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Cancer's most deadly assassin exists in every cell

A kill code is embedded in every cell in the body whose function may be to cause the self-destruction of cells that become cancerous, reports a new study. As soon as the cell's inner bodyguards sense it is mutating into cancer, they punch in the kill code to extinguish the mutating cell. Cancer can't become resistant to it, the study shows, making it a potentially bulletproof treatment. The next s

12h

 

Brazil’s new president will make it harder to limit climate change

Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s new president, looks set to further weaken protections for the Amazon rainforest, a move that threatens efforts to limit climate change

5h

 

Ærter kan blive det nye protein i vores kost

Renæssancekost: Animalsk protein kan erstattes af ærter, der dyrkningsmæssigt passer rigtig godt til vores klima.

11h

 

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New evidence of durable immune response to 3 experimental Ebola vaccines helps drive new wave of vaccine development targeting a number of diseases with epidemic potential

In the midst of an increasingly volatile Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a new study presented today finds that the immune response generated by three experimental Ebola vaccines — including one already deployed in the DRC — persists for at least two and a half years. The study, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, could ha

4min

 

Weatherwatch: forecasts may suffer if satellites share bandwidth

Frequency sharing could jam airways, lowering accuracy of forecasts, meteorologist warns We might mock weather forecasts, but in reality they have never been better. Be it an approaching storm, the chances of a sunny day, or the likelihood of flooding, most of us have access to reliable forecasts. And much of this improvement is thanks to satellite data. But weather forecasts could be set to go d

5min

 

Researchers use the Large Millimeter Telescope to observe a powerful molecular wind in an active spiral galaxy

An international team of astrophysicists using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) in central Mexico has detected an unexpected and powerful outflow of molecular gas in a distant active galaxy similar to the Milky Way. The galaxy is 800 million light years from Earth. The findings are published in the current edition of Astrophysical Journal Letters.

17min

 

Google to give away $25 million to fund humane AI projects

Google will give away $25 million to projects that propose ways to use the artificial intelligence of computers to help create a more humane society.

17min

 

IBM's $34B Red Hat deal is risky bid to boost cloud businessIBM Red Hat Linux $34B

IBM's plan to buy Red Hat is both the biggest acquisition in IBM's century-long history and a risky effort to position itself as a major player in cloud computing.

17min

 

Five laptops to buy if Apple messus up this MacBook Air update

Gadgets If you want to hop off the Apple ship, there are lots of ultra-portable PCs that are worth a look. Apple's lineup of ultra-portable laptops may get an upgrade, but we've been burned in the past.

18min

 

NASA spacecraft sets record for closest approach to sun

NASA's Parker Solar Probe is now closer to the sun than any spacecraft has ever gotten.

23min

 

Mountain birds on 'escalator to extinction' as planet warms

A meticulous re-creation of a 3-decade-old study of birds on a mountainside in Peru has given scientists a rare chance to prove how the changing climate is pushing species out of the places they are best adapted to.

23min

 

Alterations to seabed raise fears for future

The ocean floor as we know it is dissolving rapidly as a result of human activity. The seabed plays a crucial role in controlling the degree of ocean acidification by neutralizing the acidity of the water. But due to human activities, the level of CO2 in the water is so high, and the water so acidic, that the calcite on the ocean floor is simply being dissolved.

24min

 

How soil bacteria are primed to consume greenhouse gas

New research has revealed that some soil bacteria are primed ready to consume the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when they experience life without oxygen in the environment.

24min

 

Robotic arm may help to rehabilitate chronic stroke victims

New research finds that robotic arm rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients with aphasia, the loss of ability to understand or express speech, may promote speech and language function recovery.

24min

 

Gastric bypass surgery associated with greater weight loss in adults

Adults with severe obesity had greater initial and sustained weight loss with gastric bypass surgery than either sleeve gastrectomy or adjustable gastric banding, according to a new study published today in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

26min

 

Signal's "Sealed Sender" Is a Clever New Way to Shield Your Identity

"Sealed sender" gives the leading encrypted messaging app an important boost, hiding metadata around who sent a given message.

29min

 

Most Americans underestimate minorities' environmental concerns—even minorities

A new study shows most Americans underestimate just how concerned minorities and lower-income people are about environmental threats, including members of those groups.

41min

 

Animal species becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation nearly complete

Species of reptiles, amphibians and other vertebrates are becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation has claimed more than 99 percent of the country's original wooded areas.

41min

 

Alterations to seabed raise fears for future

The ocean floor as we know it is dissolving rapidly as a result of human activity.

41min

 

Beyond 1984: Narrow focus on wildfire trends underestimates future risks to water security

Dramatic increases in wildfire over the last few decades have garnered considerable media attention. Numerous headlines have claimed that the amount of wildfire in the western U.S. is unprecedented. However, in a recent issue of Earth's Future, published by the American Geophysical Union, Brendan Murphy, Larissa Yocom, and Patrick Belmont at the S.J. and Jessie E. Quinney College of Natural Resour

47min

 

Atlantic's Hurricane Oscar's water vapor measured by NASA's Terra Satellite

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean on Oct. 16 the MODIS instrument aboard analyzed water vapor within Hurricane Oscar.

47min

 

Hidden costs of disease to greater Yellowstone elk

For decades researchers have known that a bacterial disease in elk, bison and cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem causes periodic abortions in these animals and chronic illness in humans drinking infected cow's milk. The disease, called brucellosis, poses a financial concern for dairy producers and cattle ranchers, but its effects on the wild elk population have generally been considered m

47min

 

Threatening Typhoon Yutu probed by GPM Satellite

Typhoon Yutu, known as Rosita in the Philippines, is now threatening the Philippine Island of Luzon. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the heavy rainfall the storm is packing.

47min

 

How to Watch Apple's (Second!) Fall Hardware ShowApple iPad Pro Mac

We're expecting new iPads and a new MacBook. Here’s how you can watch all the action, from wherever you are.

47min

 

Long-term side effects similarly low for weekly, conventional breast radiation, trial finds

In a 10-year study of women who received radiation therapy to treat early-stage breast cancer, those receiving fewer, larger individual doses experienced similarly low rates of late-onset side effects as those undergoing conventional radiation therapy. Findings from the multi-institutional U.K. FAST clinical trial were presented last week at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radi

47min

 

Ghostly Dumbo Octopus Makes Rare Appearance in Dazzling Deep-Sea Video

Watch this majestic dumbo octopus glide through the deep sea.

50min

 

Sweet discovery pushes back the origins of chocolate

As Halloween revelers prepare to feast on chocolate, a new study from an international team of researchers is pushing back the origins of the delicious sweet treat.

53min

 

Zebrafish make waves in our understanding of a common craniofacial birth defect

Children are not as hard-headed as adults—in a very literal sense. Babies are born with soft spots and flexible joints called sutures at the junctions where various sections of their skull bones meet. If these sutures fuse prematurely, the skull cannot expand to accommodate the child's growing brain—a serious birth defect called craniosynostosis that can cause mental retardation and even death.

53min

 

Novel quantum dots enhance cell imaging

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Mayo Clinic have engineered a new type of molecular probe that can measure and count RNA in cells and tissue without organic dyes. The probe is based on the conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, but it relies on compact quantum dots to illuminate molecules and diseased cells rather than fluore

59min

 

Aggressive treatment for some stage IV lung cancer pts can dramatically improve OS

Adding radiation therapy or surgery to systemic therapy for stage IV lung cancer patients whose cancer has spread to a limited number of sites can extend overall survival time significantly, according to new results from a multicenter, randomized, controlled phase II study. The findings were presented last week at the 60th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO).

1h

 

Radiation therapy cuts low risk of recurrence by nearly 3/4 for patients with 'good risk'

A subset of patients with low-risk breast cancer is highly unlikely to see cancer return following breast conservation surgery but can lower that risk even further with radiation therapy, finds a new long-term clinical trial report. These 12-year follow-up data from the only prospective, randomized trial to compare recurrence outcomes after treatment for low-risk ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) we

1h

 

Robbers Tried to Steal an ATM, But Instead Helped Uncover Lost Medieval Artifacts

A gang of goons' bumbling robbery attempt inadvertently revealed lost Tudor treasures.

1h

 

New platform based on biology and nanotechnology carries mRNA directly to target cells

Delivering an effective therapeutic payload to specific target cells with few adverse effects is considered by many to be the holy grail of medical research. A new Tel Aviv University study explores a biological approach to directing nanocarriers loaded with protein "game changers" to specific cells. The groundbreaking method may prove useful in treating myriad malignancies, inflammatory diseases

1h

 

Study sheds light on why a warmer world may equal a wetter Arctic

The Arctic is warming faster than the rest of the globe, and as it does, it's predicted to get wetter. But why? What mechanisms might drive these changes?

1h

 

Deconstructing the superfood that determines honeybee hierarchy

All bee larvae eat royal jelly when they're new, but only future queens continue to eat it. To figure out why, researchers in Austria are taking a close look at the molecular ingredients of the fancy fare.

1h

 

Cephalopods could become an important food source in the global community

With a growing world population and climate challenges that are causing agricultural areas to shrink, many are wondering where sustainable food will come from in the future. A professor of gastrophysics and a chef offer a suggestion in a new research article: The cephalopod population (including squid, octopus and cuttlefish) in the oceans is growing and growing — let's get better at cooking them

1h

 

Earliest hominin migrations into the Arabian Peninsula required no novel adaptations

A new study suggests that early hominin dispersals beyond Africa did not involve adaptations to environmental extremes, such as to arid and harsh deserts. The discovery of stone tools and cut-marks on fossil animal remains at the site of Ti's al Ghadah provides evidence for hominins in Saudi Arabia at least 100,000 years earlier than previously known. Stable isotope analysis indicates a dominance

1h

 

Banned Ozone-Depleting Chemical Was Used Illegally in China

A hazardous, ozone-depleting compound is still being used in China, even though it is banned worldwide by the Montreal Protocol, a new study finds.

1h

 

Twitter Should Kill the Retweet

On Monday, Twitter was briefly ablaze after CEO Jack Dorsey reportedly suggested to the Telegraph that the company might eliminate its heart-shaped like button. The company quickly clarified, tweeting that as par of a "commitment to healthy conversation," it was "rethinking everything about the service," including the like button. But this wasn’t the first time Dorsey signaled his frustration wit

1h

 

Why Trump Is Blaming the Media Down the Homestretch

Traumas and tragedies change people, at least briefly. They change lives for those closest; they emotionally affect those farther away; sometimes they change society as a whole. One remarkable thing about President Donald Trump’s reaction to the massacre Saturday at a synagogue in Pittsburgh is how little it seems to have influenced him. As I reported over the weekend, his initial remarks were fa

1h

 

Hidden costs of disease to greater Yellowstone elk

For decades researchers have known that a bacterial disease in elk, bison and cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem causes periodic abortions in these animals and chronic illness in humans drinking infected cow's milk. The disease, called brucellosis, poses a financial concern for dairy producers and cattle ranchers, but its effects on the wild elk population have generally been considered m

1h

 

Why a warmer world may equal a wetter Arctic

As the Arctic warms, it's predicted to get wetter. But why? A new study looks to history for answers, examining what happened in the region during a period of warming some 8,000 years ago. The research finds evidence that in this ancient time, western Greenland became more humid, a trend often linked to increased precipitation. The study further shows that two different climactic processes may hav

1h

 

Rare Leftovers of 'Vampire' Fish, Favored by Medieval Foodies, Found in London

Deep in a medieval cesspit in the middle of London, researchers made a spooky discovery.

1h

 

Most Americans underestimate minorities' environmental concerns — even minorities

A new study shows most Americans underestimate just how concerned minorities and lower-income people are about environmental threats, including members of those groups.

1h

 

How peeking at dirty diapers can help premature babies thrive

The gut microbiome—the trillions of tiny gut bacteria that live in the digestive tract—may offer a way to personalize nutrients and feeding patterns to help premature babies get a stronger start to life, according to a new study. About half of these babies struggle to grow, putting them at risk of health problems that can last a lifetime. Currently, there is no method that consistently helps them

1h

 

Robotic arm may help to rehabilitate chronic stroke victims, finds new study

New research published in Frontiers in Neurology by NYU researcher Adam Buchwald finds that robotic arm rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients with aphasia, the loss of ability to understand or express speech, may promote speech and language function recovery.

1h

 

Do You Get Health Coverage Through Obamacare?

The period for enrolling in insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act begins on Nov. 1. Are you renewing coverage or planning to sign up?

1h

 

Five Midterm Votes That Could Have an Outsize Impact on Climate Change

A Washington ballot measure that would establish the first carbon tax in the country, along with under-the-radar races in other states, will quite likely influence national policy.

1h

 

With Bugs, You’re Never Home Alone

A citizen-science project aims to catalog the spiders, insects and other many-legged creatures that live indoors with us.

1h

 

Climate change is 'escalator to extinction' for mountain birds

A new study shows that rising temperatures drive the disappearance of mountain-top bird species in Peru.

1h

 

Good cholesterol may cut women’s dementia risk

Two recent studies shed light on which women are most at risk of developing dementia, and how we can prevent or delay the disease early. Two thirds of people living with dementia are women, and the Australian Bureau of Statistics confirms it is now the leading cause of death for women in the country. Yet, there are few studies of how dementia progresses in women. The new results are timely, comin

1h

 

In Photos: The Stunning Gila Wilderness Area

The Gila Wilderness area remains an unspoiled natural region.

