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Why Is Steve Bannon a Keynote Speaker for a Gaming Conference?

From sex robots to a failed IndieGoGo campaign to the Unabomber, ACE 2018 had a lot going on even before Bannon was invited.

31min

How Will Pittsburgh’s Jews Translate Tragedy Into Action?

PITTSBURGH—On Tuesday afternoon, two groups staged marches against President Donald Trump, moving toward each other from opposite sides of Forbes Avenue. If Not Now opposes the Israeli occupation of the West Bank, and Bend the Arc “[fights] for justice for all” through a Jewish, progressive frame. Eventually they merged, and together made their way toward Tree of Life synagogue, singing Jewish so

36min

Babies born to older fathers 'tend to have more medical issues'

Men who start families later in life should be aware of the potential health risks to their children, study says Men who start families later in life should be aware of the potential health risks to their children, according to US doctors who found that babies born to older fathers tend to have more medical issues than those born to younger men. Researchers at Stanford University in California st

13min

LATEST

Glamour Duck and the Internet's Rabid Love of Wild Animals

Every once in a while, the internet has a good day. Usually it's because a cute animal is acting strange.

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Older fathers associated with increased birth risks, Stanford study reports

A decade of data documenting live births in the United States links babies of older fathers with a variety of increased risks at birth, including low birth weight and seizures, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

15min

The Atlantic Daily: Grim

What We’re Following Bad Math: “One of the White House’s most consequential environmental rollbacks may be in self-inflicted legal danger,” writes Robinson Meyer. The administration’s clean-cars rollback plan is riddled with literal miscalculations. Many of the blaring headlines about a major new World Wildlife Fund report are mischaracterizing how many species humans have been responsible for wi

21min

A Guide to the Ryan Zinke Investigations

Ryan Zinke has faced more than 15 ethics inquiries since taking over the Interior Department. At least six are ongoing.

58min

This region runs ‘quality control’ for our brains

The cerebellum has a hand in every aspect of higher brain function—not just movement, but attention, thinking, planning, and decision-making, according to new research. Located inconveniently on the underside of the brain and initially thought to be limited to controlling movement, researchers studying higher brain functions have long treated the cerebellum like an afterthought. But the new resea

1h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: 44 Counts

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Robert Bowers was indicted on 44 counts , including federal hate crimes, in the murder of 11 people in Saturday’s synagogue shooting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. In the most detailed account of the event to date, Turkish officials said that Saudi journali

1h

Facebook removes Proud Boys pages for "hate speech"Facebook Proud Boys

The Proud Boys is a far-right group of "Western chauvinists" that have been linked to multiple instances of politically motivated violence, including clashes with the leftist group Antifa. Facebook suggested the pages trafficked in "organized hate speech." The bans come several months after multiple media platforms removed pages belonging to Alex Jones, another popular far-right figure. Facebook

1h

For Cervical Cancer Patients, Less Invasive Surgery Is Worse For Survival

Two new studies suggest that minimally invasive surgery for early stage cervical cancer patients leads to death and recurring disease more often than standard surgery through a large incision. (Image credit: Steve Gschmeissner/Getty Images/Science Photo Library)

1h

Frankenstein was based on some very real (and very creepy) experiments

Science Scientists really did believe that electricity might be able to bring the dead back to life. The idea that electricity really was the stuff of life and that it might be used to bring back the dead was certainly a familiar one in the kinds of circles in which the…

1h

Studies Warn Against Minimally Invasive Surgery for Cervical Cancer

Compared to open surgery for cervical cancer, the less invasive approach was more likely to result in cancer recurrence and death, new studies found.

1h

Troubled Alitalia says gets three takeover bids

Troubled Italian carrier Alitalia has received three takeover offers as part of its latest rescue efforts, the company said in a statement on Wednesday.

2h

New study found deep sea chemical dispersants ineffective in Deepwater Horizon oil spill

A new study of the Deepwater Horizon response showed that massive quantities of chemically engineered dispersants injected at the wellhead—roughly 1,500 meters (4,921 feet) beneath the surface—were unrelated to the formation of the massive deepwater oil plume.

2h

Hot brew coffee has higher levels of antioxidants than cold brew

In a new study, Jefferson (Philadelphia University + Thomas Jefferson University) researchers found chemical differences between hot and cold brew coffee that may have health impacts. In particular, the researchers found that hot-brewed coffee has higher levels of antioxidants, which are believed to be responsible for some of the health benefits of coffee.

2h

October's Spellbinding Space Pictures

October's Spellbinding Space Pictures Images of far away, misty nebulas and lurking black holes haunt us this month. 1_crop_eso1835a.jpg A simulation of ghostly gases swirling around a black hole. Image credits: ESO/Gravity Consortium/L. Calçada Space Wednesday, October 31, 2018 – 17:30 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — In its vast blackness, space holds glittering stars and a

2h

Hot brew coffee has higher levels of antioxidants than cold brew

Comparing the properties of cold- and hot-brew coffee, researchers found similar acidity in both, but higher antioxidant levels in hot coffee.

2h

Relapsed leukemia flies under immune system's radar

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis offers a potential explanation for why many AML patients experience a relapse after a stem cell transplant, and suggests a therapeutic approach that may help to place relapsed patients back into remission.

2h

Minimally invasive surgery leads to worse survival for cervical cancer patients

Minimally invasive hysterectomy, a popular procedure for early-stage cervical cancer, turns out to result in worse overall survival for cancer patients than traditional open surgery, reports a new study. More than half of hysterectomies performed for this purpose are minimally invasive. Patients are about 1.65 times more likely to die over four years with the minimally invasive surgery.

2h

Minimally invasive surgery associated with worse survival for women with cervical cancer compared to open hysterectomy

When comparing standard-of-care surgical options for women with early-stage cervical cancer, two studies led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center discovered that minimally invasive radical hysterectomy is associated with higher recurrence rates and worse overall survival (OS), compared to abdominal radical hysterectomy.

2h

For early cervical cancer, open hysterectomy is safer than minimally invasive surgery

A new study found that the risk of death was significantly higher for women with early cervical cancer if they had a minimally invasive hysterectomy instead of open surgery.

2h

The next novel you read may be in Facebook Messenger

Technology Facebook, Hooked, and other platforms are changing the way we read. We aren't exactly a nation of readers. But these tech companies want to change that, by putting fiction on our smartphones.

2h

Man's Bloody Tears Were Caused by This Rare Condition

It looks like Halloween costume: a man with bloody tears pouring down his face. But these tears are the real thing, the result of a rare condition.

2h

New study found deep sea chemical dispersants ineffective in Deepwater Horizon oil spill

A new study of the Deepwater Horizon response showed that massive quantities of chemically engineered dispersants injected at the wellhead — roughly 1,500 meters (4,921 feet) beneath the surface — were unrelated to the formation of the massive deepwater oil plume.

2h

UK, Canada seek to question Facebook's Zuckerberg on fake newsUK Mark Zuckerberg

Mark Zuckerberg has testified to the U.S. Congress. Could a visit before U.K. and Canadian lawmakers be next?

3h

You Should Be Worried About Your DNA Privacy

As DNA tests such as 23andMe and AncestryDNA become increasingly prevalent, concerns about genetic privacy are mounting—and with good reason, says the Atlantic writer Sarah Zhang. In the latest Atlantic Argument, Zhang explains how the recent spate of arrests that were made due to DNA databases—the most famous being the Golden State Killer—are just the beginning. “Soon, it won’t be hard to imagin

3h

Revealed: New Cortical Neuron Types

A pair of mouse studies describes neuronal subpopulations not identified before and some of their functions.

3h

Controlling future summer weather extremes still within our grasp

Continued burning of fossil fuels is likely to fuel even more extreme summers than that of 2018 because of its impact on the jet stream. The rapid disappearance of aerosols produced by pollution may, however, mitigate the impact until mid-century if countries like China phase out these fuels, according to scientists using climate models to predict changes in the occurrence of so-called Quasi-Reson

3h

Italy tells Ryanair, Wizz Air to suspend bag charge

Italy's competition watchdog told low-cost airlines Ryanair and Wizz Air Wednesday to suspend planned charges for carry-on bags that are to take effect on November 1.

3h

Virtual program successful in linking adult protective services, geriatric specialists

In its first year, an innovative virtual program has substantially increased mistreated elderly Texans' access to elder mistreatment and geriatric experts with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

3h

Researchers find the origin of an isolated bird species on South Atlantic island

By wings or maybe riding on debris, that's how a now-flightless and rare species of tiny birds likely got to Inaccessible Island, an aptly named small island of volcanic origin in the middle of the South Atlantic. And it turns out that the bird, a rail, needs a name change.

3h

Good news! Study says life span normal when Parkinson's does not affect thinking

In the past, researchers believed that Parkinson's disease did not affect life expectancy. But recent studies showed a somewhat shorter life span. Now a new study suggests that when the disease does not affect thinking skills early on, life span is not affected. The study is published in the Oct. 31, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

3h

Researchers find the origin of an isolated bird species on South Atlantic island

By wings or maybe riding on debris, that's how a now-flightless and rare species of tiny birds likely got to Inaccessible Island, an aptly named small island of volcanic origin in the middle of the South Atlantic.

3h

Eggs evolved color and speckles only once — during the age of dinosaurs

Birds’ colorful eggs were inherited from their nonavian dinosaur ancestors.

3h

Why fact checks on ‘fake news’ don’t change minds

Neutral fact checks may not sway voters to abandon false beliefs based on inaccurate information, a new study suggests. If you’re having a political argument about voter fraud, you’d think that citing a nonpartisan, neutral source like Snopes or Politifact might be the best way to correct misinformation. But that may not be the case. In the study, reading correct information from fact-checking or

3h

Seattle tech startup 98point6 raises $50 million for virtual doctor's visits

Seattle startup 98point6, whose app lets consumers consult with a primary-care doctor via text messages, has raised $50 million from investors.

3h

Empathetic machines favored by skeptics but might creep out believers

Most people would appreciate a chatbot that offers sympathetic or empathetic responses, according to a team of researchers, but they added that reaction may rely on how comfortable the person is with the idea of a feeling machine.

4h

Scientists set up a haunted lab to figure out why we like being scared

Science Or why some of us do, anyway. The researchers set up their makeshift lab in the basement of the haunted house, recruiting people who had already purchased tickets.

4h

Shape-shifting robots perceive surroundings, make decisions for first time

A Cornell University-led team has developed modular robots that can perceive their surroundings, make decisions and autonomously assume different shapes in order to perform various tasks — an accomplishment that brings the vision of adaptive, multipurpose robots a step closer to reality.

4h

Lyme disease predicted to rise in United States as climate warms

A new study looked at the relationship between climatic variables and the incidence of Lyme disease in 15 U.S. states. The study found that rising temperatures are expected to boost the number of cases of Lyme disease by more than 20 percent by mid-century.

4h

Biomarker discovered for most common form of heart failure

A team led by a Cedars-Sinai physician-scientist has discovered a biomarker — a protein found in the blood — for the most common type of heart failure, a new study published today in JAMA Cardiology shows.

4h

Facebook Could Be Unrecognizable by 2020

One of the mysteries of Facebook is that whenever public sentiment about the company feels most mixed, it delivers smashing results for Wall Street that keep any social consequences from depressing the company’s share price. This was true even during the depths of the Cambridge Analytica scandal, which began with a major price drop and ended with Facebook at a new all-time high, $209.94 a share,

4h

Brain Cancer: A New Era of Hope

Brain Cancer: A New Era of Hope A neurosurgeon discusses what developments in the field mean for patients Brain Cancer: A New Era of Hope Video of Brain Cancer: A New Era of Hope Human Wednesday, October 31, 2018 – 14:45 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) – An interview with Steven Kalkanis at the Henry Ford Health System. What does the future of brain cancer treatment look like? “You

4h

Naturally occurring 'batteries' fueled organic carbon synthesis on Mars

Mars' organic carbon may have originated from a series of electrochemical reactions between briny liquids and volcanic minerals, according to analyses of three Martian meteorites. The discovery that natural systems can form a small corrosion-powered battery that drives electrochemical reactions between minerals and surrounding liquid has major implications for astrobiology. A similar process could

4h

Unique type of skeletal stem cells found in 'resting zone' are actually hard at work

Skeletal stem cells are valuable because it's thought they can heal many types of bone injury, but they're difficult to find because researchers don't know exactly what they look like or where they live.

4h

A comprehensive 'parts list' of the brain built from its components, the cells

Neuroscientists have moved one step closer to understanding the complete list of cell types in the brain. In the most comprehensive study of its kind to date, the researchers sorted cells from the cortex, the outermost shell and the cognitive center of the brain, into 133 different 'cell types' based on the genes the cells switch on and off.

4h

Apple updates iOS12 with new emojis, group FaceTime video calls

Beyond the new iPad, MacBook Air and Mac Mini refresh, Apple also gave the world new emoji, the ability to do multi-person FaceTime video calling, and some cool photo tools in an update of iOS12, Apple's mobile operating system.

4h

Letter: ‘When Does Female Empowerment Transcend the Magical Into the Actual?’

Thank the ’90s for Practical Magic Earlier this month, David Sims wrote about how Griffin Dunne’s ostensible comedy mixed horror, empowerment, and romance in ways that were unusual for the era. I’m a colleague of David Sims’s at The Atlantic , and I consider him one of my favorite culture writers. After reading his recent piece on the film Practical Magic , I wanted to expand on his observations

4h

Wait, Have We Really Wiped Out 60 Percent of Animals?

Since Monday, news networks and social media has been abuzz with the claim that, as the Guardian among others tweeted , “humanity has wiped out 60 percent of animals since 1970”—a stark and staggering figure based on the latest iteration of the WWF’s Living Planet report . But that isn’t really what the report showed. The team behind the Living Planet Index relied on previous studies in which res

4h

Photos: The 15 Tallest Statues in the World

With the unveiling of the Statue of Unity in India today, there is a new name topping the list of the tallest statues in the world. The new monument to Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel stands 597 feet (182 meters) tall, overtaking the previous record holder, the 420-foot (128-meter) Spring Temple Buddha, in China’s Lushan County. Using Wikipedia ’s standard of measuring to “the highest part of the human

4h

Louis C.K.’s Phantom Alliance With His Black Fans

Louis C.K. says he’s been persecuted. During a Monday-night set at the New York performance mainstay the Comedy Cellar, the comedian addressed his November 2017 admission of sexual misconduct—namely, masturbating in front of several young female comedians —only to the extent that it has affected his own career. “Hard things, you survive them or you don’t,” C.K. said at the Cellar, according to a

4h

With Netflix Show 'Salt Fat Acid Heat,' the Food TV Renaissance Continues

TV about eating isn't what it used to be—now it's much more appetizing.

4h

Method spotlights best nanoparticles to deliver genetic drugs

A new screening process could dramatically accelerate the identification of nanoparticles suitable for delivering therapeutic RNA into living cells. The technique would allow researchers to screen hundreds of nanoparticles at a time, identifying the organs in which they accumulate—and verifying that they can successfully deliver an RNA cargo into living cells. Based on work known as “DNA barcodin

4h

The Gruesome Stories Behind Famous Dead People's Long-Lost Body Parts (Photos)

Whatever happened to Albert Einstein's brain? Or Louis XIV's heart? These body parts, and countless other pieces of famous dead people, are not buried in places you'd expect.

4h

Boy's Rare Brain Condition Means He Could Be Literally Scared to Death

Halloween frights are usually harmless, but not for five-year-old Reed Havlik: The boy has a rare brain condition that could cause him to be literally scared to death.

4h

2D magnetism: Atom-thick platforms for energy, information and computing research

A class of 2D magnetic materials — known as van der Waals materials — may offer one of the most ambitious platforms yet to understand and control phases of matter at the nanoscale.

5h

Appendix identified as a potential starting point for Parkinson's disease

Removing the appendix early in life reduces the risk of developing Parkinson's disease by 19 to 25 percent, according to the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. The findings solidify the role of the gut and immune system in the genesis of the disease, and reveal that the appendix acts as a major reservoir for abnormally folded alpha-synuclein proteins, which are closely linked to Par

5h

Dinosaurs put all colored birds' eggs in one basket, evolutionarily speaking

A new study says the colors found in modern birds' eggs did not evolve independently, as previously thought, but evolved instead from dinosaurs.

