaker, Middleton is an associate professor of English and the director of the film and media studies program at the University of Rochester. He studies both documentary and horror films. Middleton is also a featured expert in the new AMC documentary

12h

High-impact clinical trials yield results that could improve kidney care

The results of numerous high-impact clinical trials that could affect kidney-related medical care will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

12h

Nobody’s Cellphone Is Really That Secure

Earlier this week, The New York Times reported that the Russians and the Chinese were eavesdropping on President Donald Trump’s personal cellphone and using the information gleaned to better influence his behavior. This should surprise no one. Security experts have been talking about the potential security vulnerabilities in Trump’s cellphone use since he became president. And President Barack Ob

13h

The growing space industry is scrambling to find workers—but it can't take foreigners

Glow in the dark stars twinkling inside his childhood bedroom and science fiction books in his lap, Shayan Shirshekar grew up like most kids fascinated by space. When he was old enough to say what he wanted to be when he was older, his answer was always immediate: An astronaut.

13h

Africa needs to beef up cyber security urgently: experts

Africa is being increasingly targeted by hackers and must invest in cyber security, industry leaders said at the third Africa Cyber Security Conference closing Friday in Ivory Coast.

13h

How gender bias influences Nobel Prizes

Women receive Nobel Prizes in science significantly less often than might be predicted from their representation in those fields. But why?

13h

Trump complains about Twitter removing his followers

US President Donald Trump complained Friday that Twitter is removing some of his followers and has made it harder to join, an apparent critique of the social network's efforts to weed out fake and abusive accounts.

13h

Majority of CIS economies halt growth

Experts from the HSE Centre for Business Tendency Studies (CBTS) analysed for the first time the growth of the manufacturing industry in CIS countries between 2004 and 2016. It was conducted within the framework of a regional project of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) "Improvement of industrial statistics and development of indicators of industrial performance for po

13h

Organisationer advarer mod smarte højtalere: Du aflytter dig selv

Køber du en smarthøjtaler, skal du huske, at du potentielt aflytter dig selv og giver endnu mere direkte adgang til dine private data, lyder advarslen.

13h

What Happens When a College’s Affirmative-Action Policy Is Found Illegal

Marvin Krislov had his hands full in 2003. The University of Michigan was on trial in two cases that challenged its affirmative-action policies. One case, Grutter v. Bollinger, alleged that the law school’s admissions policy was discriminatory; the other case, Gratz v. Bollinger, said the same was true of the undergraduate policy. Krislov, the general counsel of the university from 1998 to 2007,

13h

Study: Animal migration requires both movement corridors and food

Stopover sites are critical locations for mule deer migrations in two areas of Wyoming, researchers have documented.

13h

Easier treatment for blinding eye disease shows promise in clinical trial

A new study shows that an implantable delivery system for a widely used medication to treat a blinding eye disease has enabled some patients to go 15 months in between treatments. This represents a vast improvement over the typical regimen of nearly monthly eye injections.

13h

Scientists And Parents Band Together To Research Cures For Rare Childhood Cancer

A research start-up is connecting parents with scientists in hopes of sparking new research on diseases whose survival rates and treatment options haven't budged in 30 years (Image credit: Alex Walsh for NPR)

13h

The Guardian view on misinformation: a moral problem | Editorial

Those seeking to deceive politicians and the public know distraction works better than outright fraud Most of the recent worries over the spread of propaganda have concentrated on the use of social media: WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have all been rightly criticised for their use in spreading misinformation. Less attention, perhaps, has been given to the content of the messages and the

13h

Conservationists predict bear/human conflict hot-spots in new study

A new study by WCS, American Museum of Natural History, and other partners uses long term data on bear mortality to map high-probability hot-spots for human-bear conflicts. The authors say this is a critical tool for wildlife managers to reduce mortality of bears as they recolonize their former range in the Great Basin and in other parts of the country.

13h

Low cost, energy-saving radiative cooling system ready for real-world applications

Engineers have successfully scaled up an innovative water-cooling system capable of providing continuous day-and-night radiative cooling for structures. The advance could increase the efficiency of power generation plants in summer and lead to more efficient, environmentally-friendly temperature control for homes, businesses, utilities and industries.

13h

K-core is a predictor of structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems

A network metric called the K-core could predict structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems, according to new research. The K-core appears able to forecast which species is likely to face extinction first, by global shocks such as climate change, and when an ecosystem could collapse due to external forces.

13h

Study breaks Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) distance limit

Using engineered nanocomposite structures called metamaterials, a research team reports the ability to measure a significant increase in the energy transfer between molecules. This breakthrough breaks the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) distance limit of ~10-20 nanometers, and leads to the possibility of measuring larger molecular assemblies.

13h

Rural and urban kids in U.S. have same cancer survival odds

Living in a rural or urban area at the time of a cancer diagnosis has no impact on a child’s chance of survival, a new study shows. “The widespread availability of public health insurance for children and adolescents and a nationwide network of pediatric cancer providers may explain this finding,” says Kimberly Johnson, associate professor at the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis

13h

UK fracking firm Cuadrilla pauses drilling after tremor

The only company drilling for shale gas in Britain temporarily suspended fracking Friday after a mild earthquake.

13h

EU opens anti-trust probe against Ryanair

European Union anti-trust authorities on Thursday opened an investigation into whether Ryanair benefited from measures at a German airport that give the Irish low-cost carrier an unfair leg-up over competitors.

13h

Low cost, energy-saving radiative cooling system ready for real-world applications

University of Colorado Boulder and University of Wyoming engineers have successfully scaled up an innovative water-cooling system capable of providing continuous day-and-night radiative cooling for structures. The advance could increase the efficiency of power generation plants in summer and lead to more efficient, environmentally-friendly temperature control for homes, businesses, utilities and i

14h

Man arrested in connection with attempted bombings

The arrest occurred in South Florida after officials reportedly tracked the suspect's cell phone. On Friday, suspected explosives were discovered at addresses associated with Sen. Cory Booker and former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper. The Justice Department is scheduled to hold a press conference at 2:30 p.m. E.T. Federal authorities have arrested a man in connection with the mul

14h

While eating, these tiny worms release chemicals to lure their next meal

As they eat insects, one nematode species releases chemicals that attract more insect prey.

14h

You are the company you keep—A new screening method detects direct biomolecule interactions

Proteins are the building blocks of the cell. They do most of the work and are essential for the structure, function and dynamic regulation of the cell and body's tissues and organs. Proteins rarely work alone, they interact, form protein complexes or bind DNA and RNA to control what a cell does. These complexes are key pieces of many important reactions within the cell, such as energy metabolism

14h

New composite material that can cool itself down under extreme temperatures

A cutting-edge material, inspired by nature, that can regulate its own temperature and could equally be used to treat burns and help space capsules withstand atmospheric forces is under development at the University of Nottingham.

14h

NASA's Aqua Satellite tracks super Typhoon Yutu's oblong eye

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite captured powerful Super Typhoon Yutu as it moved through the Philippine Sea. Yutu's eye appeared oblong on satellite imagery.

14h

Diagnosing strokes is complicated by 'mimics' and 'chameleons'

Stroke specialists often see conditions known as stroke 'mimics' and 'chameleons' that can complicate accurate diagnoses, Loyola Medicine neurologists report in Neuroimaging Clinics of North America. Stroke mimics are medical conditions that look like strokes, while chameleons are strokes that look like other conditions.

14h

NASA's Aqua Satellite tracks super Typhoon Yutu's oblong eye

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite captured powerful Super Typhoon Yutu as it moved through the Philippine Sea. Yutu's eye appeared oblong on satellite imagery.

14h

A Baby Fly Burrowed into a Woman's Skin During Belize Honeymoon. She Noticed It 2 Months Later.

A Florida woman will probably never forget her honeymoon in Belize, but not for the usual reasons

14h

Ecologists ask: Should we be more transparent with data?

Computational reproducibility—the ability to accurately reproduce outcomes from data sets using the same code and software—will be an increasingly important factor in future scientific studies according to a new paper released in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications.

14h

George Papadopoulos Wants Immunity From the Senate

The former Trump-campaign adviser George Papadopoulos, who pleaded guilty last year to lying to the FBI about his conversations with a foreign professor that were relevant to the Russia investigation, has asked for immunity to testify before the Senate Intelligence Committee, according to two knowledgeable congressional sources. Papadopoulos’s attorney, Caroline Polisi, declined to comment. It’s

14h

A President Who Condones Political Violence

Bombs are sent through the mail to CNN, George Soros, James Clapper, former President Obama, and other persons targeted by President Trump for vilification and abuse. A theory begins to circulate on the far edges of the right that the bombs are a “false flag” intended to discredit the president and his party. The theory rapidly moves from the edge to the center. There the theory lingers, even as

14h

Students in health enrichment programs benefit from early team-based exposure

A study provides new evidence that early exposure to multiple health disciplines in pipeline programs targeting underserved/underrepresented students interested in health professions reduces the development of traditional role and leadership stereotypes about professional health care teams and practice.

14h

Surprising network activity in the immature brain

One of the outstanding mysteries of the cerebral cortex is how individual neurons develop the proper synaptic connections to form large-scale, distributed networks. Now scientists have gained novel insights from spontaneously generated patterns of activity by local networks in the early developing visual cortex. Apparently these form the basis for long-range neural connections that are established

14h

Fighting mosquitoes in your backyard with scientists' help

Thanks to an innovative mosquito control approach, residents in several Maryland neighborhoods reduced populations of invasive Asian tiger mosquitoes by an impressive 76 percent, on average.

14h

New composite material that can cool itself down under extreme temperatures

A cutting-edge material, inspired by nature, that can regulate its own temperature and could equally be used to treat burns and help space capsules withstand atmospheric forces is under development at the University of Nottingham.

14h

CU researchers provide resource for patient care in chemical and biological attacks

The neurologic effects and treatment options for exposure to biologic and chemical agents are outlined in a newly published article by neurologists from the University of Colorado School of Medicine who collaborated on the article with military physicians.

14h

Cigarette pictorial warning labels most effective when including body parts, testimonials

As the United States moves toward implementing image-based warning labels on cigarette packs, label designers must consider what types of pictorial warnings will be most effective. New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania examines individual features to determine effectiveness, finding that diseased body parts like gangrene feet and testimonials from real smokers ha

14h

You are the company you keep — A new screening method detects direct biomolecule interactions

Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, Spain, have developed a new high-throughput screening method to detect direct biomolecule interactions. Such screening techniques are required to reveal how cellular building blocks are connected, which is crucial for understanding how cells function or dysfunction in the case of diseases. The method, published in Nature Communic

14h

New role for protein could lead to novel treatments for cancer and vascular disease

Researchers have found a new role for a well-known protein in the body that may explain, in part, what goes wrong in certain cancers, as well as vascular and neurological disorders. Beta-catenin, a wide-ranging and important protein for the regulation of cell function from the embryonic stage to adulthood, has already been implicated in the development of certain cancers, including colon, breast,

14h

DNA 'dances' in first explanation of how genetic material flows through a nucleus

DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. The finding is the first large-scale explanation of genetic material moving within a working cell. The dancing DNA may play a role in gene expression, replication and remodeling.

14h

The ghost of Cassiopeia

About 550 light-years away in the constellation of Cassiopeia lies IC 63, a stunning and slightly eerie nebula. Also known as the ghost of Cassiopeia, IC 63 is being shaped by radiation from a nearby unpredictably variable star, Gamma Cassiopeiae, which is slowly eroding away the ghostly cloud of dust and gas. This celestial ghost makes the perfect backdrop for the upcoming feast of All Hallow's E

14h

Wearable tech becomes top fitness trend for 2019

Fitness trackers, smart watches, and other wearable technology are the number one fitness trend for 2019.

14h

Late night snacker? Make it cottage cheese

Researchers found that consuming 30 grams of protein about 30 minutes before bed appears to have a positive effect on muscle quality, metabolism and overall health. And for those who have sworn off eating at night, there is no gain in body fat.

14h

Playing video games to cope with anxiety may flag addiction

Understanding why people play video games could help identify who is at risk for a gaming disorder, a new study shows. Researchers surveyed college students about their frequency of video game play, coping strategies, anxiety, and symptoms of various mental illnesses including gaming disorder and discovered that using video games as a coping mechanism for anxiety predicted symptoms of gaming diso

14h

A few drinks can change how memories form

Just a few drinks changes how memories are formed at the fundamental, molecular level, according to a new study with flies. One of the many challenges with battling alcohol addiction and other substance abuse disorders is the risk of relapse, even after progress toward recovery. Even pesky fruit flies have a hankering for alcohol, and because the molecular signals involved in forming flies’ rewar

14h

Mystisk polio-lignende sygdom rammer amerikanske børn i bølger

For tredje gang på fire år oplever USA en bølge af børn, som rammes af en sjælden sygdom, der forårsager lammelser. Herhjemme har ét barn været ramt.

14h

Letters: Is the ‘Confidence Gap’ Real?

A Lack of Confidence Isn’t What’s Holding Back Working Women Last month, Stéphanie Thomson wrote about a strong body of research suggesting that women feel just as confident in their abilities and leadership skills as their male peers—but have a harder time self-promoting, because they know that doing so won’t always advance their career. “Ultimately,” Thomson wrote, “the biggest problem with the

14h

Low cost, energy-saving radiative cooling system ready for real-world applications

University of Colorado Boulder and University of Wyoming engineers have successfully scaled up an innovative water-cooling system capable of providing continuous day-and-night radiative cooling for structures. The advance could increase the efficiency of power generation plants in summer and lead to more efficient, environmentally-friendly temperature control for homes, businesses, utilities and i

15h

Hawaiian Island Vanishes Overnight

East Island in Hawaii is no more.

15h

15h

Fewer people got the flu shot last season—and that may be why it was one of the deadliest

Health Young, healthy people need to get the shot too. By now you’ve probably heard that last year’s flu season was one of the worst on record. New data may tell us why.

15h

Google, Amazon suffer market setbacks on sales outlook

Internet titans Google and Amazon came under an investor cloud after posting disappointing sales updates, with the search leader also on the defensive for reportedly hushing up sexual misconduct.

15h

Gut microbiota products can favor diabetes

A study shows that the gut microbiota has the ability to affect how cells respond to insulin, and can thus contribute to type 2 diabetes. The findings demonstrate an hereto unknown pathological mechanism.

15h

High on the highway — stoned-driving on the increase

Getting behind the wheel after cannabis use is on the rise in the US, and THC, not alcohol, is now the most commonly detected intoxicant in US drivers. Detecting levels of THC, however, is challenging and the methods used so far cannot accurately determine a person's level of impairment.

