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Nyheder2018oktober30

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Suicide more prevalent than homicide in US, but most Americans don't know it

A new study by the University of Washington, Northeastern University and Harvard University delves into public perceptions of gun violence and the leading causes of death in the US.

14h

Mueller Wants the FBI to Look at a Scheme to Discredit Him

An alleged scheme to pay off women to fabricate sexual assault allegations against Special Counsel Robert Mueller has been referred to the FBI for further investigation, a spokesman for the special counsel’s office told The Atlantic . “When we learned last week of allegations that women were offered money to make false claims about the Special Counsel, we immediately referred the matter to the FB

1h

Bitcoin can push global warming above 2 degrees C in a couple decades

The electricity requirements of Bitcoin have created considerable difficulties, and extensive online discussion, about where to put the facilities or rings that compute the proof-of-work of Bitcoin. A somewhat less discussed issue is the environmental impacts of producing all that electricity.

2h

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Apple iPad Pro Announcement 2018 Liveblog

Follow Apple’s October 30 iPad Pro event in New York with our live news updates.

2min

Showerhead bacteria and lung infections: Researchers find correlation

Researchers have shown that the regions in the United States where pathogenic mycobacteria are most prevalent in showerheads are the same regions where nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung infections are most common. The study emphasizes the important role of showerheads in the transmission of NTM infections.

12min

Discovery of Zika virus in monkeys suggests disease may also have wild cycle

Zika virus has been detected in dead monkeys found in several areas in Brazil. The monkeys had been killed by locals who thought the animals had yellow fever. In fact, the monkeys were not bearers of that disease, but infection by Zika virus had made them sick and more vulnerable to attack by humans.

12min

Mutation associated with als causes sugar-starved cells to overproduce lipids, study shows

A genetic defect tied to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases and mental illnesses changes how cells starved of sugar metabolize fatty compounds known as lipids, a new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows. The finding could lead to new targets to treat these diseases, which currently have no cure or fully effective treatments.

13min

How plants cope with stress

With climate change comes drought, and with drought comes higher salt concentrations in the soil. A team led by University of Pennsylvania scientists have identified a mechanism by which plants respond to salt stress, a pathway that could be targeted to engineer more adaptable crops.

13min

Commercial shellfish landings decline likely linked to environmental factors

Researchers studying the sharp decline between 1980 and 2010 in documented landings of the four most commercially-important bivalve mollusks — eastern oysters, northern quahogs, softshell clams and northern bay scallops — have identified the causes.Warming ocean temperatures associated with a positive shift in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which led to habitat degradation including incre

13min

What did dinosaurs eat?

Animals Salad. And some meat. Surprisingly, the bigger the dinosaurs were, the more likely they were to be vegetarian.

16min

Is Drinking Milk Unnatural?

Some claim that drinking the milk of other animals—or drinking milk beyond infancy—is both unnatural and unhealthy. How do the arguments for and against consuming milk stack up? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16min

Novel quantum dots enhance cell imaging

Researchers have engineered a new type of molecular probe that can measure and count RNA in cells and tissue without organic dyes. The probe is based on the conventional fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, but it relies on compact quantum dots to illuminate molecules and diseased cells rather than fluorescent dyes.

27min

Rich people don't live that much longer than the poor, study finds

Differences in how many extra years rich people live compared to poor people is only about half of what we thought, according to new research.

27min

These Duck-Billed Dinosaurs Wore Their Instruments on Their Heads

Different species of duck-billed dinosaurs may have "tooted" different notes out of their trumpet-like, tubular crests, new research shows.

32min

Study uncovers key parts of mechanism for activating T cells to fight cancer and other diseases

In a study published online today by the journal Immunity, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Vanderbilt University and colleagues at other institutions show how machinery within immune system T cells responds to outside signals and activates the cells to attack cancerous, infected, or otherwise diseased cells.

35min

When silence acts as a mirror

Findings from a new study suggest that people assume that those who are silent in a conversation would agree with their own opinion, even if the majority of the speakers in the group have a different opinion. This has implications for how people form opinions about products, politics, and much more.

35min

Lifespan and sexual maturity depends on your brain more than your body

New Vanderbilt research finds how long humans and other warm-blooded animals live — and when they reach sexual maturity — may have more to do with their brain than their body. More specifically, it is not animals with larger bodies or slower metabolic rates that live longer; it is animals with more neurons in the cerebral cortex, whatever the size of the body.

35min

Life-changing intersection between big data and therapeutic pipeline in neuromuscular disease

A new report funded by the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) and released by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science indicates that genetic testing and breakthrough therapies will transform the diagnosis and care of neuromuscular disease within the next decade. The report, 'Understanding Neuromuscular Disease Care,' highlights current gaps in care and opportunities to optimize care and accel

35min

35min

How trying to solve death makes life, here and now, worse

The concept of the afterlife, argues Michael Shermer, take away from appreciating what we have right in front of us. Why be afraid of death? 100 billion humans have died before us. It's part of the process. Maybe that '80s song was right… maybe heaven really is a place on earth. Heavens on Earth: The Scientific Search for the Afterlife, Immortality, and Utopia List Price: $30.00 New From: $5.00

35min

Trilobites: A Vault of Glass and the Deepest Volcanic Eruption Ever Detected

Close to the Mariana Trench and nearly three miles below sea level, scientists found evidence of an underwater eruption that was only months old.

41min

As World’s Air Gets Worse, India Struggles to Breathe

Though India’s government has taken a few steps to curb pollution, data from across the country shows hazardous air pollution continues to rise.

41min

Your brain needs balance to pay attention

When preparing to interpret what we see, nerve cells maintain a state of balance, which may explain why a healthy brain can block out distractions, according to new research. Autism and other developmental disorders impair that ability to focus attention, which is essential to our daily lives. The new research, which appears in Nature Communications , marks a departure from the established view o

45min

Scotland’s BSE case is a reminder that many more may be out there

A case of classical BSE was confirmed in Scotland this month. While the disease seems to be on the wane in the UK, many cases worldwide may be going undetected

53min

Thousands of Hours of Newly Released Audio Tell the Backstage Story of Apollo 11 Moon Mission

Space A team of engineers spent years giving new life to old NASA tapes. 10/26/2018 Catherine Meyers, Editor To read more…

53min

GoFundMe scams: 'I don't think anyone's got their arms around it'

A Faribault, Minn., man has admitted faking cancer and spending the money raised for medical bills on marijuana, liquor, video games and dart tournaments.

56min

Becoming more sensitive to pain increases the risk of knee pain not going away

A new study by researchers in Montreal and Boston looks at the role that pain plays in osteoarthritis, a disease that affects over 300 million adults worldwide.

56min

Laser technique may open door to more efficient clean fuels

Electrocatalysts have shown promise as a way to efficiently convert waste CO2 into clean fuels, but the mechanisms by which they operate are often unknown making it hard for researchers to design new ones in a rational manner. New University of Liverpool research published in Nature Catalysis demonstrates a laser-based spectroscopy technique that can be used to study the electrochemical reduction

56min

Facial asymmetry increases with age

Asymmetry between the two sides of the face increases steadily with aging — a finding with important implications for facial rejuvenation and reconstructive procedures.

1h

Solving a 100-year mystery in blood pressure research

New insight into how cells sense blood pressure could present better targets for treating hypertension.

1h

Gunshot wounds in children account for $270 million in emergency room and inpatient charges annually

A new study of more than 75,000 teenagers and children who suffered a firearm-related injury between 2006 and 2014 pinpoints the financial burden of gunshot wounds and highlights the increasing incidence of injury in certain age groups.

1h

1h

The Spooky Evolution of Text Message-Based Horror Stories

It's like creepypasta—but with more teens on smartphones.

1h

A NASA Spacecraft Just Broke the Record for Closest Approach to Sun

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe just got closer to the sun than any other human-made object in history.

1h

Here’s How Much Bots Drive Conversation During News Events

About 60 percent of Twitter activity related to the caravan late last week was driven by bots, according to a new tool aimed at news organizations.

1h

Acqua Alta, or Venice Under Water

High tides and strong winds brought an exceptional acqua alta , or high water, to Venice, Italy, over the past few days. Though flooding is not uncommon in Venice, the high water level yesterday was just over 5 feet (156 cm), one of the highest marks ever recorded. Schools and hospitals were closed, but tourists did their best to navigate the flooded squares and alleys as they always have.

1h

Single protein controls thousands of genes essential for sperm development

A single protein regulates a battery of key genes inside developing sperm, according to a new study. Scientists discovered the protein — called Dazl — controls a network of genes essential for developing sperm to replicate and survive. The findings, published in Cell Reports, could lay the groundwork for future research into therapies for infertile men.

1h

One month of abstinence from cannabis improves memory in adolescents, young adults

A new study finds that one month of abstaining from cannabis use resulted in measurable improvement in memory functions important for learning among adolescents and young adults who were regular cannabis users.

1h

Reduced screen time for young highly recommended for well-being

A new study indicates that more hours of screen time are associated with lower well-being in those aged 2 to 17, though the association is larger for adolescents than for younger children.

1h

Plant-based 'road salt' good for highways but not for insects

Beet juice deicer, a natural alternative to road salt that is considered to be an eco-friendlier winter road management solution, may not be ecologically friendly to nearby aquatic species. The findings are the first to explore the physiological effects of beet juice deicer in freshwater animals.

1h

How researchers flinging salmon inadvertently spurred tree growth

Scientists studying salmon in Alaska flung dead fish into the forest. After 20 years, the nutrients from those carcasses sped up tree growth.

1h

New and better marker for assessing patients after cardiac arrest

Last year, researchers Tobias Cronberg and Niklas Mattsson at Lund University in Sweden published a study showing serum tau levels to be a new and promising marker for identifying patients with severe brain damage after cardiac arrest. Together with Marion Moseby Knappe, they have now discovered that the protein Neurofilament light (NFL) in serum constitutes an even better marker to identify the d

1h

Tiny light detectors work like gecko ears

By structuring nanowires in a way that mimics geckos' ears, researchers have found a way to record the incoming angle of light. This technology could have applications in robotic vision, photography and augmented reality.

1h

What Journalists and Scientists Have in Common

These two types of professionals should join forces to defend their shared values of inquiry and truth — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

New platform based on biology and nanotechnology carries mRNA directly to target cells

Researchers have developed a biological approach to directing nanocarriers loaded with protein 'game changers' to specific cells. Their groundbreaking method may prove useful in treating myriad malignancies, inflammatory diseases and rare genetic disorders.

1h

Will wearing glasses make my vision worse?

Health Short answer: no. As we age, our eyesight worsens. Although lenses can compensate for these changes, many people worry that wearing glasses will make them become dependent on specs.

1h

Beyond the classical thermodynamic contributions to hydrogen atom abstraction reactivity [Chemistry]

Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions are cornerstones of chemistry. Various (metallo)enzymes performing the HAA catalysis evolved in nature and inspired the rational development of multiple synthetic catalysts. Still, the factors determining their catalytic efficiency are not fully understood. Herein, we define the simple thermodynamic factor η by employing two thermodynamic…

1h

Faraday cage screening reveals intrinsic aspects of the van der Waals attraction [Chemistry]

General properties of the recently observed screening of the van der Waals (vdW) attraction between a silica substrate and silica tip by insertion of graphene are predicted using basic theory and first-principles calculations. Results are then focused on possible practical applications, as well as an understanding of the nature of…

1h

Nematic twist-bend phase in an external field [Physics]

The response of the nematic twist–bend (NTB) phase to an applied field can provide important insight into the structure of this liquid and may bring us closer to understanding mechanisms generating mirror symmetry breaking in a fluid of achiral molecules. Here we investigate theoretically how an external uniform field can…

1h

Comparing continual task learning in minds and machines [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Humans can learn to perform multiple tasks in succession over the lifespan (“continual” learning), whereas current machine learning systems fail. Here, we investigated the cognitive mechanisms that permit successful continual learning in humans and harnessed our behavioral findings for neural network design. Humans categorized naturalistic images of trees according to…

1h

Transcription initiation defines kinetoplast RNA boundaries [Biochemistry]

Mitochondrial genomes are often transcribed into polycistronic RNAs punctuated by tRNAs whose excision defines mature RNA boundaries. Although kinetoplast DNA lacks tRNA genes, it is commonly held that in Trypanosoma brucei the monophosphorylated 5′ ends of functional molecules typify precursor partitioning by an unknown endonuclease. On the contrary, we demonstrate…

1h

Ultrafast epithelial contractions provide insights into contraction speed limits and tissue integrity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

By definition of multicellularity, all animals need to keep their cells attached and intact, despite internal and external forces. Cohesion between epithelial cells provides this key feature. To better understand fundamental limits of this cohesion, we study the epithelium mechanics of an ultrathin (∼25 μm) primitive marine animal Trichoplax adhaerens,…

1h

Peptide design by optimization on a data-parameterized protein interaction landscape [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Many applications in protein engineering require optimizing multiple protein properties simultaneously, such as binding one target but not others or binding a target while maintaining stability. Such multistate design problems require navigating a high-dimensional space to find proteins with desired characteristics. A model that relates protein sequence to functional attributes…

1h

RPA1 binding to NRF2 switches ARE-dependent transcriptional activation to ARE-NRE-dependent repression [Cell Biology]

NRF2 regulates cellular redox homeostasis, metabolic balance, and proteostasis by forming a dimer with small musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma proteins (sMAFs) and binding to antioxidant response elements (AREs) to activate target gene transcription. In contrast, NRF2-ARE–dependent transcriptional repression is unreported. Here, we describe NRF2-mediated gene repression via a specific seven-nucleoti

1h

mTORC1 signaling suppresses Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling through DVL-dependent regulation of Wnt receptor FZD level [Cell Biology]

Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays pivotal roles in cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis by maintaining somatic stem cell functions. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling functions as an integrative rheostat that orchestrates various cellular and metabolic activities that shape tissue homeostasis. Whether these two fundamental signaling pathways couple to exert physiological…

1h

TRPM7 and CaV3.2 channels mediate Ca2+ influx required for egg activation at fertilization [Developmental Biology]

The success of mammalian development following fertilization depends on a series of transient increases in egg cytoplasmic Ca2+, referred to as Ca2+ oscillations. Maintenance of these oscillations requires Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane, which is mediated in part by T-type, CaV3.2 channels. Here we show using genetic mouse models…

1h

Frequent monoallelic or skewed expression for developmental genes in CNS-derived cells and evidence for balancing selection [Developmental Biology]

Cellular mosaicism due to monoallelic autosomal expression (MAE), with cell selection during development, is becoming increasingly recognized as prevalent in mammals, leading to interest in understanding its extent and mechanism(s). We report here use of clonal cell lines derived from the CNS of adult female F1 hybrid (C57BL/6 X JF1)…

1h

Collective decision making by rational individuals [Ecology]

The patterns and mechanisms of collective decision making in humans and animals have attracted both empirical and theoretical attention. Of particular interest has been the variety of social feedback rules and the extent to which these behavioral rules can be explained and predicted from theories of rational estimation and decision…

1h

Climate-driven declines in arthropod abundance restructure a rainforest food web [Ecology]