5h

Changes to RNA aid the process of learning and memory

Scientists show how a common RNA modifiation plays an important role in the process of learning and memory formation.

5h

Decoding how brain circuits control behavior

Scientists have combined genetic analyses, anatomical maps, and detailed studies of neuronal activity to reveal brain cells' roles in controlling movement.

5h

Flexy, flat and functional magnets

Scientists have presented the latest achievements and future potentials of 2D magnetic van der Waals (vdW) materials, which were unknown until six years ago and have recently attracted worldwide attention.

5h

Earth's oceans have absorbed 60 percent more heat than previously thought

Since 1991, the world's oceans have absorbed an amount of heat energy each year that is 150 times the energy humans produce as electricity annually, according to a new study. The strong ocean warming the researchers found suggests that Earth is more sensitive to fossil-fuel emissions than previously thought.

5h

Stimulating the spinal cord helps 3 more paralyzed people walk

There’s more evidence that with targeted spinal cord stimulation, paralyzed people can move voluntarily — and even walk.

5h

Bones and Stones: Cemetery Geology

A tour of Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, NY, focuses on the geology of the landscape and the mausoleums. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Cargill robot moves cattle herds with less stress, more safety

Meet the world's first cowboy robot. It does not look like something from Hollywood or Silicon Valley.

5h

Spinal Stimulator Implant Gives Paralytic Patients a Chance to Regain Movement

A new therapy that amplifies nerve impulses may also help the body heal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

The swamp science that lured travelers to their doom—and inspired the jack-o’-lantern

Science And led to one of the first American science experiments. A mysterious light hovers over a marsh, luring travelers to their watery dooms. This real phenomenon earned the nickname will o' the wisp—or jack-o'-lantern. Here's the…

5h

Birds Got Their Colorful, Speckled Eggs From Dinosaurs

A new study found that birds' dinosaur relatives had eggs with traces of two pigments—a red-brown one and a blue-green one. In today's birds that might produce a color such as robin's egg blue. (Image credit: Jasmina Wiemann/Yale University)

5h

World's last wilderness may vanish

The world's last wilderness areas are rapidly disappearing, with explicit international conservation targets critically needed, according to researchers. The international team recently mapped intact ocean ecosystems, complementing a 2016 project charting remaining terrestrial wilderness.

5h

Astronomers discover the giant that shaped the early days of our Milky Way

Some ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way's halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form.

5h

A wilderness 'horror story'

Producing the first comprehensive fine-scale map of the world's remaining marine and terrestrial wild places, conservation scientists say that just 23 percent of the world's landmass can now be considered wilderness, with the rest — excluding Antarctica — lost to the direct effects of human activities.

5h

Estonian soil is surprisingly rich in species, researchers find

Due to its biodiversity and probably huge number of taxa waiting to be discovered, soil fauna has been called the poor man's rain forest. A new research article analyses the biodiversity of Myriapoda and their habitat preferences in Estonia.

5h

Gut bacteria may control movement

A new study puts a fresh spin on what it means to 'go with your gut.' The findings, published in Nature, suggest that gut bacteria may control movement in fruit flies and identify the neurons involved in this response. The study was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

5h

Once Paralyzed, Three Men Take Steps Again With Spinal Implant

An experimental, pacemaker-like device offers hope for treating spinal injuries.

5h

Scientists Warn That World’s Wilderness Areas Are Disappearing

“Wild areas provide a lot of life support systems for the planet,” said the author of a study that found 77 percent of earth’s land had been modified by humans.

5h

Trilobites: The Great Speckled Dinosaur Egg

Eggs of different colors evolved in dinosaurs before the appearance of birds.

5h

Bitcoin is probably bad for the planet, but exactly how bad remains to be seen

Technology An alarming new study may also be "deeply flawed." This study claims that Bitcoin mining could warm the Earth by 2 degrees C within 22 years, all by itself. One energy expert calls baloney.

5h

There’s little doubt we’re to blame for hurricanes getting worse

Climate scientists are still scrapping over the details, but the increased ferocity, unpredictability and spread of tropical storms is in line with predictions

5h

Venezuela’s cryptocurrency is about much more than its economic crisis

Virtual currencies were conceived as a tool for the underdog. Venezuela’s leaders are hoping to buy some independence with theirs, says Brett Scott

5h

Birds have their dinosaur ancestors to thank for their colourful eggs

A careful look at dinosaur fossil eggs suggests colourful eggs evolved just once – in the group of dinosaurs that eventually gave rise to birds

5h

Neanderthals may have breastfed their young for more than two years

An analysis of 250,000-year-old Neanderthal teeth suggests that these ancient humans nursed their young for two and a half years – about the same time as modern humans in traditional societies

5h

Cutting aerosol pollution may lessen extreme weather even with warming

Reducing pollution from burning dirty fossil fuels won’t just benefit our health – it might also help limit the increase in extreme summer weather events

5h

Parkinson’s disease may start in the appendix and travel to the brain

A toxic compound that builds up in the appendix may trigger Parkinson's – and having your appendix out can lower the risk of developing the brain disorder

5h

Spinal implants are getting better at reversing paralysis

People whose spines have been crushed have regained some mobility thanks to electrical stimulation that seems to encourage the brain to grow new nerve pathways

5h

Frustrated climate activists resort to civil disobedience in London

The Extinction Rebellion aims to spark widespread civil disobedience around the world in an effort to force countries to do more to limit climate change

5h

Eco-friendly waterproof polymer films synthesized using novel method

A researcher has applied a novel method to control the wettability of polymeric substrates, which has numerous practical implications.

5h

Photos in social media reveal socio-cultural value of landscapes

Every day, users upload millions of photos on platforms, such as Flickr, Instagram or Facebook. A study now shows that these photos can be used to assess the social importance of certain landscapes. For this purpose, they developed a new image analysis method based on artificial intelligence. The results might be of particular importance for landscape management and presentation.

5h

Eurasian perch genome assembled

The genome of the Eurasian perch (Latin name, Perca fluviatilis) — three times smaller than the human genome, yet containing about a billion nucleotides and more than 23,000 genes — has been assembled by Estonian and Finnish scientists.

5h

How risk and money shape our climate change decisions

New research digs into how links between economic development, technology, politics, and decision-making affect actions people are willing to take against climate change. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) recently released a new report that calls for urgent action on climate change, including an immediate and sharp increase in investment in uncertain but potentially revolutiona

5h

The Couple Who Lives in ‘The House of Horrors’

After the notorious female serial killer Dorothea Puente died in prison at the age of 82, the filmmaker Nick Coles stumbled upon her obituary. “I was hooked when I saw that she had published a cookbook from prison titled Cooking With a Serial Killer ,” Coles recently told The Atlantic . “Who does that?” Looking into her story further, Coles was horrified and intrigued in equal measure. Puente end

5h

Spotify to give family plan subscribers a free Google Home Mini speakerSpotify Google Home Mini

Spotify is giving a Google Home Mini speaker to family plan subscribers for a song—free.

5h

Three gas clouds nearly grazed the edge of the Milky Way’s black hole

Gas clumps cozy up to the Milky Way’s enormous black hole, new observations reveal.

5h

PAPPA2: A genetic mystery

While a PAPPA2 mutation is rare, endocrinologists, who understand its function and dysregulation can create solutions to support IGF-1 bioavailability, thereby supporting patterns of healthy growth and development in children. This research was presented at the European Society of Pediatric Endocrinology in Athens and will be discussed at endocrinology conferences in 2019.

5h

A wilderness 'horror story'

Producing the first comprehensive fine-scale map of the world's remaining marine and terrestrial wild places, conservation scientists writing in the journal Nature say that just 23 percent of the world's landmass can now be considered wilderness, with the rest — excluding Antarctica — lost to the direct effects of human activities.

5h

Domestic violence is widely accepted in most developing countries, new study reveals

Societal acceptance of domestic violence against women is widespread in developing countries, with 36 per cent of people believing it is justified in certain situations.

5h

Muscle-building proteins hold clues to ALS, muscle degeneration

Amyloid-like protein assemblies, long believed to be toxic and fuel diseases like ALS, have been found to play a key role in healthy muscle regeneration.

5h

Earth's oceans have absorbed 60 percent more heat than previously thought

Since 1991, the world's oceans have absorbed an amount of heat energy each year that is 150 times the energy humans produce as electricity annually, according to a study led by researchers at Princeton and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The strong ocean warming the researchers found suggests that Earth is more sensitive to fossil-fuel emissions than previously thought.

5h

Baby-naming trends reveal ongoing quest for individuality

Choosing a baby's name that is distinctive is becoming harder, research reveals. Greater media access, global communication and rising immigration have increased people's exposure to different names, but also ensures these become common more quickly.

5h

Mycoplasma pathogens sneaking past our line of defense

New research reveals that Mycoplasma pathogens make DNA in a unique way that may protect them from our immune response. The result could provide new avenues to combat the pathogens that utilize this strategy. The study is published today in the scientific journal Nature.

5h

Cooling 'brains on fire' to treat Parkinson's

A promising new therapy to stop Parkinson's disease in its tracks has been developed at The University of Queensland. UQ Faculty of Medicine researcher Associate Professor Trent Woodruff said the team found that a small molecule, MCC950, stopped the development of Parkinson's in several animal models. The team hope to commence human clinical trials in 2020.

5h

Breakthrough neurotechnology for treating paralysis

Three patients with chronic paraplegia were able to walk over ground thanks to precise electrical stimulation of their spinal cords via a wireless implant. In a double study published in Nature and Nature Neuroscience, Swiss scientists Grégoire Courtine (EPFL and CHUV/Unil) and Jocelyne Bloch (CHUV/Unil) show that, after a few months of training, the patients were able to control previously paraly

5h

A comprehensive 'parts list' of the brain built from its components, the cells

Neuroscientists at the Allen Institute have moved one step closer to understanding the complete list of cell types in the brain. In the most comprehensive study of its kind to date, published today on the cover of the journal Nature, the researchers sorted cells from the cortex, the outermost shell and the cognitive center of the brain, into 133 different 'cell types' based on the genes the cells

5h

Unique type of skeletal stem cells found in 'resting zone' are actually hard at work

Skeletal stem cells are valuable because it's thought they can heal many types of bone injury, but they're difficult to find because researchers don't know exactly what they look like or where they live.

5h

Naturally occurring 'batteries' fueled organic carbon synthesis on Mars

Mars' organic carbon may have originated from a series of electrochemical reactions between briny liquids and volcanic minerals, according to analyses of three Martian meteorites. The discovery that natural systems can form a small corrosion-powered battery that drives electrochemical reactions between minerals and surrounding liquid has major implications for astrobiology. A similar process could

5h

UMass Medical School study safely delivers RNAi-based gene therapy for ALS in animal model

Promising new research by Christian Mueller, Ph.D., and Robert H. Brown Jr., D.Phil., M.D., at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, provides evidence that a therapy using synthetic microRNAs may safely treat patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

5h

What happened in the past when the climate changed?

New research shows for the first time how the changing climate in Asia, from 5,000 to 1,000 years ago, transformed people's ability to produce food in particular places. The model enables the co-authors to get at the causes of some dramatic historic and cultural changes.

5h

Flexy, flat and functional magnets

An international research team led by PARK Je-Geun at IBS Center for Correlated Electron Systems has just published a Perspective Review paper in Nature. It presents the latest achievements and future potentials of 2D magnetic van der Waals (vdW) materials, which were unknown until six years ago and have recently attracted worldwide attention.

5h

Decoding how brain circuits control behavior

Janelia and Allen Institute scientists team up, combining genetic analyses, anatomical maps, and detailed studies of neuronal activity to reveal brain cells' roles in controlling movement.

5h

Changes to RNA aid the process of learning and memory

In a new study published in Nature, scientists from the University of Chicago show how a common RNA modification plays an important role in the process of learning and memory formation.

5h

Dinosaurs put all colored birds' eggs in one basket, evolutionarily speaking

A new study says the colors found in modern birds' eggs did not evolve independently, as previously thought, but evolved instead from dinosaurs.

5h

World's last wilderness may vanish

The world's last wilderness areas are rapidly disappearing, with explicit international conservation targets critically needed, according to University of Queensland-led research.The international team recently mapped intact ocean ecosystems, complementing a 2016 project charting remaining terrestrial wilderness.

5h

JILA researchers see signs of interactive form of quantum matter

JILA researchers have, for the first time, isolated groups of a few atoms and precisely measured their multi-particle interactions within an atomic clock. The advance will help scientists control interacting quantum matter, which is expected to boost the performance of atomic clocks, many other types of sensors, and quantum information systems.

5h

‘Game-changing’ skin sensor could improve life for a million hydrocephalus patients

A new wireless, Band-Aid-like sensor developed at Northwestern University could revolutionize the way patients manage hydrocephalus, a potentially life-threatening condition in which excess fluid builds up in the brain. A tube or 'shunt' drains the fluid, but shunts often fail, and diagnosing shunt failure leads to CT scans, MRIs or surgery. This skin sensor will non-invasively read within five mi

5h

Astronomers discover the giant that shaped the early days of our Milky Way

Some ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way's halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form. A description of this mega-merger, discovered by an international team led by University of Groningen astronomer Amina Helmi, is now published in the scientific journal Nature.

5h

Appendix removal tied to decreased Parkinson's disease risk in about 20 percent of cases

A large-scale epidemiological analysis of more than one million individuals from Sweden has demonstrated that removal of the appendix is associated with reduced risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) in almost 20 percent of cases, a finding that implicates the tiny organ as a contributor to the onset of the condition.

5h

Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic animals — cattle, sheep, and goat — made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrg

5h

The ESRF cryo-electron microscope bears fruit in its first year

In November 2017, a Titan Krios cryo-electron microscope (cryo-EM) was inaugurated at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, France. Data collected on this cryo-EM features in a Nature publication describing the activation cycle of a serotonin receptor, which is targeted by medication against chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea.

5h

WSU researchers discover new clues on how sleep works in the brain

Star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes appear to play an essential role in sleep, a new study by scientists from the Washington State University Sleep and Performance Research Center confirms. Published today in PLOS Genetics, their study shows that astrocytes communicate to neurons to regulate sleep time in fruit flies and suggests it may do the same in mammals, including humans.

5h

Nanostraws deliver molecules to human cells safely and efficiently

Miniscule nanostraws could help solve the problem of how to deliver precise doses of molecules directly into many cells at once.

5h

Controlling future summer weather extremes still within our grasp

Continued burning of fossil fuels is likely to fuel even more extreme summers than that of 2018 because of its impact on the jet stream. The rapid disappearance of aerosols produced by pollution may, however, mitigate the impact until mid-century if countries like China phase out these fuels, according to an international team of climate scientists using climate models to predict changes in the oc

5h

Researchers discover earliest recorded lead exposure in 250,000-year-old Neanderthal teeth

Using evidence found in teeth from two Neanderthals from southeastern France, researchers from the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report the earliest evidence of lead exposure in an extinct human-like species from 250,000 years ago.

5h

Prof Kneebone is the right man for the job | Brief letters

Posy Simmonds | Universal credit | Village for sale | Surgical education | Free Telegraph | Amazing words Your article ( Review , 26 October) says Posy Simmonds “has been delighting readers with her exquisitely drawn comic strips and novels since the 1970s, when she began to lampoon the Guardian-reading bourgeoisie in a long-running comic strip that grew into Mrs Weber’s Diary”. But before that, S

5h

Parkinson’s disease could originate in appendix, study finds

Appendix removal early in life linked to a 19% reduced risk of developing the illness Parkinson’s disease could originate in the appendix, according to one of the largest studies of the neurodegenerative illness. The analysis of health records of more than 1 million individuals in Sweden found that having the appendix removed early in life is linked to a 19% reduced risk of developing Parkinson’s

5h

Paralysed men can stand and walk after electrical stimulation

Two patients can walk short distances on crutches after having pulses beamed into their spines Two men who were paralysed in separate accidents more than six years ago can stand and walk short distances on crutches after their spinal cords were treated with electrical stimulation. David Mzee, 28, and Gert-Jan Oskam, 35, had electrical pulses beamed into their spines to stimulate their leg muscles

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Greeks are the most chauvinist Europeans

Survey by Pew Research Center shows great variation in chauvinism across Europe Eight most chauvinist countries are in the east, and include Russia British much more likely than French (and slightly more likely than Germans) to say their culture is 'superior' to others Do you think your culture is superior to that of people elsewhere? Across Europe, that question is answered with a remarkable deg

5h

UT students' startups land share of $50,000 entrepreneurship cash

Texas undergraduate teams pitched their startup ideas recently at the University of Texas-Austin to win their share of $50,000.