1h

 

Rare blue asteroid reveals itself during fly-by

Blue asteroids are rare, and blue comets are almost unheard of. An international team investigated (3200) Phaethon, a bizarre asteroid that sometimes behaves like a comet, and found it even more enigmatic than previously thought.

1h

 

Scientists refine the search for dark matter

Researchers have developed a more effective technique in the search for clues about dark matter in the universe. They can now analyze much larger amounts of the data generated at CERN.

1h

 

Breakthrough in process to produce hydrogen fuel

Researchers have cracked the chemical mechanism that will enable development of a new and more efficient photo-chemical process to produce hydrogen fuel from water, according to a new article.

1h

 

Virus production boosted in cells to generate more vectors for gene transfer

Researchers increased the production of lentiviral vectors by host cells by co-expressing the proteins SPSB1 or Tax. Mechanistically, this was shown to have a range of effects, including increased activity of the HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus promoters, the latter being used for many lentiviral constructs. This approach enables greater ability to generate sufficiently large quantities of viruses for u

1h

 

Honeybees at risk from Zika pesticides

Up to 13 percent of US beekeepers are in danger of losing their colonies due to pesticides sprayed to contain the Zika virus, new research suggests.

1h

 

UK bumblebee population trends

Data collected by volunteers to assess the country's changing bumblebee populations have been analyzed in a new way for the first time — and show mixed results about their decline, with cause for concern for two species.

1h

 

Imaging collaboration sheds new light on cancer growth

Researchers have uncovered new insights into how the normal controls on cell growth are lost in cancer cells, leading to rapid tumor expansion.

1h

 

The 5 Biggest Myths of Mindfulness

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen busts the 5 biggest myths of mindfulness — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

MEGAPIXELS: Spooky animal x-rays are exactly as cool as you'd imagine

Animals They’re spooky-scary. To prepare for Halloween this year, we talked to a veterinarian at the Oregon Zoo about the wild anatomy in these spooky animal x-rays.

2h

 

Opioid-affected births to rural residents increase in rural and urban hospitals

Pregnant women with opioid addiction may have particular challenges in receiving the care they need when they live in rural areas. Both maternal opioid use disorder and neonatal abstinence syndrome, also known as infant withdrawal, are increasing faster in rural areas than in urban areas.

2h

 

Eye-tracking glasses provide a new vision for the future of augmented reality

Battery-free eye-tracking glasses creates an even more realistic experience for augmented reality enthusiasts, improving player controls for gaming and allowing for more realistic image displays.

2h

 

Scientists neutralize reactive nitrogen molecules to enhance cancer immunotherapy

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame studying tumors in prostate cancer models found that nitration of an amino acid can inhibit T-cell activation, thwarting the T-cell's ability to kill cancer cells.

2h

 

Are Anti-Vaxxers to Blame for Europe's Current Measles Outbreak?

The measles thrives in populations that are under-vaccinated. So, why have so many people in Europe avoided getting their shots?

2h

 

Astronomers witness slow death of nearby galaxy

Astronomers have witnessed, in the finest detail ever, the slow death of a neighboring dwarf galaxy, which is gradually losing its power to form stars.

2h

 

Jacques Cousteau's Grandson to Map Depths of Massive Blue Hole Off Belize's Coast

A new expedition is set to map the bowels of a mysterious blue sinkhole off the coast of Belize

2h

 

Casino lights and sounds encourage risky decision-making

The blinking lights and exciting jingles in casinos may encourage risky decision-making and potentially promote problem gambling behavior, suggests new research.

2h

 

Zebrafish make waves in our understanding of a common craniofacial birth defect

Scientists in the USC Stem Cell laboratories of Gage Crump and Robert E. Maxson, Jr., pioneered a way to study craniosynostosis in zebrafish, as published in the journal eLife.

2h

 

Animal species becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation nearly complete

Species of reptiles, amphibians and other vertebrates are becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation has claimed more than 99 percent of the country's original wooded areas.

2h

 

Threatening Typhoon Yutu probed by GPM Satellite

Typhoon Yutu, known as Rosita in the Philippines, is now threatening the Philippine Island of Luzon. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the heavy rainfall the storm is packing.

2h

 

Alterations to seabed raise fears for future

The ocean floor as we know it is dissolving rapidly as a result of human activity. The seabed plays a crucial role in controlling the degree of ocean acidification by neutralizing the acidity of the water. But due to human activities, the level of CO2 in the water is so high, and the water so acidic, that the calcite on the ocean floor is simply being dissolved.

2h

 

Novel quantum dots enhance cell imaging

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Mayo Clinic have engineered a new type of molecular probe that can measure and count RNA in cells and tissue without organic dyes. The probe is based on the conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, but it relies on compact quantum dots to illuminate molecules and diseased cells rather than fluore

2h

 

New study: reduced screen time for young highly recommended for well-being

Utilizing National Survey of Children's Health data from 2016, Twenge and Campbell analyzed a random sample of more than 40,300 surveys from the caregivers of children aged 2 to 17. The study provides further evidence that the American Academy of Pediatrics' established screen time limits — one hour per day for those aged 2 to 5, with a focus on high-quality programs — are valid.

2h

 

World Stroke Day — SVIN latest clinical trials and breaking science news

SVIN's 2018 annual meeting to showcase breakthrough technology on stroke thrombectomy offering a ray of hope for stroke patients worldwide.

2h

 

New techniques allow medicine to see the whole again

Medical diagnoses mostly focuses on resolving isolated issues. But, fixing one problem may create others and even invoke an overall health collapse. Scientists now found a new approach to assess the risks of such collapse in humans and other animals using data from wearable sensors.

2h

 

Secrets of mighty cancer killing virus unlocked by Otago researchers

University of Otago researchers have used high-resolution electron microscopy images to reveal how an anti-cancer virus interacts with tumor cells, increasing its potential to save lives.

2h

 

Study reveals how soil bacteria are primed to consume greenhouse gas

New research has revealed that some soil bacteria are primed ready to consume the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when they experience life without oxygen in the environment.

2h

 

IRL rich people don't live that much longer than the poor

Differences in how many extra years rich people live compared to poor people is only about half of what we thought. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found ways to take in to account the income-mobility that occurs in real life and provide a more realistic way to calculate differences in life expectancy. Results show that in reality the difference between the lifespan of a rich an

2h

 

Genetic search reveals key to resistance in global cotton pest

Researchers have pinpointed a dominant genetic mutation that makes cotton bollworms, one of the world's most destructive crop pests, resistant to genetically engineered cotton. The study's cutting-edge use of genomics and gene editing signals a new era in global efforts to promote more sustainable pest control.

2h

 

Interior Northwest Indians used tobacco long before European contact

Washington State University researchers have determined that Nez Perce Indians grew and smoked tobacco at least 1,200 years ago, long before the arrival of traders and settlers from the eastern United States. Their finding upends a long-held view that indigenous people in this area of the interior Pacific Northwest smoked only kinnikinnick or bearberry before traders brought tobacco starting aroun

2h

 

Naps help some preschoolers learn, but may hinder learning in children with down syndrome

New research suggests that typically developing young children retain new information better after taking a nap, but the opposite is true in children with Down syndrome.

2h

 

Inside these fibers, droplets are on the move

An MIT team has develop fibers containing systems for mixing, separating, and testing fluids. These fiber-based microfluidics systems may open up new possibilities for medical screening.

2h

 

Study reconciles persistent gap in natural gas methane emissions measurements

A new study offers answers to questions that have puzzled policymakers, researchers and regulatory agencies through decades of inquiry and evolving science: How much total methane, a greenhouse gas, is being emitted from natural gas operations across the US? And why have different estimation methods, applied in various US oil and gas basins, seemed to disagree?

2h

 

Synthetic microorganisms allow scientists to study ancient evolutionary mysteries

Scientists at Scripps Research and their collaborators have created microorganisms that may recapitulate key features of organisms thought to have lived billions of years ago.

2h

 

Astrocytes regulate signal speeds of neurons

The transmission speed of neurons fluctuates in the brain to achieve an optimal flow of information required for day-to-day activities, according to a National Institutes of Health study. The results, appearing in PNAS, suggest that brain cells called astrocytes alter the transmission speed of neurons by changing the thickness of myelin, an insulation material, and the width of gaps in myelin call

2h

 

Anti-cancer virus fits tumor receptor like a 'key in a lock'

For the first time, scientists reveal how a promising drug candidate for cancer therapy interacts with receptors on tumors.

2h

 

Fishy Behavior: Prof Allegedly Profited from School Caviar Sales

A University of Georgia fisheries researcher, who is head of the school's program to farm-raise sturgeon and sell their salt-cured eggs, is expected to retire this week.

2h

 

Animals Are Riding an Escalator to Extinction

In 1985, John Fitzpatrick hiked up a ridge called Cerro de Pantiacolla, in the Peruvian Andes, in search of birds. On an eight-kilometer uphill walk, he and his team meticulously documented all the birds that lived on the mountainside. They found dozens of species, many with delightfully ostentatious names. The buff-browed foliage-gleaner. The hazel-fronted pygmy-tyrant. The fulvous-breasted flat

2h

 

Men with these cancers fare worse than women

Men with particular cancers generally have worse survival outcomes than women with the same cancers, according to a new study. The population-based study shows men have a survival disadvantage relative to women for 11 of the 25 cancer types researchers investigated. Previous research has acknowledged sex as an important factor in the prognosis of some cancers at all ages, but few large-scale stud

2h

 

People in the Pacific Northwest smoked tobacco long before Europeans showed up

Ancient indigenous groups in the Pacific Northwest used tobacco roughly 600 years before European settlers ventured west with the plant.

2h

 

Synthetic microorganisms allow scientists to study ancient evolutionary mysteries

Scientists at Scripps Research and their collaborators have created microorganisms that may recapitulate key features of organisms thought to have lived billions of years ago, allowing them to explore questions about how life evolved from inanimate molecules to single-celled organisms to the complex, multicellular lifeforms we see today.

2h

 

Study reconciles persistent gap in natural gas methane emissions measurements

A new study offers answers to questions that have puzzled policymakers, researchers and regulatory agencies through decades of inquiry and evolving science: How much total methane, a greenhouse gas, is being emitted from natural gas operations across the U.S.? And why have different estimation methods, applied in various U.S. oil and gas basins, seemed to disagree?

2h

 

Interior northwest Indians used tobacco long before European contact

Washington State University researchers have determined that Nez Perce Indians grew and smoked tobacco at least 1,200 years ago, long before the arrival of traders and settlers from the eastern United States. Their finding upends a long-held view that indigenous people in this area of the interior Pacific Northwest smoked only kinnikinnick or bearberry before traders brought tobacco starting aroun

2h

 

Study reveals how soil bacteria are primed to consume greenhouse gas

New research has revealed that some soil bacteria are primed ready to consume the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide when they experience life without oxygen in the environment.

2h

 

Genetic search reveals key to resistance in global cotton pest

In the most recent battle in the unending war between farmers and bugs, the bugs are biting back by adapting to crops genetically engineered to kill them.

2h

 

The Trump Administration's Proposed "Redefinition" of Gender Is Scientifically Absurd

Insisting that it's a binary choice between male and female, determined at birth by genitalia goes against decades of research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

 

Having babies less than a year apart 'poses risks for mother and child'

Study of nearly 150,000 pregnancies in Canada finds the safest interval between births is 12 to 18 months Having babies less than a year apart poses risks for both mother and child, whatever the woman’s age, according to new research. The authors of a big study of nearly 150,000 pregnancies in Canada say the safest interval between births is 12 to 18 months. They suggest women over the age of 35

2h

 

USDA Approves Edible Cotton

While farmers have the green light to grow the genetically engineered plant, FDA approval is still needed before the seeds are sold as food.

2h

 

You really can be scared to death—here’s how

Health But don't freak out. You really can be "scared to death." Here’s how it happens.

3h

 

3h

 

He Promised to Restore Damaged Hearts. Harvard Says His Lab Fabricated Research.

Findings that would have revolutionized treatment of heart attacks were based on falsified and fabricated data, revealing weaknesses in medical research.

3h

 

The Spirit of Halloween 2018

With Halloween night only two days away, people around the world are in the full spirit of the season, dressing up, taking part in parades and festivals, hosting parties, and tiptoeing through haunted houses. Collected here today, a look at some of these spooky (and fun) pre-Halloween festivities this year from South Korea, across the U.S., Ukraine, Japan, England, Singapore, Ireland, and more.

3h

 

What would happen if everyone voted? Researchers suggest big changes

Americans vote at a lower rate than the citizens of other Western Democracies, with measurable effects on our policy outcomes. Several studies show that polices supported by voters are enacted at a higher rate than ones supported by non-voters; despite popular misconceptions. Learning that voting could have noticable effects may come as a pleasant surprise to the more cynical of non-voters. Voter

3h

 

Exercise may lessen fall risk for older adults with Alzheimer's

A research team decided to explore whether exercise could reduce the risk of falling among community-dwelling people with Alzheimer's Disease who also had neuropsychiatric symptoms.

3h

 

Evidence mounts that an eye scan may detect early Alzheimer's disease

Results from two studies show that a new, non-invasive imaging device can see signs of Alzheimer's disease in a matter of seconds. The researchers show that the small blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye are altered in patients with Alzheimer's.

3h

 

Truck driver pain and discomfort can be alleviated

Almost 60 per cent of truck drivers in a recent Canadian study reported experiencing musculoskeletal (MSD) pain and discomfort on the job, even though it may be preventable.