A number of studies indicate that tropical arthropods should be particularly vulnerable to climate warming. If these predictions are realized, climate warming may have a more profound impact on the functioning and diversity of tropical forests than currently anticipated. Although arthropods comprise over two-thirds of terrestrial species, information on their…

1h

Adaptation limits ecological diversification and promotes ecological tinkering during the competition for substitutable resources [Evolution]

Microbial communities can evade competitive exclusion by diversifying into distinct ecological niches. This spontaneous diversification often occurs amid a backdrop of directional selection on other microbial traits, where competitive exclusion would normally apply. Yet despite their empirical relevance, little is known about how diversification and directional selection combine to determine…

1h

Molecular profiling of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-associated hepatocellular carcinoma using SB transposon mutagenesis [Genetics]

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the fastest rising cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Western countries; however, the molecular mechanisms that cause NAFLD-HCC remain elusive. To identify molecular drivers of NAFLD-HCC, we performed Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon mutagenesis screens in liver-specific Pten knockout and in high-fat diet-fed mice, which…

1h

Shift from androgen to estrogen action causes abdominal muscle fibrosis, atrophy, and inguinal hernia in a transgenic male mouse model [Medical Sciences]

Inguinal hernia develops primarily in elderly men, and more than one in four men will undergo inguinal hernia repair during their lifetime. However, the underlying mechanisms behind hernia formation remain unknown. It is known that testosterone and estradiol can regulate skeletal muscle mass. We herein demonstrate that the conversion of…

1h

Impaired hematopoiesis and leukemia development in mice with a conditional knock-in allele of a mutant splicing factor gene U2af1 [Medical Sciences]

Mutations affecting the spliceosomal protein U2AF1 are commonly found in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and secondary acute myeloid leukemia (sAML). We have generated mice that carry Cre-dependent knock-in alleles of U2af1(S34F), the murine version of the most common mutant allele of U2AF1 encountered in human cancers. Cre-mediated recombination in murine hematopoietic…

1h

Prevalent reliance of bacterioplankton on exogenous vitamin B1 and precursor availability [Microbiology]

Vitamin B1 (B1 herein) is a vital enzyme cofactor required by virtually all cells, including bacterioplankton, which strongly influence aquatic biogeochemistry and productivity and modulate climate on Earth. Intriguingly, bacterioplankton can be de novo B1 synthesizers or B1 auxotrophs, which cannot synthesize B1 de novo and require exogenous B1 or…

1h

ADP-ribosyl-binding and hydrolase activities of the alphavirus nsP3 macrodomain are critical for initiation of virus replication [Microbiology]

Alphaviruses are plus-strand RNA viruses that cause encephalitis, rash, and arthritis. The nonstructural protein (nsP) precursor polyprotein is translated from genomic RNA and processed into four nsPs. nsP3 has a highly conserved macrodomain (MD) that binds ADP-ribose (ADPr), which can be conjugated to protein as a posttranslational modification involving transfer…

1h

Alleviating catastrophic forgetting using context-dependent gating and synaptic stabilization [Neuroscience]

Humans and most animals can learn new tasks without forgetting old ones. However, training artificial neural networks (ANNs) on new tasks typically causes them to forget previously learned tasks. This phenomenon is the result of “catastrophic forgetting,” in which training an ANN disrupts connection weights that were important for solving…

1h

Control of movement vigor and decision making during foraging [Neuroscience]

During foraging, animals decide how long to stay at a patch and harvest reward, and then, they move with certain vigor to another location. How does the brain decide when to leave, and how does it determine the speed of the ensuing movement? Here, we considered the possibility that both…

1h

Lawful tracking of visual motion in humans, macaques, and marmosets in a naturalistic, continuous, and untrained behavioral context [Neuroscience]

Much study of the visual system has focused on how humans and monkeys integrate moving stimuli over space and time. Such assessments of spatiotemporal integration provide fundamental grounding for the interpretation of neurophysiological data, as well as how the resulting neural signals support perceptual decisions and behavior. However, the insights…

1h

Mutant UBQLN2 promotes toxicity by modulating intrinsic self-assembly [Neuroscience]

UBQLN2 is one of a family of proteins implicated in ubiquitin-dependent protein quality control and integrally tied to human neurodegenerative disease. Whereas wild-type UBQLN2 accumulates in intraneuronal deposits in several common age-related neurodegenerative diseases, mutations in the gene encoding this protein result in X-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia associated

1h

Discovery of a small-molecule inhibitor of specific serine residue BAD phosphorylation [Pharmacology]

Human BCL-2–associated death promoter (hBAD) is an apoptosis-regulatory protein mediating survival signals to carcinoma cells upon phosphorylation of Ser99, among other residues. Herein, we screened multiple small-molecule databases queried in a Laplacian-modified naive Bayesian-based cheminformatics platform and identified a Petasis reaction product as a site-specific inhibitor for hBAD phosphory

1h

Potential downside of high initial visual acuity [Computer Sciences]

Children who are treated for congenital cataracts later exhibit impairments in configural face analysis. This has been explained in terms of a critical period for the acquisition of normal face processing. Here, we consider a more parsimonious account according to which deficits in configural analysis result from the abnormally high…

1h

Color opponency with a single kind of bistable opsin in the zebrafish pineal organ [Neuroscience]

Lower vertebrate pineal organs discriminate UV and visible light. Such color discrimination is typically considered to arise from antagonism between two or more spectrally distinct opsins, as, e.g., human cone-based color vision relies on antagonistic relationships between signals produced by red-, green-, and blue-cone opsins. Photosensitive pineal organs contain a…

1h

Focal adhesion molecules regulate astrocyte morphology and glutamate transporters to suppress seizure-like behavior [Neuroscience]

Astrocytes are important regulators of neural circuit function and behavior in the healthy and diseased nervous system. We screened for molecules in Drosophila astrocytes that modulate neuronal hyperexcitability and identified multiple components of focal adhesion complexes (FAs). Depletion of astrocytic Tensin, β-integrin, Talin, focal adhesion kinase (FAK), or matrix metalloproteinase…

1h

Mammalian behavior and physiology converge to confirm sharper cochlear tuning in humans [Neuroscience]

Frequency analysis of sound by the cochlea is the most fundamental property of the auditory system. Despite its importance, the resolution of this frequency analysis in humans remains controversial. The controversy persists because the methods used to estimate tuning in humans are indirect and have not all been independently validated…

1h

Mutations in the DNA demethylase OsROS1 result in a thickened aleurone and improved nutritional value in rice grains [Plant Biology]

The rice endosperm, consisting of an outer single-cell layer aleurone and an inner starchy endosperm, is an important staple food for humans. While starchy endosperm stores mainly starch, the aleurone is rich in an array of proteins, vitamins, and minerals. To improve the nutritional value of rice, we screened for…

1h

Thermodynamic favorability and pathway yield as evolutionary tradeoffs in biosynthetic pathway choice [Systems Biology]

The structure of the metabolic network contains myriad organism-specific variations across the tree of life, but the selection basis for pathway choices in different organisms is not well understood. Here, we examined the metabolic capabilities with respect to cofactor use and pathway thermodynamics of all sequenced organisms in the Kyoto…

1h

Correction to Supporting Information for Kwon et al., FoxP3 scanning mutagenesis reveals functional variegation and mild mutations with atypical autoimmune phenotypes [SI Correction]

IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction to Supporting Information for “FoxP3 scanning mutagenesis reveals functional variegation and mild mutations with atypical autoimmune phenotypes,” by Ho-Keun Kwon, Hui-Min Chen, Diane Mathis, and Christophe Benoist, which was first published December 21, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1718599115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E253–E262). The authors note that Datasets…

1h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Transmission of trauma from fathers to sons Bird’s eye view of Andersonville Prison, Georgia, August 17, 1864. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, Civil War Photographs, LC-DIG-ppmsca-33769. The effects of paternal trauma on offspring health remain largely unclear. Dora Costa et al. (pp. 11215–11220) examined…

1h

Profile of Julian I. Schroeder [Profiles]

Julian Schroeder’s research career might have unfolded differently if he had not run into Linus Pauling in the coffee room. Schroeder was a graduate student at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Göttingen, Germany, and was torn between attending a seminar on plant science and a speech by…

1h

Rapid assessment of natural visual motion integration across primate species [Neuroscience]

Our visual environment is highly dynamic and marked by continuous change. The ability to see moving objects and to interact with them is a fundamental visual skill critical for survival. Many animals rely on visual motion to capture prey or to avoid predators. In humans, visual motion perception is at…

1h

Drumming up single-molecule beats [Applied Physical Sciences]

Single-particle and single-molecule techniques have become invaluable tools to unravel complex chemical phenomena and biological processes. While fluorescence-based techniques have flourished due to advances in wavelength-dependent optical filtering and highly sensitive detectors (1), other methodologies (Fig. 1) have only recently achieved single-molecule sensitivity limits. A technique based on

1h

Strengthening sustainability through data [Sustainability Science]

There is a well-known folk tale about six blind men who go to see an elephant. Each man touches a different part of the animal, so each believes the elephant to be a different type of creature. Rather than pooling their knowledge to create a complete picture, they argue, and,…

1h

Culmination of a half-century quest reveals insight into mutant tRNA-mediated frameshifting after tRNA departure from the decoding site [Biochemistry]

The pairing of the three anticodon bases of a cognate acylated tRNA to a ribosomal aminoacyl (A)-site three-base codon and the concerted movement of this bound complex into the ribosomal peptidyl (P) site are central to standard nonoverlapping triplet decoding. Subsequently, the then-deacylated tRNA and codon complex occupies the exit…

1h

Sequential sampling strategy for extreme event statistics in nonlinear dynamical systems [Applied Mathematics]

We develop a method for the evaluation of extreme event statistics associated with nonlinear dynamical systems from a small number of samples. From an initial dataset of design points, we formulate a sequential strategy that provides the “next-best” data point (set of parameters) that when evaluated results in improved estimates…

1h

Multistability of model and real dryland ecosystems through spatial self-organization [Applied Mathematics]

Spatial self-organization of dryland vegetation constitutes one of the most promising indicators for an ecosystem’s proximity to desertification. This insight is based on studies of reaction–diffusion models that reproduce visual characteristics of vegetation patterns observed on aerial photographs. However, until now, the development of reliable early warning systems has been…

1h

Relation between blood pressure and pulse wave velocity for human arteries [Applied Physical Sciences]

Continuous monitoring of blood pressure, an essential measure of health status, typically requires complex, costly, and invasive techniques that can expose patients to risks of complications. Continuous, cuffless, and noninvasive blood pressure monitoring methods that correlate measured pulse wave velocity (PWV) to the blood pressure via the Moens−Korteweg (MK) and…

1h

Single-molecule optical absorption imaging by nanomechanical photothermal sensing [Applied Physical Sciences]

Absorption microscopy is a promising alternative to fluorescence microscopy for single-molecule imaging. So far, molecular absorption has been probed optically via the attenuation of a probing laser or via photothermal effects. The sensitivity of optical probing is not only restricted by background scattering but it is fundamentally limited by laser…

1h

Mechanism of tRNA-mediated +1 ribosomal frameshifting [Biochemistry]

Accurate translation of the genetic code is critical to ensure expression of proteins with correct amino acid sequences. Certain tRNAs can cause a shift out of frame (i.e., frameshifting) due to imbalances in tRNA concentrations, lack of tRNA modifications or insertions or deletions in tRNAs (called frameshift suppressors). Here, we…

1h

Extracellularly oxidative activation and inactivation of matured prodrug for cryptic self-resistance in naphthyridinomycin biosynthesis [Biochemistry]

Understanding how antibiotic-producing bacteria deal with highly reactive chemicals will ultimately guide therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing clinical resistance crisis. Here, we uncovered a distinctive self-defense strategy featured by a secreted oxidoreductase NapU to perform extracellularly oxidative activation and conditionally overoxidative inactivation of a matured prodrug in nap

1h

Pathological transitions in myelin membranes driven by environmental and multiple sclerosis conditions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease, leading to the destruction of the myelin sheaths, the protective layers surrounding the axons. The etiology of the disease is unknown, although there are several postulated environmental factors that may contribute to it. Recently, myelin damage was correlated to structural phase transition from…

1h

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy R403Q mutation in rabbit {beta}-myosin reduces contractile function at the molecular and myofibrillar levels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

In 1990, the Seidmans showed that a single point mutation, R403Q, in the human β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) of heart muscle caused a particularly malignant form of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) [Geisterfer-Lowrance AA, et al. (1990) Cell 62:999–1006.]. Since then, more than 300 mutations in the β-MHC have been reported,…

1h

Proximity-enhanced SuFEx chemical cross-linker for specific and multitargeting cross-linking mass spectrometry [Chemistry]

Chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (CXMS) is being increasingly used to study protein assemblies and complex protein interaction networks. Existing CXMS chemical cross-linkers target only Lys, Cys, Glu, and Asp residues, limiting the information measurable. Here we report a “plant-and-cast” cross-linking strategy that employs a heterobifunctional cross-linker that contains a highly…

1h

In operando plasmonic monitoring of electrochemical evolution of lithium metal [Chemistry]

The recent renaissance of lithium metal batteries as promising energy storage devices calls for in operando monitoring and control of electrochemical evolution of lithium metal morphologies. While the development of plasmonics has led to significant advancement in real-time and ultrasensitive chemical and biological sensing and surface-enhanced spectroscopies, alkali metals featured…

1h

Ubiquitin ligase COP1 coordinates transcriptional programs that control cell type specification in the developing mouse brain [Developmental Biology]

The E3 ubiquitin ligase CRL4COP1/DET1 is active in the absence of ERK signaling, modifying the transcription factors ETV1, ETV4, ETV5, and c-JUN with polyubiquitin that targets them for proteasomal degradation. Here we show that this posttranslational regulatory mechanism is active in neurons, with ETV5 and c-JUN accumulating within minutes of…

1h

Ribonuclease activity of MARF1 controls oocyte RNA homeostasis and genome integrity in mice [Developmental Biology]

Producing normal eggs for fertilization and species propagation requires completion of meiosis and protection of the genome from the ravages of retrotransposons. Mutation of Marf1 (meiosis regulator and mRNA stability factor 1) results in defects in both these key processes in mouse oocytes and thus in infertility. MARF1 was predicted…

1h

Progressive aridification in East Africa over the last half million years and implications for human evolution [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Evidence for Quaternary climate change in East Africa has been derived from outcrops on land and lake cores and from marine dust, leaf wax, and pollen records. These data have previously been used to evaluate the impact of climate change on hominin evolution, but correlations have proved to be difficult,…

1h

Highly bioavailable dust-borne iron delivered to the Southern Ocean during glacial periods [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Changes in bioavailable dust-borne iron (Fe) supply to the iron-limited Southern Ocean may influence climate by modulating phytoplankton growth and CO2 fixation into organic matter that is exported to the deep ocean. The chemical form (speciation) of Fe impacts its bioavailability, and glacial weathering produces highly labile and bioavailable Fe…

1h

Geomagnetic polar minima do not arise from steady meridional circulation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Observations of the Earth’s magnetic field have revealed locally pronounced field minima near each pole at the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The existence of the polar magnetic minima has long been attributed to the supposed large-scale overturning circulation of molten metal in the outer core: Fluid upwells within the inner core…

1h

Mammal diversity will take millions of years to recover from the current biodiversity crisis [Ecology]

The incipient sixth mass extinction that started in the Late Pleistocene has already erased over 300 mammal species and, with them, more than 2.5 billion y of unique evolutionary history. At the global scale, this lost phylogenetic diversity (PD) can only be restored with time as lineages evolve and create…

1h

Density-dependent adult recruitment in a low-density tropical tree [Ecology]

The Janzen–Connell hypothesis is a well-known explanation for why tropical forests have large numbers of tree species. A fundamental prediction of the hypothesis is that the probability of adult recruitment is less in regions of high conspecific adult density, a pattern mediated by density-dependent mortality in juvenile life stages. Although…

1h

Microbiome-assisted carrion preservation aids larval development in a burying beetle [Ecology]

The ability to feed on a wide range of diets has enabled insects to diversify and colonize specialized niches. Carrion, for example, is highly susceptible to microbial decomposers, but is kept palatable several days after an animal’s death by carrion-feeding insects. Here we show that the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides…

1h

Dispersal increases ecological selection by increasing effective community size [Ecology]

Selection and drift are universally accepted as the cornerstones of evolutionary changes. Recent theories extend this view to ecological changes, arguing that any change in species composition is driven by deterministic fitness differences among species (enhancing selection) and/or stochasticity in birth and death rates of individuals within species (enhancing drift)….