5h

Tales From The Bering Sea: Hole In The Boat | Deadliest Catch

Jake Anderson knows you just don't say HOLE and BOAT in the same sentence. Ever. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DeadliestCatch https://twitter

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5h

Forskere: Verdens sidste vilde natur er ved at forsvinde

Tab af levesteder er den største trussel mod biodiversitet både globalt og i Danmark, siger dansk professor.

5h

Controlling future summer weather extremes still within our grasp

Continued burning of fossil fuels is likely to fuel even more extreme summers than that of 2018 because of its impact on the jet stream. The rapid disappearance of aerosols produced by pollution may, however, mitigate the impact until mid-century if countries like China phase out these fuels, according to an international team of climate scientists using climate models to predict changes in the oc

5h

Researchers discover earliest recorded lead exposure in 250,000-year-old Neanderthal teeth

Using evidence found in teeth from two Neanderthals from southeastern France, researchers from the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report the earliest evidence of lead exposure in an extinct human-like species from 250,000 years ago.

5h

'Nanostraws' deliver molecules to human cells safely and efficiently

Researchers can design the perfect molecule to edit a gene, treat cancer or guide the development of a stem cell, but none of that will matter in the end if they can't get their molecules into the human cells they want to manipulate. The solution to that problem, described in a study published October 31 in Science Advances, could be miniscule nanostraws, tiny glass-like protrusions which poke equ

5h

World's last wilderness may vanish

The world's last wilderness areas are rapidly disappearing, with explicit international conservation targets critically needed, according to University of Queensland-led research.

5h

Researchers see signs of interactive form of quantum matter

JILA researchers have, for the first time, isolated groups of a few atoms and precisely measured their multi-particle interactions within an atomic clock. The advance will help scientists control interacting quantum matter, which is expected to boost the performance of atomic clocks, many other types of sensors, and quantum information systems.

5h

Dinosaurs put all colored birds' eggs in one basket, evolutionarily speaking

A new study says the colors found in modern birds' eggs did not evolve independently, as previously thought, but evolved instead from dinosaurs.

5h

Changes to RNA aid the process of learning and memory

RNA carries pieces of instructions encoded in DNA to coordinate the production of proteins that will carry out the work to be done in a cell. But the process isn't always straightforward. Chemical modifications to DNA or RNA can alter the way genes are expressed without changing the actual genetic sequences. These epigenetic or epitranscriptome changes can affect many biological processes such as

5h

Ballistic beetles seek safety in numbers by sheltering with other species

A group of ground beetles known as bombardier beetles are famous for shooting a boiling-hot, noxious liquid at would-be attackers, but despite their formidable defense, they prefer not to shelter alone, according to a study publishing October 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jason Schaller and colleagues from the University of Arizona in Tucson.

5h

Baby-naming trends reveal ongoing quest for individuality

Choosing a baby's name that is distinctive is becoming harder, research reveals.

5h

Major corridor of Silk Road already home to high-mountain herders over 4,000 years ago

Using ancient proteins and DNA recovered from tiny pieces of animal bone, archaeologists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History (MPI-SHH) and the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography (IAET) at the Russian Academy of Sciences-Siberia have discovered evidence that domestic cattle, sheep and goats made their way into the high mountain corridors of southern Kyrgyzstan more th

5h

Astronomers discover the giant that shaped the early days of our Milky Way

Some 10 billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way's halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form. A description of this mega-merger, discovered by an international team led by University of Groningen astronomer Amina Helmi, is now published in the scientific journal Nature.

5h

Cryo-EM reveals structure and mechanism of the 5-HT3 receptor

In November 2017, a Titan Krios cryo-electron microscope (cryo-EM) was inaugurated at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, France. Data collected on this cryo-EM features in a Nature publication describing the activation cycle of a serotonin receptor targeted by medication against chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea.

5h

Earth's oceans have absorbed 60 percent more heat than previously thought

For each year during the past quarter century, the world's oceans have absorbed an amount of heat energy that is 150 times the energy humans produce as electricity annually, according to a study led by researchers at Princeton and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California-San Diego. The strong ocean warming the researchers found suggests that Earth is more sensitive t

5h

Naturally occurring 'batteries' fueled organic carbon synthesis on Mars

Mars' organic carbon may have originated from a series of electrochemical reactions between briny liquids and volcanic minerals, according to new analyses of three Martian meteorites from a team led by Carnegie's Andrew Steele published in Science Advances.

5h

What happened in the past when the climate changed?

Once again, humanity might be well served to take heed from a history lesson. When the climate changed, when crops failed and famine threatened, the peoples of ancient Asia responded. They moved. They started growing different crops. They created new trade networks and innovated their way to solutions in other ways too.

5h

Flexy, flat and functional magnets

In the nanoworld, magnetism has proven to be truly surprising. Magnetic 2-D materials just a few atoms thick could provide a substrate for ever-smaller post-silicon electronics. An international research team led by Park Je-Geun at the Center for Correlated Electron Systems, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), has just published a Perspective Review paper in Nature presenting the latest

5h

Portugal bans use of wild circus animals

Portugal has banned the use of wild animals in circuses by 2024 with a new law passed by parliament and applauded by animal rights groups.

5h

Nerve Stimulation Gives Paralyzed People Ability to Walk

Precisely timed electrical stimulation and intensive rehabilitation restore some capacity to walk among three men more than four years after their debilitating injuries.

6h

A new robot decides how and when to transform to get the job done

A bot made of smaller robotic pieces autonomously changes its shape to trundle across flat ground, squeeze into tight spaces or climb stairs.

6h

The appendix is implicated in Parkinson’s disease

Removal of the appendix reduced the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, an analysis of nearly 1.7 million health records in Sweden suggests.

6h

60,000-year-old skeleton hints that Neanderthals stood straight

The first-ever 3D virtual reconstruction of the rib cage of the most complete Neanderthal skeleton unearthed to date may shed new light on how ancient humans moved and breathed. Researchers focused on the thorax—the area of the body that contains the rib cage and upper spine, which forms a cavity to house the heart and lungs. Using CT scans of fossils from an approximately 60,000-year-old male sk

6h

Wearable heating pad with nanowires to conduct heat

Sometimes nothing feels better on stiff, aching joints than a little heat. But many heating pads and wraps are rigid and provide uneven warmth, especially when the person is moving around. Researchers have now made a wearable heater by modifying woven Kevlar® fabric with nanowires that conduct and retain heat.

6h

Could bariatric surgery make men more virile?

Men who have undergone bariatric surgery as a long-term way of losing weight might also benefit from increased testosterone levels post-surgery. However, there is no evidence that the sperm quality of a patient improves.

6h

Cytokine levels could predict immunotherapy problems

Researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers that may help identify those patients at greatest risk of developing autoimmune side effects from the treatment.

6h

Another exec out amid sex harrassment tension at Google

Google-parent Alphabet on Wednesday confirmed that an executive accused of sexual harassment left the company without an exit package as tension over its handling of such matters heightened.

6h

GM reports strong profits, lifting shares

General Motors profits eclipsed expectations in the latest quarter, despite the impact of tariffs and slipping sales volume, as the company unveiled a plan on Wednesday to cut jobs and reduce costs.

6h

A record-long polymer DNA negative

A fragment of a single strand of DNA, built of the nucleobases cytosine and guanine, can be imprinted in a polymer – this has been shown by chemists from Warsaw, Denton and Milan. The resulting artificial negative, with a record-long length, functions chemically like a normal strand of deoxyribonucleic acid. This achievement finally confirms the possibility of creating polymer imprints of DNA, fun

6h

Bose-Einstein condensate generated in space for the first time

Scientists have created a Bose-Einstein condensate for the first time in space on board a research rocket.

6h

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar

Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label.

6h

Location of wastewater disposal drives induced seismicity at US oil sites

The depth of the rock layer that serves as the disposal site for wastewater produced during unconventional oil extraction plays a significant role in whether that disposal triggers earthquakes in the U.S., according to a new study that takes a broad look at the issue.

6h

Hubble reveals a giant cosmic 'Bat Shadow'

Shadows on Earth can be mysterious and foreboding, but when they occur in space, they can convey information we otherwise could not know. In a stellar nursery called the Serpens Nebula, nearly 1,300 light-years away, a young star's game of shadow play is revealing secrets of its unseen planet-forming disk. The near-infrared vision of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured the shadow cast by the fl

6h

EU countries back single-use plastics ban

EU countries on Wednesday backed the outlawing of certain single-use plastics, bringing the bloc a step closer to an outright ban on the products which account for huge quantities of waste in the world's oceans.

6h

Without a Proof, Mathematicians Wonder How Much Evidence Is Enough

Four researchers have recently come out with a model that upends the conventional wisdom in their field. They have used intensive computational data to suggest that for decades, if not longer, prevailing opinion about a fundamental concept has been wrong. These are not biologists, climatologists or physicists. They don’t come from a field in which empirical models get a say in determining what co

6h

Machines that learn language more like kids do

Researchers describe a parser that learns through observation to more closely mimic a child's language-acquisition process, which could greatly extend the parser's capabilities.

6h

Location of wastewater disposal drives induced seismicity at US oil sites

The depth of the rock layer that serves as the disposal site for wastewater produced during unconventional oil extraction plays a significant role in whether that disposal triggers earthquakes in the US, according to a new study that takes a broad look at the issue.

6h

Hubble reveals cosmic Bat Shadow in the Serpent's Tail

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has captured part of the wondrous Serpens Nebula, lit up by the star HBC 672. This young star casts a striking shadow — nicknamed the Bat Shadow — on the nebula behind it, revealing telltale signs of its otherwise invisible protoplanetary disc.

6h

Diagnosing and treating personality disorders needs a dynamic approach

New UC Davis research suggests that lumping those with personality disorders into a package of traits should be left behind for more dynamic analysis instead.

6h

Off-patent drug appears promising as broad-spectrum antifungal

By screening a library of off-patent drugs, scientists have identified a compound with promising broad-spectrum antifungal activity. The compound, alexidine dihydrochloride, warrants further development as a pan-fungal, anti-biofilm drug, according to the research reported in the journal mSphere.

6h

Law enforcement faces dilemma in assessing online threats

Their anger is all over social media for the whole world to see, with rants about minorities, relationships gone bad or paranoid delusions about perceived slights.

6h

Burger King designs meaty-cheesy horror burger to induce nightmares

Burger King has released a Halloween burger called the 'Nightmare King' it claims is "clinically proven to induce nightmares." It ran a study in which 100 people ate a beef-chicken-bacon-cheese burger for 10 nights and had their REM monitored. It's an obvious PR gimmick, but it highlights how little we know about the exact link between food and dreams. None If you're a fan of the podcast My Broth

6h

9 people who were way ahead of their time

Sometimes, people are so far ahead of the curve that it takes everybody else hundreds of years to catch up to their ideas. While many people are content to quietly sit back and flow with popular opinion, these nine thinkers let the world know what it was doing wrong, often with major consequences. These great thinkers remind us that taking an unpopular, bold stance might not be madness. It's been

6h

For Halloween, Consider the Chocolate Midge

A tiny fly, related to biting no-see-ums, pollinates cacao trees and enables our chocolate cravings. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Justices weigh $8.5M settlement with $0 to 129M Google users

The Supreme Court is struggling over what to do about an $8.5 million class-action settlement involving Google and privacy concerns in which all the money went to lawyers and nonprofit groups and nothing was paid to 129 million people who used Google to perform internet searches.

6h

Vietnam rolls out web monitor to control 'false information'

Vietnam said Wednesday it has set up a web monitoring unit that can scan up to 100 million news items per day for "false information", in a move that tightens its grip on internet freedom.

6h

Salvage logging, planting not necessary to regenerate Douglas firs after Klamath fires

Researchers at Portland State University and Oregon State University looking at the aftermath of wildfires in southwestern Oregon and northern California found that after 20 years, even in severely burned areas, Douglas fir grew back on its own without the need for salvage logging and replanting.

6h

Scientists unlock secrets of falcon DNA

Researchers in the University of Kent have made significant strides towards understanding the genomes—and hence the biology—of falcons.

6h

NASA gets an infrared view of Hurricane Oscar

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean and gathered temperature data on Hurricane Oscar. The data showed the bulk of strong storms were in the northwestern quadrant as Oscar began transitioning into an extra-tropical storm.

6h

CloudSat gets a slice of Typhoon Yutu's eye

NASA's CloudSat satellite captured a stunning image of Typhoon Yutu as it passed over the eye of the storm. The storm has since weakened to a tropical storm.

6h

There’s no evidence that screen time makes surgeons bad at their job

A surgeon has claimed that screen time is hampering students’ manual dexterity. But studies suggest that, if anything, technology is good for their training

6h

Global Health: In Congo’s Ebola Outbreak, Experimental Treatments Are Proving Effective

More than half of the patients who received treatment survived, scientists reported.

6h

Kepler: Nasa's telescope that found new worlds has been retiredNASA Kepler Space Earth

Nasa's Kepler telescope, which has been looking for inhabitable worlds, has run out of fuel and will look no more.

6h

Too many fishers in the sea: The economic ceiling of artisanal fisheries

A new study shows that even if fishers used the most efficient and sustainable known practices, they wouldn't generate enough revenue to maintain a living above poverty level.

6h

Oxygen levels impact on species' ability and willingness to fight

Environmental conditions could play a major role in the instigation of fights within the animal kingdom, according to new research.

6h

Salvage logging, planting not necessary to regenerate Douglas-fir after Klamath fires

Researchers at Portland State University and Oregon State University looking at the aftermath of wildfires in southwestern Oregon and northern California found that after 20 years, even in severely burned areas, Douglas fir grew back on its own without the need for salvage logging and replanting

7h

Kent scientists unlock secrets of falcon DNA

Researchers in the University of Kent have made significant strides towards understanding the genomes — and hence the biology — of falcons.

7h

High-resolution MRI imaging inspired by the humble antenna

Radio frequency (RF) probes designed like by microstrip patch antennas create uniform and strong magnetic field in high frequency MRI machines, unlike convention coil and bird cage shaped coils used today. These probes, which were designed and tested at Michigan Technical University, also showed smaller radiation losses, making them competitive, even advantageous to conventional methods.

7h

Monitoring air pollution after Hurricane Maria

When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico on September 20, 2017, the storm devastated the island's electrical grid, leaving many people without power for months. This lack of electricity, as well as other storm-related damage, prevented air-quality monitoring in many areas. Now researchers have shown that low-cost sensors that run on solar energy can be used to monitor air pollution after a disaster

7h

Important biomedical microscopy technique can now image deeper into tissue

A recently developed technique known as light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has led to many biological discoveries by allowing researchers to create 3-D images of tissue, even live animal embryos, using fluorescent tags. Now, researchers report the ability to increase the imaging depth of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy with the use of an optical phenomenon known as three-photon absorption.

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Most detailed observations of material orbiting close to a black hole

ESO's exquisitely sensitive GRAVITY instrument has added further evidence to the long-standing assumption that a supermassive black hole lurks in the center of the Milky Way. New observations show clumps of gas swirling around at about 30 percent of the speed of light on a circular orbit just outside its event horizon — the first time material has been observed orbiting close to the point of no r

7h

Machines that learn language more like kids do

In a paper being presented at this week's Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing conference, MIT researchers describe a parser that learns through observation to more closely mimic a child's language-acquisition process, which could greatly extend the parser's capabilities.

7h

UA targeting rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare pediatric cancer with few treatment options

UA Cancer Center researcher harnesses 'big data' to identify targeted treatments for rhabdomyosarcoma, a rare cancer that mostly strikes children and teenagers.

7h

Inflammation can lead to circadian sleep disorders

Inflammation, which is the root cause of autoimmune disorders including arthritis, type 1 diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome and Crohn's disease, has unexpected effects on body clock function and can lead to sleep and shiftwork-type disorders, a new Northwestern Medicine study in mice found.