3h

 

Deconstructing the superfood that determines honeybee hierarchy

All bee larvae eat royal jelly when they're new, but only future queens continue to eat it. To figure out why, researchers in Austria are taking a close look at the molecular ingredients of the fancy fare.

3h

 

Donor hearts at increased disease risk offer better survival rates for transplant recipients

Accepting an organ that has an increased risk of potentially transmitting disease offers a higher one-year survival rate for candidates on the heart transplant list over waiting for an organ with less risk, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Increased risk donors make up a growing number in the donor pool for organs, offering a potential stra

3h

 

3h

 

Coal power plant regulations neglect a crucial pollutant

Researchers determine that particle-forming sulfur dioxide is the most damaging pollutant from Texas' coal-fired power plants that lack equipment to scrub emissions.

3h

 

Improving climate models to account for plant behavior yields 'goodish' news

Climate scientists have not been properly accounting for what plants do at night, and that, it turns out, is a mistake. A new study has found that plant nutrient uptake in the absence of photosynthesis affects greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.

3h

 

Severe crimes may sway juror feelings about guilt

The severity of an alleged crime can increase jurors’ confidence in the guilt of the accused, according to a new study. “If the crime is more serious or more heinous, [mock jurors] are more likely to be convinced by the same amount of evidence,” says lead author John Pearson, an assistant professor in the biostatistics and bioinformatics department in the Duke University School of Medicine. Resea

3h

 

Races to Watch on Election Night 2018

The outcomes of these contests could shape issues like net neutrality, data privacy, and the tech industry’s business practices for years to come.

3h

 

Last week in tech: A $435,000 AI portrait, the good Twitter bots, and how a house survives a hurricane

Technology Plus, we talk about the new iPhone XR as the default iPhone on our podcast. Check out the latest episode of our podcast and catch up on the rest of the latest tech news.

3h

 

Interventions to delay and prevent type 2 diabetes are underused, researchers say

Currently, one in three American adults has prediabetes and more than 70 percent of adults are overweight or obese. Evidence shows lifestyle interventions, medication or surgery that results in weight loss effective prevents or delays the onset of Type 2 diabetes for as many as 70 percent of patients with prediabetes, but limited access to the often expensive treatments is fueling rising rates of

3h

 

Exercise may lessen fall risk for older adults with Alzheimer's

A research team decided to explore whether exercise could reduce the risk of falling among community-dwelling people with Alzheimer's Disease who also had neuropsychiatric symptoms. Their findings were published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

3h

 

Study sheds light on why a warmer world may equal a wetter Arctic

As the Arctic warms, it's predicted to get wetter. But why? A new study looks to history for answers, examining what happened in the region during a period of warming some 8,000 years ago. The research finds evidence that in this ancient time, western Greenland became more humid, a trend often linked to increased precipitation. The study further shows that two different climactic processes may hav

3h

 

Hidden costs of disease to greater Yellowstone elk

For decades researchers have known that a bacterial disease in elk, bison and cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem causes periodic abortions in these animals and chronic illness in humans drinking infected cow's milk. The disease, called brucellosis, poses a financial concern for dairy producers and cattle ranchers, but its effects on the wild elk population have generally been considered m

3h

 

Unapproved therapies cause significantly more patient injuries than reported

A team of ophthalmologists went looking for scientific evidence in support of commercially available 'cell therapy' for eye diseases. Not only did they find virtually none; they instead discovered a growing number of patients are being irreparably harmed by unapproved cell therapies.

3h

 

Relying on Dr. Google to diagnose eye problems may be dangerous to your health

A study examining the diagnoses generated by WebMD Symptom Checker showed the online tool was correct only 26 percent of the time. And the recommendation for the top diagnosis was often inappropriate, at times recommending self-care at home instead of going to the emergency room.

3h

 

-Omics for Brain Disorders

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to present their work and provide insight into the use of -omics in investigating neurological disorders.

3h

 

How Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Thinks About Female Power

In September, as the future Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh gave testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee about allegations of sexual assault leveled against him, a photographer present captured a moment that instantly went viral. The actress Alyssa Milano, her hair severely swept up in a topknot, lowered her black-framed glasses in the hearing room to stare intently at Kavanaugh’s back.

3h

 

Big quake in Romania could topple many schools, buildings

Romanian authorities say 170 schools and some 350 apartment buildings in the capital of Bucharest would not withstand a major earthquake.

4h

 

New platform based on biology and nanotechnology carries mRNA directly to target cells

Tel Aviv University's Prof. Dan Peer and his team have developed a biological approach to directing nanocarriers loaded with protein 'game changers' to specific cells. Their groundbreaking method may prove useful in treating myriad malignancies, inflammatory diseases and rare genetic disorders.

4h

 

Atlantic's Hurricane Oscar's water vapor measured by NASA's Terra Satellite

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Central Atlantic Ocean on Oct. 16, 2018, the MODIS instrument aboard analyzed water vapor within Tropical Storm Tara.

4h

 

Beyond 1984: Narrow focus on wildfire trends underestimates future risks to water security

Dramatic increases in wildfire over the last few decades have garnered considerable media attention. Numerous headlines have claimed that the amount of wildfire in the western US is unprecedented. However, in a recent issue of Earth's Future, published by the American Geophysical Union, scientist at Utah State University compiled long-term fire datasets that demonstrate the amount of wildfire occu

4h

 

Crystals that clean natural gas

A metal-organic framework that selectively removes impurities from natural gas could allow greater use of this cleaner fossil fuel.

4h

 

Scientists refine the search for dark matter

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden, among others, have developed a more effective technique in the search for clues about dark matter in the universe. They can now analyse much larger amounts of the data generated at CERN.

4h

 

Plant-based 'road salt' good for highways but not for insects

Beet juice deicer, a natural alternative to road salt that is considered to be an eco-friendlier winter road management solution, may not be ecologically friendly to nearby aquatic species. The findings—the first to explore the physiological effects of beet juice deicer in freshwater animals—were presented at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integra

4h

 

A solar cell that does double duty for renewable energy

Researchers have developed an artificial photosynthesis device called a "hybrid photoelectrochemical and voltaic (HPEV) cell" that turns sunlight and water into two types of energy – hydrogen fuel and electricity.

4h

 

New drug candidates reverse drug resistance in multiple myeloma in preclinical models

A new strategy to enhance the activity of proteasome inhibitors (PIs), which are standard-of-care agents in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), was recently reported. The study introduces a new drug candidate that overcomes PI resistance in cultured cells and extends survival in mouse models of MM.

4h

 

Psychologists devise free test for measuring intelligence

Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices is a widely used standardized test to measure reasoning ability. One drawback, however, is that the test takes 40 to 60 minutes to complete. Another is that the test kit and answer sheets can cost hundreds of dollars. Psychologists have now developed a highly comparable free test that takes 10 minutes to complete. The user-friendly test measures abstract probl

4h

 

Mænds udløsning giver kvinder bedre orgasmer

Udløsningen sender et fysisk signal om, at hendes partner nyder hende og den seksuelle aktivitet.

4h

 

Hubble Space Telescope Returns to Action after Gyroscope Glitch

The workhorse orbital observatory has resumed normal science operations, NASA says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

 

Virgin Galactic owes so much to history | Letters

Virgin Galactic fully recognises its existence and achievements are built on decades of work by thousands of committed individuals and government agencies, writes Virgin Galactic’s commercial director Stephen Attenborough. Plus Margaret Squires expresses reservations about driverless cars Michael Carley ( Letters , 22 October) suggests that the private sector is “producing an inferior late substit

4h

 

Plant-based 'road salt' good for highways but not for insects

Beet juice deicer, a natural alternative to road salt that is considered to be an eco-friendlier winter road management solution, may not be ecologically friendly to nearby aquatic species. The findings–the first to explore the physiological effects of beet juice deicer in freshwater animals–were presented at the American Physiological Society's (APS) Comparative Physiology: Complexity and Integ

4h

 

Sea science: Navy task force promotes increased knowledge of ocean environment

At the 2018 Oceans Conference, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. David Hahn discussed the goals of the US Navy's Task Force Ocean, a signature program of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson. TFO is designed to reinvigorate the Navy's commitment to ocean sciences, advancing its tactical advantage through a better knowledge of the ocean environment and its impact on sensors, weapons and o

4h

 

Casino lights and sounds encourage risky decision-making

The blinking lights and exciting jingles in casinos may encourage risky decision-making and potentially promote problem gambling behaviour, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia.

4h

 

Lights, sounds paired with winning encourages risk-taking

The intense audiovisual feedback from slot machines can directly influence a player's decisions, suggests a laboratory study of more than 100 healthy adults published in JNeurosci. The research raises new concerns that these machines and similar devices promote problematic gambling.

4h

 

4h

 

Joan McFarlane obituary

On 12 April 1973 Joan McFarlane, a young mother of 28, arrived at Westminster hospital in London to help save my life. She underwent a procedure to harvest bone marrow and the next day, Friday the 13th, I became the first person in the world to survive a transplant of bone marrow from an unrelated donor. Bone marrow donation was in its infancy then, and agreeing to donate to a stranger was an act

4h

 

'Unprecedented' Number of Dead Whales Have Washed Up in Scotland and Ireland

And scientists are pointing a finger at anti-sub sonar.

4h

 

The Dilemma of Anti-Semitic Speech Online

Robert Bowers, the alleged Pittsburgh synagogue killer, had an online life like many thousands of anti-Semitic Americans. He had Twitter and Facebook accounts and was an active user of Gab , a right-wing Twitter knockoff with a hands-off approach to policing speech. The Times of Israel reported that among anti-Semitic conspiracy theories and slurs, Bowers had recently posted a picture of “a fiery

4h

 

A Slow, Somber End to the Merkel Era

BERLIN—Angela Merkel announced to the world on Monday what everyone here already saw coming: that her time as Germany’s leader is nearing its end. Merkel—who has led her party for 18 years and her country for 13—will continue as Germany’s chancellor until the next federal elections, expected in 2021, but she will relinquish her position as the leader of the center-right Christian Democrats (CDU)

4h

 

Microdosing magic truffles makes you more creative, new study finds

A recent study showed that microdosing magic truffles can significantly increase one's creative thinking. Published in Psychopharmacology , the study joins a growing body of research showing the potential benefits of low-dose psychedelics. While this research comes with limitations, it could open up many avenues to improve anxiety and work conditions in society. What is microdosing anyway? Psycho

4h

 

Dads who exercise before having children have healthier kids

A new study shows that a father's exercise program influences the genetic expression of their children. Male mice that ate a high-fat diet and exercised had healthier children than sedentary males eating a regular diet. This could have important consequences for the health of infants moving forward. None Parental influence on their children happens long before they're even born. We've long known

4h

 

Dead penguin sex: The reason you should't anthropomorphize animals

Humans have been giving animals human characteristics since the 4th century, A.D. when a highly popular book changed how we viewed nature. You might not want to march with the penguins. Male Adelie penguins, in particular, have particularly disturbing mating habits that might have never made it past the editing room. Anthropomorphizing animals will only lead to ignorance about them. So how do sho

4h

 

Hormone-blocking injections reduce early menopause from breast cancer treatment

Final results of SWOG Cancer Research Network's groundbreaking international Prevention of Early Menopause Study (POEMS) clinical trial are in, and they show continued evidence that women who get injections of the hormone drug goserelin along with standard breast cancer chemotherapy are more likely to become pregnant – without developing negative side effects or shortening their lives.

5h

 

The FDA's updated nutrition labels could improve your health—if you know how to read them

Health The regulatory agency has finally accepted that nobody drinks just half a bottle of Coke. Food companies have been rolling out the new nutrition labels over the past few months, but last week, the FDA made clear exactly why those changes were made, along with…

5h

 

Caravan Provides a Preview of Climate Migrations, Experts Say

Global warming will compound the pressures driving migrants from poor, fragile countries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Scientists Learn the Ropes on Tying Molecular Knots

The world is tied up in knots. They form spontaneously in swirling vortices of smoke, in long strands of yarn or hair, and in the earbud cords that somehow always tangle in one’s pocket. Even down at the molecular scale, they appear in the long chains making up some proteins, and when they arise in DNA’s twists and coils, enzymes have to help unwind them. Biophysicists study these knots to figure

5h

 

China permits limited trade of rhino, tiger goods

China on Monday announced it was authorising the trade of rhinoceros and tiger parts for scientific, medical and cultural purposes, a move wildlife conservationists fear could have "devastating consequences" globally.

5h

 

Study provides whole-system view of plant cold stress

When temperatures drop, plants can't bundle up. Stuck outside, exposed, plants instead undergo a series of biochemical changes that protect cells from damage. Scientists have described these changes and identified some of the genes controlling them, but it's not clear how all the processes work together. Lacking this global view, plant breeders have struggled to engineer cold-tolerant crops.

5h

 

Illinois study provides whole-system view of plant cold stress

When temperatures drop, plants can't bundle up. Stuck outside, exposed, plants instead undergo a series of biochemical changes that protect cells from damage. Scientists have described these changes and identified some of the genes controlling them, but it's not clear how all the processes work together. Lacking this global view, plant breeders have struggled to engineer cold-tolerant crops. A rec

5h

 

UC psychologists devise free test for measuring intelligence

Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices is a widely used standardized test to measure reasoning ability. One drawback, however, is that the test takes 40 to 60 minutes to complete. Another is that the test kit and answer sheets can cost hundreds of dollars. University of California psychologists have now developed a highly comparable free test that takes 10 minutes to complete. The user-friendly tes

5h

 

SwRI improves structural health monitoring with magnetostrictive transducer

A new, more powerful generation of a patented Southwest Research Institute magnetostrictive sensor withstands extreme temperatures, automatically adjusts frequencies and incorporates a stronger magnet. The compact magnetostrictive transducer (MsT™) more accurately detects potential problems in oil, gas and chemical industry metal and nonmetal structures such as pipelines, storage tanks and anchor

5h

 

Combination drug targeting opioid system may help relieve symptoms of major depression

Two clinical trials of an investigational drug that targets the opioid system support its safety and effectiveness in reducing symptoms of major depression, when added to standard antidepressant treatment.