15h

The Myth of ‘Dumbing Down’

One of the pleasures I enjoy as an editor at The Atlantic is bringing the work of scientists and scholars to our pages. From the Object Lessons series on the ordinary lives of everyday things, to the Metropolis Now project on technology and urbanism, to our regular coverage of science, technology, and health, I have had the privilege of editing hundreds of academics, writing on topics as varied a

15h

The Books Briefing: What Makes These Horror Stories So Scary Isn’t Just the Ghosts

Halloween is just a few days away, and here at the Books Briefing, we’re diving into all things spooky and supernatural. For these authors, horror doesn’t just come from ghosts or magic or mysterious deaths. Rather, successfully scary stories remind readers of the fragility and instability of life—something that the writers Victor LaValle and Russell Banks keep in mind when approaching their fict

15h

Memory special: Can you choose what to forget?

If you want to forget an embarrassing encounter, you may just need to try. Forgetting isn't a passive process – so here's how to choose which memories you lose

15h

Physicists are turning to Lewis Carroll for help with their maths

Mathematics produced by Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, has been used to help simplify calculations used by particle physicists

15h

The rise of sponges in Anthropocene reef ecosystems

, Australian Institute of Marine Science

15h

'Navigator' neurons play critical role in sense of smell

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have identified 'navigator' neurons that are key to setting up connections in the system responsible for the sense of smell. The new study builds on a breakthrough 2014 report from the laboratory of Stowers Investigator Ron Yu, Ph.D., which showed a critical period in olfactory wiring using mice as a model system.

15h

Novel insights into the heart health benefits of cocoa flavanols and procyanidins

A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition adds to the body of data demonstrating that bioactive compounds found in cocoa can keep the heart healthy — but two types of bioactives called flavanols and procyanidins behave differently in the body.

15h

Majority of CIS economies halt growth

Experts from the HSE Centre for Business Tendency Studies (CBTS) analysed for the first time the growth of the manufacturing industry in CIS countries between 2004 and 2016. It was conducted within the framework of a regional project of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) 'Improvement of industrial statistics and development of indicators of industrial performance for po

15h

A black bear playbook: Conservationists predict bear/human conflict hot-spots in new study

A new study by WCS, American Museum of Natural History, and other partners uses long term data on bear mortality to map high-probability hot-spots for human-bear conflicts.

15h

Inside the world of million-dollar beauty pageants – for camels

When you hear "beauty pageants" you probably think of human women (and men) competing. However, a series of pageants on the Arabian Peninsula celebrate the beauty of the dromedary, or one-humped camel.

15h

Gut microbiota products can favor diabetes

A study published in the journal Cell shows that the gut microbiota has the ability to affect how cells respond to insulin, and can thus contribute to type 2 diabetes. The findings demonstrate an hereto unknown pathological mechanism.

15h

High on the highway — stoned-driving on the increase

Getting behind the wheel after cannabis use is on the rise in the US, and THC, not alcohol, is now the most commonly detected intoxicant in US drivers. Detecting levels of THC, however, is challenging and the methods used so far cannot accurately determine a person's level of impairment.

15h

Large cells for tiny leaves

Scientists identify protein that controls leaf growth and shape.

15h

Loss of work productivity in a warming world

In recent years, surveys based on social-science studies have been well applied to quantify the impact of heat stress on the work capacity. However, previous surveys were mainly for developed countries. The number of samples was usually very small (hundreds or even tens) and not suitable for identifying the regional differences across the world. The worldwide pattern of heat-related work productiv

15h

First study on climate change impact in Mediterranean

As the Mediterranean Basin is experiencing the impact of climate change more than ever, an international network of scientists has worked together to synthesize the effects of climate change and environmental problems, as well as the incurred risks, in the region, to facilitate decision-making in addressing the issues.

15h

Groundbreaking research reveals some hard truths about work in horse stables

In the first-ever research of its kind, a new study by a Brock University Labour Studies professor has examined labour issues for Ontarians working with horses.

15h

How will we survive when the population hits 10 billion? | Charles C. Mann

By 2050, an estimated 10 billion people will live on earth. How are we going to provide everybody with basic needs while also avoiding the worst impacts of climate change? In a talk packed with wit and wisdom, science journalist Charles C. Mann breaks down the proposed solutions and finds that the answers fall into two camps — wizards and prophets — while offering his own take on the best path t

15h

When it comes to respiratory effects of wood smoke, sex matters

Exposure to wood smoke can have different effects on the respiratory immune systems of men and women — effects that may be obscured when data from men and women are lumped together, according to a new study.

15h

How chloroplasts maintain energy efficiency

All life on earth ultimately relies on energy from the sun, and photosynthesis is the vital link. Photosynthesis generates adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is the universal molecular fuel in living organisms. An international team of researchers developed an approach to visualize ATP in living plants and observed that mature plant chloroplasts manage their ATP largely in isolation from other ce

15h

Biologists use 'mini retinas' to better understand connection between eye and brain

Biologists are growing 'mini retinas' in the lab from stem cells to mimic the growth of the human retina. The researchers hope to restore sight when critical connections between the eye and the brain are damaged. These models also allow researchers to better understand how cells in the retina develop and are organized.

15h

Older adults with strong grip, good memory may avoid or delay disability

To learn more about how and whether being strong can ward off disability, a team of researchers examined information from a study called SHARE.

15h

Nanotubes may give the world better batteries

Scientists use thin films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to keep lithium metal from sprouting dendrites, tentacle-like growths that can cause batteries to fail. The strategy could be key to developing batteries that hold more energy and charge faster than current, ubiquitous lithium-ion batteries.

15h

Link between DNA-protein binding, cancer onset identified

Researchers have identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.

15h

How the brain decides what to learn

Neuroscientists know a lot about how our brains learn new things, but not much about how they choose what to focus on while they learn. Now, researchers have traced that ability to an unexpected place.

15h

Drought-hit Rhine forces Germany to tap oil reserves

The German government on Friday said it had authorised the release of strategic fuel reserves after record-low water levels in the drought-hit Rhine river badly disrupted oil shipments in recent weeks.

15h

China leads the way as world's billionaires get even richer

China produced around two new billionaires a week last year as the fortunes of the world's ultra-rich soared by a record amount, a report said Friday.

15h

Location of large mystery source of banned ozone depleting substance uncovered

The compound, carbon tetrachloride, contributes to the destruction of the Earth's ozone layer, which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation.

16h

Growing algae more sustainably for biofuel production

Because fossil fuels emit pollutants that are harmful to both the environment and public health, researchers are diligently exploring more sustainable alternatives. One of these alternatives is biofuels.

16h

A Midwest Energy Transition Will Help Drive Future U.S. Emissions Reductions

The region has lagged on transitioning away from coal, but natural gas and renewables are gaining ground — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Scientists from the University of Granada debunk the effectiveness of glasses for colorblind people

The EnChroma® glasses, commercialized by a North American company, do not improve color vision for color blind people or correct their color blindness, and their effect is similar to that of other glasses such as the ones used for hunting.

16h

Shielded quantum bits

A theoretical concept to realize quantum information processing has been developed by Professor Guido Burkard and his team of physicists at the University of Konstanz.

16h

Location of large mystery source of banned ozone depleting substance uncovered

Researchers from the University of Bristol have found significant ongoing emissions of a potent ozone-depleting substance from eastern China.

16h

First study on climate change impact in Mediterranean

As the Mediterranean Basin is experiencing the impact of climate change more than ever, an international network of scientists has worked together to synthesize the effects of climate change and environmental problems, as well as the incurred risks, in the region, to facilitate decision-making in addressing the issues. This first-ever synthesis of multiple environmental changes and risks affecting

16h

Five out of five? Study reveals psychological influences in online reviews

A new study reveals how psychological factors affect the ratings people provide and how they describe their experiences when posting online reviews.Researchers at the University of East Anglia found the length of time between product or service consumption and posting affects the review given.

16h

Earth's dust cloud satellites confirmed

A team of Hungarian astronomers and physicists may have confirmed two elusive clouds of dust, in semi-stable points just 400,000 kilometres from Earth. The clouds, first reported by and named for Polish astronomer Kazimierz Kordylewski in 1961, are exceptionally faint, so their existence is controversial. The new work appears in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

16h

Ecologists ask: Should we be more transparent with data?

In a new Ecological Applications article, authors Stephen M. Powers and Stephanie E. Hampton, highlight the importance of adapting to, providing, and using data sets that are open to and usable by the public and investigators in ecology and other field research.

16h

Loss of work productivity in a warming world

Heat stress affects the health of workers and reduces the work productivity by changing the ambient working environment thus leading to economic losses. Scientists identified the regions of vulnerability to heat waves that might have been overlooked in the past.

16h

Bioactive novel compounds from endangered tropical plant species

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has isolated 17 secondary metabolites, including three novel compounds from the valuable endangered tropical plant species Alangium longiflorum. A newly isolated compound, 8-hydroxytubulosine (1), showed growth inhibitory effects at submicromolar levels against several human tumor cell lines except for drug transporter-overexpressing cells. Co

16h

Turning cells against pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is infamously resistant to treatment options because the tumor is often surrounded by cells which are "tricked" into protecting it. Now, researchers from CSHL have identified the special signals that encourage some of these cells to either help the cancer, or–ideally–hinder it.

16h

Radiobommert hos retten i Roskilde: Sendte direkte fra retssag

Lyden fra en højtprofileret banderetssag blev transmitteret over højttaleranlægget på et konferencecenter ved siden af. Nu undersøger retten, hvordan fejlen er opstået

16h

Southern right whale superpod blows a hole in the record books

A comprehensive aerial survey of whales and dolphins off the coast of South Africa supported by a range of organisations including Fauna & Flora International (FFI) has recorded an astounding 1,106 southern right whales, including 536 calves, an all-time record.

16h

Anthropocene: why the chair should be the symbol for our sedentary age

Why are there no chairs in the Bible, or in all 30,000 lines of Homer? Neither are there any in Shakespeare's Hamlet – written in 1599. But by the middle of the 19th century, it is a completely different story. Charles Dickens's Bleak House suddenly has 187 of them. What changed? With sitting being called "the new smoking", we all know that spending too much time in chairs is bad for us. Not only

16h

World's first biobricks grown from human urine

The world's first bio-brick grown from human urine has been unveiled by University of Cape Town (UCT) master's student in civil engineering Suzanne Lambert, signalling an innovative paradigm shift in waste recovery.

16h

Concussion and college football: how many hits to the head is too much?

Whether some American football players suffer from concussion after a hit on the head may depend on the number and severity of head impacts that they sustain in the days, weeks, and months leading up to the concussion, rather than a single large head impact.

16h

Baby's tears and mom's libido

A substance in young mice's tears makes female mice more likely to reject male sexual advances. This research is part of ongoing efforts to understand how animals communicate using chemicals called pheromones. Direct connections between human and mouse behavior cannot be made because pheromones are highly species specific.

16h

Study questions certain treatments for diabetic patients at high risk for heart disease

In patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular disease, targeting blood sugar to normal levels reduced the risk for macroalbuminuria, but it had no impact on more significant kidney outcomes such as serum creatinine doubling or the need for dialysis or transplantation. Targeting low blood pressures or the use of fenofibrate to lower cholesterol increased the risk for doubling of

16h

New investigational antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in phase 2 trial

Results from a phase 2 randomised trial suggest that a new investigational antibiotic is as effective as the current standard-of-care antibiotic for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by several multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

16h

Radio Atlantic: The Murder of Jamal Khashoggi

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play On October 2nd, Washington Post contributing columnist Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, never to be seen again. Details of the journalist’s brutal killing and dismemberment have since emerged, prompting an international crisis for the kingdom and its de-facto ruler, crown prince Mohammed bin Sal

16h

Hayabusa2 team prepares for asteroid sample collection

JAXA's (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's) Hayabusa2 mission is on track to return samples from its target asteroid, 162173 Ryugu, a C-type Near Earth Asteroid (NEA). The past month has seen the successful deployment of two rovers and a lander. The mission focus is now on the successful retrieval and return of a surface sample.

16h

SibFU scientists simulated the intracellular environment of a luminescent bacteria cell

A team from the Institute of Fundamental Biology and Biotechnology of SFU used glycerol and sucrose to simulate the intracellular environment of luminescent bacteria and carried out a number of enzymatic reactions in it. The work will help develop fragments of metabolic chains with different lengths and study fermentative reactions in the conditions close to intracellular. The article of the scien

16h

Highly efficient wet-processed solar cells with molecules in the same orientation

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in the journal Organic Electronics documents a new method for controlling the orientation of conducting molecules in organic solar cells that results in the enhanced light adsorption and performance of the cells.

16h

Brainwave activity reveals potential biomarker for autism in children

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects children's social and intellectual development. Conventional diagnostic methods for ASD rely on behavioral observation. Researchers based at Japan's Kanazawa University have identified a potential quantifiable biomarker for diagnosing ASD. Using magnetic brainwave imaging, they correlated altered gamma oscillation with the motor response of children with ASD,

16h

Getting the most out of atmospheric data analysis

An international team including researchers from Kanazawa University used a new approach to analyze an atmospheric data set spanning 18 years for the investigation of new-particle fomation. They found that their method — based on mutual information — supported the major findings of previous work, whilst being more accurate and easier to carry out. The method is expected to provide a useful tool

16h

I will drink to that

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a key signaling network for alcohol fermentation in sake yeast. The discovery focuses on PP2AB55δ and how it accounts for high fermentation performance. It is expected that targeting PP2AB55δ and other molecules in its network will improve industrial output for biofuels and beverages.

16h

Rationalizing phonon dispersion: an efficient and precise prediction of lattice thermal conductivity

A linear phonon dispersion of Debye, the most common approximation in the past century, often leads to a significant overestimation on lattice thermal conductivity. Taking into account the periodic boundary condition resulting from the periodic arrangements of atoms, this work rationalizes a phonon dispersion and thus a time- and cost-effective phonon transport model for accurately predicting latt

16h

Green roofs effective for adapting to climate change

A study headed by researchers of the Water and Environment Engineering Institute of Valencia's Polytechnic University (IIAMA-UPV) shows that green roofs are an effective measure to adapt to climate change in the Mediterranean, as they offer positive hydrological performance and reduce the creation of surface water runoff.

16h

A Futuristic Vision of Tokyo Inspired by 'Blade Runner'

Photographer Tom Blachford listened to the soundtrack while shooting his series *Nihon Noir*.

16h

Credit card stolen or lost? Here's what to do.

DIY Defend your information. It’s become a sad reality of the modern world: Someday, your credit card information will fall into the wrong hnds. Here's what to do when that happens to you.