1h

On the deformability of an empirical fitness landscape by microbial evolution [Evolution]

A fitness landscape is a map between the genotype and its reproductive success in a given environment. The topography of fitness landscapes largely governs adaptive dynamics, constraining evolutionary trajectories and the predictability of evolution. Theory suggests that this topography can be deformed by mutations that produce substantial changes to the…

1h

Single-molecule DNA-mapping and whole-genome sequencing of individual cells [Genetics]

To elucidate cellular diversity and clonal evolution in tissues and tumors, one must resolve genomic heterogeneity in single cells. To this end, we have developed low-cost, mass-producible micro-/nanofluidic chips for DNA extraction from individual cells. These chips have modules that collect genomic DNA for sequencing or map genomic structure directly,…

1h

Herpesvirus trigger accelerates neuroinflammation in a nonhuman primate model of multiple sclerosis [Immunology and Inflammation]

Pathogens, particularly human herpesviruses (HHVs), are implicated as triggers of disease onset/progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neuroinflammatory disorders. However, the time between viral acquisition in childhood and disease onset in adulthood complicates the study of this association. Using nonhuman primates, we demonstrate that intranasal inoculations with HHV-6A and…

1h

Alterations of tumor microenvironment by nitric oxide impedes castration-resistant prostate cancer growth [Medical Sciences]

Immune targeted therapy of nitric oxide (NO) synthases are being considered as a potential frontline therapeutic to treat patients diagnosed with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. However, the role of NO in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is controversial because NO can increase in nitrosative stress while simultaneously possessing antiinflammatory…

1h

Flow stimuli reveal ecologically appropriate responses in mouse visual cortex [Neuroscience]

Assessments of the mouse visual system based on spatial-frequency analysis imply that its visual capacity is low, with few neurons responding to spatial frequencies greater than 0.5 cycles per degree. However, visually mediated behaviors, such as prey capture, suggest that the mouse visual system is more precise. We introduce a…

1h

Disorder induced power-law gaps in an insulator-metal Mott transition [Physics]

A correlated material in the vicinity of an insulator–metal transition (IMT) exhibits rich phenomenology and a variety of interesting phases. A common avenue to induce IMTs in Mott insulators is doping, which inevitably leads to disorder. While disorder is well known to create electronic inhomogeneity, recent theoretical studies have indicated…

1h

Identification of SLAC1 anion channel residues required for CO2/bicarbonate sensing and regulation of stomatal movements [Plant Biology]

Increases in CO2 concentration in plant leaves due to respiration in the dark and the continuing atmospheric [CO2] rise cause closing of stomatal pores, thus affecting plant–water relations globally. However, the underlying CO2/bicarbonate (CO2/HCO3−) sensing mechanisms remain unknown. [CO2] elevation in leaves triggers stomatal closure by anion efflux mediated via…

1h

Inner Workings: Can robots make good teammates? [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

In every hospital labor and delivery department, a resource nurse decides which patients go to which room, which nurses care for which patients, and much more. “It’s a lot to keep in your head,” says Kristen Jerrier, a resource nurse in the labor and delivery department at Beth Israel Deaconess…

1h

Facebook language predicts depression in medical records [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Depression, the most prevalent mental illness, is underdiagnosed and undertreated, highlighting the need to extend the scope of current screening methods. Here, we use language from Facebook posts of consenting individuals to predict depression recorded in electronic medical records. We accessed the history of Facebook statuses posted by 683 patients…

1h

Advancing front of old-age human survival [Social Sciences]

Old-age mortality decline has driven recent increases in lifespans, but there is no agreement about trends in the age pattern of old-age deaths. Some argue that old-age deaths should become compressed at advanced ages, others argue that old-age deaths should become more dispersed with age, and yet others argue that…

1h

Intergenerational transmission of paternal trauma among US Civil War ex-POWs [Social Sciences]

We study whether paternal trauma is transmitted to the children of survivors of Confederate prisoner of war (POW) camps during the US Civil War (1861–1865) to affect their longevity at older ages, the mechanisms behind this transmission, and the reversibility of this transmission. We examine children born after the war…

1h

Three pillars of sustainability in fisheries [Sustainability Science]

Sustainability of global fisheries is a growing concern. The United Nations has identified three pillars of sustainability: economic development, social development, and environmental protection. The fisheries literature suggests that there are two key trade-offs among these pillars of sustainability. First, poor ecological health of a fishery reduces economic profits for…

1h

A Rare Defect Is Causing Police Body Cameras To Explode

The NYPD announced earlier this month it is removing nearly 3,000 Vievu LE-5 body cameras after one patrolling officer’s camera, while still secured to his chest, started smoking. Once removed, the device caught fire and eventually exploded. There were no injuries, but the camera’s internal battery may have ignited, according to the NYPD. The Police Commissioner directed officers with older model

1h

Research sheds light on conspiracy theory elements

What do online conspiracy theorists discuss; what are the recurring elements in these conversations; and what do they tell us about the way people think?

1h

Reducing methane emissions can play a key role in reducing ozone worldwide

Methane (CH4) is the main ingredient in natural gas. It is the second most important greenhouse gas (GHG) after carbon dioxide (CO2), and it also leads to the formation of another GHG—ozone.

1h

‘Aptitude test’ could find the best dog for the job

A new study suggests taking a look at dogs’ cognitive abilities may be a way to identify the best pup for different jobs in the diverse canine labor market. Assistance dogs may work with the visually or hearing impaired, or with people in wheelchairs. Detection dogs may learn to sniff out explosives, narcotics, or bedbugs. Other pups even learn to jump out of helicopters on daring rescue missions

1h

Single protein controls thousands of genes essential for sperm development

A single protein regulates a battery of key genes inside developing sperm, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Scientists discovered the protein—called Dazl—controls a network of genes essential for developing sperm to replicate and survive. The findings, published in Cell Reports, could lay the groundwork for future research into therapies for infer

1h

When Adolescents Give Up Pot, Their Cognition Quickly Improves

When researchers convinced a group of young people to stop smoking pot, their cognition quickly improved. This adds to research warning against teen pot use, despite marijuana's growing acceptance. (Image credit: BURGER/Canopy/Getty Images)

1h

Astronomers Creep Up to the Edge of the Milky Way’s Black Hole

For the first time, scientists have spotted something wobbling around the black hole at the core of our galaxy. Their measurements suggest that this stuff — perhaps made of blobs of plasma — is spinning not far from the innermost orbit allowed by the laws of physics. If so, this affords astronomers their closest look yet at the funhouse-mirrored space-time that surrounds a black hole. And in time

1h

Solving a 100-year mystery in blood pressure research

New insight into how cells sense blood pressure could present better targets for treating hypertension.

1h

Spay and neuter for dogs: Avoiding the health consequences

In the United States, spaying or neutering a dog has become standard practice to reduce pet overpopulation. Yet recent research has shed light on the long-term health impacts of the lack of natural hormonal balance resulting from removal of the gonads. This research article includes details on alternatives to traditional spay and neuter and encourages an individualized approach to determining the

1h

Droplet Digital PCR enables precise detection and quantification of a promoter mutation prevalent in many cancer types

Research from NYU Langone Medical Center and its Perlmutter Cancer Center along with Bio-Rad's Digital Biology Group demonstrates how two new ddPCR-based assays can specifically detect and quantify mutations linked to many cancer types.

1h

One month of abstinence from cannabis improves memory in adolescents, young adults

A Massachusetts General Hospital study finds that one month of abstaining from cannabis use resulted in measurable improvement in memory functions important for learning among adolescents and young adults who were regular cannabis users.

1h

How to Get New Emoji on Your iPhone: Upgrade to iOS 12.1

Redhead emoji! Bagel emoji! Moon cake emoji!

1h

Atlanta: A launchpad for dreams

A young Eric Boe, not even 5 years old, was awestruck while watching grainy images of two American astronauts in bulky spacesuits bounce around on another celestial body.

1h

Apples hjemmeknap er stendød: iPad-skærm går nu (næsten) helt til kanten

Ansigtlås har endegyldigt erstattet fingeraftrykket, og der er ikke længere nogen knap at trykke på for at lukke et program. Det får du lov at betale dyrt for.

2h

Interior northwest Nez Perce used tobacco long before European contact

Researchers have determined that the Nez Perce grew and smoked tobacco at least 1,200 years ago, long before the arrival of traders and settlers from the eastern United States. Their finding upends a long-held view that indigenous people in this area of the interior Pacific Northwest smoked only kinnikinnick or bearberry before traders brought tobacco starting around 1790.

2h

First humans to reach Australia likely island-hopped to New Guinea then walked – study

Researchers map likeliest route using least-cost calculations, line-of-sight sailing and likely sea levels The first people to arrive in Australia are likely to have sailed east from Borneo to Sulawesi and island-hopped to New Guinea, according to research. A study led by Australian National University PhD candidate Shimona Kealy and published in the Journal of Human Evolution has modelled the mo

2h

Quitting cannabis could lead to better memory and cognition

US research shows four weeks’ abstinence improved memory, but not attention skills Abstaining from cannabis for a month can boost the memory performance of regular users, according to a study of young people who used the drug at least once a week. Researchers found that four weeks without cannabis led to a “modest but reliable” improvement in users’ memory test scores, which could be sufficient t

2h

Young people’s memories improved when they stopped using marijuana

After just a week of not using pot, teens’ and young adults’ abilities to remember lists of words got better, a small study finds.

2h

Hurricane Oscar on satellite imagery: A one-eyed little monster with a tail

Of course, tropical cyclones have one eye and with Halloween on the horizon, false-colored infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite brought out that eye in this small tropical monster with a tail of thunderstorms.

2h

Reducing methane emissions can play a key role in reducing ozone worldwide

A new JRC report points to inexpensive and profitable solutions to reduce methane emissions in the energy, waste, wastewater and agriculture sectors.

2h

Research sheds light on conspiracy theory elements

'Our study also suggests that alternative media spreading conspiracy theories appear to better align with anti- and pro-globalism than with left- and right-leaning political ideologies.'

2h

Facial Asymmetry Increases with Age

Asymmetry between the two sides of the face increases steadily with aging — a finding with important implications for facial rejuvenation and reconstructive procedures, reports a study in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

2h

UC researchers developing test for early breast lesions

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) are investigating a molecular diagnostic test to determine whether, after biopsy, someone is at high or low risk for actually developing malignant breast cancer.

2h

CRISPR gene editing will find applications in plastic and reconstructive surgery

The CRISPR genome editing technique promises to be a 'transformative leap' in genetic engineering and therapy, affecting almost every area of medicine. That includes plastic surgery, with potential advances ranging from prevention of craniofacial malformations, to therapeutic skin grafts, to new types of rejection-free transplants, according to a paper in the November issue of Plastic and Reconstr

2h

The Indians of the Ecuadorian Amazon were using cocoa 5300 years ago

An international team* associating archaeologists, anthropologists, biochemists and geneticists recently found for the first time archaeological traces of cocoa use in South America in pre-Columbian times. This result is published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.

2h

Hurricane Oscar on satellite imagery: A one-eyed little monster with a tail

Of course, tropical cyclones have one eye and with Halloween on the horizon, false-colored infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite brought out that eye in this small tropical monster with a tail of thunderstorms.

2h

Who Needs Halloween?

Climate change will bring plenty of tricks and very few treats — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

People who gave up smoking cannabis had a memory boost within a week

Smoking cannabis can impair memory, but a new study has found that giving up can partially reverse the effect after several days

2h

Why Millions of Teens Can't Finish Their Homework

Parachute into any high-school campus in the country, and chances are you’ll land on an object lesson on technology’s ubiquity in young Americans’ everyday lives. A significant chunk of schoolwork these days necessitates a computer and internet connection, and this work includes tasks students are expected to complete at home without access to school resources. One federal survey conducted among

2h

The Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger Language of Dieting

Late last year, the health-care start-up Viome raised $15 million in venture-capital funding for at-home fecal test kits. You send in a very small package of your own poop, and the company tells you what’s happening in your gut so that you can recalibrate your diet to, among other things, lose weight and keep it off. In the company’s words, subscribers get the opportunity to explore and improve t

2h

Making a transparent flexible material of silk and nanotubes

The silk fibers produced by Bombyx mori, the domestic silkworm, has been prized for millennia as a strong yet lightweight and luxurious material. Although synthetic polymers like nylon and polyester are less costly, they do not compare to silk's natural qualities and mechanical properties. And according to research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering, silk combined wi

2h

Our neighbouring galaxy is dying as it leaks gas at an alarming rate

The Small Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy orbiting our own, is leaking a huge amount of gas. In a billion years it may not be able to form new stars anymore

2h

Neanderthals may have powered their bigger bodies by breathing deeper

The Neanderthal rib cage was about the same size as ours but a different shape, which suggests the extinct humans could take in more air with each breath

2h

Eight science policies at stake this Election Day

Environment With flipping districts come flipping issues. Enough House and Senate seats are on the ballot to flip legislative control—though a House swap is more likely.

2h

‘Thermometers’ test how heat and cold affects genes

Researchers have used computational methods and matching experiments to predict and explain how heating and cooling affect synthetic genes and gene networks that act like genetic thermometers in cells. In the natural world, organisms, cells, and therefore genes respond and adjust to temperature changes on a regular basis. But when scientists study genes in the laboratory, the cells containing the

2h

Aqua satellite captures Typhoon Yutu exiting the Northern Philippines

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Typhoon Yutu maintained its structure as it exited Luzon, the northern Philippines.