5h

 

Severity of crime increases jury's belief in guilt

A laboratory experiment with 600 mock jurors has found the more severe an alleged crime, the higher a juror's confidence in guilt becomes, regardless of the evidence. 'If the crime is more serious or more heinous, [mock jurors] are more likely to be convinced by the same amount of evidence,' said lead study author John Pearson of Duke University.

5h

 

A solar cell that does double duty for renewable energy

Researchers at the US Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, have developed an artificial photosynthesis device called a "hybrid photoelectrochemical and voltaic (HPEV) cell" that turns sunlight and water into two types of energy – hydrogen fuel and electricity.

5h

 

'Milder' ammonia synthesis method should help environment

A Chinese research team has developed a "milder" way to synthesize ammonia by requiring lower temperature and pressure than the current method. The process offers great promise for saving energy and reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

5h

 

Astronomers witness slow death of nearby galaxy

Astronomers from The Australian National University (ANU) and CSIRO have witnessed, in the finest detail ever, the slow death of a neighbouring dwarf galaxy, which is gradually losing its power to form stars.

5h

 

Sweet discovery: New UBC study pushes back the origins of chocolate

As Halloween revelers prepare to feast on chocolate, a new study from an international team of researchers, including the University of British Columbia, is pushing back the origins of the delicious sweet treat.

5h

 

Researchers create scalable platform for on-chip quantum emitters

Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology and Columbia University have developed a scalable method for creating large numbers of quantum light sources on a chip with unprecedented precision that not only could pave the way for the development of unbreakable cryptographic systems but also quantum computers that can perform complex calculations in seconds that would take normal computers years

5h

 

Mass shootings may trigger unnecessary blood donations

A new Northwestern Medicine study published in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery analyzed the blood resource needs and blood donations in Las Vegas compared to other mass shooting incidents offering insight into medical needs following a mass shooting incident, which may help guide preparedness for future events.

5h

 

Mass shootings trigger blood donations

The report, appearing this week in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, is focused on blood transfusion needs and the influence of media coverage on blood bank operations. The report includes comparisons with other recent mass shootings.

5h

 

Breast milk, formula nurture similarities, differences in gut microbes

Baby formula is designed to mimic human breast milk as closely as possible. A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis finds that formula and breast milk nurture the growth of intestinal bacteria capable of producing differing metabolites. The health implications of these differences are unknown.

5h

 

Manganese may finally solve hydrogen fuel cells' catalyst problem

Manganese could advance one of the most promising sources of renewable energy: hydrogen fuel cells. In a study published today in Nature Catalysis, a University at Buffalo-led research team reports on catalysts made from the widely available and inexpensive metal. The advancement could eventually help solve hydrogen fuel cells' most frustrating problem: namely, they're not affordable because most

5h

 

Bitcoin can push global warming above 2 degrees C in a couple decades

The electricity requirements of Bitcoin have created considerable difficulties, and extensive online discussion, about where to put the facilities or rings that compute the proof-of-work of Bitcoin. A somewhat less discussed issue is the environmental impacts of producing all that electricity.

5h

 

Improving climate models to account for plant behavior yields 'goodish' news

Climate scientists have not been properly accounting for what plants do at night, and that, it turns out, is a mistake. A new study from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that plant nutrient uptake in the absence of photosynthesis affects greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.

5h

 

Biologists discover source for boosting tumor cell drug sensitivity

Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered a new way of re-sensitizing drug-resistant human tumor cells to the potency of DNA-damaging agents, the most widely used group of cancer drugs. In a new study, they describe how a human gene known as Schlafen 11 controls the sensitivity of tumor cells to DDAs. Their research may pave the way to new strategies to overcome chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

5h

 

Finally, a robust fuel cell that runs on methane at practical temperatures

Either exorbitantly expensive fuel or insanely hot temperatures have made fuel cells a boutique proposition, but now there's one that runs on cheap methane and at much lower temperatures. This is a practical, affordable fuel cell and a 'sensation in our world,' the engineers say.

5h

 

Earliest hominin migrations into the Arabian Peninsula required no novel adaptations

A new study suggests that early hominin dispersals beyond Africa did not involve adaptations to environmental extremes, such as to arid and harsh deserts. The discovery of stone tools and cut-marks on fossil animal remains at the site of Ti's al Ghadah provides evidence for hominins in Saudi Arabia at least 100,000 years earlier than previously known. Stable isotope analysis indicates a dominance

5h

 

Our microbes are starving, and that's a good thing

Our bodies house trillions of microbes, collectively known as the microbiome, which digest food, synthesize vitamins, bolster immune systems, and even maintain mental health. Scientists have discovered that these microbial denizens are starving for nutrients, keeping them in servitude. But the modern diet and overuse of antibiotics could undermine this balance between host and microbe, tipping the

5h

 

RNA-protein network may explain why melanoma grows more

A collaboration led by scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, with Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, revealed a new way to fight melanoma. They realize that a melanoma-specific long non-coding RNA, named SAMMSON, interacts with the protein CARF, to properly coordinate protein synthesis in both the cytosol and mitochondria of melanoma cells. This mechanism ensures the maint

5h

 

Models may show how brain layout affects performance

A new approach shows promise for understanding the interplay between brain structure and performance on language-related tasks, according to a small proof-of-concept study. The architecture of each person’s brain is unique, and differences may influence how quickly people can complete various cognitive tasks. But how neuroanatomy impacts performance is largely an open question. To learn more, sci

5h

 

Young People Might Actually Turn Out for the Midterms

Millennials, as the meme goes, are easy to blame for just about everything : the rise of avocado toast, the end of home ownership, the death of Applebee’s . Older generations have characterized them as lazy and apathetic, including when it comes to politics. And Generation Z has started to receive the same treatment. But new polling suggests that young people will vote in next week’s midterms at

5h

 

Team improves structural health monitoring with magnetostrictive transducer

A new, more powerful generation of a patented Southwest Research Institute magnetostrictive sensor withstands extreme temperatures, automatically adjusts frequencies and incorporates a stronger magnet. The compact magnetostrictive transducer (MsT) more accurately detects potential problems in oil, gas and chemical industry metal and nonmetal structures such as pipelines, storage tanks and anchor r

5h

 

Memory special: How can two people recall an event so differently?

We each have a personal memory style determined by the brain, so next time you argue with someone about what really happened, remember that you may both be right

5h

 

The Biomarker Bottleneck in Immuno-oncology: Understanding to Overcome

The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts discuss their research and provide insight into how this issue is being overcome.

5h

 

Polsk regering betragter tilsyneladende Baltic Pipe-projekt som godkendt

Ifølge medierapporter forventer den polske regering, at Energinet og polske Gaz-System underskriver kontrakt i december. Samtidig har polsk selskab købt sig ind i endnu et norsk gasfelt.

5h

 

Origin of chocolate shifts 1,400 miles and 1,500 years

Cacao was in use in South America centuries before its exploitation by civilisations in Mexico and Central America, experts say The key ingredient of chocolate was being used in South America centuries before it was exploited by civilisations in Mexico and Central America, according to new research. The cacao tree, and in particular the drinks made from its dried seeds, has long been linked to th

5h

 

Ancient South Americans tasted chocolate 1,500 years before anyone else

Artifacts with traces of cacao push back the known date for when the plant was first domesticated by 1,500 years.

5h

 

5h

 

Making Creepy Music Give You Goose Bumps

Discordant music and sounds can set up the scare, but what you do (or don’t) see can decide whether it lands — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Cephalopods could become an important food source in the global community

With a growing world population and climate challenges that are causing agricultural areas to shrink, many are wondering where sustainable food will come from in the future. A professor of gastrophysics from the Department of Food Science at the University of Copenhagen and a chef offer a suggestion in a new research article: The cephalopod population (including squid, octopus and cuttlefish) in t

5h

 

Scientists to explore new sites in Puerto Rico, USVI waters

Scientists will explore new sites in deep waters surrounding Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands to learn more about coral and fish habitats as part of a 22-day mission led by the U.S. government.

5h

 

Hubble Space Telescope working again after 3-week shutdown

The Hubble Space Telescope is studying the cosmos once again after a three-week shutdown.

5h

 

Biologists discover source for boosting tumor cell drug sensitivity

DNA-damaging agents, or "DDAs," make up the most widely used group of cancer drugs. Yet their therapeutic success has been curtailed by drug resistance—either present in cancer cells from the disease onset or arising during treatment.

5h

 

Researchers create scalable platform for on-chip quantum emitters

Household lightbulbs give off a chaotic torrent of energy, as trillions of miniscule light particles—called photons—reflect and scatter in all directions. Quantum light sources, on the other hand, are like light guns that fire single photons one by one, each time they are triggered, enabling them to carry hack-proof digital information—technology attractive to industries such as finance and defens

5h

 

Our microbes are starving, and that's a good thing

Each of us is only half human. The other half is microbial. Trillions of viruses, fungi, bacteria and other microscopic organisms coat our skin and line our vital organs.

5h

 

Improving climate models to account for plant behavior yields 'goodish' news

Climate scientists have not been properly accounting for what plants do at night, and that, it turns out, is a mistake. A new study from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found that plant nutrient uptake in the absence of photosynthesis affects greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere.

5h

 

Severity of crime increases jury's belief in guilt: study

The more severe a crime, the more evidence you should have to prove someone did it. But a new Duke study, appearing Oct. 29 in Nature Human Behavior, has shown that the type of alleged crime can increase jurors' confidence in guilt.

5h

 

Astronomers witness slow death of nearby galaxy

Astronomers from The Australian National University (ANU) and CSIRO have witnessed, in the finest detail ever, the slow death of a neighbouring dwarf galaxy, which is gradually losing its power to form stars.

5h

 

Manganese may finally solve hydrogen fuel cells' catalyst problem

Manganese is known for making stainless steel and aluminum soda cans. Now, researchers say the metal could advance one of the most promising sources of renewable energy: hydrogen fuel cells.

5h

 

Bitcoin can push global warming above 2 C in a couple decades

A new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Climate Change finds that if Bitcoin is implemented at similar rates at which other technologies have been incorporated, it alone could produce enough emissions to raise global temperatures by 2°C as soon as 2033.

5h

 

Sweet discovery: New study pushes back the origins of chocolate

As Halloween revelers prepare to feast on chocolate, a new study from an international team of researchers, including the University of British Columbia, is pushing back the origins of the delicious sweet treat.

5h

 

A solar cell that does double duty for renewable energy

In the quest for abundant, renewable alternatives to fossil fuels, scientists have sought to harvest the sun's energy through "water splitting," an artificial photosynthesis technique that uses sunlight to generate hydrogen fuel from water. But water-splitting devices have yet to live up to their potential because there still isn't a design for materials with the right mix of optical, electronic,

5h

 

RNA-protein network may explain why melanoma grows more

With five-year survival rates being around 30 percent for patients with distant metastatic disease, cutaneous melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer-related deaths. The major causes of the low survival rate for melanoma patients are the limited number of options for patients lacking the BRAF mutation and the intrinsic and acquired resistance to existing therapies. It is therefore essential t

5h

 

Earliest hominin migrations into the Arabian Peninsula required no novel adaptations

A new study, led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and published in Nature Ecology and Evolution, suggests that early hominin dispersals beyond Africa did not involve adaptations to environmental extremes, such as to arid and harsh deserts. The discovery of stone tools and cut-marks on fossil animal remains at the site of Ti's al Ghadah provides definitiv

5h

 

Earth may have a pair of ‘ghost moons’ made of dust trapped in orbit

Photographs show signs of a ghost moon, a translucent gas cloud that orbits Earth along with our moon. But some say the images are not definitive

5h

 

They shell rise again: Sea turtles make comeback in Mexico

They appear as ghostly shadows riding beneath the surf, their beaks and shells illuminated in the moonlight as they drift in the swells.

5h

 

Tourists at sea as floods sweep Venice

Rain-soaked tourists in Venice were barred from an inundated St. Mark's Square on Monday, as fierce winds and rains lashing much of the country drenched the floating city, an AFP photographer reported.

6h

 

Eating organic food lowers cancer risk by 25%, study reveals

A French study of nearly 70,000 people states that organic foods reduce the risk that you'll develop non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and postmenopausal breast cancer. Agricultural pesticides have been shown to have a toxic effect on the human endocrine system. The high cost of organic food remains a barrier to entry for those wishing to eat a healthier diet. None In 1998, while working as a reporter at a

6h

 

Columbine genome reveals one really weird chromosome

Researchers have sequenced the genome of several species of columbine flowers, and one species of the related false columbine. Their findings confirm several hypotheses about the flower, but also reveal a surprise in the form of a truly bizarre chromosome. Columbines’ vivid colors and iconic spurs make them a welcome sight in gardens and mountain meadows across the northern hemisphere. For decade

6h

 

Thrill-seeking, search for meaning fuel political violence

What drives someone to support or participate in politically or religiously motivated acts of violence, and what can be done to prevent them? While one factor may be a search for meaning in life, research published by the American Psychological Association suggests people may be further driven by an increased need for excitement and feeding that need with thrilling but non-violent alternatives may

6h

 

Miljømediciner: For svag indsats for sundhedsbeskyttelse

Et aktuelt svar fra sundhedsministeren tyder på, at ministeriet har utilstrækkelig adgang til ekspertise, mener en af Danmarks førende miljømedicinere, professor Philippe Grandjean.