16h

EU-Parlamentet: Forbyd profilering af borgernes politiske holdninger ud fra netadfærd

Valget til Europa-Parlamentet nærmer sig, men efter Cambridge Analytica-skandalen er Europa-Parlamentet bange for valgmanipulation på de sociale medier. Nu vil de have strammere regler og en omfattende revision af Facebooks omgang med persondata.

16h

Nyt ’aske-kamera’ kan begrænse vulkaners påvirkning af flytrafikken

Bedre målemetode af askeskyer kan give mere sikker viden om risikoen for mennesker og deres rejseaktivitet, mener britiske forskere.

16h

New dating of Pictish sites reveals early origins of written communication in northern Britain

The Picts have long been regarded as a mysterious people, leaving behind little evidence of their presence other than their iconic carved stones.

16h

The Atlantic
The Humanification of Pet Food Is Nearly Complete

To succinctly capture the strangeness of how Americans feed their house pets in the year 2018, there are perhaps no better five words than pumpkin-spice lattes for dogs. If there’s room to use a few more qualifiers, then non-GMO, American-made goat’s-milk pumpkin-spice lattes for dogs would probably be more evocative. That is a real product, sold by a real company—“Just add warm water!” the label

16h

Hubble telescope fixed by 'jiggling it around'

Telescope close to restarting operations after being put out of action by gyroscope failure The Hubble space telescope is close to resuming full operations after Nasa “jiggled it around”. The telescope was sidelined earlier this month after a gyroscope failed, leaving it unable to point in the right direction during observations. Continue reading…

16h

Shielded quantum bits

A theoretical concept to realize quantum information processing has been developed by Professor Guido Burkard and his team of physicists at the University of Konstanz. The researchers have found ways to shield electric and magnetic noise for a short time. This will make it possible to use spins as memory for quantum computers, as the coherence time is extended and many thousand computer operations

16h

Scientists identify protein that controls leaf growth and shape

In autumn, it is not only the colours that catch the eye, but also the different sizes and shapes of leaves. But what makes leaves of different plants differ so much in their shapes? Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape.

16h

Image: Kyoto and Osaka

The Copernicus Sentinel-2B satellite takes us over Kyoto, shown in the top right, and Osaka, seen in the bottom left of this image. This striking false-colour image captures two of Japan's larger cities, which are home to 1.5 and 2.7 million people, respectively. Both are, of course, significantly smaller than the capital. Greater Tokyo has a population of around 38 million, making it the largest

16h

Cannabis extract relieves chronic pain minus the ‘high%0

Researchers have pinpointed how cannabidiol, or CBD, can relieve pain safely without the side effects. In the wake of cannabis legalization in Canada, a team of scientists has delivered encouraging news for chronic pain sufferers by pinpointing the effective dose of marijuana plant extract cannabidiol for safe pain relief without the typical “high” or euphoria that THC produces. The findings of t

16h

Testing cells for cancer drug resistance

Biophysicists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have demonstrated that Raman microscopy can be used to detect the resistance of tumour cells to cancer drugs. Unlike conventional approaches, this method does not require any antibodies or markers. It detects the response of cells to administered drugs and therefore could determine the effect of drugs in preclinical studies.

16h

Two-pronged approach — Novel combined therapy tackles excess fatty tissue

A new combined therapy for obesity and diabetes has been shown to suppress the appetite and at the same time increase energy expenditure. Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technica University of Munich (TUM), partner institutions of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD), have reported their findings in 'Nature Communications'.

16h

Plant polymers do not always act together to make beautiful shapes

Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) show in mutant plant cells that three polymers, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, are deposited at the secondary cell wall independent of each other. The discovery challenges a long-held consensus that assumed their deposition must occur in order. The discovery is expected to aid in the generation of plants that can acclimatiz

16h

The body weight bias in sales

Findings from a new study suggest that sales employees are more likely to recommend round products for customers that are overweight or obese, but there is no evidence that these customers prefer round products.

16h

A new therapeutic avenue for treating insomnia

Insomnia is one of the major sleep problems all over the world. However, the most widely prescribed medicines for the treatment of insomnia are plagued by a wide range of adverse effects. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba succeeded in identifying the first positive allosteric modulator for adenosine A2A receptors and found that it induces sleep without affecting cardiovascular function, unl

16h

New data provides guidance for management of moderately dysplastic moles

Study suggests close observation is a reasonable management strategy for moderately dysplastic moles, but certain patients require continued screening for risk for melanoma.

17h

How to Keep Lil Trick-or-Treaters Safe on Halloween Night

Glow sticks and retroreflector can help your kids be seen on Halloween night. Here's how they work.

17h

Meme It Up With 11 Sure-Fire Last-Minute Halloween Costumes

Forgot about that party? Uncreative in general? Never fear, let the internet be your guide.

17h

Scientists develop lie detector test for written text

Scientists have developed a computer tool that can spot if somebody has filed a fake police statement based purely on the text included in the document.

17h

Outer Space Particles Help Image Things On Earth

Outer Space Particles Help Image Things On Earth Scientists use something that comes from space to peer into large objects like pyramids Outerspace Particles Help Image Things On Earth Video of Outerspace Particles Help Image Things On Earth Physics Friday, October 26, 2018 – 08:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Since the beginning of this video, millions upon millions of particles ha

17h

Wasp-inspired robots open doors by themselves

Researchers have modified small flying robots to grab and haul heavy loads with the help of powerful winches and two previous inventions: gecko adhesives and microspines. A closed door is just one of many obstacles that poses no barrier to a new type of flying, micro, tugging robot called a FlyCroTug. Outfitted with advanced gripping technologies and the ability to move and pull on objects around

17h

Five out of five? Study reveals psychological influences in online reviews

A new study reveals how psychological factors affect the ratings people provide and how they describe their experiences when posting online reviews.

17h

A fine-tuned laser welds more effectively

Using laser technology Empa scientists optimized a technique to weld the electronics of implantable pacemakers and defibrillators into a titanium case. The medtech company Medtronic is now using the method worldwide to produce these devices.

17h

Plants find ways to survive no matter the terrain

Researchers from Royal Holloway, University of London, together with the University of Osnabrück in Germany, have discovered that a fascinating plant employs two mechanisms to survive, no matter where it grows.

17h

Earth's dust cloud satellites confirmed

A team of Hungarian astronomers and physicists may have confirmed two elusive clouds of dust, in semi-stable points just 400,000 kilometres from Earth. The clouds, first reported by and named for Polish astronomer Kazimierz Kordylewski in 1961, are exceptionally faint, so their existence is controversial. The new work appears in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

17h

"We Are the Halluci Nation" | A Tribe Called Red

A Tribe Called Red creates music that acts as a gateway into urban, contemporary indigenous culture, celebrating all of its layers and complexity. In a set that blends traditional powwow drums and vocals with hip-hop and electronic music, the DJ collective tells stories of the First Nations in beats and images — expanding on the concept of the "Halluci Nation," inspired by the poet, musician and

17h

Hartling: Finurlighed i Sundheds­platformen var skyld i recept-fejl

En finurlighed i systemet ligger til baggrund for fejl i næsten 4.000 recepter i Sundhedsplatformen, siger koncerndirektør i Hovedstaden, Svend Hartling. Han meddeler, at alle tilfælde nu bliver gået igennem.

18h

Patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft venter for længe på behandling i Hovedstaden

Otte patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft i Region Hovedstaden har i september accepteret at vente længere end 14 dage på behandling.

18h

The oldest weapons in North America offer a new view of prehistoric tech

Science The Paleoamerican migration plot thickens. The spearheads date back to more than 13,500 years ago, making them possibly the oldest weapons ever found in North America.

18h

Varm ballon får diabetikere til at smide insulinpennen

En ballon, der brænder ødelagte celler i tarmen væk, er et nyt lovende redskab til at give type 2-diabetikere et bedre liv, viser hollandsk forsøg.

18h

Lens-free OLEDs with efficiency comparable to that of inorganic LEDs

The use of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) has extended to various applications, but their efficiency is still lagging behind inorganic light-emitting diodes. In this research, a KAIST team provided a systematic way to yield OLEDs with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) greater than 50 percent with an external scattering medium.

18h

8 Bizarre Animal Surprises From 'True or Poo' — Can You Tell Fact From Myth?

Which of these bizarre animals facts from "True of Poo?" are real, and which are not?

18h

'Does it Fart?' Authors Drop Book Number Two, 'True or Poo?'

New book "True or Poo?" explores a range of riveting animal repulsiveness.

18h

Image of the Day: Cryo Corals

With the help of gold nanorods and a cryoprotectant, coral larvae are brought back to life after cryopreservation.

18h

'Painted People' in Scotland Developed Written Language 1,700 Years Ago

The Picts, a fierce group of people who lived in Scotland during ancient and medieval times may have developed their own written language.

18h

Step Inside the Air Force's Sound-Swallowing Anechoic Chamber

The 30-foot cube is at the center of the Air Force Research Laboratory’s effort to help soldiers, sailors, and air crews focus on what matters, when it matters.

18h

Make Your Own Fake Blood With This Medically Inspired Recipe

To make realistic fake blood for Halloween, it helps to understand why actual blood looks and flows the way it does.

18h

'Fallout 76' and 'Overwatch' Esports Top the Week's Gaming News

Halloween is nearly upon us, and zombies and bugs have descended on the gaming world. Act accordingly.

18h

How to find fulfillment: Lessons from ‘dark horse’ success

The Dark Horse Project is a long-term study run out of Harvard's Graduate School of Education. It examines how people achieve success by harnessing their individuality. What dark horses have in common is that they use fulfillment as a path to success—not the other way around. How do they do this? By investigating and understanding their motivations—that is, knowing fully what they want and why th

18h

10 of Europe's weirdest laws

While a few of the laws on this list are holdovers from long ago, some laws are as recent as 2011. While marrying a dead person or handling salmon suspiciously might sound morbid or hilarious, these laws have historical context. Some of today's laws might seem as antiquated as these in 100 years, too. In England and Scotland, it is illegal to handle a salmon in suspicious circumstances The Salmon

18h

Which Planets Do Space Scientists Love Most—and Least?

As BepiColombo heads to long-neglected Mercury, a look at which planets attract scientific missions, and why — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Physicists demonstrate magnetometer that uses quantum effects and machine learning

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Aalto University in Finland, and ETH Zurich have demonstrated a prototype device that uses quantum effects and machine learning to measure magnetic fields more accurately than its classical analogues. Such measurements are needed to seek mineral deposits, discover distant astronomical objects, diagnose brain disorders, and cre

18h

Imagining your own SeaChange – how media inspire our great escapes

Many Australians dream about moving to the country, escaping the city for good.

18h

Report calls for more science to negate CO2 emissions

Technologies that remove carbon dioxide from the air must play a major role in mitigating climate change, according to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

18h

Bacteria: Protein researchers decipher resistance mechanism

Worldwide, resistance to antibiotics is on the rise. In order to understand why bacteria are becoming immune to previously well-functioning drugs, scientists are penetrating ever deeper into the molecular structure of cells. A research group at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has now succeeded in isolating a membrane protein from the E. coli bacterium and shed light on its molecula

18h

Ancient fish evolved in shallow seas – the very places humans threaten today

You walk and talk and live on land, but your ancient relatives were fish.

18h

My thoughts are my password, because my brain reactions are unique

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

18h

Photos: Circular Geoglyphs Discovered in Peru's Sihuas Valley

Here's a look at mysterious circles etched into the desert of southern Peru.

18h

Ancient Travelers Created These Sprawling Circular Structures During Pit Stops

Mysterious desert circles in Peru follow long-ago footpaths.

18h

PLO glæder sig over fokus på børnene i vaccine-udspil

PLO-formand Christian Freitag glæder sig over tiltag som gratis HPV-vaccine til unge drenge samt en målrettet indsats for at udbrede viden vaccineprogrammet i regerings vaccineudspil. Han understreger dog behovet for klare linjer.

19h

Why alligators, wolves and mountain lions are turning up in odd places

Predators are thriving in places they shouldn't, revealing some serious misunderstandings about their behaviour and how to protect them

19h

On the DNA trail of the platypus

We all leave traces of our presence behind as we move through our environment.

19h

Falling fertility: lessons learned from Botswana – Science Weekly podcast

Fifty years ago, the average woman in Botswana had seven children . Now she will have fewer than three. Enabling women to control their fertility has had huge ramifications for their health, education and employment – could President Trump’s ‘ global gag rule ’ threaten this? Nicola Davis travels to Botswana to investigate Fifty years ago, the average woman in Botswana had seven children. Now she

19h

Researcher gives a glimpse into a limited resource—groundwater

Masaki Hayashi's lifelong interest in and research about groundwater has led him to help the Government of Alberta implement policy and regulations that affect how Albertans manage the use of groundwater.

19h

Microsoft Surface Pro 6 Review: Pricey, But the Battery Life Is Epic

Microsoft's latest pro-level portable Surface is back. Performance is improved, and this time, it comes in black.

19h

'Chilling Adventures of Sabrina' Review: The Dark, Relevant Magic of Netflix's Newest Thriller

The series is a fun, seasonally apt fantasia of your favorite classic horror tropes. But its greatest strength is making subtext sing.

19h

Continental's 'Invisible' Car Pillars Nix the Safety-Visibility Tradeoff

Thick pillars are good in crashes but bad for driver's lines of sight. Continental wants to make them disappear.

19h

AI Researchers Fight Over Four Letters: NIPS

Organizers of a top conference in artificial intelligence reject a request to change its name, sparking new protests.

19h

Tech Workers Overwhelmingly Support Democrats in 2018

But PACs run by Amazon, Microsoft, Facebook, and Google support Republicans and Democrats more or less equally.

19h

What Psychedelic Research Can and Cannot Tell Us about Consciousness

A recent Scientific American blog post misconstrues and oversimplifies the research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Trust in others predicts mortality in the US

Do you trust other people? It may prolong your life. According to a study by researchers from Lund University and Stockholm University, people who trust others live longer—those who do not increase their risk of a shortened life. The study is published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

19h

HS2 construction: Moving the remains of 40,000 people

Work begins to exhume thousands of skeletons to make way for HS2 construction.

19h

Sunshine seems to protect babies from eczema – but we don’t know why

Sunshine seems to prevent babies from getting eczema and is more effective than vitamin D supplements, but moderation is advised due to the risk of skin damage

19h

Controversial HS2 burial site dig at London Euston begins

Some 45,000 skeletons are being removed to make way for a new station terminus.

19h

Google udskyder 'smart city'-bydel i Canada

En central privacy-konsulent har forladt Google Sidewalk Labs nye smart city-bydel i Toronto. Også borgerprotester og kritik fra bystyret har udskudt byggeriet af den datadrevne bydel.