2h

Do psychiatric symptoms remain stable over time? New reviews

In patients with psychiatric disorders, stability of symptoms has important implications for diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Two reviews of symptom stability over the course of psychiatric disorders — bipolar disorder and psychotic disorders, respectively — were published online by the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

2h

Antibiotic resistance increases relapse in urinary tract infections

Patients with a certain drug-resistant urinary tract infection were more likely to have a relapse of their infection within a week than those with non-resistant infections and were more likely to be prescribed an incorrect antibiotic according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

2h

Novel technique can potentially improve success of ovarian cancer treatment, study reveals

This study is the first to investigate the impact of establishing a healthy blood supply to the tumour prior to treatment in mice models with an advanced stage of ovarian cancer. The researcher found this novel technique provides a clear pathway for treatment improving its success. This is opposite to a current approach that involves destroying the blood supply in an effort to starve the tumour.

2h

Flood of genome data hinders efforts to ID bacteria

A study led by a Rice University computer scientist demonstrates that recent growth in genomic databases has a negative effect on attempts to identify microbes from metagenomic samples.

2h

Single protein controls thousands of genes essential for sperm development

A single protein regulates a battery of key genes inside developing sperm, according to a new study out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Scientists discovered the protein–called Dazl–controls a network of genes essential for developing sperm to replicate and survive. The findings, published in Cell Reports, could lay the groundwork for future research into therapies for inf

2h

People are keeping their smartphones longer, report says

People are holding on to their aging smartphones longer, squeezing out a few more months of use before trading them in, a report indicates.

2h

Everything Apple Announced October 30: MacBook Air, iPad Pro, Mac Mini

Rejoice! New iPads, plus a much-needed refresh to the MacBook Air and Mac Mini.

2h

Best Educational Toys & Games for Infants and Toddlers

These educational and science toys could help infants and toddlers grow their little minds.

2h

Trump wants to end birthright citizenship for children of illegal immigrants

The 14th Amendment currently guarantees citizenship to any child born on U.S. soil. President Donald Trump hopes to modify the law to prevent children born to illegal immigrants from receiving citizenship, which would theoretically combat the so-called immigration practice of non-residents having "anchor babies." The bold (and likely unrealistic) move comes just before the midterms, and a day aft

2h

Tiny Beetle Entombed in Amber 99 Million Years Ago Reveals How Continents Shifted

A minuscule beetle from Myanmar is perfectly preserved in amber.

2h

NASA will keep trying to contact stalled Mars rover Opportunity

NASA has changed its mind about how long it will continue to seek contact with an aging robotic vehicle that was blanketed in a dust storm on Mars back in June and has been stalled ever since.

2h

iPads, Macs get new screens as Apple pushes creativity

Apple's new iPads will more closely resemble its latest iPhones as they ditch a home button and fingerprint sensor to make more room for the screen.

2h

NASA's Aqua Satellite captures Typhoon Yutu exiting the Northern Philippines

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that Typhoon Yutu maintained its structure as it exited Luzon, the northern Philippines.

2h

UMN Medical School researchers contribute to important neurological discovery

A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School, the Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, and the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, have used the brain's spontaneously generated patterns of activity to glean novel insights into network structure and development. They found the existence of precise organizational networks in the cerebral cortex much earlier i

2h

Brain-inspired methods to improve wireless communications

Researchers Lingjia Liu and Yang (Cindy) Yi are using brain-inspired machine learning techniques to increase the energy efficiency of wireless receivers.

2h

Effective treatments for urticarial vasculitis

What treatments are available for patients with the rare inflammatory disease known as urticarial vasculitis? How effective are these treatments? Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin embarked on a systematic review and meta-analysis to address these questions. Recently published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology*, the results of this meta-analysis reveal which of t

2h

Making a transparent flexible material of silk and nanotubes

The research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering finds that silk combined with carbon nanotubes may lead to a new generation of biomedical devices and so-called transient, biodegradable electronics.

2h

Study reconstructs Neandertal ribcage, offers new clues to ancient human anatomy

An international team, which included researchers from universities in Spain, Israel, and the United States, including the University of Washington, has completed the first 3D virtual reconstruction of the ribcage of the most complete Neandertal skeleton unearthed to date. Using CT scans of fossils from an approximately 60,000-year-old male skeleton, researchers were able to create a 3D model of t

2h

NASA researchers teach machines to 'see'

Your credit card company contacts you asking if you've purchased something from a retailer you don't normally patronize or spent more than usual. A human didn't identify the atypical transaction. A computer—equipped with advanced algorithms—tagged the potentially fraudulent purchase and triggered the inquiry.

3h

Tankevirksomhed kan være yderst krævende viser data fra skakspillere

Hjertet slog hurtigt og forbrændingen steg under en skakturnering.

3h

Here Are the Real (and Freaky) Experiments That Inspired 'Frankenstein'

Frankenstein might look like fantasy to modern eyes, but to its author and original readers there was nothing fantastic about it.

3h

Photos: Deep-Sea Expedition Discovers Metropolis of Octopuses

Researchers found numerous show-stopping octopuses in the deep waters of the Davidson Seamount. Photos captured by the ROV Hercules.

3h

Study reconstructs Neandertal ribcage, offers new clues to ancient human anatomy

An international team of scientists has completed the first 3-D virtual reconstruction of the ribcage of the most complete Neandertal skeleton unearthed to date, potentially shedding new light on how this ancient human moved and breathed.

3h

Studies raise questions over how epigenetic information is inherited

Evidence has been building in recent years that our diet, our habits or traumatic experiences can have consequences for the health of our children — and even our grandchildren. The explanation that has gained most currency for how this occurs is so-called 'epigenetic inheritance' — patterns of chemical 'marks' on or around our DNA that are hypothesized to be passed down the generations. New rese

3h

Synthetic microorganisms allow scientists to study ancient evolutionary mysteries

Scientists have created microorganisms that may recapitulate key features of organisms thought to have lived billions of years ago.

3h

Persistent gap in natural gas methane emissions measurements explained

A new study offers answers to questions that have puzzled policymakers, researchers and regulatory agencies through decades of inquiry and evolving science: How much total methane, a greenhouse gas, is being emitted from natural gas operations across the US? And why have different estimation methods, applied in various US oil and gas basins, seemed to disagree?

3h

Scientists call for unified standards in 3D genome and epigenetic data

Studying the three-dimensional structure of DNA and its dynamics is revealing a lot of information about gene expression, expanding our knowledge of how cells, tissues and organs actually work in health and disease. Properly producing and managing this large amount of data is both challenging and necessary for the progress of this field. In a perspective paper published in Nature Genetics, top res

3h

Conservationists Worry About Amazon's Fate After Bolsonaro's Victory in Brazil

The far-right president-elect has proposed opening the rainforest to trade and withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Narrow focus on wildfire trends underestimates future risks to water security

Dramatic increases in wildfire over the last few decades have garnered considerable media attention. Numerous headlines have claimed that the amount of wildfire in the western US is unprecedented. However, scientists have now compiled long-term fire datasets that demonstrate the amount of wildfire occurring in the western US remains far below the acreage burning prior to pre-European settlement.

3h

Scalable platform for on-chip quantum emitters

Researchers have developed a scalable method for creating large numbers of quantum light sources on a chip with unprecedented precision that not only could pave the way for the development of unbreakable cryptographic systems but also quantum computers that can perform complex calculations in seconds that would take normal computers years to finish.

3h

Apple iPad Pro 2018: Specs, Features, Price

Apple's iPad Pro is undergoing some major renovations, starting with a home button excavation.

3h

Universities begin redesigning principal preparation programs

One year into a four-year $49 million initiative to improve training for aspiring school principals, a new RAND Corporation report found that seven universities are beginning to change their principal preparation programs to better reflect the real-world demands of the job.

3h

Preventing sudden cardiac death with genome editing

Gene editing successfully prevented sudden cardiac death in a mouse model of inherited cardiac arrhythmia disorder.

3h

How will Texas law HB 810 impact stem cell-based intervention clinics?

A new study takes a close look at the content and potential implications of the new Texas law HB 810, which aims to expand assess of experimental stem cell interventions outside the realm of clinical trials under FDA oversight.

3h

Flexible, stable and potent against cancer

Linking therapeutically active molecules to specific antibodies can help to pilot them to their designated targets and minimize side effects–especially when treating tumors. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now described novel conjugates made from antibodies and a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor. Changing the linker between the two components allows for tuning the activity of t

3h

Advertising in mobile apps for young children — Study raises concerns about frequency and content

Nearly all smartphone and tablet apps targeted at toddlers and preschoolers have commercial content, often using 'manipulative and disruptive' advertising methods, reports a study in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

3h

Next generation of watch springs

What happens when something keeps getting smaller and smaller? This is the type of question Empa researcher Johann Michler and his team are investigating. As a by-product of their research completely novel watch springs could soon be used in Swiss timepieces.

3h

Trapping atoms, not space ships, with tractor beams

University of Adelaide researchers have delved into the realm of Star Wars and created a powerful tractor beam — or light-driven energy trap — for atoms.

3h

Test i Aarhus: Mobil robot navigerer med 0,75 centimeters præcision

Ny testplatform i Aarhus giver mulighed for at blive klogere på, hvordan en præcis positionering kan bidrage til Danmarks teknologiske udvikling og skabe meget præcise navigationssystemer til udendørs robotter og selvkørende biler

3h

Wellcome Sanger director apologises for management failings

Independent investigation criticises closed culture with few women at senior level The director of Britain’s leading genetics laboratory has apologised for failures that prompted allegations of bullying and gender discrimination. Sir Professor Mike Stratton , director of the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute in Cambridge, said that the investigation into complaints by 10 former and current staff me

3h

UK ratchets up pressure on US tech giants with new tax

Britain could become the first major world economy to impose a specific tax on tech giants, as international negotiations to overhaul analog-era global tax regulations drag on.

3h

Mount Sinai researchers find wheat oral immunotherapy to be therapeutic for allergic patients

In a major step towards understanding the safety and efficacy of wheat oral immunotherapy, Mount Sinai researchers report promising results from the first multicenter, rigorous clinical trial in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

3h

Russian scientists obtain new results in the study of inorganic pigments with apatite structure

Compounds with the apatite structure differ from most classes by the variety of their chemical compositions: to create such substances, most chemical elements of the Periodic System can be used, while the characteristics of the crystalline structure of apatite will be preserved.The resulting variety of chemical compositions also determines a wide range of physico-chemical properties and performanc

3h

Young men more likely to die in summer, older people in winter despite local climate

Young men living in the US are overall more likely to die in the summer months, according to a new study in eLife.

3h

Halloween associated with increased risk of pedestrian fatalities

Children in the United States celebrate Halloween by going door-to-door collecting candy. New research suggests the popular October 31 holiday is associated with increased pedestrian traffic fatalities, especially among children.

3h

Pedestrian fatalities increase on Halloween, particularly among children

Children are more likely to be fatally struck by a vehicle on Halloween than on other nights of the year, according to new research led by the University of British Columbia.

3h

Owls help JHU scientists unlock secret of how the brain pays attention

Studying barn owls, scientists believe they've taken an important step toward solving the longstanding mystery of how the brain chooses what most deserves attention.

3h

OnePlus 6T packs a fingerprint scanner in its screen to take on iPhone XS, Google Pixel 3

Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus has built its reputation on offering the latest specs for a cheaper price than comparable devices from Apple, Google and Samsung.

3h

Hawking's signed thesis, wheelchair auctioned in London

A copy of Stephen Hawking's doctorate thesis signed in a shaky hand was unveiled Tuesday as the highlight of a new auction of the British physicist's personal items in London.

3h

Hormone-blocking injections reduce early menopause from breast cancer treatment

Final results of a clinical trial show continued evidence that women who get injections of the hormone drug goserelin along with standard breast cancer chemotherapy are more likely to become pregnant – without developing negative side effects or shortening their lives.

4h

Does the US discard too many transplantable kidneys?

An analysis reveals that many transplanted kidneys in France would have likely been discarded in the United States.

4h

There are three options in tackling climate change. Only one will work | Mayer Hillman

We’re now at a fork in the road: either we cut out fossil fuels completely, or we pass on a dying planet to our children The world faces a near-impossible decision – one that is already determining the character and quality of the lives of the generations succeeding us. It is clear from the latest IPCC climate report that the first and only effective course, albeit a deeply unpopular one, would be

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The ocean floor is littered with adorable octopuses (and actual garbage)

Science Alongside the wild natural beauty, some evidence of humans. Today your biology homework is to watch scientists in charge of millions of dollars worth of deep-sea roving equipment get all squeal-y about a lil octopus.

4h

If you want to believe your home’s bug free, don’t read this book

‘Never Home Alone’ reveals the hidden world living in human-made spaces.

4h

'It has a story to tell': How a descendant of Napoleon's willow tree took root on a Seattle hillside

It sits among the weeds and scrub vegetation just east of Interstate 5 in downtown Seattle, this long-forgotten link to one of history's greatest military leaders.

4h

Maskinfabrik tester: Er 3D-metalprint blindgyde eller genvej?

Det kræver en millioninvestering at komme i gang med 3D-printet metal. Derfor søgte AB Jensen Maskinfabrik i Vojens om støtte gennem MADE og indgår nu i et forsøgsprojekt med TI for at afprøve mulighederne.

4h

After states expanded Medicaid, fewer dialysis patients died

The number of patients with end-stage kidney disease who died within a year of starting dialysis decreased in states that expanded Medicaid coverage in the wake of the Affordable Care Act, according to a new study. “To my knowledge, this is the first study to find an association between Medicaid expansion under the ACA and lower death rates in adults,” says Amal Trivedi, an associate professor at

4h

Higher income linked with less concern about social problems over time, new research shows

University of Alberta sociologists found that over time, people with higher incomes grew less concerned with a range of social issues.

4h

Owls help scientists unlock secret of how the brain pays attention

By studying barn owls, scientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they've taken an important step toward solving the longstanding mystery of how the brain chooses what most deserves attention.

4h

With mobile pay, you can go without a wallet at checkout

When you're at the checkout line this holiday season, you could juggle your bags and dig into your purse or billfold for your credit or debit card. Or you could use that phone you're already clutching, or that new smartwatch strapped to your wrist. Many stores now accept mobile wallets, a technology that lets customers make payments via smartphone or watch.

4h

Fiat Chrysler profits hit by charges for diesel probe

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles said Tuesday its third-quarter profits dropped nearly 40 percent due to a one-off charge to cover possible payments in a U.S. diesel probe involving SUVs and light-duty pickups.

4h

Farmers fear it will take years to recover from storm strike

Hurricane Michael left a snowy landscape of ruined white cotton on Georgia's red clay, destroying a crop and likely bringing hard times to the region's many small communities built on agriculture.

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RGB vs. CMYK: A Colorful Showdown

What’s a graphic designer’s “favorite” process? Converting the digital colors on a computer screen to the analog printed product! Oh… it’s not at all their favorite? Why could that be? Starting at 11 AM EDT on 11/1 and going for 24 hours, it’s time for some optics and color theory. RGB: Red, green, and blue, the primary colors of light. Because this color model uses light itself, RGB is additive

4h

How Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality Can Revolutionize Science

An upcoming “hackathon” is designed to accelerate their use in scientific visualization — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

How the world's fastest muscle created four unique bird species

When the male bearded manakin snaps its wings at lightning speed, it's more than part of an elaborate, acrobatic mating ritual. The tiny muscle doing the heavy lifting is also the reason this exotic bird has evolved into four distinct species, according to new research published in the journal eLife by Wake Forest University biologist Matthew Fuxjager.