6h

 

The 2018 World Series Was Good for the Red Sox—And Bad for Baseball

Playoff baseball turns bloody socks into priceless memorabilia, and 12-year-old suburbanites into folk heroes. It is maddening, unpredictable, and altogether emotionally draining. It is also, as the World Series–winning Red Sox illustrate, a dreadful chore. The Red Sox defeated the Dodgers in five games to secure the franchise’s fourth World Series title since it ended its 86-year championship dr

6h

 

Free movement can protect humans from environmental threats

Greater freedom of movement and investments in human rights and social opportunities can help protect humans from environmental threats like rising sea levels, new research says.

6h

 

Chimpanzees react faster to cooperate than make selfish choices

When it comes to cooperation, there's no monkey business in how some chimpanzees respond.

6h

 

Why people have lateral preferences when kissing and hugging

Typically, a person will initiate a hug with the right hand. Similar preferences are also present in other forms of social touch. The question of right resp. left-handedness plays a role in the process. However, it is not the only relevant aspect.

6h

 

New drug candidates reverse drug resistance in multiple myeloma in preclinical models

A new strategy to enhance the activity of proteasome inhibitors (PIs), which are standard-of-care agents in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM), was reported by researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina in the journal Leukemia. Their study introduces a new drug candidate that overcomes PI resistance in cultured cells and extends survival in mouse models of MM

6h

 

Dartmouth's PhasorSec protects power grids from cyberattack

A new technique protects power grids from attacks against utility control systems that can shut down facility operations, trigger longer-term blackouts and even cause permanent physical damage.

6h

 

New guidelines on best practices for videoconferencing-based telemental health

New guidance is available from the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the American Telemedicine Association (ATA) to assist in the development and delivery of effective and safe interactive videoconferencing-based mental health services.

6h

 

Study: Coal power plant regulations neglect a crucial pollutant

Rice University researchers determine that particle-forming sulfur dioxide is the most damaging pollutant from Texas' coal-fired power plants that lack equipment to scrub emissions.

6h

 

Veterans with PTSD improve mental health after therapeutic horseback riding intervention

Veterans with combat-related post-traumatic stress disorder were less anxious and depressed and had an improved quality of life after an eight-week therapeutic horseback riding program, according to a Baylor University study.

6h

 

Can attending a top high school reduce teens' marijuana abuse?

Low-income students who attended a top-achieving high school were less likely to abuse marijuana than those who weren't offered admission. For boys, the risk dropped 50 percent by 11th grade.

6h

 

At least one year between pregnancies reduces risks for mother and baby

Twelve to 18 months seems to be the ideal length of time between giving birth and getting pregnant again, according to new research from the University of British Columbia and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

6h

 

Gunshot wounds in children account for $270 million in emergency room and inpatient charges annually

A new Johns Hopkins study of more than 75,000 teenagers and children who suffered a firearm-related injury between 2006 and 2014 pinpoints the financial burden of gunshot wounds and highlights the increasing incidence of injury in certain age groups.

6h

 

User-friendly tools help older adults guide future medical care

A user-friendly website on advance care planning, as well as easy-to-read advance directives, can be highly effective in empowering both English- and Spanish-speaking older adults to plan for their future medical care, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

6h

 

Can Seabiscuit's DNA explain his elite racing ability?

Seabiscuit was not an impressive-looking horse. He was considered quite lazy, preferring to eat and sleep in his stall rather than exercise. He'd been written off by most of the racing industry after losing his first 17 races. But Seabiscuit eventually became one of the most beloved thoroughbred champions of all time – voted 1938 Horse of the Year after winning his legendary match race as an under

6h

 

Goodbye Gab, a Haven for the Far RightGab Pittsburgh GoDaddy

After the Squirrel Hill massacre, the tech industry needs to grapple with a major question: Do platforms like Gab radicalize attackers?

6h

 

Role of shelf seas in removing and storing carbon and cycling nutrients revealed

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have contributed to a major study of British seas which reveals the extent of the role they play in removing and storing carbon and cycling nutrients.

6h

 

These Dogs Have a Nose for Malaria

These Dogs Have a Nose for Malaria Dogs successfully detected malaria parasites in infected children by sniffing their socks. dognose.jpg Image credits: Trudie Davidson/ Shutterstock Human Monday, October 29, 2018 – 10:15 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) — Dogs have an incredible sense of smell. Their noses can sniff out illegal drugs, hidden bombs and bed bugs, and they can also hel

6h

 

Chimpanzees react faster to cooperate than make selfish choices

When it comes to cooperation, there's no monkey business in how some chimpanzees respond.

6h

 

Research investigates 'smart' highway signs to prevent wrong-way driving crashes

Innovative traffic safety research from Florida State University, incorporating a fascinating mix of engineering and psychology, is being deployed on highways to save lives by targeting a deadly problem: wrong-way driving crashes.

6h

 

Halloween no treat for pets, says veterinarian

Halloween can be fun for children and adults alike, but for pets it can be a potentially dangerous holiday, according to a Kansas State University veterinarian.

6h

 

Free movement can protect humans from environmental threats

Greater freedom of movement and investments in human rights and social opportunities can help protect humans from environmental threats like rising sea levels, new research says.

6h

 

A new method to quickly identify outliers in air quality monitoring data

Ambient air quality monitoring data are the most important source for public awareness regarding air quality and are widely used in many research fields, such as improving air quality forecasting and the analysis of haze episodes. However, there are outliers among such monitoring data, due to instrument malfunctions, the influence of harsh environments, and the limitation of measuring methods. A n

6h

 

NSU researcher part of team that conducted genome-wide study of tigers

Study brings important context and conclusions to recovery and management strategies for a treasured endangered species, and included subspecies, at high extinction risk.

6h

 

Regionerne vil have ventetiden på akutmodtagelser ned

Nyt akutudspil skal bl.a. sikre kortere ventetider for patienter med mindre alvorlige skader eller lidelser. Lægeforeningen ser gode tiltag, men havde gerne set et mere ambitiøst udspil.

6h

 

Verdens første professor i retsmedicinsk kardiologi

Rigshospitalet og Retsmedicinsk institut har udnævnt Jacob Tfelt-Hansen som professor i retsmedicinsk kardiologi, hvor han skal kortlægge miljø, gener og hjertesygdomme blandt pludseligt døde.

6h

 

Hospitalslæge tiltalt for bedrageri for flere mio. kr.

En læge er anklaget for bedrageri for 3,7 mio. kr., hvor lægen skulle have overført forskellige beløb fra hospitaler til en virksomhed.

6h

 

Honeybees at risk from Zika pesticides

Zika – which can cause severe brain defects in unborn children – is spread by mosquitoes, so the insects are being targeted in the southern US where Zika-carrying mosquito species live.

6h

 

How isolation fuels opioid addiction | Rachel Wurzman

What do Tourette syndrome, heroin addiction and social media obsession all have in common? They converge in an area of the brain called the striatum, says neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman — and this critical discovery could reshape our understanding of the opioid crisis. Sharing insights from her research, Wurzman shows how social isolation contributes to relapse and overdose rates and reveals how m

6h

 

Why people have lateral preferences when kissing and hugging

Typically, a person will initiate a hug with the right hand. Similar preferences are also present in other forms of social touch. The question of right resp. left-handedness plays a role in the process. However, it is not the only relevant aspect.

7h

 

Chimpanzees react faster to cooperate than make selfish choices

When it comes to cooperation, there's no monkey business in how some chimpanzees respond.

7h

 

Alt-labor filling in where unions can't

Alt-labor describes the informal coalition of organizations that is pushing to advance workers' rights in the wake of decreased union membership.

7h

 

Crickets rapidly evolve new mating call to evade their parasites

In Hawaii, parasitic flies target singing crickets, forcing them to rapidly evolve to escape detection. Now some males have developed a special, seductive purr

7h

 

Drugs' side effects in lungs 'more widespread than thought'

A systematic review of research has revealed that the toxic effects on the lung of drugs commonly taken to treat a range of common conditions is much more widespread than thought.

7h

 

UK bumblebee population trends

Data collected by Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT) volunteers to assess the country's changing bumblebee populations have been analysed in a new way for the first time at the University of Kent—and show mixed results about their decline, with cause for concern for two species.

7h

 

Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences describe 17 new species of sea slugs

This National Sea Slug Day, celebrate the addition of 17 new species of nudibranch to the tree of life. Adorned in lavish patterns and colors that range from yellow polka dots to shades of mauve and neon blue, the new marine invertebrates hail from coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific region. Researchers from the California Academy of Sciences described the new-to-science sea slugs in the Zoologica

7h

 

S&P cuts IBM debt rating following Red Hat acquisitionIBM Red Hat Linux $34B

S&P Global Ratings on Monday cut the grade for IBM by one notch following the massive acquisition of cloud computing firm Red Hat for a staggering $34 billion in cash.

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Toward language inference in medicine

Recent times have witnessed significant progress in natural language understanding by AI, such as machine translation and question answering. A vital reason behind these developments is the creation of datasets, which use machine learning models to learn and perform a specific task. Construction of such datasets in the open domain often consists of text originating from news articles. This is typi

7h

 

Climate change: 'Wetlands vital to protect cities'

Urban areas need to cherish wetlands as a natural defence against flooding, experts warn.

7h

 

The Fight for Corals Loses Its Great Champion

Ruth Gates, who passed away Thursday at age 56, was known as much for her laugh as for her science. She laughed easily, loudly, and infectiously. When she first snorkeled around Heron Island, in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, she reportedly laughed so loudly that boat drivers could hear her from the surface. “Laughing even underwater; that’s Ruth,” says Tracy Ainsworth , a close friend and coral

7h

 

Researchers achieve breakthrough in process to produce hydrogen fuel

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and the Technion Israel Institute of Technology researchers have cracked the chemical mechanism that will enable development of a new and more efficient photo-chemical process to produce hydrogen fuel from water, according to a new paper published in Nature Communications.

7h

 

Red Hat soar on IBM dealIBM Red Hat Linux $34B

Shares of Red Hat skyrocketed at the opening bell Monday after IBM, in the biggest acquisition of its 100-year history, acquired the software company.

7h

 

AI and NMR spectroscopy determine atoms configuration in record time

Many drugs today are produced as powdered solids. But to fully understand how the active ingredients will behave once inside the body, scientists need to know their exact atomic-level structure. For instance, the way molecules are arranged inside a crystal has a direct impact on a compound's properties, such as its solubility. Researchers are therefore working hard to develop technologies that can

7h

 

Taking part in everyday life—adolescents with and without impairments speak up

Research has shown that participating in home, school and community activities has a positive influence on a person's health and wellbeing. For an adolescent with an impairment or disability, how much does this affect their participation? In a new study, Frida Lygnegård from the CHILD research environment at the School of Health and Welfare at Jönköping University decided to let Swedish adolescent

7h

 

Mycoplasma genitalium's cell adhesion mechanism revealed

Researchers from the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC) and the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB-UAB) have discovered the mechanism by which the bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mgen) adheres to human cells. This adhesion is essential for the onset of bacterial infection and subsequent disease development.

7h

 

Online tool designed to calculate property energy efficiency

Achieving energy efficient housing while maximising economic profit is the objective of RentalCal, an online tool designed by the University of Alicante together with experts from eight European countries. This is the first tool, open to anyone, designed for calculating the incentives and costs involved in energy efficiency renovation works in housing.

7h

 

Astrophysicists study asteroid 3200 Phaeton

Polarimetric investigation of a near-Earth asteroid Phaethon was carried out in December 2017 on its closest approach to the Earth. The study was conducted in collaboration with scientists from the Ussuriysk Astrophysical Observatory and the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. The article has been published in the scientific journal Astronomy and Astrophysics.

7h

 

Coal power plant regulations neglect a crucial pollutant

Cleaning up or replacing coal-fired power plants that lack sulfur pollution controls could help Texans breathe cleaner, healthier air, according to researchers at Rice University.

7h

 

Mycoplasma genitalium's cell adhesion mechanism revealed

Researchers from the Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC) and the Institute of Biotechnology and Biomedicine (IBB-UAB) have discovered the mechanism by which the bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium (Mgen) adheres to human cells. This adhesion is essential for the onset of bacterial infection and subsequent disease development.

7h

 

AI and NMR spectroscopy determine atoms configuration in record time

EPFL scientists have developed a machine-learning approach that can be combined with experiments to determine, in record time, the location of atoms in powdered solids. Their method can be applied to complex molecules containing thousands of atoms and could be of particular interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

7h

 

Ben-Gurion University researchers achieve breakthrough in process to produce hydrogen fuel

"This discovery could have a significant impact on efforts to replace carbon-based fuels with more environmentally friendly hydrogen fuels. Auto manufacturers seek to develop hydrogen-powered vehicles that are considered efficient and environmentally friendly and unlike electric vehicles, allow for fast refueling and extended mileage."

7h

 

FEFU astrophysicists studied asteroid 3200 Phaeton

Polarimetric investigation of a near-Earth asteroid Phaethon was carried out in December 2017 on its closest approach to the Earth. The study was conducted in collaboration with scientists from the Ussuriysk Astrophysical Observatory and the Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences. The article reporting the results of the observational campaign has been submitted to the scientific

7h

 

Imaging collaboration sheds new light on cancer growth

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have uncovered new insights into how the normal controls on cell growth are lost in cancer cells, leading to rapid tumour expansion.