19h

Discovery of new superconducting materials using materials informatics

A NIMS-Ehime University joint research team succeeded in discovering new materials that exhibit superconductivity under high pressure using materials informatics (MI) approaches (data science-based material search techniques). This study experimentally demonstrated that MI enables efficient exploration of new superconducting materials. MI approaches may be applicable to the development of various

19h

Coconut the snow leopard recovers from eyelid surgery

Coconut, the snow leopard cub born at the Sacramento Zoo earlier this year, underwent a rare eyelid surgery on Wednesday, October 24.. UC Davis veterinary specialists and the Sacramento Zoo veterinary team collaborated to correct a congenital eyelid defect known as colombas. This ocular deformity is sometimes documented in snow leopards under human care. Coconut was also born with other birth defe

19h

Rygning, chili eller vinterbadning: Kan du skyde genvej til et vægttab?

Vil du gerne tabe dig uden at gå den hårde vej? Der findes en del husråd, men holder de videnskabeligt?

19h

What Causes Alcohol-Induced Blackouts?

In search of answers, a neurobiologist looks to rodents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Nanocrystals arrange to improve electronics

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers are working to make better electronic devices by delving into the way nanocrystals are arranged inside of them.

19h

Scientists find great diversity, novel molecules in microbiome of tree roots

Researchers with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered that communities of microbes living in and around poplar tree roots are ten times more diverse than the human microbiome and produce a cornucopia of novel molecules that could be useful as antibiotics, anti-cancer drugs, or for agricultural applications.

19h

Importance of growth factor diffusion in sensory organ development

A multi-disciplinary team consisting of NUS biophysicists along with scientists from New York University and National Institutes of Health have discovered that the protein Anosmin1 controls the diffusion of fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10) in the formation of sensory organs in zebrafish models.

19h

Ny professor i geriatri har fokus på ældres muskelfunktion

Charlotte Suetta er tiltrådt som professor i geriatri med specielt fokus på muskel- og funktionstab hos ældre patienter.

20h

Revealing the mechanisms behind the enhancement of thermal properties of graphene nanofluids

Disperse graphene in a suitable solvent and the resulting nanofluid will have much better thermal properties than the original liquid. Three ICN2 research groups collaborated to describe and explain this effect from the inside out. The results, published in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Nanoscale, provide a comprehensive analysis that alternately rules out and lends support to different existin

20h

Mars Express keeps an eye on curious cloud

Since 13 September, ESA's Mars Express has been observing the evolution of an elongated cloud formation hovering in the vicinity of the 20 km-high Arsia Mons volcano, close to the planet's equator.

20h

Racial and economic disparities intertwined, study finds

By many measures, the U.S. has made important strides when it comes to civil rights: The racial gaps in educational achievement, life expectancy, and wages, though still considerable, have all narrowed measurably in the past 50 years.

20h

CRISPR opens door to new type of medicine—'genome surgery'

Within a few years, Jim Johnsen and Delaney Van Riper may be among the first to benefit from CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing, a breakthrough that has already revolutionized biology research and promises to resurrect gene therapy.

20h

Lynetteholmen godkendt: Bredt flertal bag ny københavner-ø

Folketinget har nu godkendt aftalen om at anlægge en ny ø, Lynetteholm, ud for København

20h

Blog: Top 3 matematikdidaktiske bommerter. Nogensinde

Matematikundervisning har ikke altid været fyldt emd formidlingsmæssige genialiteter. Nicolas Guilbert har lavet en top tre.

20h

Naturgas kan nu erstattes med varmepumper

Forligskredsen bag energiaftalen er blevet enige om at ophæve brændselsbindingen til naturgas i de mindre, decentrale kraftvarmeværker.

20h

Megyn Kelly’s Original Sin

When Megyn Kelly launched Megyn Kelly Today , in late September 2017, the host made a great show of how apolitical NBC’s new show would be. “The truth is, I am kind of done with politics for now,” Kelly informed the audience , at home and in her soft-lit, blond-wooded, fresh-flowered studio, her tone managing to be confessional and conspiratorial at the same time. The assembled crowd roared with

20h

Kamala Harris’s Anti-Trump Tour

I NDIANOLA, Iowa—The 35-year-old white woman is gripping Kamala Harris’s arms, looking right at her. “Everything that was in my head,” she says, “was coming out of your mouth.” It’s 3 o’clock on a Monday afternoon, 30 minutes south of Des Moines, on the top floor of a bar that doesn’t start serving drinks for another hour. Obviously, the only reason a senator from California is here is because sh

20h

Burning Is a Patient, Spellbinding Mystery Thriller

The concept of Haruki Murakami’s short story “ Barn Burning ,” first published in 1983 (and translated into English a decade later), is brief and transfixingly ambiguous, like an artful curl of cigarette smoke that lingers and then vanishes. Two men, one rich and important, the other a listless writer, share some pot and have a conversation that quickly turns chilling: The former confesses a secr

20h

Coral larvae survive being frozen and thawed for the first time

Cryopreservation might help save some coral reefs at risk from climate change and other dangers.

20h

Baby's tears and mom's libido

A substance in young mice's tears makes female mice more likely to reject male sexual advances. This research is part of ongoing efforts at the University of Tokyo to understand how animals communicate using chemicals called pheromones. Direct connections between human and mouse behavior cannot be made because pheromones are highly species specific.

21h

Forskere holder fup-forlag i live

For at trives godt skal predatory publishers løbende fodres med penge og akademisk indhold. Danske universiteter har i ni år bistået med at få firmaernes pseudo science­-platforme til at vokse.

21h

If the Pipe-Bomb Mailings Aren’t Terrorism, What Is?

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET on October 26, 2018. Recent mornings have brought a series of fast-breaking reports, one after another, of pipe bombs mailed to prominent figures, from Democratic politicians to the actor Robert De Niro. Suspicious packages kept coming on Friday, including an explosive device addressed to Democratic Senator Cory Booker. But according to CNN's Jake Tapper, a spokesperson fo

21h

Hubble telescope fixed by 'jiggling it around'

Telescope close to restarting operations after being put out of action by gyroscope failure The Hubble space telescope is close to resuming full operations after Nasa “jiggled it around”. The telescope was sidelined earlier this month after a gyroscope failed, leaving it unable to point in the right direction during observations. Continue reading…

21h

GomSpace tester kommunikation til satellit-sværme

To danske satellitter har demonstreret kommunikation på 2.500 kilometers afstand i kredsløb om Jorden

21h

Hør ugens podcast: Danske forskere bidrager til pseudovidenskabelige tidsskrifter

Den videnskabelige proces undergraves af underlødige videnskabelige tidsskrifter og konferencer, der publicerer forskningsresultater uden et vederhæftigt peer review. Over 100 danske forskere har publiceret i fuptidsskrifterne.

22h

En barndom i nedre samfundslag sætter fysiske spor senere i livet

Børn af ufaglærte har en ringere fysisk funktion midt i livet end akademikerbørn….

22h

6.8 magnitude quake causes Greek island damage, no injuries

A powerful 6.8-magnitude undersea earthquake struck early Friday off the Ionian Sea island of Zante, causing structural damage but no injuries, officials said.

22h

Switzerland's Richemont, China's Alibaba team up

Swiss luxury goods group Richemont announced Friday a partnership with Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba to develop platforms in China for high-end products.

22h

Light-bending tech shrinks kilometers-long radiation system to millimeter scale

The DESY accelerator facility in Hamburg, Germany, goes on for miles to host a particle making kilometer-long laps at almost the speed of light. Now researchers have shrunk such a facility to the size of a computer chip.

22h

Small risks may have big impact on breast cancer odds of childhood cancer survivors

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists found that the combined effect of common genetic variations can dramatically increase risk of breast cancer for female pediatric cancer survivors.

23h

Genetic profiling may inform breast cancer risk in young childhood cancer survivors

A combined evaluation of common variants with small effects and rare predisposing mutations among young female childhood cancer survivors may further stratify this high-risk population for subsequent breast cancer risk.

23h

'Big dry' drags on as Australia sets up drought-proof fund

Australia is setting up a billion-dollar fund to "future proof" the country against droughts, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Friday, as farmers struggle with a 'big dry' forecast set to continue for months.

23h

Armed drones, iris scanners: China's high-tech security gadgets

From virtual reality police training programmes to gun-toting drones and iris scanners, a public security expo in China showed the range of increasingly high-tech tools available to the country's police.

23h

Hurricane largely wipes out tiny Hawaiian island

Marine debris teams were dispatched to assess the damage this week after a tiny, remote Hawaiian island was largely wiped off the map when a raging hurricane passed through, officials said.

23h

Who am I? Hunt for heritage drives Chinese to DNA tests

Chinese executive Miao Qing spits into a specially designed container, destined for a lab where her saliva will be analysed and sequenced, offering an insight into her genetic make-up and—more importantly—her ancestry.

23h

Daddy cool: Same-sex penguin couple become parents

Two male penguins who paired up as a "same-sex couple" have successfully incubated a baby chick and are "doting" on their tiny offspring, an Australian aquarium announced Friday.

23h

Google app tested in Venezuela takes swipe at press censors

Google has unveiled a tool meant to help fight press censorship around the world, testing it first in Venezuela, where journalists say they're battling a government bent on burying online stories that expose corruption and human rights abuses.

23h

Poor Ivory Coast pupils' ray of hope: solar backpacks

The equatorial sun has been up for about an hour as a gaggle of children set off from the Ivorian village of Allepilla on their hour-long trek to school.

23h

GM proposes nationwide zero-emissions vehicle sales mandate

General Motors says it will ask the federal government for one national gas mileage standard, including a requirement that a percentage of auto companies' sales be zero-emissions vehicles.

23h

Snapchat parent pressured by drop in users

Snapchat parent Snap came under selling pressure Thursday after a quarterly report showing a loss of one million users even as it grew revenues and narrowed losses.

23h

It's hard to build a life when you need to move cities for an academic career | Anonymous academic

To be successful, it seems you need to be available for short, fixed-term contracts all over the world This summer I started a short-term postdoc after finishing my PhD. I really like my postdoc advisor, who looks out for my mental wellbeing, as well as my new department and the city I’ve moved to. It’s refreshing to be in such a happy environment after experiencing bullying from other students a

1d

Hjertepatienter får unødvendige scanninger

Op imod hver femte hjerte-CT-undersøgelse på danske hospitaler kan være overflødig. Massiv udrulning af scannere på flere end 20 danske hospitaler har ikke ført til bedre kvalitet, mener hjerteeksperter.

1d

Machine learning skal gøre spil endnu mere realistiske

Alexandra Instituttet og IO Interactive samarbejder om at gøre animationer i spil endnu mere realistiske ved hjælp af kunstig intelligens.

1d

It-skurke slog store dele af nettet ud med heftige botnet: Nu arbejder de for FBI

Den 21. oktober 2016 slog et heftigt angreb næsten hele internettet ud. Nu arbejder de tre unge mænd bag Mirai-botnettet sammen med FBI for at forhindre lignende angreb i fremtiden.

1d

1d

How a Comedian Pushed Ireland Into a Referendum on Blasphemy

On Friday, Irish voters will participate in their second referendum of the year—this time, to decide whether to remove a prohibition against blasphemy from Ireland’s constitution. Like the decision in May to overturn a ban on abortion and the 2015 decision to legalize same-sex marriage, this vote stands to shift the country away from its traditionally Catholic heritage. The referendum, which coin

1d

Falling fertility: lessons learned from Botswana – Science Weekly podcast

Fifty years ago, the average woman in Botswana had seven children. Now she will have fewer than three. Enabling women to control their fertility has had huge ramifications for their health, education and employment – could President Trump’s ‘ global gag rule’ threaten this? Nicola Davis travels to Botswana to investigate

1d

Tre hospitaler kæmper for at forbedre behandling af lungebetændelse

Lungebetændelse er en overset og alvorlig sygdom, som ofte ikke behandles efter retningslinjerne. I projekt optiCAP arbejder tre hospitaler intensivt med at forbedre udredning og behandling af patienterne og for at sikre et reduceret og mere målrettet forbrug af antibiotika. De første resultater er positive. Håbet er nu at skabe en permanent kulturændring.

1d

Kroniske skimmelsvampe i lungerne er oversete og kan slå ihjel

Kroniske skimmelsvampe i lungerne er en overset og underdiagnosticeret sygdom, som ubehandlet har en særdeles høj dødelighed. Odense Universitetshospitals lungelæger Christian B. Laursen og Jesper Rømhild Davidsen opfordrer til at tænke på svampen som en mulig diagnose, når en lungepatient udvikler uforklarlige symptomer.

1d

Landets intensivafdelinger kritiseres for at nedprioritere KOL-patienterne

KOL-patienter, der får en svær forværring af deres sygdom, lander ofte mellem to stole. De får typisk nej til behandling på intensivafdelingerne på grund af ringe kapacitet mens lungeafdelingerne mangler de ekstra sygeplejersker, der skal til for selv at kunne løfte opgaven, fortæller lungemediciner.

1d

Lungepatienterne står ifølge ny rapport fra Etisk Råd i skyggen af kræftindsatsen

Betalingsviljen i forhold til at give patienterne et ekstra kvalitetsleveår er den dobbelte for kræftområdet i forhold til f.eks. lungeområdet. De store økonomiske investeringer i kræft fortrænger vigtige indsatser for KOL og andre lungesygdomme, advarer Etisk Råd.

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Danmarks Frie Forskningsfond: Vi nedprioriterer ikke lungemedicin

Vi får generelt få lungemedicinske ansøgninger, hvorfor der uundgåeligt vil blive givet relativt få bevillinger til dette område.

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Lungebehandlinger ­betegnes som »dybt ­forældede« på grund af for få forskningsmidler

Forskning i lungesygdomme er kraftigt underprioriteret i Danmark, siger lungeforsker på baggrund af egen opgørelse. Det går hårdt ud over en svag patientgruppe, som må nøjes med gårsdagens behandlinger, lyder kritikken.

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When it comes to respiratory effects of wood smoke, sex matters

Exposure to wood smoke can have different effects on the respiratory immune systems of men and women — effects that may be obscured when data from men and women are lumped together, according to a study published today in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine by scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health.

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Dr. Hansen og George Clooney kan gøre rigtige læger bedre

Fiktive læger kan gøre de rigtige læger mere empatiske. Det mener professor Anne-Marie Mai, der peger på, at fiktionen får lægerne til at reflektere mere over deres virke som læge og deres idealer.

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22. februar 2022

Kære dagbog, i dag har jeg været sundhedsminister i tre år.