4h

Researchers have assembled Eurasian perch genome

Eurasian perch (Latin name Perca fluviatilis) genome, which is three times smaller than the human genome, yet contains about a billion nucleotides and more than 23,000 genes, discovered Estonian and Finnish scientists.

4h

New Apple MacBook Air (2018): Price, Specs, Release DateApple MacBook Air Retina

It's the update the Mac faithful have been waiting for.

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New Mac Mini 2018: Specs, Features, PriceApple New Mac Mini

Apple has neglected its hockey puck Mac Mini desktop computer for years. Not anymore.

4h

New species of Swallowtail butterfly discovered in Fiji

A spectacular new butterfly species has been discovered on the Pacific Island of Vanua Levu in Fiji. The species, named last week as Papilio natewa after the Natewa Peninsula where it was found, is a remarkable discovery in a location where butterfly wildlife was thought to be well known.

4h

Tiny beetle trapped in amber might show how landmasses shifted

In 2016, Shuhei Yamamoto obtained a penny-sized piece of Burmese amber from Hukawng Valley in northern Myanmar, near China's southern border. He had a hunch that the three-millimeter insect trapped inside the amber could help ansshow why our world today looks the way it does.

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Psykiaterens ansvar for et sygt menneske kan ikke konsekvensløst erstattes

Mennesker med psykisk sygdom har behov for både en psykologfaglig og en lægefaglig behandling. Og psykiateren er uddannet til at tage behandlingsansvaret – og håndtere balancen mellem biologi, psykologi og sociale faktorer.

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Sundhedsstyrelsen advarer om lille øget risiko for hudkræft ved populært blodtryksmiddel

Sundhedsstyrelsen anbefaler, at borgere i behandling med hydrochlorthiazid, taler med deres læge, om de skal have ændret deres medicin. Praksislæger har ikke ansvar for at handle proaktivt.

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Aarhus Universitet præsenterer tre overlæger i ledelsen på Institut for Klinisk Medicin

Leder for Institut for Klinisk Medicin på Aarhus Universitet opretter en ekstra stilling og ansætter tre nye viceinstitutledere i stedet for to.

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Ny ledende overlæge til klinisk biokemisk afdeling i Region Sjælland

Jesper Clausager Madsen tiltræder som ledende overlæge på klinisk biokemisk afdeling i Region Sjælland, hvor han i høj grad vil gøre brug af sin indsigt i den primære sektor.

4h

Balloon measurements reveal dust particle properties in free troposphere over desert

The Taklamakan Desert is one of the major sources of Asian dust. The area is significant for studying the initial state of Asian dust particle transportation, which is mainly influenced by westerly winds. Scientists from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) of the Chinese Academy of Science reported balloon-borne measurements of dust particles in the free troposphere under calm weather condi

4h

Are we immune to the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing scissors?

By studying immune responses to CRISPR-Cas9 in humans, researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have found widespread immunity to the Cas9 protein. The researchers are in the process of developing innovative solutions that will ensure CRISPR-Cas9 can be used safely in a range of clinical applications. Their report on the potential benefits and risks of CRISPR-Cas9 can be found in the

4h

Dopamine drives early addiction to heroin

Scientists have made a major advance in untangling the brain circuits that lead to the powerful addictive effects of heroin, a study in the open-access journal eLife reports.

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University of Barcelona researchers describe a new anatomic structure in the ankle

Researchers describe a new ligament in the lateral side of the ankle.

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AAFP releases new how to feed a cat consensus statement to the veterinary community

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the AAFP Consensus Statement, 'Feline Feeding Programs: Addressing Behavioral Needs to Improve Feline Health and Wellbeing' and accompanying client brochure to the veterinary community. The Consensus Statement, published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, explores the medical, social, and emotional problems that can

4h

AAFP releases new how to feed a cat consensus statement to the veterinary community

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the AAFP Consensus Statement, "Feline Feeding Programs: Addressing Behavioral Needs to Improve Feline Health and Wellbeing" and accompanying client brochure to the veterinary community. The Consensus Statement, published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, explores the medical, social, and emotional problems that can

4h

Free movement can protect humans from environmental threats

Greater freedom of movement and investments in human rights and social opportunities can help protect humans from environmental threats like rising sea levels, new research says.

4h

AI and NMR spectroscopy determine atoms configuration in record time

Scientists have developed a machine-learning approach that can be combined with experiments to determine, in record time, the location of atoms in powdered solids. Their method can be applied to complex molecules containing thousands of atoms and could be of particular interest to the pharmaceutical industry.

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What everyday citizens can do to claim power on the internet | Fadi Chehadé and Bryn Freedman

Technology architect Fadi Chehadé helped set up the infrastructure that makes the internet work — essential things like the domain name system and IP address standards. Today he's focused on finding ways for society to benefit from technology. In a crisp conversation with Bryn Freedman, curator of the TED Institute, Chehadé discusses the ongoing war between the West and China over artificial inte

4h

Volkswagen vil være verdens største elbilproducent: Overvejer at lave batterierne selv

Overvejer at følge i sporene på Tesla-Panasonic-modellen.

4h

Weird blue asteroid is even stranger than we thought

A bizarre asteroid that sometimes behaves like a comet, is even more enigmatic than previously thought, according to new research. Using telescopes in Hawaii and Arizona, the team studied sunlight reflected off the asteroid, dubbed Phaethon, which is known to be blue in color. Blue asteroids, which reflect more light in the blue part of the spectrum, make up only a fraction of all known asteroids

4h

An end to arachnophobia 'just a heartbeat away'

Researchers have discovered that exposing people with phobias to their fear — for examples, spiders for those who have arachnophobia — at the exact time their heart beats, led to the phobia reducing in severity.

4h

New species of Swallowtail butterfly discovered in Fiji

A spectacular new butterfly species has been discovered on the Pacific Island of Vanua Levu in Fiji. The species, named last week as Papilio natewa after the Natewa Peninsula where it was found, is a remarkable discovery in a location where butterfly wildlife was thought to be well known. It was confirmed as a species new to science by John Tennent, Honorary Associate at Oxford University Museum o

4h

When the Syrians bathed like the Romans

Classical scholars from Münster explore rare Roman bathing facility and magnificent early Christian basilica in southeastern Turkey — Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence make new archaeological findings in the ancient town of Doliche — northern Syrian town flourished across epochs and religions — Roman and Christian influences can be proven

4h

Report outlines priorities to improve the lives of cancer survivors and caregivers

A new report from the American Cancer Society creates a set of critical priorities for care delivery, research, education, and policy to equitably improve survivor outcomes and support caregivers.

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Tiny beetle trapped in amber might show how landmasses shifted

Scientists have discovered a tiny fossil beetle trapped in amber. It's three mm long, and it has a flat body and giant feathery anntennae that it would have used to navigate under tree bark. And, since it was found in amber from Asia but its closest relatives today live in South America, it hints at how landmasses have shifted over the past 100 million years.

4h

The Best Gifts for Science Nerds and Geeks

If you're wondering what to get the science geek in your life, look no further. Do they need a moon lamp? Maybe a custom map of their favorite volcano? And don't forget that science geeks can never have too many science themed socks or t-shirts.

4h

The Parachute That Will Help Gently Plop the Rover Down on Mars Also Broke a World Record on Earth

After months of testing supersonic parachutes, NASA is confident they have found the one.

4h

Study tracks severe bleaching events on a Pacific coral reef over the past century

As climate change causes ocean temperatures to rise, coral reefs worldwide are experiencing mass bleaching events and die-offs. For many, this is their first encounter with extreme heat. However for some reefs in the central Pacific, heatwaves caused by El Nino are a way of life. Exactly how these reefs deal with repeated episodes of extreme heat has been unclear. A new study from the Woods Hole O

4h

What Jewish Schools Are Telling Students About the Pittsburgh Shooting

Besie Katz runs an Orthodox Jewish day school in Northeast Philadelphia. During Sunday classes this week, her students were confused and saddened by the shooting that had taken place at a synagogue the previous day on the other side of the state of Pennsylvania. “The overriding question” they had, she says, “was, in different iterations, how could somebody do something like this? How could this h

5h

The Pittsburgh Gunman Embraced Conspiracy Theories. He’s Not the First.

Little makes sense when it comes to the massacre of 11 worshippers in a Pittsburgh synagogue on Saturday. But after media identified the suspect, Robert D. Bowers, and duly excavated his apparent social-media postings, there was at least a hint of what was in his mind: By his own account, he was acting in the grip of an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory. In this, Bowers resembles the man who alleged

5h

The Citizenship Clause Means What It Says

“It is proper to take alarm at the first experiment on our liberties,” James Madison wrote in 1785. President Donald Trump confirmed Tuesday that he plans to move from experimentation on liberty into widespread application of the tyrant’s playbook. In an interview with Axios on HBO, Trump confirmed what had been suspected since last summer: He is planning an executive order that would try to chan

5h

The Jews of Pittsburgh Bury Their Dead

Under other circumstances, Daniel Leger might be among those making sure the 11 Jews who were murdered in Pittsburgh are cared for in death. He is the leader of Pittsburgh’s liberal chevre kadisha —the committee responsible for tending to and preparing bodies before burial. Instead, he is in the hospital. He is one of the two congregants and four police officers who were injured in this week’s ho

5h

Your blood pressure and heart rate change to meet physical and social demands

Blood pressure and heart rate are not fixed, but rather they adapt to meet physical and social demands placed on the body, according to new research.

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Finally, a robust fuel cell that runs on methane at practical temperatures

Either exorbitantly expensive fuel or insanely hot temperatures have made fuel cells a boutique proposition, but now there's one that runs on cheap methane and at much lower temperatures.

5h

Biologists discover source for boosting tumor cell drug sensitivity

Biologists have discovered a new way of re-sensitizing drug-resistant human tumor cells to the potency of DNA-damaging agents, the most widely used group of cancer drugs.

5h

Genetic research confirms six subspecies of tigers

A new study brings important context and conclusions to recovery and management strategies for a treasured endangered species, and included subspecies, at high extinction risk.

5h

Diabetes medication may protect against a common cause of blindness

Researchers have shown that people with type 2 diabetes who took a common diabetes medication, metformin, had a significantly lower rate of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

5h

Australia's changing relationship with alcohol

New research has revealed that 30 per cent of Australians recently reduced the quantity of their alcohol consumption and a further 29 per cent reduced the frequency of their drinking, while six per cent kicked the habit for good.

5h

The islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria could be closer together within millions of years

There is a gravitational sinking or isostatic adjustment of Teide after the volcanic crisis of 2004. This phenomenon has been detected thanks to data provided by the GPS stations situated in the areas surrounding the island of Tenerife, with millimetric values each year.

5h

The long-term effects of alcohol demand on retail alcohol markets

As new study has examined the determinants of the number of licensed bars, restaurants, and liquor stores across neighborhoods in 53 California cities from 2000 to 2013.

5h

Scientists describe 17 new species of sea slugs

This National Sea Slug Day, celebrate the addition of 17 new species of nudibranch to the tree of life. Adorned in lavish patterns and colors that range from yellow polka dots to shades of mauve and neon blue, the new marine invertebrates hail from coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific region. The team also identified a number of distant relatives that have independently evolved the same color patte

5h

Advanced solution for satellite missions

Estonian start-up company Spaceit has unveiled next-generation service for control and monitoring of satellites. The company offers an alternative approach to satellite ground communications, enabling customers to use their resources more efficiently via a modern and secure software solution.

5h

High-performance components made by electroplating

What happens when something keeps getting smaller and smaller? This is the type of question Empa researcher Johann Michler and his team are investigating. As a by-product of their research completely novel watch springs could soon be used in Swiss timepieces.

5h

New light detector works a lot like gecko ears

Researchers have created a new kind of light detector based on geckos’ ears. Geckos and many other animals have heads that are too small to triangulate the location of noises the way we do, with widely spaced ears. Instead, they have a tiny tunnel through their heads that measures the way incoming sound waves bounce around to figure out which direction they came from. Facing their own problem of

5h

Illuminating the 'dark web'

In the wake of recent violent events in the U.S., many people are expressing concern about the tone and content of online communications, including talk of the "dark web." Despite the sinister-sounding phrase, there is not just one "dark web." The term is actually fairly technical in origin, and is often used to describe some of the lesser-known corners of the internet. As I discuss in my new book

5h

This Tiny Drone Uses Friction to Pull More Than Its Own Weight

New flying robots can pull loads that appear far too heavy for their tiny size. Here's the physics of how they cheat friction with their tiny claws and gecko-like grippers.

5h

How LSD changes perception

LSD changes the communication patterns between regions of the brain, a new study by researchers of the University of Zurich and Yale University shows. The study also provides insights into how mental health disorders develop and how these could be treated.

5h

Fermented dairy products may protect against heart attack

Men who eat plenty of fermented dairy products have a smaller risk of incident coronary heart disease than men who eat less of these products, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. A very high consumption of non-fermented dairy products, on the other hand, was associated with an increased risk of incident coronary heart disease.

5h

Berkeley computer theorists show path to verifying that quantum beats classical

Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, have just found a way to show that quantum computing beats classical computing by giving a leading practical proposal known as random circuit sampling (RCS) a qualified seal of approval with the weight of complexity theoretic evidence behind it. They showed that producing a random output with a 'quantum accent' is indeed hard for a classical c

5h

Improving structural health monitoring with magnetostrictive transducer

A new, more powerful generation of a magnetostrictive sensor withstands extreme temperatures, automatically adjusts frequencies and incorporates a stronger magnet.

5h

Mass shootings trigger blood donations

A new report focuses on blood transfusion needs and the influence of media coverage on blood bank operations. The report includes comparisons of the 2017 Las Vegas mass shooting with other recent mass shootings.

5h

Whole-system view of plant cold stress

When temperatures drop, plants can't bundle up. Stuck outside, exposed, plants instead undergo a series of biochemical changes that protect cells from damage. Scientists have described these changes and identified some of the genes controlling them, but it's not clear how all the processes work together. Lacking this global view, plant breeders have struggled to engineer cold-tolerant crops. A rec

5h

NASA's Kepler Mission May Have Found Fewer Habitable Exoplanets Than Thought

New data from the European Gaia space telescope could lead to a downward revision to tally of Earth-like worlds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The Science of Fake Blood

The Science of Fake Blood As Halloween approaches, stage blood takes the spotlight and chemistry tricks can treat viewers. FakeBlood_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Josh via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Tuesday, October 30, 2018 – 09:30 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) — While most people think of stage makeup as big eyelashes and pancake foundation, Shannon Higgins s

5h

Germs dodge immune defenses with DNA-building enzymes

Some bacteria, including those that cause strep throat and pneumonia, use a certain type of enzyme to replicate their DNA without the usually required metal ions, according to new research. This process may allow infectious bacteria to replicate even when the host’s immune system sequesters iron and manganese ions in an attempt to slow pathogen replication. The findings could drive the developmen

5h

Researchers advance understanding of key protein in photosynthesis

Moss evolved after algae but before vascular land plants, such as ferns and trees, making them an interesting target for scientists studying photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight to fuel. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made a discovery that could shed light on how plants evolved to move from the ocean t

5h

Neighborhood "greening" may lead to gentrification and displacement

Many post-industrial cities have areas of vacant and derelict land (VDL) which can have negative health and environmental impacts on nearby residents. VDL is located predominantly in poorer neighborhoods, posing a disproportionate risk upon these communities. Repurposing these areas into green spaces and community gardens may mitigate the risk of health and environmental hazards, but they may also

5h

Dogs detect malaria by sniffing socks worn by African children

As the global battle against malaria stalls, scientists may be adding a novel tool to the fight: sniffer dogs. In recent tests trained sniffer dogs successfully diagnosed malaria infections simply by sniffing samples from socks worn briefly by children from a malaria endemic area of West Africa, according to a new study.