7h

 

'Majority rules' when looking for earthquakes, explosions

A dormant volcano in Antarctica helped researchers at Sandia National Laboratories improve sensor data readings to better detect earthquakes and explosions and tune out everyday sounds such as traffic and footsteps.

7h

 

Antarctica is no longer the cool place it used to be for its cold-adapted fish. So what changed?

It's what drives every scientific expedition. Without it, Lewis and Clark would not have ventured out west and Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin would never have stepped foot onto the Saturn V rocket that launched them into space.

7h

 

No chance for bacteria on implants

Hip and dental implant operations are routine. But not entirely risk-free. They may result in infection that is difficult to control with oral or intravenous antibiotics. In such cases, the implant will probably need to be replaced. Fraunhofer researchers can now apply a precisely matched drug directly to the replacement implant while significantly increasing the effectiveness of the antibiotic vi

7h

 

Treating the fear of spiders with augmented reality

Arachnophobia is the technical term for the fear of spiders. Approximately 3.5 to 6.1 percent of the population suffer from this phobia. Exposure therapy is the most common form of treatment. However, 60 to 80 percent of arachnophobes do not receive any therapy because of a lack of services. Others simply cannot bear the terror of facing up to real spiders. Together with partners, Fraunhofer resea

7h

 

Delivering pressure with an unconventional crystal interface

The use of pressure to alter semiconductor properties is showing increasing promise in applications such as high-performance infrared sensors and energy conversion devices. With a novel and unconventional crystal interface, researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have enabled more powerful and dynamic tuning of the method, which they initially pioneered in 2015.

7h

 

There is a weird new state of matter that can’t be stirred or pushed

Rigid light is a strange new state of matter. It’s somewhere between a solid and a superfluid, and can’t be stirred, rotated, or even pushed

7h

 

Weight-loss app works for low-income people with obesity

Low-income people with obesity and signs of cardiovascular risk lost a clinically meaningful amount of weight when using a free phone app, a new study reports. The study is among the first to report successful weight loss within a low-income population—a group that suffers from skyrocketing rates of obesity but is hard to treat, says lead author Gary Bennett, a professor of psychology and neurosc

7h

 

What to Expect from Apple's October 30 iPad Pro and Macbook EventApple iPad Pro Mac

Apple just plain refuses to give your wallet some rest.

7h

 

3-D-knitted shells save on construction materials and time

With just the press of a button, ETH researchers knit a textile that serves as the primary shaping element for curved concrete shells. Now they have used the new technology to create a five-tonne concrete structure for an exhibition in Mexico City.

7h

 

Drones soar up to clouds to understand ice-formation effect on climate

EU-funded scientists used instrument-bearing drones to investigate the effect of aerosols on ice crystals in clouds which are thought to affect climate and climate change.

7h

 

Do white people dominate the outdoors?

"Do white people dominate the outdoors?" David Labistour, CEO of Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC), asked. As Canada's iconic retailer of clothing and equipment for the outdoors, what MEC says matters.

7h

 

7h

 

How the Greenland ice sheet fared in 2018

The end of August traditionally marks the end of the melt season for the Greenland ice sheet as it shifts from mostly melting to mostly gaining snow.

7h

 

How does racial discrimination impact users of online dating websites?

Many people go online to find their perfect match in a romantic or sexual partner but find that racial discrimination is prevalent. Ryan Wade is a professor of social work at the University of Illinois who studies a phenomenon known as racialized sexual discrimination and how it affects the psychological well-being of gay or bisexual black men who use sexual networking apps or websites. Wade spoke

7h

 

Large amounts of antimicrobial substances in Swedish sewage treatment plants

A large number of antimicrobial substances are found in sludge and water in Swedish sewage treatment plants. Several of them pass through the treatment plants and are released into the aquatic environment. However, with new technologies like ozone and activated carbon, emissions can be significantly reduced. This is shown by Marcus Östman in his dissertation, which he defends at Umeå University on

7h

 

How to prevent eye strain when you stare at screens all day

Health Yes, it is possible! Ever tried carrying around a bowling ball for nine hours a day? Your arms would get pretty tired. That’s what you’re doing to your eyes when you stare at screens all…

7h

 

UK bumblebee population trends

Data collected by Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT) volunteers to assess the country's changing bumblebee populations have been analyzed in a new way for the first time at the University of Kent — and show mixed results about their decline, with cause for concern for two species.

7h

 

One in 10 people may opt-out of proposed organ donor system

A new study has revealed that around one in 10 people are considering opting out of a proposed new system that aims to increase organ donation by presuming consent.

7h

 

Modified LDL particles activate inflammatory pathways in monocyte-derived macrophages

A hallmark of atherosclerosis is its complex pathogenesis, which is dependent on altered cholesterol metabolism and inflammation. A number of studies characterized transcriptomics of macrophages following interaction with modified LDL, and revealed alteration of the expression of genes responsible for inflammatory response and cholesterol metabolism. The researchers attempted to identify the main

7h

 

Honeybees at risk from Zika pesticides

Up to 13 percent of US beekeepers are in danger of losing their colonies due to pesticides sprayed to contain the Zika virus, new research suggests.

7h

 

Scientists developed new contactless method of measuring blood flow in hands

Russian researchers proposed a new contactless method for measuring blood flow in the upper limbs. The method is based on video recording of the skin surface under green light measuring the absorption of red blood cells. This helps to see how effective the circulatory system and the blood flow regulation are. The work was published in Biomedical Optics Express.

7h

 

Cloud computing load balancing based on ant colony algorithms improves performance

The criticality of certain sectors, as well as the requirement of users, involve Cloud providers to guarantee a high level of performance. This article embraces two parts, including a first section that assesses the factors which influence performance by using an analysis methodology inspired by the concept of the Taguchi experience plan. The second part builds on the conclusions of the first sect

7h

 

Sniffer dogs could detect malaria in people

Dogs could be trained to sniff out malaria in people according to new research aimed at preventing the spread of the deadly disease.

7h

 

New study reports dogs successfully diagnosed malaria by sniffing socks worn by African children

As the global battle against malaria stalls, scientists may be adding a novel tool to the fight: sniffer dogs. In recent tests trained sniffer dogs successfully diagnosed malaria infections simply by sniffing samples from socks worn briefly by children from a malaria endemic area of West Africa, according to a new study presented today at the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTM

7h

 

Study finds unexpected levels of bromine in power plant exhaust

Some coal-fired power plants in the United States emit gases that may have significant effects on the atmosphere and can produce harmful compounds in drinking water, according to new research.

7h

 

"Schrödinger's Bacterium" Could Be a Quantum Biology Milestone

A recent experiment may have placed living organisms in a state of quantum entanglement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

 

Rare Genetic Sequences Illuminate Early Humans' History in Africa

Little-studied ethnic groups are helping researchers to understand the movements of people who lived on the continent tens of thousands of years ago — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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7h

 

Regionerne og kommunerne vil skrotte de 150 særlige pladser i psykiatrien

Mange af de 150 særlige pladser i psykiatrien står tomme, og derfor opfordrer Danske Regioner og KL nu regeringen til at omlægge dem til ordinære sengepladser i psykiatrien.

7h

 

Dogs can detect malaria by sniffing people's socks

Study says the animals appear able to identify people infected with the disease even if they are not showing symptoms Dogs’ noses could become a powerful weapon in the battle against malaria, according to research suggesting the animals can tell from a sniff of a sock whether someone has the disease. Dogs have previously proved highly accurate at detecting a range of human diseases, including pro

7h

 

Can Brazil’s Democracy Withstand Jair Bolsonaro?

RIO DE JANEIRO —Carlos Alberto da Silva opposes Jair Bolsonaro’s plan to arm Brazil’s citizenry, the way he degrades women and gays, and his aggressive defense of the country’s last dictatorship. But da Silva, a textile-delivery worker in Rio de Janeiro, still voted for him on Sunday. “I don’t think he’s great, but I want to see if he can change things, because we have to do something about secur

7h

 

A more efficient membrane-based generator for harvesting osmotic power

A team of researchers from Jilin University, Beihang University and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a more efficient membrane-based generator for harvesting osmotic power. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their generator and how well it worked when tested.

7h

 

Why there may be thousands of stink bugs hiding under your sofa

It's that time of the year when mornings are met with crisp autumn air, when scarlet and amber leaves crunch beneath your feet and when restaurant menus are filled with everything pumpkin spice.

7h

 

Air pollution kills 600,000 children each year: WHO

Exposure to toxic air both indoors and out kills some 600,000 children under the age of 15 each year, the World Health Organization warned Monday.

8h

 

The Science of the Sniff: Why Dogs Are Great Disease Detectors

Dogs have been trained to detect a dozen human diseases—most recently, malaria—but even these pups may ultimately find their jobs replaced by machines.

8h

 

Virus production boosted in cells to generate more vectors for gene transfer

Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers increased the production of lentiviral vectors by host cells by co-expressing the proteins SPSB1 or Tax. Mechanistically, this was shown to have a range of effects, including increased activity of the HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus promoters, the latter being used for many lentiviral constructs. This approach enables greater ability to generate suf

8h

 

Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences describe 17 new species of sea slugs

This National Sea Slug Day, celebrate the addition of 17 new species of nudibranch to the tree of life. Adorned in lavish patterns and colors that range from yellow polka dots to shades of mauve and neon blue, the new marine invertebrates hail from coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific region. The team also identified a number of distant relatives that have independently evolved the same color patte

8h

 

Diabetes medication may protect against a common cause of blindness

Researchers from Taiwan have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who took a common diabetes medication, metformin, had a significantly lower rate of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

8h

 

Can a holographic screen help a new phone break out?RED Hydrogen One RHO

Most leading phones offer the same basics: Big screens, decent battery life and good cameras. So when a newcomer brings something innovative to the party, why is it difficult to break through a phone market dominated by Apple and Samsung?

8h

 

Fast-flowing electrons may mimic astrophysical dynamos

A powerful engine roils deep beneath our feet, converting energy in the Earth's core into magnetic fields that shield us from the solar wind. Similar engines drive the magnetic activity of the sun, other stars and even other planets—all of which create magnetic fields that reinforce themselves and feed back into the engines to keep them running.

8h

 

Ghana must move from coping with floods to adapting for them

Ghana has a serious flood problem. Over about 50 years, 4 million people have been affected by floods, resulting in economic damage exceeding USD$780 million. At least one major flood disaster has occurred every year over the past 10 years.

8h

 

Has a new dwarf galaxy been found hiding behind Andromeda?

One of the greatest challenges of astronomy is locating objects in space that are obscured by the light of nearby, brighter objects. In addition to making extra-solar planets very difficult to directly image, this problem also intrudes on surveys of the local Universe, where astronomers are unable to detect dwarf and isolated galaxies because of all the brighter ones surrounding them.

8h

 

Scientists form flat tellurium

In the way things often happens in science, Amey Apte wasn't looking for two-dimensional tellurium while experimenting with materials at Rice University. But there it was.

8h

 

The Best Gifts for Tardigrade Lovers

Here are some gift ideas for the tardigrade-entranced.

8h

 

‘Electric’ dust storms create key chemical in Martian dirt

The zip of electricity in Martian dust storms helps to form the huge amounts of perchlorate in the planet’s soils, according to new research. It’s not lightning but another form of electrostatic discharge that packs the key punch in the planet-wide distribution of the reactive chemical, says study coauthor Alian Wang, a research professor in the earth and planetary sciences department at Washingt

8h

 

Dataset may resolve questions about the configuration of supercontinent Rodinia

A new paper recently released in Geology by researchers Jacob Mulder, Karl Karlstrom, and other Australian colleagues provides a new dataset that may resolve the more than three decades-long debate about which continents were adjacent to southwestern USA within the 1 billion year old supercontinent of Rodinia.

8h

 

Chemists suggest a new method to synthesise titanium nanoparticles for water purification

RUDN chemists have developed a new method for obtaining titanium-based nanoparticles to clean water from phenols—toxic aromatic hydrocarbons with an OH-group. The atoms of metals in the nanoparticles oxidize the pollutants under the influence of light and turn them into water and carbon dioxide. The new method will make the production of such nanoparticles easier and cheaper. The results of the wo

8h

 

A new material for energy-efficient data storage reaches computer operating temperature

Multiferroics are considered miraculous materials for future data storage – as long as their special properties can be preserved at computer operating temperatures. This task has now been accomplished by researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, with colleagues from Institut Laue-Langevin ILL in Grenoble. With this, they have taken these materials one step closer to practical applications. T

8h

 

Scientists create new oil-resistant filter technology

Crude oil is sticky stuff and often clogs filter membranes and other equipment used in the oil and gas industry. To address this problem, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a novel approach, which will prolong the lifetime of key industrial equipment.

8h

 

Desert test drive for Mars rover controlled from 1,000 miles away

The ExoFiT Mars rover testing team will use a new model called 'Charlie' to test hardware, software and to practise science operations for the future European Space Agency (ESA) ExoMars rover, which will look for life on Mars in 2021.

8h

 

Crowd-mapping gender equality – a powerful tool for shaping a better city launches in Melbourne

Inequity in cities has a long history. The importance of social and community planning to meet the challenge of creating people-centred cities looms large. While planners, government and designers have long understood the problem, uncovering the many important marginalised stories is an enormous task.