7h

Neuroscientists find molecular clue in ALS, suggesting potential new drug target

Houston Methodist researchers uncovered a link between motor neurons' inability to repair oxidative genome damage in ALS, suggesting that DNA ligase-targeted therapies may prevent or slowdown disease progression. The defect found was with DNA ligase III, an important enzyme for connecting single-stranded DNA breaks in mature neurons that, once worn out, are no longer capable of new growth or being

7h

Tracking Aedes aegypti across the ages with vector genomics

The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.

7h

Best practices in palliative care supported by growing evidence base, study finds

Best practices in the growing field of palliative care have been created on several occasions based upon consensus among experts. However, the latest version of palliative care clinical guidelines were aided by a systematic review of published research that found the evidence base for best practices in palliative care is larger than generally appreciated.

7h

Previously jailed vets at increased risk of suicide

Researchers are now looking at the healthcare services used by people who attempted suicide to find patterns that could help identify who is most at risk before an attempt is made.

7h

Cytokine levels could predict immunotherapy problems

Researchers at UT Southwestern have identified blood-based biomarkers that may help identify those patients at greatest risk of developing autoimmune side effects from the treatment.

7h

Too many fishers in the sea: The economic ceiling of artisanal fisheries

Researchers from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the University of British Columbia found that even if fishers used the most efficient and sustainable known practices, they wouldn't generate enough revenue to maintain a living above poverty level.

7h

NASA's CloudSat gets a slice of Typhoon Yutu's eye

NASA's CloudSat satellite captured a stunning image of Typhoon Yutu as it passed over the eye of the storm. The storm has since weakened to a tropical storm.

7h

NASA gets an infrared view of Hurricane Oscar

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the North Atlantic Ocean and gathered temperature data on Hurricane Oscar. The data showed the bulk of strong storms were in the northwestern quadrant as Oscar began transitioning into an extra-tropical storm.

7h

Roaches Kick Wasps in the Head to Avoid Becoming Zombies

Cockroaches use defensive moves against "zombifying" parasitic wasps.

7h

These Counties Could Determine Control of the House

This November, the Republican Party’s control of Congress is on the line. Democrats need to net 23 seats in the House to flip that chamber for the first time in eight years, and two seats in the Senate to wrest control from the GOP. Victory will be harder to reach in the latter body, where 10 of the seats Democrats are defending are in states Donald Trump carried in 2016. But recent shifts among

7h

Our food could cost us control over gut bacteria

Scientists have discovered that hosts starve their microbial denizens of nutrients, essentially forcing the microbes in our guts to do our bidding. Each of us is only half human. The other half is microbial. Trillions of viruses, fungi, bacteria and other microscopic organisms coat our skin and line our vital organs. We depend on these microbial communities to digest food, synthesize vitamins, bo

7h

We created a frankenhouse of the most common phobias

Science Explore the things that keep humanity up at night—and learn why they haunt us. What keeps you up at night? This frankenhouse is the ultimate fear factory, based on humanity’s most commonly diagnosed phobias. Learn why they get to us.

7h

How, When, and Whether to Use Cryotherapy

Cryotherapy is a recovery method that some pro athletes use nearly every day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Study links cottonseed oil with lower cholesterol

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found that a high-fat diet enriched with cottonseed oil drastically improved cholesterol profiles in young adult men.

7h

Time-lapse shows thirty years in the life of supernova 1987A

Yvette Cendes, a graduate student with the University of Toronto and the Leiden Observatory, has created a time-lapse showing the aftermath of Supernova 1987A over a 25-year period, from 1992 to 2017.

7h

Large cells for tiny leaves

In autumn, it is not only the colours that catch the eye, but also the different sizes and shapes of leaves. But what makes leaves of different plants differ so much in their shapes? Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have now discovered how a protein called LMI1 can control leaf growth and shape.

7h

Genes that could lead to improvement of beef cattle are identified

Researchers identify 35 genes associated with reproduction, milk composition, growth, meat and carcass, health or body conformation traits in Gir cattle.

7h

Neonatal birthweights increase in direct proportion to number of births

A new Tel Aviv University study finds that neonatal birthweights increase in direct proportion with the number of births of the mother in at least 30 percent of all cases. Large for gestational weight (LGA) babies are at risk for several neonatal complications, including jaundice, low sugar levels after birth and more.

7h

Oxygen levels impact on species' ability and willingness to fight

Scientists at the University of Plymouth have discovered that different flow regimes and oxygen levels within the marine environment are likely to result in conflict.

7h

Important biomedical microscopy technique can now image deeper into tissue

A recently developed technique known as light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has led to many biological discoveries by allowing researchers to create 3-D images of tissue, even live animal embryos, using fluorescent tags.

7h

Trading sex for sleep — Aging dormice shorten their hibernation for more reproduction

Edible dormice are extremely long-lived thanks to their seasonal dormancy with hibernation periods lasting between at six and eleven months. Factors influencing the variable duration, apart from specific environmental conditions, have so far been unknown. Researchers at Vetmeduni Vienna hypothesised that older animals should shorten their winter dormancy in favour of a reproductive advantage and c

7h

Could bariatric surgery make men more virile?

Men who have undergone bariatric surgery as a long-term way of losing weight might also benefit from increased testosterone levels post-surgery. However, there is no evidence that the sperm quality of a patient improves. These are the findings of a comprehensive review in the Springer journal Obesity Surgery, which is the official publication of the International Federation for the Surgery of Obes

7h

Study: Denosumab effective in treating osteoporosis in transfusion dependent thalassemia

For patients with osteoporosis caused by transfusion-dependent thalassemia (TDT), a twice-yearly injection appears to improve spinal bone mineral density, according to a new study.

7h

America Can’t Seem to Kick Its Racist Costume Habit

“When you know better, you do better,” the old adage goes, and colleges are working hard to make sure that their students know not to wear racist or offensive costumes this year. The University of Oklahoma sent a memo reminding students that costumes should be “designed respectfully.” The University of Wisconsin at Madison told students that they’re free to wear what they want, but “racist, crude

7h

The Everlasting Joy of Terrifying Children

I n childhood, when the hours unravel slowly and answers to questions are often unsatisfying, literature is a rejoinder for restlessness. For the generation of readers that devoured R. L. Stine’s serialized horror, the witching hour meant binge-reading campy paperbacks with titles such as One Evil Summer , The Wrong Number , Bad Dreams , and Truth or Dare . Stine accomplished something that is st

7h

What Kanye West’s Trump Phase Meant

Kanye … recants? “My eyes are now wide open and now realize I’ve been used to spread messages I don’t believe in,” the rapper tweeted Tuesday night. “I am distancing myself from politics and completely focusing on being creative !!!” His tweet has been taken as a disavowal of Donald Trump, which it may or may not fully be: The “messages” West doesn’t believe in aren’t specified. But remarkably, a

7h

US Homeland Security Dogs Face a Growing Occupational Risk: A Nasty Parasite

A surprising number of dogs working for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security are infected with this parasite, according to a new study.

7h

Hawaii top court approves controversial Thirty Meter Telescope

Construction had halted in 2015 amid protests from native Hawaiians who consider the land sacred.

7h

Swift Stone Skippers Could in Theory Skip 100s of Skips

Kurt Steiner holds the record for the most consecutive skips of a stone—but physics suggests the upper limit is actually much higher.

7h

Monitoring air pollution after Hurricane Maria

When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017, the storm devastated the island's electrical grid, leaving many people without power for months. This lack of electricity, as well as other storm-related damage, prevented air-quality monitoring in many areas. Now researchers have shown that low-cost sensors that run on solar energy can be used to monitor air pollution after a disaster. Th

7h

The materials engineers are developing environmentally friendly materials

Recently the research article "A method for producing conductive graphene biopolymer nanofibrous fabrics by exploitation of an ionic liquid dispersant in electrospinning" written by the researchers of Tallinn University of Technology was published in a leading peer-reviewed journal Carbon.

7h

CNIO finds the origin of a type of thrombocytopenia caused by an oncogene

This work has allowed to understand, through the study of MASTL protein, the molecular origin of inherited thrombocytopenia in some patients and to successfully explore therapeutic options on a mouse model.MASTL controls the cytoskeleton, the structure that gives cells their shape and governs their mobility and capacity for grouping.Abnormalities in the cytoskeleton of tumor cells facilitate their

7h

Pain sensitization increases risk of persistent knee pain

Becoming more sensitive to pain, or pain sensitization, is an important risk factor for developing persistent knee pain in osteoarthritis (OA), according to a new study by researchers from the Université de Montréal (UdeM) School of Rehabilitation and Hôpital Maisonneuve Rosemont Research Centre (CRHMR) in collaboration with researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM).

7h

Understanding endometriosis

About 10 percent of women worldwide suffer from endometriosis, a painful and debilitating disease with inadequate treatments. Currently, doctors don't know what causes the condition, which occurs when endometrial tissue escapes the uterus and forms lesions on other organs. But scientists are working hard to better understand the disease and develop new diagnostic tests and medicines, according to

7h

Human Pressures Have Shrunk Wildlife Populations by 60 Percent

In 40 years, human actions like deforestation have taken a major toll on wildlife, a new report finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

To Stave Off Winter's Chill, Honeybees Hug

When staying warm is a matter of survival, they use this tried-and-true strategy. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

A bullet-proof heating pad

Sometimes nothing feels better on stiff, aching joints than a little heat. But many heating pads and wraps are rigid and provide uneven warmth, especially when the person is moving around. Researchers have now made a wearable heater by modifying woven Kevlar fabric with nanowires that conduct and retain heat. They report their results in ACS' journal Nano Letters.

8h

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar

Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label. The researchers report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

8h

Hotspot discovery proves Canadian astrophysicist's black hole theory

The recent detection of flares circling black holes has proven a decade-old theory co-developed by a Canadian physicist about how black holes grow and consume matter.

8h

5 ways to keep your teeth cavity-free

Sweet foods and drinks are hard to avoid around Halloween, but it’s not only our general health that suffers. These treats also have consequences for our oral health, and can lead to cavities—the most prevalent chronic disease in both children and adults. Research shows a clear link between our food habits and the health of our teeth and gums, but dentists and nutritionists have traditionally had

8h

World's longest DNA sequence decoded

A team of UK scientists have claimed the record for decoding the world's longest DNA sequence.

8h

Timelapse shows twenty-five years in the life of one the most studied objects in astronomy: Supernova 1987a

Since it first appeared in the southern night sky on February 24th 1987, Supernova 1987A has been one of the most studied objects in the history of astronomy.

8h

Direktiv går imod dansk ønske: Plastlåg skal sidde fast på flasker

Miljø- og fødevareminister Jakob Ellemann-Jensen får ikke held med at få Danmark undtaget for kommende regler, der skal begrænse plastforurening.

8h

A bullet-proof heating pad

Sometimes nothing feels better on stiff, aching joints than a little heat. But many heating pads and wraps are rigid and provide uneven warmth, especially when the person is moving around. Researchers have now made a wearable heater by modifying woven Kevlar® fabric with nanowires that conduct and retain heat. They report their results in ACS' journal Nano Letters.

8h

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar

Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label. The researchers report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry .

8h

New report finds tropical disease causing heart problems in dogs assisting with homeland security duties

More than 100 working dogs employed by the federal government across the United States have been infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease, which may lead to heart problems, according to a new study presented today at the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. Chagas disease is a tropical infection spread by a blood-sucking triato

8h

High-end solutions to extreme climate change in a new online resource

With climate change becoming an increasingly hot topic globally, the EU-funded project IMPRESSIONS launches a new online resource to provide a scientifically robust and policy-relevant understanding of the nature and scale of more extreme and long-term consequences of climate and socio-economic change, and guide the use of this knowledge by decision-makers working on adaptation, mitigation and sus

8h

The internet is taking over a person’s life for Halloween. And you can be a part of it.

An MIT experiment is handing a single person’s free will to the crowd to test how the digital hive mind works.

8h

New insight into the mechanism of the drug against sclerosis and psoriasis

A multidisciplinary research team at Aarhus University has provided fundamental new insight into the mechanism of the medical drug dimethyl fumarate, which is the active component of important treatments for multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. The results contribute to the development of new strategies for drug discovery.

8h

Cold therapy offers promising prevention against taxane-induced dermatologic events

Researchers at the George Washington University found skin cooling methods may be the best preventative intervention against taxane-based chemotherapy side effects.

8h

Prenatal exposures to medication affecting brain neurotransmitter systems and risk of ASD

An exploratory study that examined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk and prenatal exposure to medications that affect neurotransmitters, including the typical targets of antidepressants and antipsychotics, suggests that most medications weren't associated with higher estimates of ASD risk. The study used data from a large health maintenance organization in Israel for an analytic sample that incl

8h

Common medications taken during pregnancy are not associated with risk for autism

New method developed by Mount Sinai team allows systematic study of effects of a wide range of drugs on the developing fetus.

8h

New report finds tropical disease causing heart problems in dogs assisting with homeland security duties

More than 100 working dogs employed by the federal government across the United States have been infected with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease, which may lead to heart problems, according to a new study presented today at the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) Annual Meeting. Chagas disease is a tropical infection spread by a blood-sucking triato

8h

Rose geranium oil may ease common painful nasal symptoms linked to cancer treatment

Rose geranium oil may help to ease the symptoms of nasal vestibulitis, a common and painful nasal condition linked to cancer drug treatment, according to the results of a small observational study, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.

8h

Behold the mighty elephant bird, blindly crashing through the Madagascan forest

Science Sightless, flightless, and 10 feet tall. Islands breed strange animals. Isolated from the rest of the world, these ecosystems often produce creatures uniquely adapted to their idiosyncratic environments.

8h

Physical and human capital rather than military spending key for economic growth in Russia: study

Investment in education, healthcare, sports, road infrastructure and transportation, rather than national defense and, to a lesser extent, national security and law enforcement, is what drives economic growth rates and GDP level upwards in Russia, suggests a recent analysis of government expenditure data gathered between 2002 and 2016.

8h

8h

Blockchain tech is new hot topic for universities around the world

Blockchain is becoming more prevalent and with it, the need for blockchain developers, opening up an entirely new job market. More universities are jumping on the band wagon and offering courses on blockchain development Courses you can learn and how you can use the advancement of blockchain to get ahead According to new research carried out by Coinbase , we're witnessing a significant rise in th

8h

The blockchain phone is coming…but what does it mean?

Blockchain has made some huge popularity gains over the past couple of years, but the concept of a blockchain phone still remains quite a mystery. We're both baffled that so many companies are trying to bring this concept to reality, and also surprised that it's taken this long and we don't already have a fully working model. What is the Blockchain Phone, and Which Companies Are Developing It? Th

8h

Illuminating the Dark Web

It might sound scary, but the ‘dark web’ is not much different from the rest of the internet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Why polarized politicians can represent citizens best

Do ideologically extreme politicians deemed "polarized" misrepresent a more moderate populace? According to the article "The Delegate Paradox: Why Polarized Politicians Can Represent Citizens Best" published in the October 2018 issue The Journal of Politics by Douglas J. Ahler and David E. Broockman, that's not the case. In fact, they argue, enacting campaign finance or election reform to reduce p

8h

These Images Are Not a Horror Movie Gone Wrong

They're photographs meant to deconstruct how we look at bodies.

8h

This part of the brain suppresses fear

Scientists have identified a part of the brain involved in inhibiting fear, a discovery that holds potential for helping patients with psychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The findings of a new study, which appears in Nature Communications , shows that a small brain region in the thalamus called the nucleus reuniens plays a role in inhibiting fear in rats. Prior to

8h

Photos in social media reveal socio-cultural value of landscapes

Every day, users upload millions of photos on platforms, such as Flickr, Instagram or Facebook. A study of researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) now shows that these photos can be used to assess the social importance of certain landscapes. For this purpose, they developed a new image analysis method based on artificial intelligence. The results might be of particular importance fo

9h

Dolutegravir, an alternative first-line HIV treatment for low and middle-income countries

Two years after its launch, NAMSAL (New Antiretroviral and Monitoring Strategies in HIV-infected Adults in Low-income countries), by the French Agency for Research on AIDS and Viral Hepatitis (ANRS), is yielding its first results.