5h

As Canadian oil exports increase, research explores effects of crude oil on native salmon

Oil spills spell disaster for affected wildlife, leading to detrimental outcomes, including suffocation, poisoning and problems related to exposure to crude oil and its components. Researchers now take a closer look at the potential effects on regional salmon populations as Canada eyes expansion of its crude oil export capacity.

5h

European tech leaders warn against EU digital services tax

A group of technology company chiefs is warning that a digital services tax proposed by the European Commission would hinder innovation and economic growth.

5h

Nature in steep decline due to human activities: WWF Living Planet Report 2018

The ways in which humans feed, fuel and finance our societies and economies are pushing our planet's natural systems – which support all life on earth—to the edge, according to WWF's Living Planet Report 2018 released today.

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These new techniques expose your browsing history to attackers

Security researchers at UC San Diego and Stanford have discovered four new ways to expose Internet users' browsing histories. These techniques could be used by hackers to learn which websites users have visited as they surf the web.

5h

Simple, mass production of giant vesicles using a porous silicone material

A technique to generate large amounts of giant vesicle (liposome) dispersion has been developed. The technique involves adsorbing a lipid into a silicone porous material resembling a 'marshmallow-like gel' and then squeezing it out like a sponge by impregnating a buffer solution.

5h

Deforestation triggered mass extinction of endemic animal species in Haiti

The findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggest that in less than two decades Haiti will lose all of its remaining primary forest cover and, as a result, most of its endemic species will disappear.

5h

Photosynthesis like a moss

Moss evolved after algae but before vascular land plants, such as ferns and trees, making them an interesting target for scientists studying photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight to fuel. Now researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have made a discovery that could shed light on how plants evolved to move from the ocean to land.

5h

Modelling a future fuelled by sustainable energy

University of Adelaide economists have modelled the transition from a world powered by fossil fuels to one in which sustainable sources supply all our energy needs.

5h

Study finds growth of genomic databases affects species accuracy

There are many ways to slice and dice genomic data to identify a species of bacteria, or at least find its close relatives. But fast techniques to sequence genomes have flooded the public databases and in a biased fashion, containing lots of genomic data about some species and not enough about others, according to a Rice University computer scientist.

5h

Flexible, stable and potent against cancer—new approach to tumor treatment

Linking therapeutically active molecules to specific antibodies can help to pilot them to their designated targets and minimize side effects—especially when treating tumors. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now described novel conjugates made from antibodies and a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor. Changing the linker between the two components allows for tuning the activity of th

5h

Modelling a future fuelled by sustainable energy

University of Adelaide economists have modelled the transition from a world powered by fossil fuels to one in which sustainable sources supply all our energy needs.

5h

All genes of the Aspen tree mapped

This week, a team of researchers from Sweden, Belgium, England, Italy, Norway and South Korea publish the genomes of two species of aspen trees, a project that has taken close to ten years to complete and that proved to be more complicated than thought as well as significantly expanding in scope.

5h

Childhood exposure to contaminants varies by country and compound

The levels of 45 environmental contaminants were measured in samples from 1 300 mother-child pairs in Greece, Spain, France, Lithuania, UK and Norway, as part of the HELIX Study.

5h

How the world's fastest muscle created four unique bird species

When the male bearded manakin snaps its wings at lightning speed, it's more than part of an elaborate, acrobatic mating ritual. The tiny muscle doing the heavy lifting is also the reason this exotic bird has evolved into four distinct species, according to new research published in the journal eLIFE by Wake Forest University biologist Matthew Fuxjager.

5h

Paul Volcker’s Guide to the Almighty Dollar

Paul Volcker’s 6-foot-7-inch frame was draped over a chaise longue when I spoke with him recently in his Upper East Side apartment, in Manhattan. He is in his 91st year and very ill, and he tires easily. But his voice is still gruff, and his brain is still sharp. We talked about his forthcoming memoir, Keeping at It: The Quest for Sound Money and Good Government —about why he wrote the book and t

5h

Trump's Plan to End Birthright Citizenship Takes Direct Aim at the Constitution

President Donald Trump is proposing removing the right to U.S. citizenship for children born to noncitizens on U.S. soil—a move that could spark fierce debate over the Fourteenth Amendment and American identity. In a new interview with Axios , the president said he intends to revoke birthright citizenship through an executive order. “It was always told to me that you needed a constitutional amend

5h

New adhesive for better recycling

Adhesives to join components are indispensable in industry, but reliable joining is no longer sufficient. The recycling economy pushed by the EU requires proper disassembly of high-tech products, such as mobiles, into their basic materials during repairs or recycling. A thermolabile and reversible adhesive developed by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) now helps to do so. This invention can

5h

The new electric vehicle highway is a welcome gear shift, but other countries are still streets ahead

Perhaps buoyed by a 67% increase in the sale of electric cars in Australia last year – albeit coming off a low base – the federal government this month announced a A$6 million funding injection for a network of ultra-fast electric vehicle recharging stations.

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Mars 2020 parachute is a 'go'

In the early hours of Sept. 7, NASA broke a world record.

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The coincidence between two overachieving NASA missions

Two vastly different NASA spacecraft are about to run out of fuel: The Kepler spacecraft, which spent nine years in deep space collecting data that detected thousands of planets orbiting stars outside our solar system; and the Dawn spacecraft, which spent 11 years orbiting and studying the main asteroid belt's two largest objects, Vesta and Ceres.

5h

Electronic noise due to temperature difference in atomic-scale junctions

Noise is a fundamental feature of any electrical measurement that calculates random and correlated signal fluctuations. Although noise is typically undesirable, noise can be used to probe quantum effects and thermodynamic quantities. Writing in Nature, Shein Lumbroso and co-workers now report a new type of electronic noise discovered to be distinct from all other previous observations. Understandi

5h

Let’s watch Apple announce new iPads, updated MacBook laptops, and more

Gadgets Maybe a new HomePod? Tim Cook and company are in NYC to announce some new Apple stuff. Aren't you proud of us for avoiding the "Big Apple" joke?

5h

The Roots of Data Visualization, Why We Kill Ourselves, and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Scientific breakthrough: Promising new target for immunotherapy

Following the 2018 Nobel Prize for Medicine, global attention is now more than ever turned toward the promise of immunotherapy in oncology. An international team's work has shed new light on a molecule called TIM-3 that might play a key role in the regulation of the immune response.

5h

Your blood pressure and heart rate change to meet physical and social demands

Blood pressure and heart rate are not fixed, but rather they adapt to meet physical and social demands placed on the body, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

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Research uncovers key differences in brains of women and men with schizophrenia

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found clear disparities in the way males and females–both those with schizophrenia and those who are healthy–discern the mental states of others.

5h

Gender myths dispelled by major new maths study

A major study into maths attainment has found that boys and girls perform equally in the subject, dispelling long-held myths around gender and education.

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Drought fighter found in soil

Some discoveries happen by accident. Consider how Sept. 28, 1928, unfolded: Alexander Fleming, back in the lab after a vacation with the family, was sorting through dirty Petri dishes that hadn't been cleaned before he went away. A mold growing on one of the dishes caught his attention—and so began the story of the world's first antibiotic: penicillin.

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Searching for wild tulips in the mountains of Kyrgyzstan

Tulips are one of the world's most iconic flowers, but their wild existence is still somewhat shrouded in mystery. Thoughts may turn to Holland, but no! Wild tulips actually carpet the stony slopes of the mountains of Central Asia. Kyrgyzstan alone is home to 27 wild tulips, a third of all global species. The spectacular Greig's tulip, Tulipa greigii, with its large red flowers, is one of six loca

5h

Where sexes come by the thousands

By the end of every spring semester, students in my introductory biology course at Vanderbilt University have become quite familiar with natural variation in human sex chromosomes. They know, for example, that most females have two X chromosomes and most males have one X and one Y chromosome. But in every thousand humans, there are typically a few whose biological sex doesn't match their sex chrom

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Tales from the crypt: Microbial life thrives in graveyards

Three continents. Nine countries. Cemeteries from Antwerp to Barcelona to Hellerup.

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States that heavily invest in legislature more influential in public policy

Around election season, some politicians try to pass more legislation to give off an air of productivity for voters.

5h

Two proteins slow down the train of DNA replication in Drosophila

Two major factors matter when it comes to cells copying DNA: getting everything accurate in the sequence and how much of it is replicated. Mistakes can result in mutations, which can lead to diseases such as cancer.

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The Bitter Class Struggle Behind Our Definition of a Kilogram

Meters, kilograms, degrees Celsius. To most Americans, these units of measurement are little more than funny inconveniences on trips abroad. To scientists, they’re the very standards that allow for meaningful comparisons of experiments. But to historians of metrology—the study of measurement—those innocuous-looking units are something else entirely: the culmination of a long, fraught battle again

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Centrifugation-based Cell Separation Using the Accuspin-Histopaque System

Learn about the ACCUSPIN system, the difference between types of Histopaque gradient media, and additional products for centrifugation-based cell separation!

6h

Region Syddanmark vil have faglært rengøring på sygehusene

Region Syddanmark vil begrænse antallet af hospitalserhvervede infektioner ved udelukkende at have faglært rengøringspersonale på sygehusene. Opkvalificeringen af de ufaglærte rengøringsfolk, skal sygehusene betale.

6h

Promoting Effective Project Teams for Drug Discovery

A drug-discovery research project can be made more efficient, with reduced costs and increased likelihood for success, by using a modern informatics systems to handle data accessibility and assist interpretation!

6h

RemoveDebris: UK satellite tracks 'space junk'

The British-led mission to test techniques to clear up space junk initiates its second experiment.

6h

Domestic violence interventions: Thoughts on what works to address this costly crime

In addition to the physical and psychological harm done to victims of domestic violence, domestic violence costs U.S. taxpayers billions of dollars each year. A significant portion of this money is spent by states as they prosecute offenders, punish the convicted and attempt to intervene to stop future offenses. Programs vary from state to state. Briana Barocas, research associate professor at New

6h

Using nanomaterials that respond to cancer-specific stimuli for targeted delivery of treatments and imaging compounds

Nanosystems that deliver anticancer drugs or imaging materials to tumours are showing significant progress, particularly those that respond to tumour-related stimuli, according to a review published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. However, further research is still required to make sure these delivery systems are stable, non-toxic and biodegradable.

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Two high-redshift quasars discovered using OGLE

Astronomers report the finding of two new high-redshift quasars using imagery from the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE). The newly found quasars, designated OGLE J015531−752807 and OGLE J005907−645016, have redshifts of 5.09 and 4.98 respectively. The discovery is detailed in a paper published October 19 on arXiv.org.

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(Pseudo) Scientific Strategies for Trick-or-Treating Like a Beast

You want all the Halloween candy. A bit of data crunching will help you get it.

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Inside these fibers, droplets are on the move

A team has develop fibers containing systems for mixing, separating, and testing fluids. These fiber-based microfluidics systems may open up new possibilities for medical screening.

6h

Former Audi boss released as diesel probe continues

A German court released Tuesday former Audi chief executive Rupert Stadler after months in custody but he remains under suspicion in connection with parent group Volkswagen's role in the "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal.

6h

General Electric reports 3Q loss of $22.8 bn, cuts dividend

General Electric reported a third-quarter loss of $22.8 billion Tuesday following a large asset write-down and cut most of its dividend as it seeks a turn-around under a new chief executive.

6h

UK demonstrators press Uber ahead of key legal fight

Hundreds of people who work in the so-called "gig economy" have gathered to protest outside Britain's Royal Courts of Justice as Uber appealed earlier legal rulings that have broad implications for its business model.

6h

RemoveDebris: UK satellite tracks 'space junk'

The British-led mission to test techniques to clear up space junk initiates its second experiment.

6h

Tianhe-2 supercomputer works out the criterion for quantum supremacy

A world's first criterion for quantum supremacy was issued, in a research jointly led by Prof. Junjie Wu in National University of Defense Technology and Prof. Xianmin Jin in Shanghai Jiao Tong University. The boson sampling task was simulated on Tianhe-2 supercomputer using current most efficient permanent-computing algorithms, requiring ~100 min for generating one 50-photon sample. A physical qu

6h

High stability of the hepatitis B virus

At room temperature, hepatitis B viruses (HBV) remain contagious for several weeks and they are even able to withstand temperatures of four degrees centigrade over the span of nine months. When applied properly, disinfectants are effective — but only undiluted. These are the results gained by a German-Korean research team in a study using a novel HBV infection system in human liver cells. Due to

6h

Neuroscience Discovers Power of "Lesion Network Mapping"

A new technique is reviving the century-old study of brain lesions and revealing surprising things about neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

New gene-therapy eases chronic pain in dogs—human trials underway

When Shane the therapy dog was hit by a Jeep, life changed for him and his guardian Taryn Sargent.

6h

Scientists develop model to predict drug levels in Europe's rivers

Scientists at Radboud University and the University of York have developed a sophisticated model to calculate the levels of pharmaceuticals in rivers across Europe. The study is published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

6h

Tiny, pain free vaccinations—microneedles and nanoparticles

If it's up to Ph.D. student Guangsheng Du, patients don't need to worry about big needles anymore. At the Leiden Academic Center for Drug Research (LACDR), he studied the use of microneedles and nanoparticles as a new vaccination system. "I want to create a more patient-friendly delivery method." He defends his Ph.D. on 30 October.

6h

New instrument joins the hunt for Earth-like planets

A ground-breaking $3.8 million instrument, used by astronomers to discover and study Earth-like planets, has been launched by a team from UNSW Sydney, The Australian National University (ANU) and Australian Astronomical Optics (AAO) at Macquarie University.

6h

Tiny light detectors work like gecko ears

Geckos and many other animals have heads that are too small to triangulate the location of noises the way we do, with widely spaced ears. Instead, they have a tiny tunnel through their heads that measures the way incoming sound waves bounce around to figure out which direction they came from.

6h

Trapping atoms, not space ships, with tractor beams

University of Adelaide researchers have delved into the realm of Star Wars and created a powerful tractor beam – or light-driven energy trap – for atoms.

6h

The Hosts of Pod Save America Are Embracing the ‘Partisan’ Label

Before the Pod Save America podcast even existed, there was Keepin’ It 1600 , a breezy political roundtable hosted by four strategists and speechwriters who used to work in Barack Obama’s administration—Jon Favreau, Dan Pfeiffer, Jon Lovett, and Tommy Vietor. In the lead-up to the 2016 presidential election, they offered their perspectives from campaigns past, discussed strategies for Democratic

6h

Insurance policy could save Earth's coral reefs

A new strategy to save the world's coral reefs proposes an "insurance policy" which focuses on the reefs most likely to survive global warming.