8h

 

Consequences-focused cognitive training may promote healthier habits

Interventions aimed at reducing unhealthy behaviors often focus on retraining people's mental associations, but a series of studies suggests that showing people the consequences of the behaviors may be more effective.

8h

 

Obese mice lose a third of their fat using a natural protein

To the great surprise of cancer researchers, a protein they investigated for its possible role in cancer turned out to be a powerful regulator of metabolism.

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Dear Therapist: I Don’t Want My Nightmare Brother at Thanksgiving

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I have struggled to get along with my brother for the past 15 to 20 years, putting up with his sarcasm, his demeaning behavior, and his planning family gatherings in which everyone is invited but me. If I dare

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Chemists report a detailed description of azopyrazolonic dyes

RUDN chemists have identified the structure of azopyrazolone dyes. The new development will make their synthesis more eco-friendly. The work of the scientists was published in Reviews in Inorganic Chemistry.

8h

 

The islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria could be closer together within millions of years

There is a gravitational sinking or isostatic adjustment of Teide after the volcanic crisis of 2004. This phenomenon has been detected thanks to data provided by the GPS stations situated in the areas surrounding the island of Tenerife, with millimetric values each year.

8h

 

The long-term effects of alcohol demand on retail alcohol markets

As new study by the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation and the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, Department of Biostatistics examined the determinants of the number of licensed bars, restaurants, and liquor stores across neighborhoods in 53 California cities from 2000 to 2013.

8h

 

Synchronized telescope dance puts limits on mysterious flashes in the sky

Two outback radio telescopes synchronized to observe the same point of sky have discovered more about one of the Universe's most mysterious events in new research published today.The Curtin University-led Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and CSIRO's Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescopes were searching the sky for fast radio bursts, which are exceptionally bright flashes of energy coming from

8h

 

Lifetime peer influences, and parenting, predict adult coercive relationships

Researchers in the Arizona State University Department of Psychology have found peer socialization and disruptive parenting were strong predictors of whether adults age 28-30 years were in a coercive romantic relationship. The 230 study participants were followed starting at age 11, and those who engaged in deviancy training at age 16-17 were more likely to end up in unhealthy relationships as adu

8h

 

Evidence mounts that an eye scan may detect early Alzheimer's disease

Results from two studies show that a new, non-invasive imaging device can see signs of Alzheimer's disease in a matter of seconds. The researchers show that the small blood vessels in the retina at the back of the eye are altered in patients with Alzheimer's.

8h

 

Australia's changing relationship with alcohol

New research from La Trobe University has revealed that 30 per cent of Australians recently reduced the quantity of their alcohol consumption and a further 29 per cent reduced the frequency of their drinking, while six per cent kicked the habit for good.

8h

 

Cappuccino made with jackfruit seed flour has chocolate aroma

According to a new study, roasted jackfruit seeds can replace between 50 percent and 75 percent of the cocoa that is blended with milk and coffee to make cappuccino without impairing flavor or aroma.

8h

 

What if humans are no longer earth's most intelligent beings?

In his final, posthumously published book, famed physicist Stephen Hawking raises an alarm about the dangers of artificial intelligence, or AI, and the existential threat it could pose to humanity.

8h

 

Five vampire traits that exist in the natural world

When asked to describe a vampire, most people think of a tall, pale creature, with fangs and a cloak. But were the creatures of folklore inspired by real traits seen in the animal kingdom? From avoiding sunlight to using a cloak, here are five classic vampire characteristics that exist in the natural world.

8h

 

Smell and behavior: The scents of taking action

Scientists have discovered a neural pathway that links olfaction to locomotion.

8h

 

Trump Needs to Demilitarize His Rhetoric

Anti-Semitism reared its ugly head this Sabbath in the deadliest attack on Jews in American history. The 46-year-old Robert D. Bowers walked into Pittsburgh’s Tree of Life synagogue and opened fire on congregants as he yelled out, “All Jews must die!” Bowers is so far to the right and so addled by hatred that he has refused to support President Donald Trump on the grounds that he is “controlled b

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Beto O’Rourke’s Huge Facebook Bet

Beto O’Rourke is placing a very big bet on Facebook—so big that he’s spent nearly as much money on that type of digital ad as the next five-biggest candidate spenders combined. Through October 20, O’Rourke alone had spent $5.4 million advertising on the platform, according to Facebook’s Ad Archive Report . J. B. Pritzker, Kamala Harris, Andrew Cuomo, Claire McCaskill, and Heidi Heitkamp had spent

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Marine robots could improve forecasts of European weather in the future

On Saturday 20th October the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Cook departed on an expedition during which a new automated system of collecting climate data will be trialed. If successful, the new technology could help improve long-range European weather forecasts in the future.

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Solar power – largest study to date discovers 25% power loss across UK

Researchers at the University of Huddersfield have undertaken the largest study to date into the effectiveness of solar panels across the UK and discovered that parts of the country are suffering an overall power loss of up to 25% because of the issue of regional 'hot spots'. Hot spots were also found to be more prevalent in the North of England than in the south.

8h

 

3C 17 is a member of a newly identified galaxy cluster, observations reveal

Using the Gemini Observatory and NASA's Chandra spacecraft, a team of astronomers has provided new information about the radio galaxy 3C 17 and its environment. The observations show that 3C 17 is the brightest member of a newly found galaxy cluster. The finding is reported in a paper published October 18 on arXiv.org.

8h

 

Bioactive novel compounds from endangered tropical plant species

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has isolated 17 secondary metabolites, including three novel compounds from the valuable endangered tropical plant species Alangium longiflorum. A newly isolated compound, 8-hydroxytubulosine, showed growth inhibitory effects at submicromolar levels against several human tumor cell lines except for drug transporter-overexpressing cells. Compou

8h

 

Bigger = better: Big bees fly better in hotter temps than smaller ones do

Larger tropical stingless bees fly better in hot conditions than smaller bees do and larger size may help certain species better tolerate high body temperatures. The findings run contrary to the temperature-size 'rule,' which suggests that insects that rely on the external environment to control their temperature are larger in cold climates and smaller in hot ones.

8h

 

Weird and Funny Science Gifts That Are Sure to Make You Laugh

Who says science isn’t funny? Live Science collects a roundup of humorous and weird science-themed holiday gifts.

8h

 

The Singular Joy of the Dumb, Fun Slasher-Movie Threequel, From 'Halloween III' to 'A Nightmare on Elm Street 3'

The threequel is often the most interesting installment of a long-running horror series, an attempt to break away from its predecessors—no matter how ridiculously.

8h

 

The future of energy supply: Combined energy storage a key technology

The idea is simple. A team headed by Franz Georg Pikl, a Ph.D. student at the Institute of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management at TU Graz, has combined the advantages of pumped storage technology and heat storage using water as a medium to create a "hot-water pumped storage hydropower plant." The new system stores and supplies electricity, heat and cooling energy as required.

8h

 

Plant polymers do not always act together to make beautiful shapes

In plants, the cell wall acts like a skeleton, providing support and stability, and also like muscle, passing water from the ground all the way to the highest leaves and branches. The structure responsible for water transport is the secondary cell wall, composed of xylem, which NAIST Prof. Taku Demura has been studying.

8h

 

Scientists simulate the intracellular environment of a luminescent bacteria cell

A team from the Institute of Fundamental Biology and Biotechnology of SFU used glycerol and sucrose to simulate the intracellular environment of luminescent bacteria and carried out a number of enzymatic reactions. They hope to develop fragments of metabolic chains with different lengths and study fermentative reactions in conditions close to intracellular. The research was published in the Molecu

8h

 

Why some yeasts are better at fermentation in alcohol manufacturing

Alcohol has been celebrated throughout history. The ancient Greeks worshiped Dionysus, while the Chinese recognized Yidi as the creator of libertine drink. Unknowingly, both were actually servants of the true alcohol master, yeast. In Japan, some of the best sake is the result of a single mutation in yeast. Researchers at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report in a new study p

8h

 

Rocky? Habitable? Sizing up a galaxy of planets

The planets so far discovered across the Milky Way are a motley, teeming multitude: hot Jupiters, gas giants, small, rocky worlds and mysterious planets larger than Earth and smaller than Neptune. As we prepare to add many thousands more to the thousands found already, the search goes on for evidence of life – and for a world something like our own.

9h

 

Determining the shape of cells

Cells are constantly performing small tasks such as repairing wounds. They exert force by changing shape. But how do cells translate their shape into exerting a force in a specific direction? Experimental and theoretical physicists from Leiden University have now found a clue to answer this question. Cells' shapes turn out to be approximated by arcs of an ellipse. The research was published in Phy

9h

 

Image: Hubble sets sights on a galaxy with a bright heart

This Hubble Space Telescope image shows the unbarred spiral galaxy NGC 5033, located about 40 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (the Hunting Dogs). The galaxy is similar in size to our own galaxy, the Milky Way, at just over 100,000 light-years across. Like in the Milky Way, NGC 5033's spiral arms are dotted with blue regions, indicating ongoing star formation. The bl

9h

 

CRISPR Gene Editing Shows Promise for Treating a Fatal Muscle Disease

Results from a dog trial may help push new Duchenne muscular dystrophy therapy toward human trials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

 

Vote for the 2019 Brain Awareness Week Sticker Design!

Tis the season to vote in the United States, and the Dana Foundation presents you with an opportunity to have your voice heard! It was difficult to select our finalists from the wonderful designs submitted to our 2019 Brain Awareness Week (BAW) Sticker Design Contest , but we have narrowed it down to five. Now, we need your help to choose our first-, second-, and third-place winners. Public votin

9h

 

Image: It's valley fog season

It's autumn in the Northern Hemisphere, which means many people living in mountainous areas are awakening to fog-filled valleys.

9h

 

Studying cellular deliveries

Many cells, including cancer cells, are known to secrete short RNAs in tiny vesicles, which then move inside other cells—potentially a form of cell-to-cell communication.

9h

 

Against the grain: Soil constraints holding back Australian wheat

A model developed by researchers at The University of Queensland could address soil problems that cost Australia's wheat producers almost $2 billion a year.

9h

 

En milliard euro til kvanteforskning

Forskere på Niels Bohr Institutet ved Københavns Universitet indgår i et højt…

9h

 

Peer support can help curb acute care for persons with depression and diabetes

A new study from UAB describes the impact of a peer coach intervention on hospitalizations and emergency room visits for individuals with diabetes and depression.

9h

 

New report claims 'broken system' fails migrant workers suffering wage theft

Less than 10 per cent of international students and backpackers in Australia recover unpaid wages, even when they are aware they are being underpaid.

9h

 

Image: Ancient cold front in Perseus

A gigantic cold front in the Perseus galaxy cluster has been observed by a trio of X-ray telescopes.

9h

 

Light echos in the Eta Carinae Nebula

The young star Eta Carinae shines prominently in the skies of the southern hemisphere. Although located relatively far away from Earth (about seven thousand light-years away, as compared with the average distance of naked-eye stars of about a thousand light-years), it can be seen easily by people in the southern hemisphere because it is fantastically bright—about five million times more luminous t

9h

 

Did a gigantic bird really eat a Neanderthal child?

Science A paleontologist walks us through the details of the case. Did a giant bird eat the finger bones of a neanderthal child 100,000 years ago? A fossil expert walked us through what it would take to get from bone to bird.

9h

 

How Unions Help Moms Take Maternity Leave

A working woman who is expecting faces a litany of tough questions before giving birth: Can she afford to take maternity leave? Will her employer compensate her if she does? Will the government help stabilize her pay? Most industrialized countries have laws ensuring that mothers can stay home to care for their newborns without losing pay. But in the United States, the only federal law that protec

9h

 

Memory special: What happens to memories over time?

Memories fade, but that's no accident. Forgetting is a useful trick of the mind, and even when memories are lost, they aren't always forgotten

9h

 

Shedding light on Weyl fermions

Researchers from the Theory Department of the MPSD in Hamburg and North Carolina State University in the US have demonstrated that the long-sought magnetic Weyl semi-metallic state can be induced by ultrafast laser pulses in a three-dimensional class of magnetic materials dubbed pyrochlore iridates. Their results, which have been published in Nature Communications, could enable high-speed magneto-

9h

 

Tampering with cellular fats holds great promise

Today, much of the biology underlying the cellular composition of lipids is a black box to scientists. Even though lipids are a major group of biomolecules, they are difficult to study because their synthesis is regulated by complicated metabolism.

9h

 

Scientists debunk the effectiveness of EnChroma glasses for colorblind people

The recent commercialization of the EnChroma glasses has generated great expectations among the color blind thanks to a strong campaign on social networks and the media. Users of the glasses hoped to see new colors or even correct their color blindness.

9h

 

Getting the most out of atmospheric data analysis

New particle formation in the atmosphere provides the nucleation centres required for the formation of clouds, making it an important process for understanding climate. Efforts to investigate the complex balance of chemistry and physics that leads to new particle formation have resulted in the acquisition of very large data sets. A team of researchers based at a number of centers, including Kanaza

9h

 

Baby's tears and mom's libido

A substance in young mouse tears makes female mice more likely to reject male sexual advances. This research is part of ongoing efforts at the University of Tokyo to understand how animals communicate using chemicals called pheromones.

9h

 

We've Been Talking About Self-Driving Car Safety All Wrong

Forget miles driven and disengagements. It's time for a new framework. We just need to figure out what that looks like.

9h

 

The US Is Throwing Out Donor Kidneys That Could Be Given to Patients, Study Says

There's a serious kidney shortage in the United States.