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S har taget point på at serve først

Socialdemokratiet overraskede ved at komme først med et større sundhedsudspil. Selvom det på nogle vigtige områder er overfladisk og har nogle uforståelige mangler, så har det givetvis tvunget regeringen til at udskyde sit udspil.

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Vi må rette op på skævhederne

Vi risikerer derved at bruge ressourcerne på de raske. Er det retfærdighed?

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Over 100 danske forskere har publiceret i fuptidsskrifter

En Ingeniøren-kortlægning af danske bidrag til såkaldte 'scam journals' viser, at forskere fra en række teknisk-naturvidenskabelige fakulteter har publiceret via forlag, som udenlandske universiteter advarer imod som plattenslagere, og som amerikanske myndig­heder har sagsøgt.

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Tooth loss can indicate malnutrition, study finds

Older adults are at risk for both impaired oral health and malnutrition, according to a new study.

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Hallucinations associated with brain hyperactivity in people with macular degeneration

New research shows for the first time that visual hallucinations in people with macular degeneration are associated with abnormally heightened activity in the visual cortex of the brain. The findings could improve diagnosis of such hallucinations.

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Local hormone production is root of issue for plant development

Plant roots rely on local production of a key hormone that controls many aspects of development and response to environmental changes, according to new research. Specifically, local auxin production is required to keep plants healthy.

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New lead for mechanism of action of diabetes drug metformin

Researchers are able to see how frontline diabetes drug metformin alters cell glucose uptake using new technology that probes how drugs act on all cellular functions.

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Experimental drug more effective in treating rare kidney disease

New study finds that experimental drug sparsentan is an effective treatment for the rare kidney disease focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, which currently has no FDA-approved therapies.

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Prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among teens and adults in Gabon remains high

New research suggests that 30 years after the first epidemiological survey of the seroprevalence of Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infections in Gabon, the country remains highly endemic, with a seroprevalence of 7.3 percent.

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One size doesn't fit all, when using hormone therapy to treat endometriosis

Endometriosis — a condition caused by uterine tissue growing outside of the organ — affects 10 percent of reproductive-aged women, whom it causes chronic pain that is significant and debilitating. New research shows that the effectiveness of progestin-therapy depends on whether a woman's endometriotic lesions have the progesterone receptor (PR) present.

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Systematic review of clinical studies suggests newer shingles vaccine far more effective

A systematic review of clinical studies involving more than two million patients aged 50 years and older suggests the newer shingles vaccine Shingrix was far more successful in preventing the painful condition compared to the older vaccine Zostavax.

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At last, a simple way to solve the complex mysteries of the microbiome

Understanding how the microbes in the microbiome interact — and how they influence human health — is a gargantuan task, akin to counting the grains of sand on a beach.

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Method for determining donor kidneys' suitability for transplantation may be flawed

Results from biopsies taken when kidneys were procured from donors were not reliable for determining whether the organs were suitable for transplantation.

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Biologists gain new insights into surface, acoustic behaviors of endangered right whales

In response to the dwindling number of North Atlantic right whales, researchers have conducted a major study of the surface and acoustic behaviors of right whale mother-calf pairs. The team discovered that the near-surface resting behavior of mother-calf pairs dominates the first five months of the calves' lives.

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The world's largest campodeid dipluran named after the mythological giant Daidarabotchi

Two new to science dipluran species were discovered in touristic caves in the southern Japanese islands. Amongst them is the largest member of the campodeid family, aptly named after the giant Japanese yökai creature Daidarabotchi. They belong to a genus so far known exclusively from a few caves scattered across the easternmost continental parts of Asia.

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Why knee joint injury leads to osteoarthritis

The mechanisms leading to osteoarthritis are not known. Currently, it is not possible for a physician examining a patient to predict future joint condition and possible development of osteoarthritis. In the future, however, this may be possible, as a new study now shows that articular cartilage degenerates specifically around injury areas when the fluid flow velocity becomes excessive.

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Machine learning identifies antibiotic resistance genes in tuberculosis-causing bacteria

Researchers have trained a machine learning algorithm to identify and predict which genes make infectious bacteria resistant to antibiotics. The approach was tested on strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis — the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB) in humans. It identified 33 known and 24 new antibiotic resistance genes in these bacteria. The approach could be used to predict resistance in other

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Smoke alarms using mother's voice wake children better than high-pitch tone alarms

Researchers examined characteristics of four different smoke alarms to determine which ones worked best to wake children. The researchers found that a sleeping child was about three times more likely to be awakened by one of the three voice alarms than by the tone alarm.

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Facial exercise speeds Botox's wrinkle-reducing effects

For people who can't wait the three or four days for the wrinkle smoothing effects of botulinum toxin (Botox) injections to kick in, a new study shows facial exercise after the injections speeds the change in appearance by one day. This is the first time facial exercise has been rigorously tested in Botox. Faster time is important to patients who leave Botox for last minute before a social event.

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Good news for immersive journalism: Look at your audience

A new study shows that in virtual reality news experiences, basic interactivity can increase buy-in without compromising faithful reporting.

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Tetris: It could be the salve for a worried mind

The venerable video game Tetris was used in a recent experiment to create a state of 'flow' — the term psychologists use to describe a state of mind so engaged it makes the rest of the world fall away, and time pass more quickly. Researchers have found that state of perfect disengagement may improve the otherwise-emotionally unpleasant experience of awaiting uncertain news. The participants who a

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New species of the 'first bird' Archaeopteryx uncovered

A new species of the famous 'first bird,' Archaeopteryx, supporting its status as the transitional fossil between birds and dinosaurs, has been published by in the journal Historical Biology.

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Plump songbirds more likely to survive migration over Gulf of Mexico

A kilometer above Fort Morgan, Alabama, small migratory birds face a critical decision. Ahead lies a thousand kilometers of open water, the Gulf of Mexico, and a 22- to 24-hour flight without rest or food. On the other side, if they make it, they'll continue the journey to their South American winter habitat. For some, the journey will end in the waters of the Gulf.

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Could thyroid screening make your baby smarter?

Thyroid hormones are essential for normal brain development, but many pregnant women do not produce enough. Thyroid testing and replacement therapy are simple and widely available — so why do countries like the UK and USA not offer screening to all newly pregnant women?

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Study of 500,000 people clarifies the risks of obesity

Elevated body mass index (BMI) — a measure of weight accounting for a person's height — has been shown to be a likely causal contributor to population patterns in mortality, according to a new study using measurements and mortality data from 500,000 people.

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Aequatus — a free, open-source visualization tool enabling in-depth comparison of homologous genes

Aequatus — a new bioinformatics tool — is helping to give an in-depth view of syntenic information between different species, providing a system to better identify important, positively selected, and evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA.

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Air pollution leads to millions of ER visits for asthma attacks worldwide

Nine to 33 million visits to the emergency room (ER) for asthma worldwide may be triggered by breathing in air polluted by ozone or fine particulate matter — pollutants that can enter the lung's deep airways, according to a new study.

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SIDS: Serotonin neurons contribute to fail-safe mechanism that ensures recovery from interrupted breathing

Research in mice adds to evidence that dips in the activity of serotonin neurons may increase SIDS risk. The study reveals the activity of serotonin-producing neurons in the infant mouse brain contributes to a fail-safe switch that allows recovery from interrupted breathing. If replicated in human studies, findings could pave the way to screening for SIDS risk, new therapies.

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Bagsiden: Riber Ret anno 1269 slår nu igennem i Canada

Bygningsreglementet: Skrappere afstandskrav og mildere domme for tyveri

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Antibiotic explorers: where tetracyclines go in human cells

In clinical trials, tetracycline antibiotics have proven effective in treating some pathological inflammation and cancer. And yet, despite promising results, exactly how the treatment works remained elusive. Now, after much painstaking exploration, we have an answer as well as a new technique to find similar answers numerous other drugs.

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New test measures men's fertility

At a time when more than half of male infertility cannot be explained by current methods, a new test is able to measure male fertility.

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Certain physical disabilities may affect outcomes in kidney transplant recipients

Compared with kidney transplant recipients who did not report a disability, recipients with a visual disability were at higher risk of organ failure and recipients with a walking disability were at higher risk of early death.Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

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Study reveals racial and ethnic disparities in pediatric kidney transplantation outcomes

From 1995 to 2014, patient survival after kidney transplantation improved overall for pediatric recipients in the United States; however, racial/ethnic disparities in long-term survival worsened over time.Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

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Acute kidney injury linked to higher risk of dementia

Patients with acute kidney injury had more than a 3-fold higher risk of developing dementia compared with those without acute kidney injury during a median follow-up time of 5.8 years.Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

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Does obesity have an impact on kidney transplant outcomes?

In a study of kidney transplant recipients, those with ideal BMI (18-25) had the best organ survival. There was no difference when comparing BMI 30-35 with >35. There were no significant differences in patient survival across different BMI groups.Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2018 Oct. 23-28 at the San Diego Convention Center.

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MRI tool watches how electrical stimulation could cure digestive disorders

Researchers used an MRI to show a play-by-play of how sending an electric impulse to the vagus nerve successfully corrects stomach complications. The technique paves the way for more precise treatment that drugs and dietary changes have not achieved.

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Glyphosate found in cat and dog food

A new study finds that glyphosate, the active herbicidal ingredient in widely used weed killers like Roundup, was present at low levels in a variety of dog and cat foods the researchers purchased at stores. Before you go switching Fido or Fluffy's favorite brand, however, be aware that the amounts of the herbicide found correspond to levels currently considered safe for humans.

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Annual dead-zone report card for the Chesapeake Bay, U.S.

An annual model-based report on low-oxygen conditions in Chesapeake Bay during 2018 indicates a total volume of 'hypoxic' waters very similar to the previous year, but with a dramatic drop in hypoxia during late July due to mixing by strong winds. The duration of hypoxia in 2018 was greater than in recent years.

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The Atlantic Daily: Looking Less Like a Standard-Bearer of the Democratic Party

What We’re Following The Big Tent: In Arizona, two candidates are vying in a close race to become the state’s first female senator—a centrist Democrat and a Republican aligning more closely with President Donald Trump. But the centrist wasn’t always so solidly centrist; in fact, quite the opposite. In Montana, a candidate who “looks less like a standard-bearer of the Democratic Party than like th

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Rising seas will swamp homes, report says

Climate advisors say coastal communities must "get real" about the possibility of 1m sea level rise.

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Spinning the light: The world's smallest optical gyroscope

A new tiny optical gyroscope fits on the tip of your finger and could find its way into drones and spacecraft in the future.

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New genetic pathways linked to severe lung disease in preemies

Scientists have identified promising new genetic pathways associated with severe lung disease in extremely premature infants.

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'Gut-on-a-chip' system shows intestinal barrier disruption is the onset initiator of gut inflammation

The first study investigating the mechanism of how a disease develops using human organ-on-a-chip technology has been successfully completed by engineers.

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Unique patterns of neural communications found in brains of children with autism

A research team studying MRI scans of school-age children's brains found unique patterns of neural communication involving the amygdala, the area of the brain responsible for processing social information. In children with ASDs, the amygdala connections with other parts of the brain proved to be weaker with some regions — and stronger with others — when compared with typically developing childre

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Novel bat behavior in Panama observed

Researchers who studied Peters' tent-making bats (Uroderma bilobatum) report that mothers prod their young with their forearms, perhaps encouraging them to fledge and wean.

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The Lancet Infectious Diseases: New investigational antibiotic effective against drug-resistant bacteria in phase 2 trial

Peer-reviewed / Randomised Controlled Trial / PeopleDrug's novel approach is designed to address three main mechanisms of antibiotic resistance used by Gram-negative bacteria

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The Amazon Selling Machine

What if there was a company that knew what you wanted to buy before you did? What if it made shopping recommendations that tapped into your deepest desires and wants? Better yet, what if it then made buying completely seamless? Would you ever stop shopping? Amazon shareholders may like the answers to those questions. The company that revolutionized the way we buy has now gotten serious about sell

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Creepy AI-Created Portrait Fetches $432,500 at Auction

It's the arrival of artificial intelligence in the art world.

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Mind’s quality control center found in long-ignored brain area

The cerebellum, once thought to be limited to controlling movement, is involved in every aspect of higher brain function, according to a new study.

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Artificial fly brain can tell who's who

Researchers have built a neural network that mimics the fruit fly's visual system and can distinguish and re-identify flies. This provides evidence that the humble fruit fly's vision is clearer than previously thought.

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New epigenetic drug strategy to treat cancer

Researchers have discovered that inhibiting CDK9, a DNA transcription regulator, reactivates genes that have been epigenetically silenced by cancer. Reactivation leads to restored tumor suppressor gene expression and enhanced anti-cancer immunity.

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How sleeping mammary stem cells are awakened in puberty

Scientists have discovered how the growth of milk-producing mammary glands is triggered during puberty. Sleeping stem cells in the mammary gland are awoken by a protein dubbed FoxP1, according to the research.

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Pretend porpoise sounds are helping conservation efforts, research shows

An examination into the detection of harbour porpoises is helping to give new understanding of effective monitoring of species under threat from anthropogenic activities such as fisheries bycatch and coastal pollution.

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Lavender might actually help you relax

Health In mice, sniffing some linalool is similar to taking Valium. Immersing yourself in a lavender cloud may actually help reduce anxiety, according to new research published this week.

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Blot halvdelen af gigtramte får behandling i tide

Danskerne skal være bedre mellem til at genkende gigtsmerter, og de praktiserende læger skal være bedre til at sende patienter videre til gigtlægen. Det siger professor Jette Primdahl fra Kong Christian X’s Gigthospital, der har lavet studier i tidlig diagnosticering.

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EU-rapport kårer det bedste sensorsystem til måling af blodsukker

Et nyt europæisk studie viser, at det nye flash-system til glukosemonitorering forbedrer diabetespatienters sundhed. Seniorprojektleder hos Defactum Claus Løvschall er glad for resultatet og mener, at sensorer er vejen frem.

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Mouse and human skin cells produce melanin on a 48-hour cycle

Researchers have discovered that mouse skin and skin cells from humans produce pigmentation in response to sunlight on a 48-hour cycle. They observed that exposing skin to ultraviolet light every two days yielded darker pigmentation with less radiation damage than daily exposure.

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Just a few drinks can change how memories are formed

Researchers have found that alcohol hijacks a conserved memory pathway in the brain and changes which versions of genes are made, forming the cravings that fuel addiction.

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Three proteins may play key roles in female fertility and cancer biology

Three proteins regulate each other with surprising twists and turns in female mouse eggs, a finding that may play an important role in female fertility and cancer biology, according to researchers.