6h

Electronic activity previously invisible to electron microscopes revealed

The chips that drive everyday electronic gadgets such as personal computers and smartphones are made in semiconductor fabrication plants. These plants employ powerful transmission electron microscopes. While they can see physical structures smaller than a billionth of a meter, these microscopes have no way of seeing the electronic activity that makes the devices function.

6h

Paleontologists discovered six new species in the East African Rift

Sometimes hidden clues beneath our feet can reveal intriguing stories about the impacts of environmental change.

6h

Researcher discovers vegetarian sharks

She's never seen "Jaws" or heard "Mack the Knife," but don't underestimate Samantha Leigh's shark credentials. She knows how to hypnotize the creatures, analyze their blood and even take them on a two-hour car trip.

6h

The search for the source of a mysterious fast radio burst comes relatively close to home

Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are just that – enormous blasts of radio waves from space that only last for a fraction of a second. This makes pinpointing their source a huge challenge.

6h

Models suggest injection of sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere could have unintended consequences

A team of researchers from the National Center for Atmospheric Research, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Cornell University has found via modeling that injecting sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere could have unintended negative consequences. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describe their models and what they showed.

6h

Renovating buildings to save energy

In the suburbs of Valladolid, a city in central Spain, one district is at the forefront of Europe's energy transition. With its 19 residential buildings and a single tower block, surrounded by a small park, it was built in the 1960s for employees of the car manufacturer FASA-Renault, which gave its name to the neighbourhood. The factory workers have long since moved on, and this middle-class distr

6h

Controlling the crystal size of organic semiconductors

Recently, solution-processable organic semiconductors are being highlighted for their potential application in printed electronics, becoming a feasible technique to fabricate large-area flexible thin film at a low cost. The field-effect mobility of small-molecule organic semiconductors is dependent on the crystallinity, crystal orientation, and crystal size. A variety of solution-based coating tec

6h

Cephalopods could become an important food source in the global community

Among chefs and researchers in gastronomy, there is a growing interest in exploring local waters in order to use resources in a more diverse and sustainable manner, including using the cephalopod population as a counterweight to the dwindling fishing of bonefish, as well as an interest in finding new sources of protein that can replace meat from land animals.

6h

The psychedelic science behind dreamy new Netflix hit, Maniac

Emma Stone and Jonah Hill cavort in multiple roles in a show exploring the use of hallucinogenic drugs to treat mental trauma and psychological disorders

6h

Unprecedented atlas of coral reefs released

Today, Paul G. Allen Philanthropies and a consortium of partners, including Carnegie, unveiled the Allen Coral Atlas, a pioneering effort that uses high-resolution satellite imagery and advanced analytics to map and monitor the world's coral reefs in unprecedented detail. At launch, the Allen Coral Atlas offers the highest-resolution, up-to-date global image of the world's coral reefs ever capture

6h

Neuroscientists Heading to San Diego This Week – and So Are We

We’re heading off to attend the Society for Neuroscience’s Annual Meeting , Neuroscience 2018, which starts on Saturday in San Diego. More than 30,000 neuroscientists and their friends will converge on the San Diego Convention Center–a city’s worth of brain-lovers! Before SfN’s official start, we’ll also be taking in the annual meeting of the International Neuroethics Society (INS), held at the S

6h

How Economic Inequality Inflicts Real Biological Harm

The growing gulf between rich and poor inflicts biological damage on bodies and brains — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Hidden Monuments and "Suburbs" Discovered in Ancient Izapa Kingdom

Remote-sensing studies have revealed the ancient settlements in southern Mexico — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Researchers find sand flies prefer marijuana plants

An international team of researchers has found that sand flies have a strong preference for Cannabis sativa plants over all other plant choices. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes capturing sand flies from five sites around the globe, studying the contents of their guts using DNA analysis, and what they found.

6h

Sharing life with the planets next door

How life could be shared between planets in close proximity to one another has received a greater insight thanks to new analytics based on previously known and new calculations. The findings are allowing researchers to understand how likely life might be on a given planet in such tight-knit systems if that world shows signs of habitability.

6h

Lamprey teeth identified for the first time in London's archaeological record

Keratin 'teeth' belonging to the gruesome lamprey fish have been identified in London's archaeological record for the first time. The exceptionally rare discovery was made by Alan Pipe Senior Archaeozoologist at MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology), as he examined environmental samples from excavations near Mansion House station in London.

6h

First results from Lucky Spectroscopy, an equivalent technique to Lucky Imaging

The Galactic O-Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS) is acquiring blue-violet spectroscopy of all optically accessible O stars in the Galaxy at resolution ~2500 and signal-to-noise ratio S/N > 200. To date, data from a total of 590 O stars has been published.

6h

The smallest steerable catheter

Scientists have developed a very small magnetic steerable catheter for minimally invasive surgery. Thanks to its variable stiffness, surgeons can perform more complex movements inside the body with a lower risk of injury to the patient.

6h

Image: BepiColombo magnetometer boom deployed

The 2.5 m long boom carrying the magnetometer sensors onboard ESA's BepiColombo Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) has been successfully deployed. The sensors are now prepared to measure the magnetic field on the way to Mercury.

6h

Memory FAQ: Answers to the common questions that baffle us all

Why can’t we remember being babies? Does closing your eyes help you recall? Why can’t I remember what I did 5 seconds ago? What is photographic memory? And more

6h

Why Women’s Shoes Are So Painful

It’s not that I think wearing Toms with socks to work is a good look, per se. I admire your d’Orsay oxfords and fun mules. But unfortunately, when it comes to shoes, my only criteria is “Will these cause my feet to dribble blood all over my open-plan office?” I am simply not meant to wear professional office flats. I can’t wear Payless flats, but I also can’t wear the premium, handcrafted-in-Ital

6h

As states scramble to find execution drugs, experts say it’s time to let lethal injection die

Health It isn't more humane than antiquated methods—it’s just easier to watch. While death by drug is the overwhelming execution method of choice—all of the 31 death penalty states use it—injection is more likely to go wrong than any other method…

7h

A powerful new battery could give us electric planes that don’t pollute

A manufacturing trick with magnetic fields produces a battery that may discharge fast enough to get an aircraft off the ground.

7h

Image of the Day: Shrink Ray

A near-infrared laser warps a tissue culture surface to mimic natural cellular environments.

7h

Ceramic honeycomb air filters could cut city pollution

A new type of outdoor filter that could cut city air pollution and is scheduled to be debuted at the 2024 Paris Olympics has been awarded the €3 million Horizon Prize on materials for clean air.

7h

Does Climate Change Mean You Should Fly Less? Yeah, Maybe

Individual acts like eating less meat or adopting solar power won't on their own save the planet, but they can inspire new social norms that lead to policy change.

7h

Europe Shows First Cards in €1-billion Quantum Bet

One of the most ambitious EU ‘Flagship’ schemes yet has picked 20 projects, aiming to turn weird physics into useful products — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Photos: Black-Tailed Jackrabbits, the Curious Creatures of the American West

Surely one of the more unique species of mammal found across the western regions of North America is the black-tailed jackrabbit.

7h

Beermats to boost conversations in pubs and tackle loneliness in older men

Specially-designed beermats have been created to highlight the important role traditional pubs have to play in tackling loneliness in older men.

7h

Video: Preparing MetOp-C

The third in the series of MetOp satellites is scheduled for launch on 7 November from Europe's spaceport in Kourou. In this special edition of Earth from Space, ESA's MetOp-C project manager, Stéfane Carlier, talks about this latest polar-orbiting weather satellite and how its range of instruments provide data on a host of atmospheric variables such as temperature and humidity. These data are use

7h

Computer theorists show path to verifying that quantum beats classical

As multiple research groups around the world race to build a scalable quantum computer, questions remain about how the achievement of quantum supremacy will be verified.

7h

Scientists discover technique for manipulating magnets at nanoscale

Physicists from the University of California, Irvine have discovered a new way to control magnets at the nanometer scale by electric current. This breakthrough, detailed in a paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology, may pave the way for the next generation of energy-efficient computers and data centers.

7h

A freak 1870s climate event killed millions – and could happen again

Few people have heard of it, but the global famine of 1876-78 probably killed 50 million, and it was triggered by a natural climate event that could easily recur

7h

Thermal 'earmuffs' protect cell phone batteries from extreme temperatures

New research by Berkeley engineers may soon make it more practical to use battery-powered vehicles and devices in extreme temperatures, such as in icy-cold winters in Minnesota or stifling-hot summers in Death Valley. Those conditions represent temperature ranges that fall outside the narrow window—typically 20 to 40 degrees Celsius—needed for a lithium-ion battery's optimum and safe performance.

7h

Karrosserier i kulfiber kan fungere som batterier i biler og fly

Karrosserier kan lede både energi og data, viser forskning fra svensk universitet.

7h

Geometry versus Gerrymandering

Mathematicians are developing statistical forensics to identify districts that disenfranchise voters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

What Does a Crooked Election Look Like?

In the search for electoral fraud, researchers use forensic tool kits to detect statistical signs of ballot stuffing and voter rigging — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

'Alien Invasion' Radio Broadcast Terrified Listeners 80 Years Ago. Would E.T. Contact Cause Panic Today?

A radio report of an alleged "alien invasion" in New Jersey caused alarm 80 years ago today.

7h

High Vitamin D Levels Linked with Better Fitness

There's yet another reason to make sure you're getting enough vitamin D.

7h

Nearly Half of Americans Think Alternative Medicine Can Cure Cancer. It Can't.

Many Americans hold the misguided view that alternative therapies alone can cure cancer, even though such methods are not proven to be effective in treating cancer.

7h

Why Do People Like Pumpkin Spice So Much?

What is it about the seasonal trend — that is, infusing pumpkin spice flavor into all kinds of treats — that makes it a fall favorite?

7h

De rige lever ikke SÅ meget længere end de fattige … men forskellen vokser

Kvinder lever længere end mænd og rige lever længere end fattige. Statistisk set. Det…

7h

The Hindenburg Wasn't Alone: Here's a Look at 23 Intriguing Airship Adventures

Long before jet aircraft came to dominate air transport, a variety of lighter-than-air vessels known as airships sought to combine the capabilities of ships at sea with the radical new ability of soaring through the skies.

7h

8h

Crystals that clean natural gas

Removing the troublesome impurities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from natural gas could become simpler and more effective using a metal-organic framework (MOF) developed at KAUST.

8h

Scientists refine the search for dark matter

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden, among others, have developed a more effective technique in the search for clues about dark matter in the universe. They can now analyse much larger amounts of the data generated at CERN.

8h

Milder ammonia synthesis method should help environment

A Chinese research team has developed a "milder" way to synthesize ammonia by requiring lower temperature and pressure than the current method. The process offers great promise for saving energy and reducing carbon dioxide emissions.

8h

A new method to quickly identify outliers in air quality monitoring data

Ambient air quality monitoring data comprise the most important source for public awareness of air quality, and are widely used in many research fields, such as improving air quality forecasting and the analysis of haze episodes. However, there are outliers among such monitoring data, due to instrument malfunctions, the influence of harsh environments, and the limitation of measuring methods.

8h

Virus production boosted in cells to generate more vectors for gene transfer

The introduction of foreign genes into cells has a range of benefits, such as compensating for dysfunctional genes in cells and producing large amounts of specific gene products that can be harvested and used clinically. Viruses are useful tools for this purpose, as they have evolved to enter cells and express their genetic material there. However, it has been difficult and expensive to produce le

8h

Synchronized telescope dance puts limits on mysterious flashes in the sky

Two outback radio telescopes synchronised to observe the same point of sky have discovered more about one of the universe 's most mysterious events in new research published today.

8h

The islands of Tenerife and Gran Canaria could be closer together within millions of years

Experts from the University of Seville and the Laboratory of Astronomy, Geodesy and Cartography at the University of Cadiz have published a study reporting the behaviour of the geodynamic area of the island of Tenerife. Although the behaviour between the two areas was not the aim of the study, it has been observed that Tenerife and Gran Canaria are closing distance, which could be caused by the ac

8h

Gold 'micro jewels' from the 3-D printer

Thanks to a laser technique that ejects ultra-tiny droplets of metal, it is now possible to print 3-D metal structures—not only simple 'piles' of droplets, but complex overhanging structures, as well, like a helix measuring just microns in size, made of pure gold. Using this technique, it will be possible to print new 3-D micro components for electronics or photonics. University of Twente scientis

8h

Bagvendt logik: Bredere motorveje øger bare trafikpresset

Et ekstra motorvejsspor vil afhjælpe trafikken, men det kan også medføre en stigning i bilister, som blandt andet kommer fra offentlig transport.

8h

Innocent on death row: How I survived 18 years

Damien Echols was a member of the West Memphis Three, a group of young men who were wrongfully convicted of murdering three children. He served nearly 20 years on death row before being exonerated and released. Some have described his plight as exploitative, in that the case became a media circus first and a murder case second. While in prison, he practiced High Magick, a form of theurgical cerem

8h

How Boston Dynamics' Robot Videos Became Internet Gold

CEO Marc Raibert shares the backstory of his company's viral videos and how the internet's favorite robot dog, SpotMini, came to be.

8h

Scared by Spiders? Get Over It!

You should be grateful to have Halloween’s creepiest creature around — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Internettet er på vej mod et kvantespring

Forskere ser store muligheder i at sende kvantebit over et særligt internet, men lige så store problemer står i vejen for drømmen.

8h

Ny konkurrent til MobilePay og Dankort app: Google lancerer betalingsløsning

Betalingsløsningen Google Pay kommer til Danmark. Virksomheden vil kombinere Google-tjenester for at forbedre brugeroplevelsen.

8h

Beskedtjenesten Signal gør klar til at kryptere mere information

Applikationen Signal vil forsøge sig med at kryptere informationer om, hvem der er afsender på beskeder.

8h

5 tips til at undvige et fuptidsskrift

De danske universiteter tager nye midler i brug for at undgå at spilde personalekræfter, penge og prestige på at indsende forskningsresultater til fup-tidsskrifter.

8h

China defends decision to ease rhino, tiger parts ban

China on Tuesday defended its controversial decision to ease a 25-year ban on trading tiger bones and rhinoceros horns after conservationists warned that the government had effectively signed a "death warrant" for the endangered species.

8h

Higher fuel costs clip Lufthansa's wings in third quarter

German airline giant Lufthansa reported falling profits in the third quarter, hit by higher fuel costs and the pricey integration of defunct competitor Air Berlin.

8h

Nintendo first-half profit up 25% on Switch console salesNintendo Switch GameCube

Nintendo said Tuesday its net profit jumped by more than a quarter for the six months to September as blockbuster game titles from the "Donkey Kong" and "Mario" series helped boost demand for its popular Switch console.

8h

'Worst year' for Horsey seals injured by rubbish

The animals have been getting fishing nets stuck to them or rings trapped on their necks.