9h

 

Want to Be a Bat Hero This Halloween? Don't Visit the Batcave. (Op-Ed)

It may sound like a thrilling adventure to visit caves full of hibernating bats — which, just like Batman’s Batcave, are largely hidden from the public eye. But venturing inside of bats' dark homes is actually incredibly dangerous to the bats.

9h

 

Photos: Hidden Monuments Found at Ancient Site of Izapa Kingdom

Here's a look at the amazing discoveries from the ancient site of the Izapa kingdom in southern Mexico.

9h

 

Hidden Monuments and Cookie-Cutter 'Suburbs' Discovered in Ancient Izapa Kingdom

Ancient hidden settlements were revealed in a new lidar survey of the Izapa kingdom in southern Mexico.

9h

 

S.Africa coal belt among world's pollution hotspots: Greenpeace

South Africa's eastern Mpumalanga province has the most polluting cluster of coal-fired power stations in the world producing record levels of nitrogen dioxide, a report by environmental campaign group Greenpeace said Monday.

9h

 

Image of the Day: Cellular Pulse

The protein RhoA coordinates pulses of movement in Caenorhabditis elegans cells.

9h

 

Redefining the Kilogram

Officials will vote to overhaul the SI system of measurements, basing units such as the kilogram not on physical objects but on fundamental constants — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

 

Income Inequality's Most Disturbing Side Effect: Homicide

Where financial disparities are greatest, the murder rate tends to be high — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

 

Forget quantum laptops, our quantum computing future is in the cloud

Australian of the Year Michelle Simmons is hoping her work building a new type of quantum computer can solve problems we don't even know about

10h

 

Trump Shut Programs to Counter Violent Extremism

Set aside the question of whether President Donald Trump’s rhetorical flirtations with white nationalism enabled Saturday’s mass shooting in Pittsburgh. What’s undeniable is that his administration has hobbled the infrastructure designed to prevent such murders. In the waning days of Barack Obama’s administration, the Department of Homeland Security awarded a set of grants to organizations workin

10h

 

How trying to solve death makes life, here and now, worse

The concept of the afterlife, argues Michael Shermer, take away from appreciating what we have right in front of us. Why be afraid of death? 100 billion humans have died before us. It's part of the process. Maybe that '80s song was right… maybe heaven really is a place on earth. Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality, and Utopia List Price: $30.00 New From: $5.00

10h

 

Techtopia #76: Sådan kommer danske virksomheder i gang med 3D-print i produktion

Danske små og mellemstore virksomheder bruger hovedsagligt 3D-print til prototyper, men der er store gevinster i at bruge 3D-print i selve produktionen.

10h

 

Marketingbureauer driver pseudo-prisportaler i samarbejde med Google

I virkeligheden er prisportalerne reklamekataloger for nogle få butikker og kæder, mener Forbrugerrådet Tænk. Det gavner ikke forbrugerne.

10h

 

Regeringen vil have nummerpladescanning i landets fire største byer

Regeringen vil som en del af deres klimaplan opstille nummerpladescannere i miljøzoner, det rejser spørgsmål til, hvad kameraernes data egentligt må bruges til.

10h

 

Rapport: Flydende naturgas i transport er mere skadeligt for klimaet end diesel

LNG er ikke gunstigt i transportsektoren, hverken for biler, tog eller skibe, konkluderer miljøorganisation i ny rapport.

10h

 

Tag superkræfterne på i garderoben: Robotten sidder i tøjet

Exoskeletter, der understøtter kroppens bevægelser, bliver stadigt mindre og mere fleksible, så de bedre kan løse flere forskellige typer opgaver for medarbejdere i industrien.

10h

 

Why We Love to Scare Ourselves on Halloween (and the Rest of the Year, Too)

Experiencing fear in the absence of real danger has clear psychological benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

 

Carbon Capture Is Messy and Fraught—But Might Be Essential

A new report calls for more research into carbon capture tech. Problem, though: Who will pay to make it happen?

10h

 

San Francisco Tech Billionaires Go to War over Homelessness

Salesforce's Marc Benioff and Square's Jack Dorsey line up on opposite sides of a proposed tax on businesses to fund homeless programs.

10h

 

Vitamin Vaping Raises Wariness among Scientists

Companies claim e-cigarettes can deliver nutrients, but experts say the science looks shaky — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

 

Rationalizing phonon dispersion: an efficient and precise prediction of lattice thermal conductivity

Lattice thermal conductivity strongly affects the applications of materials related to thermal functionality, such as thermal management, thermal barrier coatings and thermoelectrics. In order to understand lattice thermal conductivity more quantitatively and in a time- and cost-effective way, many researchers have devoted their efforts and developed a few physical models using approximated phonon

11h

 

VIDEO Krager laver værktøj af pinde og klarer udfordring

Krager fra øer i Stillehavet kan selv sammensætte redskaber til at få fat i føde, viser ny undersøgelse.

11h

 

My Grandfather Was Welcomed to Pittsburgh by the Group the Gunman Hated

On their second attempt to leave Europe, in 1921, my grandfather and his family spent three days in an outdoor potato cellar. The potatoes don’t seem to have been much help; my grandfather would later recall that they subsisted, for those three days, on stale bread and water. He was 12, or maybe 14—official immigration records conflict with family lore. His father and older brother had already se

11h

 

The Campaign Deval Patrick Is Searching For

CHARLESTON, S.C. —The reverend asked for a moment of silence. Twelve bells chimed. No place in America knows the pain of Pittsburgh quite like here at Mother Emanuel AME Church. Another man corrupted by hate, with another gun; another group of innocent people murdered because of who they were, in the place they’d come to pray. The reverend looked out at the congregation: half full, with one armed

11h

 

Trump Is the Glue That Binds the Far Right

Last week began with a wave of mail bombs sent to the enemies of President Donald Trump and ended with the massacre of 11 people at a synagogue in Pittsburgh. In between, a racially motivated shooter in Kentucky killed two African Americans . That incident received relatively little coverage, primarily because a locked door prevented the perpetrator from killing even more people at a nearby black

11h

 

'Fortnite' Scams Are Even Worse Than You Thought

YouTube videos with millions of views. Nearly 5,000 bogus websites. V-Bucks scammers have gotten out of control.

11h

 

Zapping substances with electrons can quickly map chemical structures

Speedy molecular identification originally developed for proteins might benefit crime lab researchers and drugmakers.

11h

 

Nej, ørelægens rolle er tripel

Kim Werther er blot en blandt mange ØNH-læger, der aktivt og helt uden blusel bruger deres lægelige autoritet som afsæt for at sælge høreapparater til borgere, der i kraft af systemets indretning skal omkring lægen for at blive udredt.

12h

 

Obese mice lose a third of their fat using a natural protein

To the great surprise of cancer researchers in a Georgetown University-led study, a protein they investigated for its possible role in cancer turned out to be a powerful regulator of metabolism.

12h

 

Experimental vaccine may reduce post-stroke blood clot risk

An experimental vaccine might one day protect ischemic stroke survivors from developing blood clots and subsequent strokes. The vaccine was found to be as safe and effective as one of the most widely used oral blood thinners currently used to reduce clotting risk.

12h

 

Home monitoring confirms clinic diagnosis of high blood pressure

A US study found that home blood pressure readings of 130/80 mm Hg or higher correspond to greater risk for cardiovascular complications. This is the first US data to confirm a home monitoring threshold that helps diagnose high blood pressure.

12h

 

The Fetishization of Mr. Rogers’s ‘Look for the Helpers’

After the senseless calamity of a mass shooting, people seek comforts—even small ones—in the face of horror. One of those small comforts has come to be Fred Rogers’s famous advice to look for the helpers . “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news,” Rogers said to his television neighbors, “my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are help

12h

 

Provokerende udsagn om amputation

Flyvbjergs og Christensens opfordring til udbredelse af SDCC-modellen nationalt kan virke ganske provokatorisk i betragtning af, at der i de seneste fem år er gjort en ekstra indsats for udredning og behandling af diabetiske fodsår.

13h

 

Budapest's underwater wonderland draws divers from far and wide

Not every diver's dream is to watch shimmering shoals of fish swim through coral reefs in dazzlingly blue seas.

13h

 

EU air quality slowly improving but still deadly: report

Air pollution is slowly easing in EU countries but still causes nearly half a million early deaths each year, the European Environment Agency (EEA) said in its annual report published Monday.

13h

 

China, France launch satellite to study climate change

The first Franco-Chinese satellite was launched into orbit on Monday to study ocean surface winds and waves around the clock, better predict cyclones and improve scientists' understanding of climate change.

13h

 

IBM buys software company Red Hat for $34bn in bid for cloud dominanceIBM Red Hat Linux $34B

IBM said Sunday it has reached a deal to buy open source software company Red Hat for $34 billion, among the biggest tech mergers in history which the computing giant said would enhance its cloud offerings.

13h

 

US election integrity depends on security-challenged firms

It was the kind of security lapse that gives election officials nightmares. In 2017, a private contractor left data on Chicago's 1.8 million registered voters—including addresses, birth dates and partial Social Security numbers—publicly exposed for months on an Amazon cloud server.

13h

 

As Canadian oil exports increase, research explores effects of crude oil on native salmon

Oil spills spell disaster for affected wildlife, leading to a number of detrimental outcomes, including suffocation, poisoning and longer-term problems related to exposure to crude oil and its components. New research out of the University of Guelph in Canada takes a closer look at the potential effects on regional salmon populations as Canada eyes expansion of its crude oil export capacity. The f

13h

 

Smell and behavior: The scents of taking action

In all animals, including humans, smell—the oldest of the five senses—plays a predominant role in many behaviors essential for survival and reproduction. It has been known since ancient times that animals react to odours.

13h

 

Rocket carrying 1st UAE-made satellite launched from Japan

A Japanese rocket on Monday lifted the United Arab Emirates' first locally made satellite into orbit successfully from a space center in southern Japan.

14h

 

Scientific research transforms lives. Why is that so often forgotten? | Jess Cole

Unless researchers can persuade the public of the importance of their work, academia will never be an investment priority Today’s budget will set a clear direction for next year’s important comprehensive spending review, in which the chancellor will unveil spending plans for 2020 and beyond. Over the coming months, different sectors will be battling it out for their share of the pie. For the UK’s

14h

 

Sundhedsplatformen printede forkerte pilledoser: Derfor gik det galt

Sundhedsplatformen har lavet 3.829 recepter med forkert dosis det sidste halve år. Men fejlen var faktisk ikke en fejl.

15h

 

Are hydrogen trains the future of UK travel?

Trains that emit pure water could be in the UK by the "early 2020s", according to the government.

16h

 

Museforsøg: Når ungerne græder, siger mor nej til sex

Et signalstof i museungers tårer får hunmus til at afvise seksuelle tilnærmelser fra hanmus.

16h

 

Ringstedbanens nye station må bygges om igen, når Femerntunnelen åbner

Snart står den ombyggede Ringsted Station til 730 millioner kroner klar til at tage imod de ekstra tog fra den nye Ringstedbane. Men få år senere må der bygges om igen, fordi stationen ikke får kapacitet til togtrafikken fra den kommende Femerntunnel.

17h

 

Drugs' side effects in lungs 'more widespread than thought'

A systematic review of research has revealed that the toxic effects on the lung of drugs commonly taken to treat a range of common conditions is much more widespread than thought.

17h

 

Consequences-focused cognitive training may promote healthier habits

Interventions aimed at reducing unhealthy behaviors often focus on retraining people's mental associations, but a series of studies suggests that showing people the consequences of the behaviors may be more effective. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

17h

 

Smell and behavior: The scents of taking action

Canadian scientists have discovered a neural pathway that links olfaction to locomotion.

17h

 

Oral curcumin shows no benefit in reducing inflammation following vascular surgery

A study of oral curcumin, the active medicinal ingredient in turmeric, showed no benefit in preventing inflammation and complications in patients undergoing elective surgery for aortic aneurysm repair, according to a large randomized controlled trial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

17h

 

Antivaccine propaganda from Dr. W. Gifford-Jones in The Toronto Sun

On Saturday, The Toronto Sun published a syndicated column by a pseudonymous Canadian doctor, Dr. W. Gifford-Jones. The column was packed with antivaccine misinformation and pseudoscience. Apparently due to complaints, the article was taken down sometime Sunday, but is still available on the websites of several other Canadian newspapers. Its misinformation is still there to frighten parents out of

17h

 

Potholes: Why do we have so many of them?

The chancellor says councils in England will get an extra £420m in his Budget to fix potholes.

19h

 

IBM Buying Open Source Specialist Red Hat for $34 BillionIBM Red Hat Linux $34B

The deal could bolster IBM's position in cloud computing.

21h

 

Creams remove skin sun spots with minimal pain and may prevent cancer

Sun spots – or actinic keratoses – are caused by UV light. Now people are using medicated creams to remove them before they have a chance to turn cancerous

21h

 

Why we need a new telescope to search for alien life

A new federally commissioned report recommends the construction of a new type of space telescope to help find life on other planets or discover other solar systems like ours. Bruce Macintosh, an astrophysicist at Stanford University who was a member of the report committee, says the proposed telescope would directly image Earth-like exoplanets orbiting stars similar to our sun, and could work in

22h

 

Brain’s ‘gatekeeper’ decides which details need attention

Neuroscientists know a lot about how our brains learn new things, but not much about how they choose what to focus on while they learn. Now, researchers have traced that ability to an unexpected place in the brain. In order to learn about the world, an animal needs to do more than just pay attention to its surroundings. It also needs to learn which sights, sounds, and sensations in its environmen

22h

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