9h

Physical and human capital rather than military spending key for economic growth in Russia

Investment in education, healthcare, sports, road infrastructure and transportation, rather than national defense and, to a lesser extent, national security and law enforcement, is what drives economic growth rates upwards in Russia, suggests a recent analysis of government expenditure data gathered between 2002 and 2016. The empirical study, conducted by Dr Alexey Kudrin and Dr Alexander Knobel,

9h

Why polarized politicians can represent citizens best

Do ideologically extreme politicians deemed 'polarized' misrepresent a more moderate populace? According to the article 'The Delegate Paradox: Why Polarized Politicians Can Represent Citizens Best' published in the October 2018 issue The Journal of Politics by Douglas J. Ahler and David E. Broockman, that's not the case. In fact, they argue, enacting campaign finance or election reform to reduce p

9h

Supplemental issue honors the life and scholarship of Nobel Laureate Gary S. Becker

A special supplement to the most recent issue of the Journal of Political Economy (JPE) (October 2018) commemorates the life and work of the late Nobel laureate Gary S. Becker. The issue contains contributions from economists such as fellow Nobel laureate and JPE editor James J. Heckman, as well as Richard Blundell, Edward P. Lazear, Pierre-Andre Chiappori, Monica Costa Dias, James Liang, John Eri

9h

The Trump Administration Flunked Its Math Homework

One of the White House’s most consequential environmental rollbacks may be in self-inflicted legal danger. In trying to freeze gas-mileage rules for new cars and trucks, Trump officials have hit an unusually damaging snag: They seem to have messed up their math homework. The Trump administration’s official case for repealing car fuel-economy rules is riddled with calculation mistakes, indefensibl

9h

AI systems shed light on root cause of religious conflict: Humanity is not naturally violent

Artificial intelligence can help us to better understand the causes of religious violence and to potentially control it, according to new research. The study combined computer modelling and cognitive psychology to create an AI system able to mimic human religiosity, allowing them to better understand the conditions, triggers and patterns for religious violence.

9h

After 10 Years, Bitcoin Has Changed Everything—and Nothing

It all started when the pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto published a white paper outlining a digital currency, secured by something called the blockchain.

9h

The science of studying the effects of extraordinary beliefs on consumer behavior

The study of superstition and other extraordinary beliefs in the marketplace brings challenges and opportunities for the enhancement of consumer well-being. In "Superstition, Ethics, and Transformative Consumer Research," published in the October issue of the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, Stuart Vyse examines the ethical issues involved in research on consumer superstitions and

9h

This 4,500-Year-Old Ramp Contraption May Have Been Used to Build Egypt's Great Pyramid

Archaeologists may have discovered the system used to haul massive stone blocks into place for Egypt's most massive pyramid.

9h

The Blockchain Phone Is Coming…But What Does it Mean?

Blockchain has made some huge popularity gains over the past couple of years, but the concept of a blockchain phone still remains quite a mystery. We're both baffled that so many companies are trying to bring this concept to reality, and also surprised that it's taken this long and we don't already have a fully working model. What is the Blockchain Phone, and Which Companies Are Developing It? Th

9h

Bose-Einstein condensate generated in space for the first time

A team of scientists from Germany has succeeded in creating a Bose-Einstein condensate for the first time in space on board a research rocket.

9h

Colectomy associated with increased risk of diabetes

People who have had a colectomy have increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals have shown in a new study analysing data from more than 46,000 citizens. The researchers hope this new knowledge may pave the way for new ways of preventing and treating the disease.

9h

Scholars: Estonian soil is surprisingly rich in species

A new study shows that Estonian soils can be very rich in species.

9h

The science of studying the effects of extraordinary beliefs on consumer behavior

The study of superstition and other extraordinary beliefs in the marketplace brings challenges and opportunities for the enhancement of consumer well-being. In 'Superstition, Ethics, and Transformative Consumer Research,' published in the October issue of the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research, Stuart Vyse examines the ethical issues involved in research on consumer superstitions and

9h

Vind-giganter vil sikre billigere vindkraft med ens tårne og fundamenter

Vinger, nav, nacelle og styring vil de store producenter af vindmøller dog ikke standardisere.

9h

A Supreme Court Impeachment Fight That's Already Under Way

C ourts, it is often remarked, control neither armies nor treasuries. Their power comes from their legitimacy—by the collective respect won by their credibility and independence. After the bitter, partisan confirmation fight of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, many Americans see that legitimacy as under threat . Battles for the credibility and independence of the courts have also been takin

9h

Giant flightless birds were nocturnal and possibly blind

If you encountered an elephant bird today, it would be hard to miss. Measuring in at over 10 feet tall, the extinct avian is the largest bird known to science. However, while you looked up in awe, it's likely that the big bird would not be looking back. According to a brain reconstruction, the part of the elephant bird brain that processed vision was tiny, a trait that indicates they were nocturna

9h

A fully human system to cultivate skin cells for grafting

Researchers have, for the first time, successfully cultured skin cells from human tissue-proteins to produce skin grafts for safer treatment of severe burns. The new technique could potentially replace the decades-old method of culturing skin grafts from combined human and animal biological material — the latter is considered high-risk under pharmaceutical GMP standards and the resulting 'xenogra

9h

Uhyggeligt men sandt: Grusomme parasitter forvandler dyr til zombier

Paralyserede mariehøns og fårekyllinger, der tvinges til selvmord. Her er fire kryb, der bliver til zombier, når parasitter overtager deres krop.

9h

How tech companies deceive you into giving up your data and privacy | Finn Lützow-Holm Myrstad

Have you ever actually read the terms and conditions for the apps you use? Finn Lützow-Holm Myrstad and his team at the Norwegian Consumer Council have, and it took them nearly a day and a half to read the terms of all the apps on an average phone. In a talk about the alarming ways tech companies deceive their users, Myrstad shares insights about the personal information you've agreed to let compa

9h

Want to eat more sustainably? Try the squid

New research shows how cephalopods—including squid, octopus, and cuttlefish—could become an important and sustainable food source in the future. Among chefs and researchers in gastronomy there is a growing interest in exploring local waters in order to use resources in a more diverse and sustainable manner, including using the cephalopod population as a counterweight to the dwindling fishing of b

9h

Machine learning improves accuracy of particle identification at LHC

Scientists from the Higher School of Economics have developed a method that allows physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to separate between various types of elementary particles with a high degree of accuracy. The results were published in the Journal of Physics. http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1742-6596/1085/4/042036/meta

9h

A new pharmacological molecule improves the safety of canine sedation and anaesthesia

Vatinoxan reduces the adverse effects on the cardiovascular system of pharmacological agents used for animal sedation and anaesthesia. Also, other drugs achieve their therapeutic effect faster when administered simultaneously with vatinoxan.

9h

Ultrasensitive toxic gas detector

In a paper published in NANO, researchers from the School of Microelectronics in Tianjin University have discovered a two-step sputtering and subsequent annealing treatment method to prepare vertically aligned WO3-CuO core-shell nanorod arrays which can detect toxic NH3 gas.

9h

Eco-friendly waterproof polymer films synthesized using novel method

In a NANO paper published in NANO, a researcher from the Department of Chemistry at Myongji University has applied a novel method to control the wettability of polymeric substrates, which has numerous practical implications.

9h

Strong ability to detect and perceive motion may prevent pilot disorientation

A new study led by researchers at Massachusetts Eye and Ear found that good performance on a piloting task was associated with lower vestibular thresholds, which represent stronger ability to sense and perceive information about motion, balance and spatial orientation. Published online today in the Journal of Neurophysiology, the findings suggest that astronauts or pilots with higher vestibular th

9h

Are we losing one of our biggest CO2 sinks?

Seagrasses help to buffer against climate change, but we are losing a soccer field size seagrass area every 30 minutes.

9h

The Longterm Solution to Voter Suppression

News stories on voting this campaign season have focused on suppression tactics that make casting a ballot more difficult for citizens. Less appreciated is the fact that next week’s midterm elections could result in a vast expansion of voting rights. All told, the expansion measures could broaden the franchise more than current suppression measures shrink it. These opportunities come via voter in

9h

Venice is flooded, but other cities are in much greater danger

Venice has flooded. But while worry about the worst floods in a decade and warnings about the impacts of climate change and sea level rise dominate most of the media coverage, there's a more complex story to be told.

9h

Scary giant blue stars may unlock mysteries of stellar evolution

Imagine a single star more luminous than a million suns, erupting every few decades in a massive flare that shines as bright as a supernova. But the blast, as ferocious as it is, does not obliterate the tumultuous star. It remains, its surface roiling with violence as spasms rock its inner layers. Soon enough the star will end its suffering in a final titanic blast, but before it does, it must suf

9h

Language Barrier Means Millions Of Elderly Can't Access Alzheimer's Trials

In the U.S., Alzheimer's clinical trials are largely limited to fluent English speakers, which leaves millions of patients without the opportunity to participate and scientists without diverse data. (Image credit: Richard Bailey/Getty Images)

9h

Three types of depression identified

Scientists have used brain imaging to identify three sub-types of depression — including one that is unresponsive to commonly prescribed serotonin boosting drugs.

9h

Akutlæger glæder sig over »visionært« akutudspil fra regionerne

Danske Regioners bud på fremtidens akutområde med tanker om én fælles indgang til området og en ny sygeplejeuddannelse begejstrer formand for Dansk Selskab for Akutmedicin.

9h

Region Sjælland finder job til yderligere 40-50 fyrede medarbejdere

Det er lykkedes Region Sjælland at finde op mod 90-100 stillinger i regionen til de 317 varslede fyrede medarbejdere.

9h

E-cigarettes: The new hazardous waste

Single-use plastic straws, bags and coffee pods have captured the attention of the public and legislatures looking to ban products that wind up littering the landscape. But at the same time, e-cigarettes have begun to show up on streets and shores, catching officials off-guard and presenting the challenge of how to deal with litter that is part-recyclable and part-hazardous waste.

9h

Things We Loved This Month: The Pixel 3, Surface Pro 6, and New iPad

Plus: wireless headphones, a sweet Specialized bike, and a pair of magical sunglasses.

9h

More black South Africans are donating blood

Before 2005, blood donations from black South Africans were used selectively and often discarded, due to the higher recorded rates of HIV infection in the black population. In October 2005, SANBS became the first blood service in the world to implement individual donation nucleic acid testing nationawide. An analysis of ten years of data shows a substantial increase in the number and proportion of

10h

Reproducing pediatric kidney disease from human iPS cells

Scientists in Japan have found a skeleton key for congenital kidney disease research. Using iPS cells generated from the skin cells of a patient with a nephrin mutation, scientists have successfully developed kidney tissue that exhibits the early stages of congenital kidney disease. Since nephrin abnormalities are commonly found in other types of kidney diseases, these results are expected to unlo

10h

Cocaine adulterant may cause brain damage

People who regularly take cocaine cut with the animal anti-worming agent levamisole demonstrate impaired cognitive performance and a thinned prefrontal cortex. These findings from two recent studies at the University of Zurich indicate that levamisole could have a toxic effect on the brain. Drug-checking programs should therefore be expanded, argue the researchers.

10h

Microplastics in food — Many unanswered questions among scientists and the general public

Although overall 75 percent of the population regard food as safe, more and more Germans are showing concern about microplastics in food. As the latest BfR Consumer Monitor — a regular population survey conducted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) — shows, the topic is better known and more people are concerned about it than they were six months ago.

10h

The Mincle receptor provides protective immunity against Group A Streptococcus

Group A Streptococcus (GAS) causes invasive infections that result in high mortality. Despite being susceptible to many antibiotics, GAS continues to cause devastating infections. Here, the immune receptor, Mincle, was activated by exposure to components of GAS. Osaka University-led researchers found that DGDG, a glycolipid produced by GAS, inhibited activation of Mincle and contributed to immune

10h

A 31-year global diurnal sea surface temperature dataset

A dataset of hourly sea surface temperature (SST) from the period Jan. 1, 1982 to Dec. 31, 2012, and covering the global ocean at a resolution of 0.3° × 0.3°, was created using a validated ocean mixed-layer model (MLSST).

10h

To avoid becoming zombies, these roaches kick wasps

When the American cockroach faces zombification at the sting of the emerald jewel wasp, it fights back, using its hind legs to deliver a powerful kick, according to new research. A sting to the brain from the emerald jewel wasp turns the roach into a placid egg carrier and then larvae chow, so the kick can be the difference between life and a horrifying death. Ken Catania, a professor of biologic

10h

How Fake Blood Is Made to Look So Real

For Halloween, stage blood takes the spotlight and chemistry tricks can treat viewers.

10h

The Real Origins of Birthright Citizenship

Birthright citizenship just might be, former slaves believed, the safeguard they needed. In the decades before the Civil War, in an era when a remedy like the Fourteenth Amendment was hard to imagine, free black Americans embraced the view that they were citizens by virtue of having been born on U.S. soil. It was a lofty claim, especially because the Constitution was largely silent on the matter

10h

How a team of biologists is taking on an infestation and saving a species from extinction

Eggs hatching. Larvae burrowing under the skin and feeding on surrounding tissue. It's like a scene from a horror movie. Only this isn't a movie—it's happening in real life to an extremely endangered bird species, the Ridgway's hawk. The culprit is a botfly in the genus Philornis that is so aggressive it's eating hawk nestlings from the inside out.

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Image: Simulating the darkness of space

A Halloween view inside one of the darker recesses of ESA's technical heart. Shaded to resemble the blackness of deep space, the GNC Rendezvous, Approach and Landing Simulator, or GRALS, is seen being used to test vision-based navigation algorithms under development for the proposed Hera binary asteroid mission.

10h

Better cocoa crops for better livelihoods

Chocolate may be one of life's little pleasures, but in Ghana, for many, it is the very means of life. Around 800,000 households, smallholdings effectively, make their way by cultivating cocoa, and many more are involved in the supply chains that bring it to our supermarket shelves.

10h

Colorado is a rectangle? Think again.

Colorado looks like a rectangle. It isn't. The Centennial State has not four, but 697 sides. That makes it a hexahectaenneacontakaiheptagon . Does that make Wyoming the only real rectangular state? Well, about that… America loves its straight-line borders. The only U.S. state without one is Hawaii – for obvious reasons (1). West of the Mississippi, states are bigger, emptier and boxier than back

10h

Google puts up $25 million for AI research

Google is creating a $25 million fund for artificial intelligence research around the world to address social and economic problems.

10h

Is there a risk to human health from microplastics?

The Austrian Federal Environment Agency and the Medical University of Vienna have presented the first preliminary results of a pilot study on microplastics (microplastic particles) in humans. They have detected microplastic particles in stool of eight volunteers. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) summarizes its findings on possible health risks of microplastic particles for hu

10h

Two-cells-in-one combo therapy could bolster leukemia treatment

A cancer therapy based on fusing two types of cells into a single unit shows promise in strengthening existing treatments for acute myeloid leukemia. The approach joins blood platelets that carry cancer drugs with stem cells that guide the platelets into bone marrow where leukemia begins.

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China develops world's first instrument system for raman-activated cell sorting and sequencing

The world's first instrument system for Raman-activated Cell Sorting and Sequencing (RACS-SEQ) was recently developed in East China's Qingdao City, allowing functional identification, sorting and sequencing of individual cells, in a label-free manner.

10h

Cutting societal alcohol use may prevent alcohol disorders developing — Otago research reveals

Society must take collective responsibility to reduce the harm caused by alcohol use disorders, a University of Otago academic says.

10h

Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers protect Ridgeway's hawks from botflies

To save the endangered Ridgway's hawk from extinction, Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers have found a way to combat infestations of Philornis botflies. The insects are so aggressive, they eat hawk nestlings from the inside out. To combat this, the researchers devised a solution where they climb up to the nests and spray nestlings with the same insecticide pet owners use to rid dogs and c

10h

Russia blames rocket failure on technical malfunction

Russia's space agency says an investigation has found that a rocket carrying a crew to the International Space Station failed recently because of a technical malfunction of a sensor.

10h

How a small change will reduce distortion in measuring innovation

When your child is diabetic, a few minutes can make a big difference, and it pays to have real-time access to their blood sugar numbers. But what if no one sells a product that can do that? You build one, like the open-source community that developed the wireless blood sugar monitor Nightscout did.