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Det nære sundhedsvæsen skal være spydspids i kampen mod diabetes

Kommuner kan søge midler til at afprøve nye metoder til målrettet opsporing af type 2-diabetes blandt socialt udsatte borgere. Det er en spændende ny opgave, siger chef for kommunalt diabetescenter, der dog også ser både problemer med de kommunale strukturer og de afsatte midler.

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A single genetic switch changes butterfly wing color

New research shows how just one gene controls whether a certain species of butterfly has white or yellow spots on its wings.

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Tracing the evolutionary origins of fish to shallow ocean waters

Coral reefs are envisioned as the seats of great biodiversity, but they may not be where all that diversity got its start. Paleobiologists reveal that the earliest fish may have diversified in shallower waters near shore.

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How Does Gaming Affect Your Body? We Actually Tried to Find Out

From brain-mapping to pitting our reactions against an esports pro's, we're aiming to figure this out once and for all.

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Wi-Fi could get much faster thanks to a proposed change in the wireless spectrum

Technology The FCC voted to open up more space in the spectrum for connected devices. The 6 Ghz part of the wireless spectrum could soon host your Wi-Fi gadgets.

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Round 3 of neuron naming is now underway!

The 129 Eyewirers who completed over 5,000 cubes during the Countdown to Neuropia , which contributed to the recent publication in Cell , are now eligible to name a new type of neuron! Name nominations are taking place via Eyewire notifications. Once the name suggestions roll in, the vote will be open from Nov 1-8 to all players who played cubes between 10/2014 and 8/2015. The winning name will b

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: More Bombs Intercepted

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines The Trump administration reportedly plans to send an additional 800 to 1,000 troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in anticipation of the arrival of the caravan of Central American immigrants currently traveling through Mexico. The troops are only permitted to provide support to border patrol off

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Amgen Slashes the Price of a Promising Cholesterol Drug

The drug maker cut the list price of the drug Repatha by 60 percent in an effort to increase sales, which have been meager.

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Trilobites: WhereDid Fish First Evolve? The Answer May Be Shallow

They lacked jaws. Some had armor and spikes. And they were some of our earliest ancestors with spines in the shallow coasts around supercontinents.

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Splosh! How the dinosaur-killing asteroid made Chicxulub crater

When the dinosaur-killing asteroid struck Earth, it made billions of tonnes of rock move like a fluid.

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New species of ‘missing link’ between dinosaurs and birds identified

Researchers have identified a new species of Archaeopteryx that is closer to modern birds in evolutionary terms.

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Some planetary systems just aren't into heavy metal

Researchers have discovered that compact, multiple-planet systems are more likely to form around stars that have lower amounts of heavy elements than our own Sun.

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Army scientists develop computational model to predict human behavior

U.S. Army researchers have developed for the first time an analytic model to show how groups of people influence individual behavior.

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Medicaid expansion linked to reduced mortality among dialysis patients

A new Brown University study finds that fewer patients with end-stage kidney disease died within a year of starting dialysis in states that expanded Medicaid coverage in the wake of the Affordable Care Act.

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Method for determining donor kidneys' suitability for transplantation may be flawed

Results from biopsies taken when kidneys were procured from donors were not reliable for determining whether the organs were suitable for transplantation.

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Study questions certain treatments for diabetic patients at high risk for heart disease

In patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk for cardiovascular disease, targeting blood sugar to normal levels reduced the risk for macroalbuminuria, but it had no impact on more significant kidney outcomes such as serum creatinine doubling or the need for dialysis or transplantation. Targeting low blood pressures or the use of fenofibrate to lower cholesterol increased the risk for doubling of

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Marine algae bloom-derived biotoxins alter development of zooplankton and ocean food web

Researchers have analyzed the impact of diatom algae in the development of Oikopleura dioica, a type of marine zooplankton invertebrate which plays an important role in the global dynamics of the marine food webs and the biosphere carbon cycle.

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How people power can track alien species

New research shows how the public can play a vital role in helping to track invasive species.

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Mysteries of polymer strands in fuel cells unravelled

Fuel cell efficiency of hydrogen fuel cells decreases as the Nafion membrane, used to separate the anode and cathode within a fuel cell, swells as it interacts with water. Russian and Australian researchers have now shown that this Nafion separator membrane partially unwinds some of its constituent fibers, which then protrude away from the surface into the bulk water phase for hundreds of microns.

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Google parent Alphabet keeps ad growth in mixed quarter

Google parent Alphabet said Thursday its third-quarter profit rose 36 percent to $9.2 billion, fueled by gains in digital advertising delivered online and on smartphones.

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Google says fired 48 for sexual harassment over two years

Google said Thursday it had fired 48 employees in the past two years—including 13 senior executives—as a result of sexual harassment allegations, citing "an increasingly hard line" on inappropriate conduct.

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How to Pee a Brick (And Help Save the Planet While You Do It)

The cities of the future could be made of human pee — and that's a good thing.

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Amazon quarterly profit rockets tenfold to $2.9 bn

Amazon reported Thursday that its profit in the recently-ended quarter rocketed to $2.9 billion in a ten-fold increase from the same period last year.

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Repeated interferon stimulation creates innate immune memory

The innate immune system may be able to be trained to react to viral infections more efficiently by repeated exposure to anti-viral signaling molecules.

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Biomarkers facilitate early detection of glaucoma

Researchers have identified new potential biomarkers that may facilitate early detection of glaucoma in patients. Moreover, they ascertained that the mutation of a certain gene in mice causes intraocular pressure elevation. This, in turn, is one of the main risk factors for glaucoma.

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Your Move, Alphabet Board

Can powerful men in tech who commit sexual misconduct be called to account, or simply paid to leave? A blistering, deeply reported, year-in-the-making New York Times story makes the case that Google and its parent company, Alphabet, have a track record of quietly handling credible sexual-misconduct allegations while paying out and even celebrating the men responsible. When Andy Rubin, who created

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Tiger Genome Sequencing Determines There Are Six Subspecies

The new finding could aid tiger conservation, with only 4,000 of the big cats remaining.

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Not enough fruits, vegetables grown to feed the planet

Study results show that the global agriculture system currently overproduces grains, fats and sugars, while production of fruits and vegetables and, to a smaller degree, protein is not sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of the current population. The researchers also found that shifting production to match nutritional dietary guidelines would require 50 million fewer hectares of arable land,

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Novel method to block immunosuppression in cancer

Scientists have elucidated the three-dimensional structure of an assembly of proteins operating on cells that dampen immune responses. They also discovered how an antibody can block this assembly and the immunosuppression it induces downstream. Such an antibody could serve to stimulate immunity against tumor cells in cancer patients, triggering the destruction of their tumors by immune cells.

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Deaths due to tainted herbal medicine under-recorded

A forensic pathologist is warning that potentially harmful substances found in herbal medicines may be playing a bigger role in deaths of 'health tourists' than previously thought.

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Asian catfish genome decoded

For the first time, scientists decipher the entire genome of the striped catfish, paving the way for better breeding of the critical commercial species.

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Lawmakers Seek Review of Pentagon Contract Thought to Favor Amazon

Two Republican members of Congress have asked the Defense Department's Inspector General to probe the specs for a $10 billion cloud computing contract.

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Robyn’s Honey: The Thrill Is Gone, and That’s Okay

The sort of anthems that made Robyn famous speed time up. “ Dancing on My Own ,” “ Call Your Girlfriend ,” and “ Show Me Love ” draw on bittersweet feelings, but from their first synthetic whirl of notes—as sad-happy verses open up into sad-happy choruses—they’re also a rush. Sing the tunes en masse and it’s fun like a roller coaster is fun, like a thriller movie is fun, or like a night of drinki

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Vi skylder patienterne akutte løsninger på lægemangel

Kortsigtede løsninger er sværere og gør mere ondt, men Socialdemokratiet har ikke noget ønske om at trække løsninger ned over hovedet på nogen og vil optage forhandlinger med Lægeforeningen, herunder PLO og Yngre Læger, om at sikre danskerne en praktiserende læge.

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Study: 4.6 percent of Massachusetts residents have opioid use disorder

A recent study estimates that more than 275,000 people — or 4.6 percent of people over the age of 11 in Massachusetts — have opioid use disorder, a figure nearly four times higher than previous estimates based on national data. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the study involved an analysis of several linked public health data sets, allowing for a more accurate picture of the impact

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California and New Jersey family leave policies improve breastfeeding rates for some women

Partially paid family leave policies in California and New Jersey helped increase breastfeeding in those states, a new analysis from UC San Francisco has found, but rates increased most among higher-income women who could afford to take more time off from work.

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4 Bedtime habits to embrace if you're in a relationship

The evening represents many things to different people. It's a time to unwind, a time to catch up on sleep, and for many couples, it's the most opportune time to connect with one another. And since we know that there's an inextricable link between sleep and the success of a relationship (yes, there are even sleep habits that can mess with a relationship! ), it's important to implement practices t

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Taking care of your hearing and vision slows cognitive decline by 50-75%

Decline in hearing and vision can add to overall mental decline. Hearing aids can slow cognitive decline by 75%. Similarly, cataract surgery can help cognitive decline by 50%. None Cognitive decline is something that happens to all of us as we age, to varying degrees. But new research is showing that taking care of your eyes and ears as you age could help keep your brain sharp for longer than pre

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Authai is an Asian elephant. She can count like us.

Asian elephants and African elephants diverged, evolutionarily, more than 7.6 million years ago. In a recent study, an Asian elephants named Authia, was found to count numbers. Authia seems to not be held back by other animals' numeracy limitations. In recent years, we've seen a variety of animals exhibit some proficiency at counting. Lions only attack other prides whose members outnumber their o

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5 Halloween horror stories found in nature

Animals utilize shocking capacities in an effort to survive and pass on their genes. We look at five such gruesome scenarios to see how nature is red in more than tooth and claw. Halloween monsters don't have anything on Mother Nature. It's October, and with Halloween just a few days away, 'tis the season to enjoy a good scare. Pop culture overruns with monsters and miscreants looking to maim, ma

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First Vertebrates Evolved in Shallow Water

Fish stuck to coastal habitats for nearly 100 million years after they first appeared.

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Whiskers, surface growth and dendrites in lithium batteries

Researchers take a closer look at lithium metal plating and make some surprising findings that might lead to the next generation of batteries.

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Relationship between tremors, water at the Cascadia margin

Researchers find evidence of water escaping during subduction and infiltrating sedimentary material related to small tremors that occur beneath the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

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Scientists uncover relationship between tremors, water at the Cascadia margin

The earthquakes are so small and deep that someone standing in Seattle would never feel them. In fact, until the early 2000s, nobody knew they happened at all. Now, scientists at Rice University have unearthed details about the structure of Earth where these tiny tremors occur.

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Astronomers confirm collision between two Milky Way satellite galaxies

If you're standing in the Southern Hemisphere on a clear night, you can see two luminous clouds offset from the Milky Way.

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Air pollution and noise increase risk for heart attacks

Air pollution and transportation noise are both associated with an increased risk of heart attacks. Studies on air pollution, which do not take into account traffic noise, tend to overestimate the long-term effect of air pollution on heart attacks.

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Growing noise in the ocean can cause dolphins to simplify their calls

Noise levels in the world's oceans are on the rise, but little is known about its impact on marine mammals like dolphins that rely on sound for communication. Researchers have found that dolphins are simplifying their calls to be heard over noise from recreational boats and other vessels in nearby shipping lanes.

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Rice U. scientists uncover relationship between tremors, water at the Cascadia margin

Rice University researchers find evidence of water escaping during subduction and infiltrating sedimentary material related to small tremors that occur beneath the Pacific Northwest of the United States.

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Whiskers, surface growth and dendrites in lithium batteries

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis take a closer look at lithium metal plating and make some surprising findings that might lead to the next generation of batteries.

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IUPUI biologists use 'mini retinas' to better understand connection between eye and brain

IUPUI biologists are growing 'mini retinas' in the lab from stem cells to mimic the growth of the human retina. The researchers hope to restore sight when critical connections between the eye and the brain are damaged. These models also allow researchers to better understand how cells in the retina develop and are organized. These results are published online in Scientific Reports, a Nature Resear

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Nanotubes may give the world better batteries

Rice University scientists are counting on films of carbon nanotubes to make high-powered, fast-charging lithium metal batteries a logical replacement for common lithium-ion batteries.

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Whiskers, surface growth and dendrites in lithium batteries

As our love of gadgets grows, so do demands for longer lasting batteries. But there's a problem.

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New tools for creating mirrored forms of molecules

Chemists have developed an easier way to make libraries of candidate drugs with a specific 'handedness.'

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What makes a good working dog? Canine 'aptitude test' might offer clues

A canine cognition test could help organizations that train working dogs identify the dogs that are most likely to succeed, according to new research. If organizations could better predict which dogs will succeed in working roles, it could save thousands of dollars in training costs and ensure people in need get dogs faster.

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A new model for how working memory gets you through the day

MIT neuroscientists present a new model of working memory that explains how the brain holds information in mind (the 'memory' part) and also executes volitional control over it (the 'working' part).

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Adenovirus is normally harmless—here's why some outbreaks turn deadly

Health Here's what you need to know about the adenovirus. This past week, New Jersey State Health Officials reported the deaths of seven children, all from a rehabilitation center in the state’s town of Haskell.

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Men Are Socialized to ‘Act Inhumanely’

Thomas Page McBee transitioned at age 30. In his male body, he “started to experience the world differently immediately,” he says in a video filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival in June. “I gained a lot of privileges and also lost a lot of connection.” McBee, the author of Amateur: A True Story About What Makes a Man , goes on to detail how his experience of male socialization later in life af

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Khashoggi’s Murder Heralds a New Era of Impunity

The head of the United Nations delivered a dark and, it turns out, prophetic warning several weeks ago. As power diffuses from the United States, the world is devolving into chaos. “Impunity and unpredictability” are becoming “the name of the game,” António Guterres told me. At the time, the UN secretary-general had the kaleidoscopic and catastrophic Syrian war top of mind. Now we have another st

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CRISPR pinpoints gene that switches butterfly wing color

Scientists have used genome sequencing and CRISPR to home in on a single gene that controls wing color in butterflies. Heliconius butterflies are a diverse and colorful group of species that live throughout tropical regions of Central and South America. Many of them have wing patterns and colors that mimic other species to protect themselves from predators. Now, new research shows that in one spe

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How Do Birds Know to Fly South?

Birds such as the Arctic tern used magnetic particles and eye pigments to navigate. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nanotubes may give the world better batteries

Rice University scientists use thin films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to keep lithium metal from sprouting dendrites, tentacle-like growths that can cause batteries to fail. The strategy could be key to developing batteries that hold more energy and charge faster than current, ubiquitous lithium-ion batteries.