8h

Dissecting the Bloodthirsty Bliss of Death Metal

Fans of this violent music report feelings of transcendence and positive emotions; psychologists want to learn why — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

WWF report: Mass wildlife loss caused by human consumption

WWF blames "exploding consumption" for average losses of 60% in vertebrate populations since 1970.

8h

Discovery of Zika virus in monkeys suggests disease may also have wild cycle

Sylvatic cycle would give virus a natural reservoir from which it could more frequently reinfect humans. Study on subject has been published by Brazilian researchers in Scientific Reports.

8h

Researchers find correlation between showerhead bacteria and lung infections

Researchers from the University of Colorado, Boulder have now shown that the regions in the United States where pathogenic mycobacteria are most prevalent in showerheads are the same regions where nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) lung infections are most common. The study, published in the journal, mBio, emphasizes the important role of showerheads in the transmission of NTM infections.

8h

The 10-foot-tall microscopes helping combat world's worst diseases

The century-old mission to understand how the proteins responsible for amyloid-based diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntingdon's and Parkinson's work has taken major steps forward in the last 12 months, thanks to a revolution in a powerful microscopy technique used by scientists.

8h

How some heart cells cope with high blood pressure

Individual cells within the same heart cope differently with high blood pressure, according to a study in human cells and mice by a team of cardiologists and computational biologists at the University of Tokyo. This is the first time researchers have identified distinct differences between heart muscle cells that fail and those that adapt to high blood pressure.

8h

Three Ways to Combat Climate Change Through the Courts

Climate change is crashing into America’s courts. As the science gets more conclusive, the reality more sobering, and the predictions more dire, the executive and legislative branches have refused to act. That leaves the judicial branch. In theory, courts are a good place for climate science. Unlike legislative bodies, where bills based on science can be derailed just because a few people say the

8h

Taylor Swift’s Savvy, Smiley Instagram Voter Drive

It’s the final days before a national election, which means that the celebrities are getting out the vote. Will Ferrell is knocking on doors in Georgia. Travis Scott is rallying with Beto O’Rourke in Texas. Taylor Swift? She’s at a hideaway in Australia , talking to her cat . Which is not to say she’s uninvolved. Her Instagram story has recently morphed into a continuously updated gallery of peop

8h

The Biggest Story of the Midterms Is One the Democrats Aren’t Telling

Here’s the real news of the 2018 midterm elections. One week out, Democrats appear poised to win big on two of the three big playing fields. They were never going to retake the Senate, if only because of the mix of seats up for election this year—10 of those held by Democrats are in states Donald Trump carried in 2016. But in the House of Representatives and in state houses around the country, De

8h

Trump Doesn’t Need a Second ‘Solarium’

President Donald Trump doesn’t get enough appreciation for the fact that the national-security policies he campaigned on, he is carrying out: withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the Iranian nuclear deal; renegotiating NAFTA ; trying to have good relations with Russia; resetting the rules of international institutions, agreements, and relationships, including getting tough on allies

8h

Insecure’s Natasha Rothwell on Finding Her Path to Hollywood

Natasha Rothwell was born in Wichita, Kansas, but doesn’t remember much about it. Her father was in the Air Force, so she grew up moving around—to New Mexico, Florida, Illinois, New Jersey, Maryland, and even Turkey. “I definitely have wanderlust because of how I grew up,” she says. As an adult, she moved to Tokyo, where she performed at the Tokyo Comedy Store and taught English. She’s had a vari

8h

New devices could help turn atmospheric CO2 into useful supplies

New electrochemical cells transform carbon monoxide into useful chemical compounds like ethylene and acetate much more efficiently than their predecessors.

9h

Parker Solar Probe: Nasa's Sun mission smashes records

America's audacious mission to "touch the Sun" has now got nearer to our star than any previous human-made object.

9h

The 10-foot-tall microscopes helping combat world's worst diseases

The century old mission to understand how the proteins responsible for amyloid-based diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntingdon's and Parkinson's work has taken major steps forward in the last 12 months, thanks to a revolution in a powerful microscopy technique used by scientists.

9h

Tests show integrated quantum chip operations possible

Quantum computers that are capable of solving complex problems, like drug design or machine learning, will require millions of quantum bits—or qubits—connected in an integrated way and designed to correct errors that inevitably occur in fragile quantum systems.

9h

Orangutans are exceptionally good at keeping their infants alive

Over 90 per cent of orangutans survive childhood long enough to have their first baby, a feat human societies only achieved in the 1900s

9h

Global hunger for soybeans 'destroying Brazil's Cerrado savanna'

Brazil's highly biodiverse Cerrado is being destroyed for soybean production, conservationists say.

9h

Tests show integrated quantum chip operations possible

Quantum computers that are capable of solving complex problems, like drug design or machine learning, will require millions of quantum bits — or qubits — connected in an integrated way and designed to correct errors that inevitably occur in fragile quantum systems. Now, an Australian research team has experimentally realized a crucial combination of these capabilities on a silicon chip, bringing

9h

Food scraps to become dairy and meat substitutes

Finicky eating habits and wasteful processes have led to a system that discards millions of tonnes of food each year, but new approaches are salvaging the scraps we never see to make products that people will want to eat.

10h

Sierra Leone's chimpanzees pay price of human expansion

They have their hands full at the Tacugama Chimpanzee Sanctuary, where record numbers of orphaned chimps are being delivered to their care, victims of the relentless expansion of human activity.

10h

Nature pushed to the brink by 'runaway consumption'

Unbridled consumption has decimated global wildlife, triggered a mass extinction and exhausted Earth's capacity to accommodate humanity's expanding appetites, the conservation group WWF warned Tuesday.

10h

Nature under assault: key indicators

The World Wildlife Fund and partners have tracked population changes in Earth's animal species for decades. News from the latest "Living Planet" report, released Tuesday, is more grim than ever.

10h

Giant killers

Giant kelp forests — those ethereal, swaying columns of seaweed found in the intermediate to deep water zones of cooler coasts along the Pacific Ocean and Southern Hemisphere — provide habitat for a variety of species that spend their lives in kelp's canopies or at the rocky bottoms.

10h

A 'deal for nature' to rescue wildlife: WWF chief

The global population of fish, birds, amphibians, reptiles and mammals has declined 60 percent since 1970, according to the WWF's "Living Planet" report released Tuesday.

11h

Sony nearly doubles first-half net profits, upgrades forecast

Sony on Tuesday announced its six-month net profit had nearly doubled from last year to a new record, and upgraded its annual forecasts, with games and movies leading the way.

11h

Apple Watch supplier under fire over China student labour

Apple is investigating a factory in southwest China after a labour rights group said the tech giant's supplier forced student workers to work "like robots" to assemble its popular Apple Watch.

11h

Vitamin D levels in the blood linked to cardiorespiratory fitness

Vitamin D levels in the blood are linked to cardiorespiratory fitness, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a publication of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

11h

Trolling the Monster in the Heart of the Milky Way

Something very large and dark occupies the center of our galaxy, and new data suggest that it is indeed a black hole.

11h

Circling a Black Hole

Astronomers are probing the edge of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy.

11h

From streaming TV to Gmail, it's all about the cloud

Whether you're watching your favorite show on Netflix or backing up all-important cat photos to Google Drive, the "cloud" has become an essential part of our digital lives.

11h

Crouching tigers, hidden cameras: Nepal counts its big cats

Chayan Kumar Chaudhary flicked through photographs captured on a hidden camera in the jungle, hoping his favourite big cat—dubbed "selfie tiger" for its love of the limelight—had made another appearance.

11h

Volkswagen profits soar as diesel scandal costs fade

German car giant Volkswagen reported soaring profits Thursday for a third quarter free of massive payouts for diesel emissions cheating but the results were still weighed down by new pollution tests.

11h

Spy chief wanted ban on China telecoms from Australian 5G

Australia's critical infrastructure including electricity grids, water supplies and hospitals could not have been adequately safeguarded if Chinese-owned telecommunications giants Huawei and ZTE Corp. were allowed to help roll out the nation's 5G network, a spy chief said.

11h

Apple expected to unveil new iPads, Mac in New York

New iPads and Mac computers are expected Tuesday as part of an Apple event in New York.

11h

Honda raises forecasts on solid motorbike sales

Japan's Honda Motor said Tuesday it was raising annual forecasts after first-half profits rose over 19 percent on brisk sales of motorcycles in Asia.

11h

Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems

A large-scale, long-term experiment on kelp forests off Southern California brings new insight to how the biodiversity of coastal ecosystems could be impacted over time as a changing climate potentially increases the frequency of ocean storms.

11h

Study uncovers high levels of previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, environment

Scientists at Indiana University found high levels of a previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, in an electronic waste recycling facility and in the natural environment. People are likely to be exposed to this pollutant by breathing contaminated dust or through skin contact.

11h

Miljøorganisation: Regeringens vision om biobrændsel er til mere skade end gavn

Ifølge regeringens klimaplan skal vi blande førstegenerations biobrændstoffer i benzin og diesel længere end EU kræver. Men ifølge tal fra EU er disse brændstoffer selv til skade for klimaet.

11h

Dette Netcompany-projekt skal fixe gældsinddrivelsen i Skat

Oracle-produkt samt hjemmelavede Java-applikationer skal få pengene til at rulle ind i Skat igen efter EFI-katastrofe.

12h

Black history has much to reveal about our ancestors – and ourselves | Sada Mire

In pursuit of a peaceful society, it is important that we record all perspectives of our complex human story Black History Month, which runs through October, is trying to address a problem. That problem is, how to move the study of black history away from focusing solely on slavery and colonialism so that we don’t end up with an unbalanced knowledge of the past, and inadvertently confirm rather th

13h

To børn opereret i rygsøjlen, mens de stadig lå i mors mave

Det farlige indgreb skal forhindre varige handicaps som lammelse i benene og inkontinens hos de små.

13h

Study uncovers high levels of previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, environment

Scientists at Indiana University found high levels of a previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, in an electronic waste recycling facility and in the natural environment. People are likely to be exposed to this pollutant by breathing contaminated dust or through skin contact.

13h

Rhino horn: Alarm as China eases 25-year ban on rhino and tiger parts

Experts worry this will increase demand for the animals and jeopardise efforts to protect them.

14h

Researchers teach 'machines' to detect Medicare fraud

Like a 'needle in a haystack,' human auditors have the painstaking task of manually checking thousands of Medicare claims for specific patterns that could indicate foul play or fraudulent behaviors. Currently, fraud enforcement efforts rely heavily on health care professionals coming forward with information about Medicare fraud. Researchers are the first to use big data from Medicare Part B and e

14h

Bigger brains associated with greater cancer risk

For the first time — in Norway and internationally — researchers have looked at the direct correlation between brain size and cancer risk in adults.

14h

APA Stress in America: Generation Z stressed about issues in the news but least likely to vote

Headline issues, from immigration to sexual assault, are causing significant stress among members of Generation Z — those between ages 15 and 21- – with mass shootings topping the list of stressful current events, according to the American Psychological Association's report Stress in America™: Generation Z released today.

14h

Study: Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems

A future with stormier seas may bring strong changes to the biodiversity of coastal sea life.

14h

Not just for children: Study shows high prevalence of atopic dermatitis among US adults

As many as 16.5 million adults in America suffer from a skin disease known as atopic dermatitis, an inflammatory disease that results in red, itchy skin. The estimate comes from a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which also projected 6.6 million of these adults have disease that would be classified as moderate to severe, leading to a decrease in qua

14h

Advertising in kids' apps more prevalent than parents may realize

Child consumer advocacy groups plan to file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission about the study's findings.

14h

Pseudarthrosis following single-level ACDF is five times more likely when a PEEK interbody device is used

Researchers found pseudarthrosis (lack of new bone regrowth) to be five times more likely after a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody spacer device had been used to bridge the gap between vertebrae during cervical spine surgery than after a structural (bone) allograft had been used.

14h

DTU og møllegiganter sætter ind mod regndråbers hærgen

Regn koster dyrt i vedligehold og nedetid.

15h

IBM’s Call for Code Prize Goes to a Team With ‘Clusterducks’

The Winning IBM Call for Code Team Wants to Provide Internet After Hurricanes

15h

Dolphins Dumb Down Calls to Compete with Ship Noise

Bottlenose dolphins simplify and raise the pitch of their whistles to be heard above underwater shipping noise. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

15h

Synchronized telescope dance puts limits on mysterious flashes in the sky

Two outback radio telescopes synchronized to observe the same point of sky have discovered more about one of the Universe's most mysterious events. The telescopes were searching the sky for fast radio bursts, which are exceptionally bright flashes of energy coming from deep space.

17h

Study Fingers Bitcoin as Major Climate Change Culprit

Researchers predict that activity around the digital currency could single-handedly push warming above 2 °C within 30 years, but other experts say the conclusion is flawed.

18h

Chocolate: Origins of delicacy pushed back in time

The delights of chocolate were first discovered in the Amazon rainforest about 5,000 years ago.

18h

Studies raise questions over how epigenetic information is inherited

Evidence has been building in recent years that our diet, our habits or traumatic experiences can have consequences for the health of our children — and even our grandchildren. The explanation that has gained most currency for how this occurs is so-called 'epigenetic inheritance' — patterns of chemical 'marks' on or around our DNA that are hypothesised to be passed down the generations. New rese

18h

The Atlantic Daily: ‘Everyone Else Would Stop Him, Right?’

What We’re Following Take Me to Your Leader: Brazil has a new president in the former far-right military leader Jair Bolsonaro, who won 55 percent of the votes cast in Sunday’s runoff. “If he tries to install a dictatorship, the Senate and everyone else would stop him, right?” one Brazilian voter wondered. Angela Merkel, the longtime leader of one of Europe’s most powerful countries, announced th

19h

Experimental vaccine may reduce post-stroke blood clot risk

An experimental vaccine might one day protect ischemic stroke survivors from developing blood clots and subsequent strokes. The vaccine was found to be as safe and effective as one of the most widely used oral blood thinners currently used to reduce clotting risk.

20h

Peer support can help curb acute care for persons with depression and diabetes

A new study describes the impact of a peer coach intervention on hospitalizations and emergency room visits for individuals with diabetes and depression.

20h

White House sends 5,200 more troops to U.S.-Mexico border as 'caravan' heads north

Two large groups of migrants are currently traveling north through Mexico toward the U.S. About 5,200 U.S. troops will be sent to supplement 2,100 National Guardsmen already assisting officials at the U.S.-Mexico border. Officials said migrants will be treated humanely, but won't be allowed to cross the U.S.-Mexico border. The Trump administration plans to deploy 5,200 active-duty troops to the U

20h

Stephen King says writers should stop using this one "very tired" word

In a tweet published Sunday night, Stephen King asked writers to stop using the word "amazing". Many users agreed, also suggesting that similarly overused adjectives like "awesome" be retired. In his 2000 bestselling book "On Writing: A Memoir to the Craft", King offered similar advice on overusing adverbs. "Amazing" is one adjective that aspiring writers should nix and replace with something mor

20h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Rhetoric and Responsibility

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Robert Bowers, the man facing 29 criminal charges over the murder of 11 people in Saturday’s attack at a Pittsburgh synagogue, appeared in court . Prosecutors said they will seek the death penalty. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump are p

21h

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