10h

Can bacteria colonies be good neighbours?

A team of German scientists have gained new insights into the way bacteria colonies interact.

10h

Updating high-resolution MRI

How can you make a high-frequency MRI machine more precise? By taking an electrical engineering approach to creating a better, uniform magnetic field.

10h

Can organic production be the driving force for development in Africa?

In Africa, the development of organic agriculture is facing specific challenges because of the need to achieve food security for a rapidly expanding population and the persistent low chemical input use for producing food for home consumption. We are familiar with the export of certified organic products to countries in the North, but know little about organic farming's potential for the continent'

10h

Is my headache actually eye strain?

Health Why tired eyes cause you pain. You’ve got a headache for the third time this week, and the culprit could be anything. But what if the pain is just coming from eye strain?

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DMI skal hjælpe med at bygge efter fremtidens klima

Nye klimascenarier udarbejdet af DMI skal hjælpe bygge- og infrastrukturprojekter med at blive klar til fremtidens vejr. Det vil gøre byggerierne mere robuste, lyder det fra DTU-professor.

10h

NASA retires Kepler Space TelescopeNASA Kepler Space Earth

After nine years in deep space collecting data, NASA's Kepler space telescope has run out of fuel needed for further science operations. NASA has decided to retire the spacecraft within its current, safe orbit, away from Earth. Kepler leaves a legacy of more than 2,600 planet discoveries from outside our solar system, many of which could be promising places for life.

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Staggering extent of human impact on planet revealed in new report

Humanity and the way we feed, fuel and finance our societies and economies is pushing nature and the services that power and sustain us to the brink, according to a new report that presents a sobering picture of the impact of human activity on the world's wildlife, forests, oceans, rivers and climate.

10h

Math describes how bubbles pop

Understanding the dynamics of bursting bubbles can provide critical insights for a range of fields from oceanography to atmospheric science, but the mechanisms that drive the final pop are complex and difficult to describe.

10h

Asia coal plants worrying for climate targets: IEA

Coal-fired power plants operating and under construction in Asia pose a threat to achieving the goal of halting global warming, the head of the International Energy Agency told the Financial Times on Wednesday.

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Fujitsu develops technology to predict biochemical reactions, clarifying the mechanisms of genetic disorders

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, a data analytics research institution based in Ireland, and Fujitsu (Ireland) Limited today announced the development of a technology that makes it possible to predict large volumes of unknown chemical reactions, about twice as many as the conventional procedure. In serious diseases, including cancer, it is common for there to be ab

10h

Using AI to deduce bias in social media and news

"I'm feeling sick." "This video game is SICK!" To a computer, the word "sick" may have the same meaning in these two sentences.

10h

Why the number 137 is one of the greatest mysteries in physics

The fine structure constant has mystified scientists since the 1800s. The number 1/137 might hold the clues to the Grand Unified Theory. Relativity, electromagnetism and quantum mechanics are unified by the number. None Does the Universe around us have a fundamental structure that can be glimpsed through special numbers? The brilliant physicist Richard Feynman (1918-1988) famously thought so, say

10h

Study finds most likely route of first humans into Australia

A new study from ANU indicates the most likely route the ancestors of Aboriginal people took to enter Australia for the first time tens of thousands of years ago.

10h

The Bus Is Still Best

A recent conference I attended featured a panel called “Microtransit: The Fight Against Congestion.” Microtransit : It sounds as though a genius has shrunk public transportation in a laboratory, making it adorable. In some cases, shrinking vehicles is a great idea. Cities don’t have room for everyone’s car. With shared electric scooters , and improvements to bicycle access , people are finding ne

10h

Chirality of vitamin-D derivative affects the protonation states of its receptor protein

Researchers at Toyohashi University of Technology, in cooperation with researchers at Teijin Pharma Ltd. and Teikyo University, have highlighted the possibility that chirality of vitamin-D derivatives can affect the protonation states of histidine residues in the vitamin-D receptor protein via ab initio molecular simulations and biomedical analyses. This finding emphasizes that protonation states

10h

A fully human system to cultivate skin cells for grafting

Duke-NUS Medical School and the Singapore General Hospital have, for the first time, successfully cultured skin cells from human tissue-proteins to produce skin grafts for safer treatment of severe burns. The new technique could potentially replace the decades-old method of culturing skin grafts from combined human and animal biological material – the latter is considered high-risk under pharmaceu

10h

Researchers identify three shades of blue

OIST scientists have used brain imaging to identify three sub-types of depression — including one that is unresponsive to commonly prescribed serotonin boosting drugs.

10h

Balloon measurements reveal dust particle properties in free troposphere over desert

The Taklamakan Desert, one of the major sources of Asian dust, is situated in the Tarim Basin, with the Tianshan Mountains in the north, Pamir Plateau in the west, Kunlun Mountains in the south, and Dunhuang in the east. The area is significant for studying the initial state of Asian dust particle transportation, which is mainly influenced by westerly winds.

10h

Blood test spots microscopic cancer to predict relapse risk

A new blood test detects cancer DNA after surgery to predict a relapse and guide decisions about whether patients should receive chemotherapy. A diagnosis of cancer can be terrifying—but sometimes the treatments themselves can be just as frightening for patients. Surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and immunotherapy can be daunting and some of the side effects from these life-saving technol

10h

Landmænd kan skære 25 % af deres udgifter til kvælstof

En ny dansk metode til at kortlægge marker kan reducere udledningen af kvælstof og samtidig…

10h

DSAM-formand efter EMA-gennemgang: Nu er det ikke længere præfaktuelt

Da EMA nu har gennemgået forskningsresultaterne omkring hydrochlorthiazid og risikoen for hudkræft, er tiden kommet til at viderebringe oplysningerne til patienterne, mener DSAM-formand Anders Beich, der har været stærkt kritisk over for forløbet.

10h

Patienter strømmer til midlertidige praksisklinikker

De nyåbnede midlertidige praksisklinikker på Amager og Frederiksberg Hospital oplever stor tilstrømning af patienter. Der har været behov for klinikkerne, mener overlæger.

10h

Top Stories in October: 'Next Generation' Voting Machines Have Alarming Vulnerabilities

Plus: The carousing Texan who won a Nobel, a brain-eating amoeba claims another victim, and Netflix finally cancels some shows.

10h

Just How Fast Is the Parker Solar Probe? Astonishingly Fast

The probe just broke the record to become the fastest human-made object, relative to the sun. Here's what that record really means.

10h

A study of mammalian vocalizations in lead-up to copulations using giant pandas as an example

A team of researchers from San Diego Zoo's Institute for Conservation Research and the China Research and Conservation Centre for the Giant Panda has found that vocalizations play an important role in the lead-up to copulation with giant pandas. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of vocalizations leading up to copulation in giant pan

10h

Researchers assemble the Eurasian perch genome

In a study published recently in the scientific journal G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, researchers from Estonian University of Life Sciences, in collaboration with colleagues from University of Turku, assembled the Eurasian perch genome. It is three times smaller than the human genome, yet contains about 1 billion nucleotides and more than 23,000 genes. The investigated perch originated from the da

10h

NASA's mission to Jupiter's Trojans given the green light for development

NASA's mission to perform the first reconnaissance of the Trojans, a population of primitive asteroids orbiting in tandem with Jupiter, passed a critical milestone today. NASA has given approval for the implementation and 2021 launch of the Lucy spacecraft.

10h

The Demise of FilmStruck Is Part of a Bigger Pattern

The creation of FilmStruck in 2016 seemed like a logical response to the growing ecosystem of online film viewing. Long gone were the days when classic movies were the backbone of Netflix’s offerings. As streaming became widespread, the rights to stream films got more expensive, and digital libraries became valuable tools for luring new subscribers. FilmStruck—a combination of the Criterion Colle

11h

What Zombie Plants Can Teach Us

They could offer valuable insights into how we might protect ourselves against climate change — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Trick vs Treat and A Brief History of Halloween

Trick vs Treat, a Hallowe’en Showdown Competition runs Oct 31 from 10 am US ET to midnight! Halloween goes back to the ancient Celts who celebrated a festival called Samhain on Nov 1 that marked the end of the harvest season. They left out food and wine for spirits they believed came back as ghosts on Oct 31. When Celts went out on Samhain, they dressed as ghosts to either blend in or calm the ro

11h

Deep learning for glaucoma detection

Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world, impacting approximately 2.7 million people in the U.S alone. It is a complex set of diseases and, if left untreated, can lead to blindness. It's a particularly large issue in Australia, where only 50 percent of all people who have it are actually diagnosed and receive the treatment they need.

11h

One hundred and ten liters of urban stormwater cleaned every second

Dirty runoff sweeps urban streets, pollutes groundwater and pressures sewage systems. A University of Copenhagen researcher has invented a treatment method that is now being used at a large, new wastewater facility in Copenhagen, Denmark. At the facility, stormwater runoff is turned into a clean resource without the use of power or chemicals.

11h

Sailing towards a fully electric ferry

The Danish island of Aeroe, located in the Baltic Sea, is one of the few islands not connected to the mainland by a bridge. As a result, it is dependent on car ferries. Aeroe also has another distinction: it aims to become 100% carbon neutral by 2025. Although it has already made big strides towards achieving this goal via a comprehensive solar and wind powered infrastructure, its dependence on co

11h

Monitoring antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is a complex problem in animal husbandry. Antibiotics are essential for both veterinary and human healthcare, but their usage can lead to antimicrobial resistance. Dik Mevius, an expert in the use of antibiotics for livestock management, gives here an overview of this collaborative work and findings within EFFORT where he coordinated the collection of samples and farm data as

11h

Scientists obtain new results in the study of inorganic pigments with apatite structure

Compounds with the apatite structure differ from most classes by the variety of their chemical compositions. To create such substances, most chemical elements can be used, while the characteristics of the crystalline structure of apatite will be preserved. The resulting variety of chemical compositions also determines a wide range of physico-chemical properties and performance characteristics of t

11h

A new pharmacological molecule improves the safety of canine sedation and anaesthesia

A drug discovery made at the University of Helsinki's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine will increase the safety of animal sedation and anaesthesia. Vatinoxan, the pharmacological molecule discovered in the study, reduced the adverse effects of other drugs on the cardiovascular system of canine patients.

11h

Cell behavior, once shrouded in mystery, is revealed in new light

A cell's behavior is as mysterious as a teenager's mood swings. However, University of Missouri researchers are one step closer to understanding cell behavior, with the help of a specialized microscope.

11h

Cold, Dark Stars Lurking in the Universe Could Act Like Single Giant Atoms

Mysterious quantum stars that act like single, monster atoms could form surprisingly quickly.

11h

Earth Is Being Haunted by a Ghostly Dust Storm — And There May Be More Out There

Cosmic tumbleweeds of dust hover nearly 250,000 miles above our planet, new images reveal.

11h

Dissecting the Bloodthirsty Bliss of Death Metal

Fans of this violent music report feelings of transcendence and positive emotions; psychologists want to learn why

11h

New model is a leap forward in understanding plant organ growth

Cells are the building blocks of life that grow and divide to create all living things.

11h

Commercial shellfish landings decline likely linked to environmental factors

Researchers studying the sharp decline between 1980 and 2010 in documented landings of the four most commercially-important bivalve mollusks — eastern oysters, northern quahogs, softshell clams and northern bay scallops — have identified the causes. Warming ocean temperatures associated with a positive shift in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), which led to habitat degradation including incr

11h

How plants cope with stress

With climate change comes drought, and with drought comes higher salt concentrations in the soil. Scientists have identified a mechanism by which plants respond to salt stress, a pathway that could be targeted to engineer more adaptable crops.

11h

Mutation associated with ALS causes sugar-starved cells to overproduce lipids, study shows

A genetic defect tied to a variety of neurodegenerative diseases and mental illnesses changes how cells starved of sugar metabolize fatty compounds known as lipids, a new study shows. The finding could lead to new targets to treat these diseases, which currently have no cure or fully effective treatments.

11h

CRISPR gene editing will find applications in plastic and reconstructive surgery

The CRISPR genome editing technique promises to be a 'transformative leap' in genetic engineering and therapy, affecting almost every area of medicine. That includes plastic surgery, with potential advances ranging from prevention of craniofacial malformations, to therapeutic skin grafts, to new types of rejection-free transplants, according to a new article.

11h

First comprehensive study of chemosensory organ physiology in an annelid

A team of researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Germany and the University of Exeter in the U.K. has conducted the first comprehensive study of the head chemosensory organ physiology in an annelid. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Biology, the group describes their study of the brain of the marine worm Platynereis dumerilii and what they found.

11h

What any country can and can't do in Antarctica, in the name of science

Antarctica is owned by no one, but there are plenty of countries interested in this frozen island continent at the bottom of the Earth.

11h

YouTube’s Push to Counter Toxic Videos With ‘Good’ Creators

Through Creators for Change, YouTube gives a small group of tolerance-building filmmakers funding, training, and publicity. The hope? That an influx of meaningful content will help drown out the more nefarious crap on the streaming-site.

11h

Første planetjæger går på pension: Kepler fandt 2.662 planeter

Efter ni år i rummet har NASA pensioneret rumteleskopet Kepler. Det fandt tusindvis af planeter og viste, at der er flere planeter end stjerner i Mælkevejen.

11h

Halloween Can Bring Out Our Phobias

Image: Shutterstock It’s Halloween, which means many of us will be using haunted houses and horror-movie marathons to intentionally tap into our deepest fears. We all experience fear, but what happens when those fears become unbearable and turn into phobias? It’s important to remember that fear and phobias are different things – according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorde

11h

Factors That Up the Chances an Exotic Pet Gets Released into the Wild

People dump their exotic animals for logical, if not good, reasons — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Australian Academics Fear Political Interference Following Vetoed Projects

A minister’s decision to quietly cancel projects selected by funders could damage the country’s academic reputation, warn researchers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

New research recovers nutrients from seafood process water

Process waters from the seafood industry contain valuable nutrients, that could be used in food or aquaculture feed. But currently, these process waters are treated as waste. Now, a research project from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows the potential of recycling these nutrients back into the food chain.

11h

NASA retires Kepler Space TelescopeNASA Kepler Space Earth

After nine years in deep space collecting data that indicate our sky to be filled with billions of hidden planets—more planets even than stars—NASA's Kepler space telescope has run out of fuel needed for further science operations. NASA has decided to retire the spacecraft within its current, safe orbit, away from Earth. Kepler leaves a legacy of more than 2,600 planet discoveries from outside our

11h

'Folded' optical devices manipulate light in a new way

The next generation of electronic devices, ranging from personal health monitors and augmented reality headsets to sensitive scientific instruments that would only be found in a laboratory, will likely incorporate components that use metasurface optics, according to Andrei Faraon, professor of applied physics in Caltech's Division of Engineering and Applied Science. Metasurface optics manipulate l

11h

The when, where and what of air pollutant exposure

Scientists have linked air pollution with many health conditions including asthma, heart disease, lung cancer and premature death. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter is especially harmful because the tiny particles (diameter of 2.5 μm or less) can penetrate deep within the lungs. Now, researchers have integrated data from multiple sources to determine the personal exposure of people in

11h

In Photos: Eerie Zoo Animal Skeletons, in X-Rays

Are X-rays of animals gorgeous or creepy? Maybe a little of both.

11h

Zoo's Animal X-Rays Reveal Spooky, Scary Skeletons

Animals from the Oregon Zoo are also beautiful on the inside.

11h

Doctors Retrieve Spoon from Man's Esophagus — A Year After He Swallowed It

A swallowed steel spoon was finally freed from a man's gullet.

11h

Slæde til landmanden skal læse jorden og reducere kvælstof

Teknologi skal gøre det muligt for landmanden at gøde med meget stor præcision og spare både miljø og pengepung.

11h

The spookiest things we learned this week

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly frightful facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

11h

The when, where and what of air pollutant exposure

Scientists have linked air pollution with many health conditions including asthma, heart disease, lung cancer and premature death. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter is especially harmful because the tiny particles (diameter of 2.5 μm or less) can penetrate deep within the lungs. Now, researchers have integrated data from multiple sources to determine the personal exposure of people in

11h

Los Angeles Must Pay Billions to Adapt—or Slip Into the Sea

It’ll take LA as much as $6.4 billion to fortify itself against an impending increase in coastal flooding, with moves such as nourishing its beaches with extra sand and elevating its ports.