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Evolution does repeat itself after all: How evolution lets stripes come and go

A team of evolutionary biologists discovers the genetic basis for the repeated evolution of color patterns. The findings about the stripes of the especially diverse species of East-African cichlid fishes explain how evolution can repeat itself at record speed.

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Novel material could make plastic manufacturing more energy-efficient

An innovative filtering material may soon reduce the environmental cost of manufacturing plastic. The material, a metal-organic framework, can extract ethylene, the key ingredient in the most common form of plastic, from a mixture of other chemicals — while consuming far less energy than usual.

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A Psychological Theory Explains the Mail Bomber Reaction

There’s no suspect yet for the spate of mail bombs terrorizing America, but don’t expect this minor detail to prevent the opinion-makers from divining the sender’s motives. I mean, who needs a suspect to know exactly what he, or maybe she, secretly wants? So far, many have blamed right-wing extremism . And perhaps that’s only natural given the intended recipients, a Who’s Who list of President Do

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Earl E. Bakken, Pacemaker Inventor and Medtronic Founder, Dies at 94

Starting in a garage, where he invented the battery-powered pacemaker, he and a brother-in-law created the world’s largest medical device company.

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Watch Live Today: A Breakthrough Pulsar Discovery

Astrophysicist and equality advocate Jocelyn Bell Burnell will discuss her landmark discovery of pulsars during a live webcast tonight at 7 P.M. Eastern time — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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These plants bring all the birds to your yard

Animals Songbirds need bugs, and bugs need local greens. By studying more than 160 yards, Narango found that suburban lawns with at least 70% native trees and shrubs were able to sustain breeding chickadees.

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Ridiculously Tiny Baby Octopus Riding Ocean Trash Is So, So Smol

Marvel at the cuteness of a pea-size baby octopus.

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What makes a good working dog? Canine 'aptitude test' might offer clues

A canine cognition test could help organizations that train working dogs identify the dogs that are most likely to succeed, according to new research led by the University of Arizona. If organizations could better predict which dogs will succeed in working roles, it could save thousands of dollars in training costs and ensure people in need get dogs faster.

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Biologists gain new insights into surface, acoustic behaviors of endangered right whales

In response to the dwindling number of North Atlantic right whales, researchers in the College of Arts and Sciences at Syracuse University have conducted a major study of the surface and acoustic behaviors of right whale mother-calf pairs. The team discovered that the near-surface resting behavior of mother-calf pairs dominates the first five months of the calves' lives.

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Racism, sexual assault contribute to college mental health challenges, study finds

A text mining analysis of academic and news articles related to mental health issues in higher education finds that racism, violence and sexual assault are key contributors to mental health challenges for students.

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At least 57 negative impacts from cyber-attacks

New research codifying how cyber-attacks can cause harm is aimed at helping organizations become more aware of the ways they could be affected.

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Controversial Spearpoints Could Rewrite the Story of the First Americans

Archaeologists have unearthed what are potentially the oldest weapons ever found in North America: eleven spearpoints dating to about 15,500 years ago, a new study finds.

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What makes a good working dog? Canine 'aptitude test' might offer clues

The canine labor market is diverse and expansive. Assistance dogs may be trained to work with the visually or hearing impaired, or with people in wheelchairs. Detection dogs may be trained to sniff out explosives, narcotics or bedbugs. Other pups even learn to jump out of helicopters on daring rescue missions.

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New tools for creating mirrored forms of molecules

One of the biggest challenges facing synthetic chemists is how to make molecules of only a particular "handedness." Molecules can come in two shapes that mirror each other, just like our left and right hands. This characteristic, called chirality, can be found in biological molecules like sugars and proteins, which means that drug designers often want to develop medicines that are only left- or ri

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Not enough fruits, vegetables grown to feed the planet, study reveals

If everyone on the planet wanted to eat a healthy diet, there wouldn't be enough fruit and vegetables to go around, according to a new University of Guelph study.

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Crashing waves may have spurred the evolution of backbones

Backbones helped vertebrates conquer the oceans and move onto land. Now a study hints they may have evolved as protection against strong waves in shallow waters

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Not enough fruits, vegetables grown to feed the planet, U of G study reveals

Study results show that the global agriculture system currently overproduces grains, fats and sugars, while production of fruits and vegetables and, to a smaller degree, protein is not sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of the current population.The researchers also found that shifting production to match nutritional dietary guidelines would require 50 million fewer hectares of arable land,

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New tools for creating mirrored forms of molecules

Chemists have developed an easier way to make libraries of candidate drugs with a specific 'handedness.'

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Older adults with strong grip, good memory may avoid or delay disability

To learn more about how and whether being strong can ward off disability, a team of researchers examined information from a study called SHARE, and published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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One size doesn't fit all, when using hormone therapy to treat endometriosis

Endometriosis — a condition caused by uterine tissue growing outside of the organ — affects 10 percent of reproductive-aged women, whom it causes chronic pain that is significant and debilitating. The standard first-line treatment for all women with endometriosis is hormonal, specifically progestin-based, therapy.

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Belgian researchers discover a novel method to block immunosuppression in cancer

Belgian research groups from the UCLouvain and WELBIO, VIB and Ghent University, and the biotechnology company argenx elucidated the three-dimensional structure of an assembly of proteins operating on cells that dampen immune responses. They also discovered how an antibody can block this assembly and the immunosuppression it induces downstream. Such an antibody could serve to stimulate immunity ag

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Scientists uncover key brain mechanism in salience processing

A study carried out by professor ZHU Yingjie from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, in collaboration with Prof. CHEN Xiaoke from Stanford University, uncovered the brain mechanism underlying salience processing.

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Midlife women transitioning to menopause have a higher risk of metabolic syndrome, which predisposes to heart disease and type 2 diabetes

Midlife women transitioning to menopause may be able to lower their risk of developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes, if they exercise more or eat a lower calorie diet, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Fragile seashores were 'cradle of evolution' for early fish

Evolution of the major groups of fish that we recognize today took place in shallow waters, close to the seashore, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.The findings, published in Science suggest that, while coral reefs may be vital for diversification at the present day, fragile near shore environments were crucial for evolution some 480-360 million years ago.

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Researchers build an artificial fly brain that can tell who's who

CIFAR researchers have built a neural network that mimics the fruit fly's visual system and can distinguish and re-identify flies. This provides evidence that the humble fruit fly's vision is clearer than previously thought.

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Stanford researchers learn how the brain decides what to learn

Neuroscientists know a lot about how our brains learn new things, but not much about how they choose what to focus on while they learn. Now, Stanford researchers have traced that ability to an unexpected place.

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Tracing the lineages of the mammalian gut community

The unique compositions of bacteria residing in the guts of mice are inherited from parents and remain more or less the same over many generations, according to a new study.

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New metal-organic framework separates gases with ease

Researchers have developed a type of microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) that displays 'exceptional' separation properties in the production of polymer-grade ethylene, a highly important — yet costly to produce — industrial chemical.

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Mapping the chromatin landscape of human cancer

By mapping the largely uncharted chromatin landscape of primary human cancers, researchers have revealed new insights into the regulation of different cancer-related genes.

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The shallow-water cradle of vertebrate evolution

The first vertebrates on Earth originated and diversified in the shallow-water lagoons lining the mid-Paleozoic coastline, a new study finds.

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Stanford-led study identifies link between DNA-protein binding, cancer onset

Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators at other institutions have identified a link between how proteins bind to our DNA and how cancer develops. This finding may allow researchers to predict cancer pathways and long-term patient outcomes.

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Novel material could make plastic manufacturing more energy-efficient

An innovative filtering material may soon reduce the environmental cost of manufacturing plastic. The material, a metal-organic framework, can extract ethylene, the key ingredient in the most common form of plastic, from a mixture of other chemicals — while consuming far less energy than usual.

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Evolution does repeat itself after all: How evolution lets stripes come and go

A team of evolutionary biologists from the University of Konstanz, headed by Professor Dr. Axel Meyer, discovers the genetic basis for the repeated evolution of color patterns. The findings about the stripes of the especially diverse species of East-African cichlid fishes explain how evolution can repeat itself at record speed. The study is published in Science magazine on Oct. 26.

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Tracing the evolutionary origins of fish to shallow ocean waters

Coral reefs are envisioned as the seats of great biodiversity, but they may not be where all that diversity got its start. Paleobiologist Lauren Sallan of the University of Pennsylvania and Ivan Sansom of the University of Birmingham and colleagues reveal that the earliest fish may have diversified in shallower waters near shore.

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Science/Science Careers' survey ranks top biotech, biopharma, and pharma employers

The Science and Science Careers' 2018 annual Top Employers Survey polled employees in the biotechnology, biopharmaceutical, pharmaceutical, and related industries to determine the 20 best employers in these industries as well as their driving characteristics. Respondents to the web-based survey were asked to rate companies based on 23 characteristics, including financial strength, easy adaptation

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Prevalence of HTLV-1 infection among teens and adults in Gabon remains high

A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, by Mirdad Kazanji, of the Centre International de Recherches Medicales de Franceville in Gabon, and the Institut Pasteur de la Guyane in French Guiana, suggests that 30 years after the first epidemiological survey of the seroprevalence of Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infections in Gabon, the country remains highly endemic, w

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Grim’s Haunted Carnival: Skelethon Results!

Ooooooh! You did a frightfully good job at the Skelethon. This first 1110-cube cell finished in 13 hours 10 minutes, and the second 972-cube cell finished in 14 hours 2 minutes. Put those dry, bony hands together for a seasonally spooky round of applause! We hope you enjoyed this last event of Grim’s Haunted Carnival, and that you’ll hop online at 4 PM EDT on Friday for awards and promotions. Joi

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Absurdly expensive ‘Himalayan Viagra’ faces extinction

A parasitic fungus that grows wild throughout the Himalayas and sells for more than its weight in gold could vanish if current harvesting and climate trends continue, researchers warn. The fungus, Ophiocordyceps sinensis , survives by preying on ghost moth caterpillars in some of the highest reaches of the Himalayas. The fungus infects and eats the insides of a caterpillar that burrows undergroun

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Drug improves survival in metastatic breast cancer

The drug palbociclib, used in combination with standard treatment, improved survival for women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, according to a large phase III clinical trial.

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Europe backs own space launchers amid growing competition

Major European countries are backing a new generation of home-grown space launchers amid growing competition from private space companies and developing nations such as India and China.

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The first vertebrates on Earth arose in shallow coastal waters

After appearing about 480 million years ago in coastal waters, the earliest vertebrates stayed in the shallows for another 100 million years.

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Dutch join G7-led push to rid oceans of plastics

Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte announced his country's endorsement of a G7-led initiative to rid the oceans of plastics, during a visit to Ottawa on Thursday.

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BA says 185,000 more customers affected in cyber attack

British Airways owner IAG on Thursday said that a further 185,000 customers may have had their personal details stolen in a cyber attack earlier this year.

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The Guardian view on Black Sea shipwrecks: discovering our past | Editorial

Three years of research have produced astonishing results, including the remains of 65 vessels, one thought to be ancient Greek. This should be only the start The seabed produces archaeological wonders. The Mary Rose , which sank in the Solent in 1545, and the Vasa , which capsized in 1633 in the harbour of Stockholm, are just two of the famous ships that have been lifted from the deep. There is a

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Soft magnetic materials for a sustainable and electrified world

Soft magnetic materials are key to the efficient operation of the next generation of power electronics and electrical machines (motors and generators). Many new materials have been introduced since Michael Faraday’s discovery of magnetic induction, when iron was the only option. However, as wide bandgap semiconductor devices become more common in both power electronics and motor controllers, ther

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News at a glance

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Us against them

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AAAS Council reminder

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Showing their stripes

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Measuring charity

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Blood by the clock

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Dynamic salience processing in paraventricular thalamus gates associative learning

The salience of behaviorally relevant stimuli is dynamic and influenced by internal state and external environment. Monitoring such changes is critical for effective learning and flexible behavior, but the neuronal substrate for tracking the dynamics of stimulus salience is obscure. We found that neurons in the paraventricular thalamus (PVT) are robustly activated by a variety of behaviorally rel

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The paraventricular thalamus is a critical thalamic area for wakefulness

Clinical observations indicate that the paramedian region of the thalamus is a critical node for controlling wakefulness. However, the specific nucleus and neural circuitry for this function remain unknown. Using in vivo fiber photometry or multichannel electrophysiological recordings in mice, we found that glutamatergic neurons of the paraventricular thalamus (PVT) exhibited high activities duri

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Efficient access to unprotected primary amines by iron-catalyzed aminochlorination of alkenes

Primary amines are essential constituents of biologically active molecules and versatile intermediates in the synthesis of drugs and agrochemicals. However, their preparation from easily accessible alkenes remains challenging. Here, we report a general strategy to access primary amines from alkenes through an operationally simple iron-catalyzed aminochlorination reaction. A stable hydroxylamine d

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Synchrotron radiation from an accelerating light pulse

Synchrotron radiation—namely, electromagnetic radiation produced by charges moving in a curved path—is regularly generated at large-scale facilities where giga–electron volt electrons move along kilometer-long circular paths. We use a metasurface to bend light and demonstrate synchrotron radiation produced by a subpicosecond pulse, which moves along a circular arc of radius 100 micrometers inside

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Ethane/ethylene separation in a metal-organic framework with iron-peroxo sites

The separation of ethane from its corresponding ethylene is an important, challenging, and energy-intensive process in the chemical industry. Here we report a microporous metal-organic framework, iron(III) peroxide 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate [Fe 2 (O 2 )(dobdc) (dobdc 4– : 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylate)], with iron (Fe)–peroxo sites for the preferential binding of ethane over eth

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A room-temperature single-photon source based on strongly interacting Rydberg atoms

Tailored quantum states of light can be created via a transfer of collective quantum states of matter to light modes. Such collective quantum states emerge in interacting many-body systems if thermal fluctuations are overcome by sufficient interaction strengths. Therefore, ultracold temperatures or strong confinement are typically required. We show that the exaggerated interactions between Rydber

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Methylammonium-free, high-performance, and stable perovskite solar cells on a planar architecture

Currently, perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with high performances greater than 20% contain bromine (Br), causing a suboptimal bandgap, and the thermally unstable methylammonium (MA) molecule. Avoiding Br and especially MA can therefore result in more optimal bandgaps and stable perovskites. We show that inorganic cation tuning, using rubidium and cesium, enables highly crystalline formamidinium-bas

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Transmission modes of the mammalian gut microbiota

Mammals house a diversity of bacteria that affect health in various ways, but the routes by which bacterial lineages are transmitted between hosts remain poorly understood. We experimentally determined microbiota transmission modes by deriving 17 inbred mouse lines from two wild populations and monitoring their gut microbiotas for up to 11 host generations. Individual- and population-level microb