11h

Inside Death Café, The Place People Go to Talk About Dying

Mortality is inevitable. Death Cafés just give you a safe space to talk about it.

11h

Exclusive: Grave doubts over LIGO’s discovery of gravitational waves

The news we had finally found ripples in space-time reverberated around the world in 2015. Now it seems they might have been an illusion

11h

An AI lie detector will interrogate travellers at some EU borders

A digital border guard will be trialled at some borders in Hungary, Latvia and Greece for six months. It includes an AI lie detector, but some doubt it will work

11h

PLO og Region Hovedstaden forhandler om løsning på lægemangel

De midlertidige praksisklinikker var en sidste nødløsning, lyder det fra PLO og Region Hovedstaden, der forhandler for at finde en bæredygtig løsning på lægemanglen.

11h

Judges Shouldn’t Have the Power to Halt Laws Nationwide

Democrats were ecstatic when a judge in Honolulu barred enforcement of the Trump administration’s travel ban. They were thrilled when a judge in Chicago halted a policy to rescind grant funding to sanctuary cities. In both cases, the judges extended their ruling beyond the litigants to the whole country, issuing so-called national injunctions. For opponents of Donald Trump’s administration, this

12h

Trick-or-Treating Isn’t What It Used to Be

Nostalgia is a fun-house mirror, so any claims that “back in my day, we went trick-or-treating until midnight with no parental supervision,” while kids these days are forced to make do with half an hour of highly supervised trick-or-treating before sunset, are surely a distortion. Still, it seems like the tradition of going door-to-door demanding candy is not quite what it used to be for many U.S

12h

Sticky Science: the Evolution of Spider Webs

The eight-legged weavers have been hunting insects for almost 400 years, flaunting their long history in a rich array of architectures — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Artificial Intelligence Is Learning to Keep Learning

A new machine-learning technique mimics the brain’s ability to adapt to new circumstances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

12h

Image of the Day: Flood Protection

Aphids induce their host plants to produce tiny hairs that help keep the surfaces water-repellent.

12h

Alkaline Water Surges Despite Lack of Evidence

Alkaline water is pure BS – there is no plausibility to the claims of any health benefits, and what evidence we have is negative. Its popularity grows despite this.

12h

How to Not Become a Zombie, Using Martial Arts

Cockroaches are famously indestructible. Tough, fast, and agile, they are renowned for their hardiness in the face of poisons and heavy boots. But unlike us hapless humans, the emerald cockroach wasp can kill roaches—and in the worst way imaginable. The wasp is a beautiful creature decked out in Hollywood colors , with a metallic teal body and bright-orange thighs. It is also a parasite, and cock

12h

Stephen Hawking PhD thesis and wheelchair to sell in online auction

Lots include A Brief History of Time signed with thumbprint and Simpsons script Personal items belonging to Stephen Hawking, including his medals and one of his wheelchairs, are to be sold at an online auction. The British physicist , best known for his research on black holes, died in March, aged 76. Continue reading…

12h

ScienceTake: This Halloween, Consider the Unappreciated Beauty of Spiders

Arachnids get a bad rap, particularly around Halloween, but they’re actually quite lovely in their own, deadly, leaping, eight-legged, cannibalistic way.

12h

A Mandarin Duck Mysteriously Appears in Central Park, to Birders’ Delight

A brilliantly colored duck appeared in the Pond in Central Park in October. The duck, which is native to East Asia, stunned wildlife officials.

12h

Cost-effective marketing campaigns on social media

Social media is the new equivalent of "word of mouth" advertising, and in the United States alone, corporate social media spending is projected to exceed $17 billion by 2019.

12h

Coral Reef Scientist Ruth Gates Dies

Gates was director of the Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology and a strong advocate for coral conservation.

12h

France’s Jews Look to Pittsburgh ‘Across a Narrow Bridge’

PARIS —So many times in the past few years, as France underwent a wave of terrorist attacks that killed hundreds of people from 2012 to 2016, American Jews would send solidarity to France. The tables now seem to have turned. At a memorial here this week, from a dais adorned with American and French flags, a rabbi at the Mouvement Juif Libéral de France, a Reform synagogue, read aloud the names of

12h

Nature matters—and it is sending us an SOS that we can no longer ignore

Planet earth, nature and us. We are all linked in such a subtle and clever way that we don't even know how lucky we are—until it changes. Yesterday we relied on nature, today we rely on nature, and tomorrow we will still rely on nature.

12h

'Zombie' stars return from the dead

Black holes are among the most elusive objects in the universe, but research out of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) suggests the remnant cores of burned-out stars could be the key to making the first observation of the most elusive class of black holes.

12h

Sifting through 50 million phone calls for patterns to aid refugees

When refugees use their mobile phones they leave clues about how well they are integrating (or not) into their host country. Clio Andris, assistant professor of geography in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, is analyzing a year's worth of phone calls to find the clues to help address the Syrian refugee crisis in Turkey.

12h

Popular meal-kit companies may be creating low-wage, dead-end jobs, study finds

Meal kits make cooking easier for millions of busy families and time-starved professionals. But a new study by the Center for Labor Research and Education (Labor Center) at UC Berkeley suggests that the workers filling boxes with pre-portioned ingredients and recipe cards are struggling with low wages, unaffordable benefits, unpredictable schedules, inconsistent wage increase policies, risk of inj

12h

Inspiring new drug discovery by pseudo natural products

Almost a third of available pharmaceuticals are based on natural products. The discovery of new natural products-inspired drugs, however, is slow due to their limited chemical diversity, their high chemical complexity and the resulting low yields. The group of Herbert Waldmann has found a way to bypass these limitations by developing substances with new molecular frameworks that don't look like na

12h

Goodbye Europe, hello Moon: European Module ships soon

The European Service Module that will power and propel the Orion spacecraft on its first mission around the moon will ship early next week from Bremen to the United States. It will take off in an Antonov An-124 aircraft in the early hours of 5 November and arrive at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA on 6 November.

12h

Researchers discover weak chemical interactions hold together box of infinite possibilities

Researchers have identified the weak molecular forces that hold together a tiny, self-assembling box with powerful possibilities. The study demonstrates a practical application of a force common in biological systems and advances the pursuit of artificial chemical life.

12h

DBA-brugere fik løjerlig besked om 'Hack'

Brugere af app'en til handels-sitet dba.dk har ved en fejl fået en besked med ordlyden 'hack'.

12h

Forsvaret satsede på nanosatellit: Nu vil de store lande lege med

Siden februar har Forsvarets første nanosatellit overvåget fly og skibe i Arktis og sparket døre ind hos andre lande. Nu drømmer man om en konstellation af satellitter og flere jordstationer.

12h

China's Five Steps for Recruiting Spies in the US

A series of high-profile cases involving alleged Chinese recruits shows how the country identifies and develops potential spies stateside.

12h

Calling the Caravan's Migrants "Diseased" Is a Classic Xenophobic Move

The migrants almost certainly do not have smallpox or leprosy, a claim that is just the latest attempt to dehumanize foreigners.

12h

Apple's iPads Are Officially More Interesting Than Its MacBooks

The MacBook Air looks like a great computer. But it's not what a great computer will look like in the future.

12h

She Has Her Mother’s Laugh by Carl Zimmer review – the latest thinking on heredity

What do we pass on from generation to generation? This deeply researched book explores the murky past of genetic research as well as its fast-moving present Genealogy is apparently the second most searched subject on the internet … after the obvious. Now that we can map our genes, we want to know where we come from. But heredity is not as simple as the passing on of traits from parents to offspri

12h

Falling Walls: Social Relationships as a Spatial Problem

The hippocampus appears to keep track of social dynamics just as it tracks us moving physically through real spaces — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Russia plans first manned launch to ISS after accident on December 3: agencies

Russia on Wednesday said the first manned launch to the International Space Station since a failed blast-off this month will take place on December 3.

13h

IT-Politisk Forening: Masseovervågning mod digitalt pirateri er totalitært og absurd

En masseovervågning af netabonnenter vil indeholde fejlkilder, hører hjemme i Kina og er også ude af proportion i forhold til udviklingen i digitalt pirateri, lyder den skarpe kritik fra IT-Politisk Forening til nyt forslag fra regeringsudvalg

13h

Skuespilleres kloner får evigt liv

Med muligheden for at scanne skuespillere kan man nu caste dem til roller efter deres død eller bruge yngre versioner af dem.

13h

The Milky Way's Monster, Unveiled

Astronomers have come closer than ever before to seeing our galaxy’s mysterious supermassive black hole — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

13h

Potential markers identified for early detection and prevention of liver cancer

A new study offers hope of early detection for hepatocellular carcinoma — the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, claiming 700,000 lives each year. The results show a dramatic increase in expression of sugar-burning 'glycolytic' genes in precancerous cirrhotic livers, associated with a significantly higher risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. This could lead to a b

13h

Don't underestimate the force

Researchers have identified the weak molecular forces that hold together a tiny, self-assembling box with powerful possibilities. The study demonstrates a practical application of a force common in biological systems and advances the pursuit of artificial chemical life.

13h

Biden Stumps in Iowa as He Ponders 2020

CEDAR RAPIDS, Iowa—Joe Biden’s plan was to avoid Iowa during his nationwide midterm campaigning: He didn’t want to feed the 2020 talk that he and his aides knew a trip there would spark, and he wasn’t sure what kind of crowd it would bring. On Tuesday night, he arrived here at the veterans’ hall downtown, raised his arms, and saluted the crowd of more than 1,000 cheering for him, applauding him,

13h

The Stench of Violence

There is a passage from the prophet Ezekiel in the Passover Haggadah, often omitted or skipped over: “And when I passed by thee, and saw thee wallowing in thy blood, I said unto thee: In thy blood, live; yea, I said unto thee: In thy blood, live.” And after the Pittsburgh massacre, that is where the Jews are today, as in some measure they always have been: wounded and bereft, torn and bloody, yet

13h

A Flawed European Ruling on Free Speech

According to dominant Islamic traditions, the Prophet Muhammad’s third wife Aisha was six years old at their marriage and nine at its consummation. Muslims, as Graeme Wood has pointed out , have debated the issue of Aisha’s age for a very long time, and critics of Islam seemingly can’t keep off the subject. In the fall of 2009, a woman referred to as E.S., a 47-year-old Austrian national, convene

13h

Air France-KLM gets boost from employee accord

Air France-KLM, hit badly earlier this year by strikes and management upheaval, reported Wednesday its third quarter net profit jumped nearly 23 percent year-on-year to 786 million euros ($900 million).

13h

Panasonic first-half profit sags on higher costs

Japanese electronics giant Panasonic said Wednesday first-half net profit slipped on higher costs linked to a factory it runs with US electric carmaker Tesla, though sales rose thanks to growth in automotive products and industrial systems.

13h

Airbus says Q3 net profit more than triples to 957 mn euros

European aerospace giant Airbus reported Wednesday a third quarter net profit of 957 million euros ($1.1 billion), more than triple the 2017 performance.

13h

Pengetank-formand om forskningsfusk: Mine medarbejdere kan ikke snyde mig

Ingen artikler i mærkværdige tidsskrifter med flosset troværdighed slipper forbi formanden for Danmarks Frie Forskningsfond.

13h

How ‘The Goblin’ may unravel the mystery of Planet Nine

'The Goblin' is a dwarf planet known more formally as '2015 TG387'. It was nicknamed The Goblin because of the 'TG' in its title, and because of the time of year it was discovered: Halloween. The Goblin has an extreme orbit: far-flung and elongated. It takes 40,000 years to make a complete orbit around the Sun. This cosmic anomaly is a clue. Astronomers hypothesize that The Goblin is being pulled

13h

Operation i tyktarmen kædet sammen med øget risiko for diabetes

Der er forhøjet risiko for at udvikle type 2 diabetes, hvis man får foretaget en operation…

13h

Færre genindlæggelser er ikke svaret på sundhedsvæsenets økonomikrise

Det er forstemmende, at sundhedsministeren lader sig forlede af snedige regnetekniske manøvrer til at lægge ansvaret for de stigende sundhedsudgifter på sektorovergangen.

13h

Researchers discover how protein pair controls cellular calcium signals

All mammalian cells need a ready supply of calcium ions to execute functions as diverse as neurotransmission, muscle contraction, hormone release, or immune responses. So fundamental is this requirement that cells protect themselves from disaster by storing calcium in a network of intracellular cisterns called the endoplasmic reticulum, or ER. Then, as cells lose calcium as part of their daily rou

14h

Everglades needs more freshwater to combat peat soil collapse

More saltwater in the Everglades could make climate change worse, a new Florida International University study found.

14h

Babies born at home have more diverse, beneficial bacteria, study finds

Infants born at home have more diverse bacteria in their guts and feces, which may affect their developing immunity and metabolism, according to a study in Scientific Reports.

14h

Most detailed observations of material orbiting close to a black hole

ESO's exquisitely sensitive GRAVITY instrument has added further evidence to the long-standing assumption that a supermassive black hole lurks in the center of the Milky Way. New observations show clumps of gas swirling around at about 30 percent of the speed of light on a circular orbit just outside its event horizon — the first time material has been observed orbiting close to the point of no r

14h

LJI investigators discover how protein pair controls cellular calcium signals

wo studies recently published by La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) investigators Patrick Hogan, PhD, and Aparna Gudlur, PhD — one paper appearing early this year in Cell Reports and the other in the October 31, 2018, issue of Nature Communications — report how a calcium-sensing protein called STIM1 signals that it's time to initiate calcium retrieval and then relays that message to its par

14h

Most detailed observations of material orbiting close to a black hole

ESO's exquisitely sensitive GRAVITY instrument has added further evidence to the long-standing assumption that a supermassive black hole lurks in the centre of the Milky Way. New observations show clumps of gas swirling around at about 30% of the speed of light on a circular orbit just outside its event horizon—the first time material has been observed orbiting close to the point of no return, and

14h

Social Stigma Is One Reason The Opioid Crisis Is Hard To Confront

The CDC estimated that 72,000 people died of drug overdoses in 2017. There are many reasons why the opioid crisis is so hard to confront. One of them is social stigma. (Image credit: Jennifer Schmidt/NPR)

14h

America Isn’t the ‘Only Country’ With Birthright Citizenship

“We’re the only country in the world where a person comes in and has a baby, and the baby is essentially a citizen of the United States … with all of those benefits.” So said Donald Trump this week, in explaining why he may sign an executive order ending the right to citizenship for those born on U.S. soil even if their parents aren’t citizens or permanent residents. It’s part of the president’s

14h

Survey Skeleton

Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers has a lovely Survey Skeleton peeking out enticingly on some of their journal websites now. It's to lure you to take their survey , where you can win attractive prizes…. …such as the unique Vesalius: The Fabric of the Human Body (value CHF 1,500). Just thought you should know.

15h

Flippin' hard: Myanmar's sea turtles fight against the odds

Peril plagues the lives of Myanmar's baby turtles: if crabs don't get them before they scramble from beach to sea, then poachers or fishing trawlers might finish them off instead.

15h

Baidu profit grows 56% as apps and AI lift revenues

Chinese online search giant Baidu on Wednesday said net profit for the third quarter jumped 56 percent on continued robust growth in revenue and traffic to its mobile app.

15h

Black boxes: crucial to air crash probes

When investigators arrive at an aviation crash site, one of their first priorities is to locate the plane's black boxes, two pieces of equipment that can hold vital clues on what caused an aircraft to go down.

15h

Neil Armstrong's huge souvenir collection to be auctioned

Talk about a pack rat: thousands of things that Neil Armstrong saved over the course of a career that saw him become the first man to walk on the moon will be auctioned off this week.

15h

Widely used mosquito repellent proves lethal to larval salamanders

Insect repellents containing picaridin can be lethal to salamanders. So reports a new study published today in Biology Letters that investigated how exposure to two common insect repellents influenced the survival of aquatic salamander and mosquito larvae.

16h

Fertilizers' impact on soil health compared

In a newly published study, researchers dug into how fertilizing with manure affects soil quality, compared with inorganic fertilizer.

16h

Karate kicks keep cockroaches from becoming zombies, wasp chow

Rick Grimes has nothing on the humble American cockroach when it comes to avoiding zombification.