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Agouti-related peptide 2 facilitates convergent evolution of stripe patterns across cichlid fish radiations

The color patterns of African cichlid fishes provide notable examples of phenotypic convergence. Across the more than 1200 East African rift lake species, melanic horizontal stripes have evolved numerous times. We discovered that regulatory changes of the gene agouti-related peptide 2 ( agrp2 ) act as molecular switches controlling this evolutionarily labile phenotype. Reduced agrp2 expression is

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The nearshore cradle of early vertebrate diversification

Ancestral vertebrate habitats are subject to controversy and obscured by limited, often contradictory paleontological data. We assembled fossil vertebrate occurrence and habitat datasets spanning the middle Paleozoic (480 million to 360 million years ago) and found that early vertebrate clades, both jawed and jawless, originated in restricted, shallow intertidal-subtidal environments. Nearshore d

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PIEZOs mediate neuronal sensing of blood pressure and the baroreceptor reflex

Activation of stretch-sensitive baroreceptor neurons exerts acute control over heart rate and blood pressure. Although this homeostatic baroreflex has been described for more than 80 years, the molecular identity of baroreceptor mechanosensitivity remains unknown. We discovered that mechanically activated ion channels PIEZO1 and PIEZO2 are together required for baroreception. Genetic ablation of

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New Products

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Single-cell analysis uncovers convergence of cell identities during axolotl limb regeneration

Amputation of the axolotl forelimb results in the formation of a blastema, a transient tissue where progenitor cells accumulate prior to limb regeneration. However, the molecular understanding of blastema formation had previously been hampered by the inability to identify and isolate blastema precursor cells in the adult tissue. We have used a combination of Cre-loxP reporter lineage tracking and

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Super-resolution chromatin tracing reveals domains and cooperative interactions in single cells

The spatial organization of chromatin is pivotal for regulating genome functions. We report an imaging method for tracing chromatin organization with kilobase- and nanometer-scale resolution, unveiling chromatin conformation across topologically associating domains (TADs) in thousands of individual cells. Our imaging data revealed TAD-like structures with globular conformation and sharp domain bo

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The chromatin accessibility landscape of primary human cancers

We present the genome-wide chromatin accessibility profiles of 410 tumor samples spanning 23 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We identify 562,709 transposase-accessible DNA elements that substantially extend the compendium of known cis-regulatory elements. Integration of ATAC-seq (the assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing) with TCGA multi-omic data identifie

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Comment on "The earliest modern humans outside Africa"

Hershkovitz et al . (Reports, 26 January 2018, p. 456) interpreted the Misliya-1 fossil maxilla as evidence of the earliest known anatomically modern human outside Africa. However, the fossil’s reported age of 177,000 to 194,000 years relies on flawed interpretations of uranium-series data. We contend that those data support a minimum age of no more than ~60,000 to 70,000 years.

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Evolutionary shift toward protein-based architecture in trypanosomal mitochondrial ribosomes

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) plays key functional and architectural roles in ribosomes. Using electron microscopy, we determined the atomic structure of a highly divergent ribosome found in mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei , a unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. The trypanosomal mitoribosome features the smallest rRNAs and contains more proteins than all known ribosomes. The s

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Response to Comment on "The earliest modern humans outside Africa"

Our original claim, based on three independent numerical dating methods, of an age of ~185,000 years for the Misliya-1 modern human hemi-maxilla from Mount Carmel, Israel, is little affected by discounting uranium-series dating of adhering crusts. It confirms a much earlier out-of-Africa Homo sapiens expansion than previously suggested by the considerably younger (90,000 to 120,000 years) Skhul/Q

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Mouse Microbiomes Are Mostly Inherited

Using wild mice housed in laboratory conditions, researchers find that gut bacteria compositions change little from one generation to the next.

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New tool streamlines the creation of moving pictures

It's often easy to imagine balloons soaring or butterflies fluttering across a still image, but realizing this vision through computer animation is easier said than done. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new tool that makes animating such images much simpler.

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Boeing opens first European plant, picking UK despite Brexit

The US aerospace giant Boeing opened its first manufacturing plant in Europe on Thursday, giving a boost to Britain's business credentials ahead of its impending exit from the European Union.

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Algorithm art fetches $432,500 at NY auction: Christie's

A portrait made by algorithm smashed new boundaries Thursday, selling for $432,500 and becoming the first piece of Artificial Intelligence art sold at a major auction house, Christie's said.

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Novel material could make plastic manufacturing more energy-efficient

An innovative filtering material may soon reduce the environmental cost of manufacturing plastic. Created by a team including scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the advance can extract the key ingredient in the most common form of plastic from a mixture of other chemicals—while consuming far less energy than usual.

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Tracing the evolutionary origins of fish to shallow ocean waters

The first vertebrates on Earth were fish, and scientists believe they first appeared around 480 million years ago. But fossil records from this time are spotty, with only small fragments identified. By 420 million years ago, however, the fossil record blossoms, with a huge variety of fish species present en masse.

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Team discovers the genetic basis for the repeated evolution of color patterns

A team of evolutionary biologists from the University of Konstanz, headed by Prof. Dr. Axel Meyer, has discovered the genetic basis for the repeated evolution of colour patterns. The findings about the stripes of the diverse species of East African cichlid fishes explain how evolution can repeat itself at record speed. The study is published in Science magazine on 26 October.

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Hearing aids and cataract surgery could protect against dementia

Decline in hearing and vision can add to overall mental decline. Hearing aids can slow decline by 75%. Similarly, cataract surgery can help cognitive decline by 50%. None Cognitive decline is something that happens to all of us as we age, to varying degrees. As your eyesight and hearing fade, this can lead to an overall mental decline. For decades ( perhaps even centuries , a case could be made).

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Magic mushrooms evolved to scramble insect brains, send them on wild trips

Fungi species that produce psilocybin—the main hallucinogenic ingredient in "magic" mushrooms—aren't closely related to one another. Researchers have discovered that the way these fungi independently gained the ability to produce psilocybin is because of horizontal gene transfer. Based on how uncommon horizontal gene transfer is in mushroom-producing fungi and the types of fungi that produce psil

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The Moral Dilemmas of Self-Driving Cars

The Moral Dilemmas of Self-Driving Cars Results from a new survey reveal cultural differences in whom participants prefer to be spared in fatal accidents. Crosswalk_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Air Force photo by Margo Wright Technology Thursday, October 25, 2018 – 13:15 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — If your car was in a lethal accident, would you prefer for it to kill one inn

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The Resistance Won't Win Back Arizona's Senate Seat

YUMA , Ariz.—Steve Alameda is Kyrsten Sinema’s dream voter. In this military town, roughly 20 miles from the Mexico border, the culture is “hard right” and “stubborn,” according to locals. The economy is heavily agricultural: Growers say they provide 90 percent of the country’s leafy greens during the winter. Alameda is a farmer who heads the local fresh-vegetable association, and he identifies a

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R.E.M., in Retrospect

Elitist hipster-critic types always prefer the early stuff, the blurry, spiky, private-passion stuff, but I’m going to say it anyway: For all the grave emotional eloquence of their maturity, and the great feats of artist-to-audience heart connection that they achieved with songs like “Everybody Hurts” and “Losing My Religion,” it’s primitive R.E.M. that we’re missing most keenly today—the first t

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Trump to develop national strategy on '5G' wireless networks

The Trump administration is announcing plans to come up with a strategy for supporting the development of next-generation wireless networks known as "5G."

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Here's how to view, download, and delete your personal information online

Technology Set aside lots of time and extra hard-drive space. Download your personal data from Facebook, Apple, Microsoft, and other tech heavies.

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'Phantom' Archaeopteryx, One of the World's 1st Birds, Could Probably Fly

After years spent sitting in private collections, a "phantom" fossil of one of the world's first known birds has finally seen the light of day. Now, scientists have determined that it's a previously unknown species within the famous genus of Archaeopteryx

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Team study breaks Forster resonant energy transfer (FRET) distance limit

Using engineered nanocomposite structures called metamaterials, a City College of New York-led research team reports the ability to measure a significant increase in the energy transfer between molecules. Reported in the journal ACS Photonics, this breakthrough breaks the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) distance limit of ~10-20 nanometers, and leads to the possibility of measuring larger

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GPM Satellite shows powerful super Typhoon Yutu hitting Northern Marianas

NASA's GPM Core observatory satellite captured an image of Super Typhoon Yutu when it flew over the powerful storm just as the center was striking the central Northern Mariana Islands north of Guam.

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Researchers observe novel bat behavior in Panama

Baby birds learn to fly. Baby mammals switch from milk to solid food. Baby bats, as winged mammals, do both at the same time during their transition from infants to flying juveniles. According to a new report from researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) who studied Peters' tent-making bats (Uroderma bilobatum), mothers prod their young with their forearms, perhaps encoura

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Offering employees a helping hand can backfire

When a coworker or employee is struggling, is it better to offer help on the job or just a shoulder to cry on? A new study led by San Francisco State University researchers shows that the two forms of support do roughly the same thing—but that sometimes, it's best not to address the situation at all.

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OU meteorologist expects severe drought and heavy rain events to worsen globally

A University of Oklahoma meteorologist, Elinor R. Martin, expects severe drought and long-lasting rainfall events to worsen in the future. In Martin's new study just published, she determines how frequent, intense and long lasting these types of events will be in the future. Martin looks at both severe drought and rain events, but it is the first time extended heavy rain events have been studied.

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At last, a simple way to solve the complex mysteries of the microbiome

This much is clear: The tiny bacteria that live on and inside us are tremendously important for our health and well-being, affecting everything from our mood to the risk of autism. But understanding how those multitudes of microbes interact—and how they influence human health—is a gargantuan task, akin to counting the grains of sand on a beach.

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CCNY study breaks Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) distance limit

Using engineered nanocomposite structures called metamaterials, a City College of New York-led research team reports the ability to measure a significant increase in the energy transfer between molecules. Reported in the journal ACS Photonics, this breakthrough breaks the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) distance limit of ~10-20 nanometers, and leads to the possibility of measuring larger

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Spinning the light: The world's smallest optical gyroscope

Gyroscopes are devices that help vehicles, drones, and wearable and handheld electronic devices know their orientation in three-dimensional space. They are commonplace in just about every bit of technology we rely on every day. Originally, gyroscopes were sets of nested wheels, each spinning on a different axis. But open up a cell phone today, and you will find a microelectromechanical sensor (MEM

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Methamphetamine Roils Rural Towns Again Across The U.S.

Meth is back "with a vengeance," police say. Now made mostly by superlabs in Mexico, it is stronger, cheaper and more prevalent, cutting across demographic barriers and sparking serious crime. (Image credit: GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images)

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The K-core as a predictor of structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems

A network metric called the K-core could predict structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems, according to research by physicists at The City College of New York. The K-core appears able to forecast which species is likely to face extinction first, by global shocks such as climate change, and when an ecosystem could collapse due to external forces.

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DNA 'dances' in first explanation of how genetic material flows through a nucleus

DNA flows inside a cell's nucleus in a choreographed line dance, new simulations reveal. The finding is the first large-scale explanation of genetic material moving within a working cell.

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Algorithms Can Be a Tool For Justice—If Used the Right Way

Companies like Netflix, Facebook, and Uber deploy algorithms in search of greater efficiency. But when used to evaluate the powerful systems that judge us, algorithms can spur social progress in ways nothing else can.

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This plant protein plays ‘chess’ with bacterial invaders

Plant scientists have shed new light on a genetic pathway that influences both plant growth and disease resistance. The findings make this pathway a promising target for breeding new crop varieties that can fight pathogens without sacrificing performance. The research, published in the journal Current Biology , details how the protein Feronia works in the model plant Arabidopsis to promote growth

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CCNY finds K-core as a predictor of structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems

A network metric called the K-core could predict structural collapse in mutualistic ecosystems, according to research by physicists at The City College of New York. The K-core appears able to forecast which species is likely to face extinction first, by global shocks such as climate change, and when an ecosystem could collapse due to external forces.

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Holder de skiftende årstider Jordens klima på et behageligt niveau?

Jordens iskapper og sæsonvariationer kan give et klima, der hverken er for koldt eller for varmt. Men stabiliteten er skrøbelig, viser matematisk analyse.

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Divide and Preserve: Reclassifying Tigers to Help Save Them From Extinction

Are there many subspecies of tiger, or only two? A correct accounting is the only way to preserve what is left of the animal’s genetic diversity, some scientists say.

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Altria to Stop Selling Some E-Cigarette Brands That Appeal to Youths

Bowing to public and government pressure over vaping among young people, the major tobacco company said it would take two flavor-based products off the market.

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The Main Suspect Behind an Ominous Spike in a Polio-like Illness

A s the summer of 2014 gave way to fall, Kevin Messacar , a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital Colorado, started seeing a wave of children with inexplicable paralysis. All of them shared the same story. One day, they had a cold. The next, they couldn’t move an arm or a leg. In some children, the paralysis was relatively mild, but others had to be supported with ventilators and feeding tubes afte

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The Feds Just Hit Notorious Swatter Tyler Barriss With 46 New Charges. He Intends to Plead Guilty

Prosecutors in California have filed 46 new counts against Tyler Barriss for bomb threats, fraud, and swatting incidents nationwide. He’s angling to get the case transferred to Kansas and intends to plead guilty.

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Offering employees a helping hand can backfire

When a coworker or employee is struggling, is it better to offer help on the job or just a shoulder to cry on? A new study led by San Francisco State University researchers shows that the two forms of support do roughly the same thing — but that sometimes, it's best not to address the situation at all.

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Political competition is hurting our charitable giving, study finds

As the U.S. midterm election heats up and the fallout of the Supreme Court nomination rings across the political divide, a new study presents a unique angle of American politics: how party affiliation affects charitable donations. Researchers representing four institutions found voters who live in counties where political competition is high give less to charity.

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Spinning the light: The world's smallest optical gyroscope

A new tiny optical gyroscope fits on the tip of your finger and could find its way into drones and spacecraft in the future.

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Unique patterns of neural communications found in brains of children with autism

A research team studying MRI scans of school-age children's brains found unique patterns of neural communication involving the amygdala, the area of the brain responsible for processing social information. In children with ASDs, the amygdala connections with other parts of the brain proved to be weaker with some regions — and stronger with others — when compared with typically developing childre

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Experimental drug more effective in treating rare kidney disease

New study finds that experimental drug sparsentan is an effective treatment for the rare kidney disease focal segmental glomerulosclerosis, which currently has no FDA-approved therapies.

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