16h

Samsung Electronics enjoys record Q3 despite smartphone struggles

Samsung Electronics on Wednesday posted record quarterly operating and net profits as solid demand for its memory chips cushioned the fallout from slowing smartphone sales—but warned of tougher times ahead.

16h

Artificial intelligence bot trained to recognize galaxies

Researchers have taught an artificial intelligence program used to recognise faces on Facebook to identify galaxies in deep space.

16h

Karate kicks keep cockroaches from becoming zombies, wasp chow

Far from being a weak-willed sap easily paralyzed by the emerald jewel wasp's sting to the brain — followed by becoming a placid egg carrier and then larvae chow — the cockroach can deliver a stunning karate kick that saves its life.

16h

How roaches fight off wasps that turn their victims into zombies

Cockroaches kick attacking emerald jewel wasps to avoid being incapacitated and buried alive as living meat for the wasps’ young.

16h

Oxford-forskere blotlægger enorm tracking gennem apps: »Profilering kan være ulovlig«

Over 90 procent af næsten en million undersøgte apps fra Google Play indeholder mindst én tredjepartstracker, viser ny undersøgelse fra Oxford Universitet. Undersøgelsen miskarakteriserer »almindelige funktionelle tjenester«, siger Google.

17h

European workers fail to maintain water balance

A newly published scientific paper indicates that occupational safety and daily day performance in seven out of 10 workers, from several European industries, is negatively affected by a combination of heat stress and failure to maintain water balance. The study combines field observations and motor-cognitive testing in the lab, and was conducted by the Pan-European Heat-Shield project coordinated

17h

Gaps in understanding European children's nutrient intake levels

A new study has found only a third of European countries have robust reporting on child and adolescent nutrient intakes. The study identified some key areas of concern and in particular found that the average intakes for children reported in the majority of countries, including the UK, did not meet most of the WHO recommended nutrient intakes.

17h

Ghosting busters: why tech companies are trying to stop us blanking each other

We’ve all had to deal with the person who starts a friendly chat then just … vanishes. Dating apps, Facebook and Google think they have the answers. But why do they care? This Halloween, ghosts aren’t welcome. Two dating apps have announced plans to use the season to crack down on the rudest of social media villains, the ghoster: the person who enthusiastically replies to your messages, starts a

17h

Has new ghost particle manifested at Large Hadron Collider?

‘Something terribly new’ goes bump in data yet to be confirmed by Atlas detector Scientists at the Cern nuclear physics lab near Geneva are investigating whether a bizarre and unexpected new particle popped into existence during experiments at the Large Hadron Collider. Researchers on the machine’s multipurpose Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector have spotted curious bumps in their data that may

17h

Rapport: Vi er ved at ødelægge fundamentet for liv

Menneskelig aktivitet presser naturen langt ud over dens ydeevne. Men der er håb endnu, siger WWF i rapport.

18h

3 percent of children hit daily activity target

Only one in 30 children does the recommended amount of daily physical activity, new research suggests.

19h

Fertilizers' impact on soil health compared

In a newly published study, researchers dug into how fertilizing with manure affects soil quality, compared with inorganic fertilizer.

19h

New research recovers nutrients from seafood process water

Process waters from the seafood industry contain valuable nutrients, that could be used in food or aquaculture feed. But currently, these process waters are treated as waste. Now, a research project from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows the potential of recycling these nutrients back into the food chain.

19h

Small association between early antibiotic exposure and weight gain in young children

A pioneering study conducted within a nationwide network, the National Patient Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet), finds that antibiotic use at <24 months of age was associated with slightly higher body weight at 5 years of age. The study, 'Early Life Antibiotic Use and Weight Outcomes in Children Ages 48 to <72 Months of Age,' appears in the journal Pediatrics published online today.

19h

Widely used mosquito repellent proves lethal to larval salamanders

Insect repellents containing picaridin can be lethal to salamanders. So reports a new study published today in Biology Letters that investigated how exposure to two common insect repellents influenced the survival of aquatic salamander and mosquito larvae.

19h

Cykelfabrik må understøttes, mens 200 ton forurenet jord bores op

Klorerede opløsningsmidler truer både ny vandboring og indeklimaet hos naboerne til Winthers cykelfabrik i Them.

19h

Artificial intelligence bot trained to recognize galaxies

Researchers have taught an artificial intelligence program used to recognize faces on Facebook to identify galaxies in deep space.The result is an AI bot named ClaRAN that scans images taken by radio telescopes.Its job is to spot radio galaxies — galaxies that emit powerful radio jets from supermassive black holes at their centres.

20h

Facebook Sketches a Future With a Diminished News Feed

The social media giant expects growth from its Stories platform, plus Messenger and WhatsApp, as it confronts big challenges.

21h

We can tell whether pandas are mating successfully by their bleats

Giant pandas make all sorts of sounds – honks, chirps, roars – and now we know how to tell if they’ve mated by listening to their bleats

21h

Trilobites: Deer Antlers Couldn’t Grow So Fast Without These Genes

Studying the genes that let deer quickly regrow their antlers could one day lead to treatments for people who suffer bone ailments like osteoporosis.

21h

Heart Cell Therapy Trial Paused After Fraud Allegations

A trial to test whether so-called c-kit cardiac stem cells, first reported by Piero Anversa, could help patients with chronic heart failure has been halted in light of suspicion surrounding his work.

22h

Wildlife Populations Have Shrunk by 60 Percent Since 1970

A new report finds the decline in vertebrate abundance over the past four decades is most severe in South and Central America.

22h

Blæksprutter kan blive en vigtig fødevareressource i det globale samfund

Blæksprutte af arten Eledone cirrhosa. Foto: Jonas Drotner Mouritsen Blandt kokke og forskere…

22h

A Florida Man Is Suing Tesla for a Scary Autopilot Crash

The latest lawsuit over Elon Musk's semi-autonomous driving feature claims Tesla sales reps oversold the system's capabilities.

22h

A study identifies new markers associated with protection by the RTS,S malaria vaccine

Protection conferred by the RTS,S malaria vaccine depends greatly on the amount and subclass of antibodies generated upon vaccination, and on previous exposure levels to the parasite, according to a study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa' Foundation. The results, published in BMC Medicine, shed new light on the mechanisms by which RTS,S confers protection and provide the basi

22h

Genes behind rapid deer antler growth, hardening identified in Stanford-led study

Each spring, male deer sprout a new pair of antlers, which are essentially temporary external bones, at a speed unparalleled by the bone growth of other mammals. Now, research led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine has identified two genes that drive the animals' abnormally quick bone generation.

22h

Genes behind rapid deer antler growth, hardening identified

Each spring, male deer sprout a new pair of antlers, which are essentially temporary external bones, at a speed unparalleled by the bone growth of other mammals. Now, research led by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine has identified two genes that drive the animals' abnormally quick bone generation.

23h

Neanderthal ribcage reconstructed, offering new clues to ancient human anatomy

Scientists have completed the first 3D virtual reconstruction of the ribcage of the most complete Neanderthal skeleton unearthed to date. Using CT scans of fossils from an approximately 60,000-year-old male skeleton, researchers were able to create a 3D model of the chest — one that is different from the longstanding image of the barrel-chested, hunched-over 'caveman.'

23h

Scientists call for unified standards in 3D genome and epigenetic data

Studying the three-dimensional structure of DNA and its dynamics is revealing a lot of information about gene expression, expanding our knowledge of how cells, tissues and organs actually work in health and disease. Properly producing and managing this large amount of data is both challenging and necessary for the progress of this field. In a new paper, top researchers call for unified standards a

23h

Brain-inspired methods to improve wireless communications

Researchers are using brain-inspired machine learning techniques to increase the energy efficiency of wireless receivers.

23h

Specific networks in brain present much earlier than previously thought

A team of researchers have used the brain's spontaneously generated patterns of activity to glean novel insights into network structure and development. They found the existence of precise organizational networks in the cerebral cortex much earlier in development than previously thought.

23h

Flexible, stable and potent against cancer

Linking therapeutically active molecules to specific antibodies can help to pilot them to their designated targets and minimize side effects — especially when treating tumors. Scientists have now described novel conjugates made from antibodies and a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor. Changing the linker between the two components allows for tuning the activity of this cytostatic drug, which is ef

23h

Preventing sudden cardiac death with genome editing

Gene editing successfully prevented sudden cardiac death in a mouse model of inherited cardiac arrhythmia disorder.

23h

How to feed a cat: Consensus statement to the veterinary community

The American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP) today released the AAFP Consensus Statement, 'Feline Feeding Programs: Addressing Behavioral Needs to Improve Feline Health and Wellbeing' and accompanying client brochure to the veterinary community. The Consensus Statement, published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, explores the medical, social, and emotional problems that can

23h

Secrets of mighty cancer killing virus unlocked

Researchers have used high-resolution electron microscopy images to reveal how an anti-cancer virus interacts with tumor cells, increasing its potential to save lives.

23h

Why don't birds fall over when they jump?

Scientists have been analyzing the way birds jump when they take-off to help us understand why they simply don't just fall over when attempting to fly. The researchers, based in the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering at The University of Manchester, have been investigating the biomechanics of how birds jump, and will use the findings to design jumping robots in the future.

23h

AI systems shed light on root cause of religious conflict

Artificial intelligence can help us to better understand the causes of religious violence and to potentially control it, according to a new Oxford University collaboration.The study published in The Journal for Artificial Societies and Social Stimulation, combined computer modelling and cognitive psychology to create an AI system able to mimic human religiosity, allowing them to better understand

23h

Giant flightless birds were nocturnal and possibly blind

If you encountered an elephant bird today, it would be hard to miss. Measuring in at over 10 feet tall, the extinct avian is the largest bird known to science. However, while you looked up in awe, it's likely that the big bird would not be looking back. According to brain reconstruction research led by The University of Texas at Austin, the part of the elephant bird brain that processed vision was

23h

Why don't birds fall over when they jump?

Scientists have been analysing the way birds jump when they take-off to help us understand why they simply don't just fall over when attempting to fly.

23h

Giant flightless birds were nocturnal and possibly blind

If you encountered an elephant bird today, it would be hard to miss. Measuring in at over 10 feet tall, the extinct avian is the largest bird known to science. However, while you looked up in awe, it's likely that the big bird would not be looking back.

23h

New species of Swallowtail butterfly discovered in Fiji

A spectacular new butterfly species has been discovered on the Pacific Island of Vanua Levu in Fiji. The species, named last week as Papilio natewa after the Natewa Peninsula where it was found, is a remarkable discovery in a location where butterfly wildlife was thought to be well known.

23h

The Atlantic Daily: What the Fourteenth Amendment Says About Birthright Citizenship

What We’re Following Birthright: President Donald Trump wants to remove by executive order the right to U.S. citizenship for children born to noncitizens on U.S. soil, he suggested in a new interview. (Reminder: We’re one week out from the U.S. midterm elections.) Any move to revoke birthright citizenship will ignite debate over interpretation of the Fourteenth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution

1d

Body mass index associated with deaths from most causes

Body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat, is linked to risk of death from every major cause except transport accidents, according to new research published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology.

1d

North-south divide in early deaths deepening, study finds

Northerners aged 25 to 44 more likely to die from causes such as suicide and smoking There has been a “profoundly concerning” rise in early deaths from accidents, suicide, alcohol misuse, smoking, cancer and drug addiction in the north of England, deepening the north-south divide, research has found. Socioeconomic deprivation has led to a particularly sharp rise in deaths among 25 to 44-year-olds

1d

Trapping atoms, not space ships, with tractor beams

Researchers have delved into the realm of Star Wars and created a powerful tractor beam — or light-driven energy trap — for atoms.

1d

How the world's fastest muscle created four unique bird species

When the male bearded manakin snaps its wings at lightning speed, it's more than part of an elaborate, acrobatic mating ritual. The tiny muscle doing the heavy lifting is also the reason this exotic bird has evolved into four distinct species, according to new research.

1d

Simple, mass production of giant vesicles using a porous silicone material

A technique to generate large amounts of giant vesicle (liposome) dispersion has been developed. The technique involves adsorbing a lipid into a silicone porous material resembling a 'marshmallow-like gel' and then squeezing it out like a sponge by impregnating a buffer solution.

1d

Tiny beetle trapped in amber might show how landmasses shifted

Scientists have discovered a tiny fossil beetle trapped in amber. It's three millimeters long, and it has a flat body and giant feathery antennae that it would have used to navigate under tree bark. And, since it was found in amber from Asia but its closest relatives today live in South America, it hints at how landmasses have shifted over the past 100 million years.

1d

How LSD changes perception

LSD changes the communication patterns between regions of the brain, new research shows. The study also provides insights into how mental health disorders develop and how these could be treated.

1d

These new techniques expose your browsing history to attackers

Security researchers have discovered four new ways to expose Internet users' browsing histories. These techniques could be used by hackers to learn which websites users have visited as they surf the web.

1d

How people perceive cities and suburbs is not merely a matter of boundary lines

What separates cities and suburbs isn't always a geographic boundary. Subjective social factors also play a role, particularly school quality and public safety, according to a new study.

1d

Pedestrian fatalities increase on Halloween, particularly among children

Children are more likely to be fatally struck by a vehicle on Halloween than on other nights of the year, according to new research.

1d

Owls help scientists unlock secret of how the brain pays attention

Studying barn owls, scientists believe they've taken an important step toward solving the longstanding mystery of how the brain chooses what most deserves attention.

1d

Young men more likely to die in summer, older people in winter despite local climate

Young men living in the US are overall more likely to die in the summer months, according to a new study.

1d

Berkeley computer theorists show path to verifying that quantum beats classical

Researchers have just found a way to show that quantum computing beats classical computing by giving a leading practical proposal known as random circuit sampling (RCS) a qualified seal of approval with the weight of complexity theoretic evidence behind it. They showed that producing a random output with a 'quantum accent' is indeed hard for a classical computer through a technical complexity theo

1d

An end to arachnophobia 'just a heartbeat away'

Researchers have discovered that exposing people with phobias to their fear — for examples, spiders for those who have arachnophobia — at the exact time their heart beats, led to the phobia reducing in severity.

1d

New anatomic structure in the ankle described

Researchers describe a new ligament in the lateral side of the ankle. The ligament complex would explain chronic pain after an ankle sprain.

1d

Generation Z stressed about issues in the news but least likely to vote

Headline issues, from immigration to sexual assault, are causing significant stress among members of Generation Z — those between ages 15 and 21 — with mass shootings topping the list of stressful current events, according to a new report.

1d

Scientists neutralize reactive nitrogen molecules to enhance cancer immunotherapy

Researchers studying tumors in prostate cancer models found that nitration of an amino acid can inhibit T-cell activation, thwarting the T-cell's ability to kill cancer cells.

1d

Pittsburgh Honors Two Brothers, ‘Gentle Giants’ of the Community

PITTSBURGH—Cecil and David Rosenthal were buried in matching caskets made of wood, each adorned with a single Jewish star. The brothers, 59 and 54, were two of the 11 Jews killed in Pittsburgh on Saturday, remembered by all as irrepressibly friendly synagogue regulars. But they were also vulnerable in a different way from the other victims of the shooting at the Tree of Life synagogue: The brothe

1d

Promising new target for immunotherapy

Researchers have shed new light on a molecule called TIM-3 that might play a key role in the regulation of the immune response.

1d

Modelling a future fuelled by sustainable energy

Economists have modeled the transition from a world powered by fossil fuels to one in which sustainable sources supply all our energy needs.

1d

Photosynthesis like a moss

Moss evolved after algae but before vascular land plants, such as ferns and trees, making them an interesting target for scientists studying photosynthesis, the process by which plants convert sunlight to fuel. Now researchers have made a discovery that could shed light on how plants evolved to move from the ocean to land.

1d

Advertising in kids' apps more prevalent than parents may realize

Ninety-five percent of reviewed apps for children ages 5 and under include at least one form of advertising, a new study finds. Researchers found play was frequently interrupted by pop-up video ads, persuasion by commercial characters to make in-app purchases to enhance the game experience and overt banner ads that could be distracting, misleading and not always age-appropriate.

1d

How Did Two Mothers Both Carry the Same Child?

Their success is due to a twist on a relatively new fertility treatment.

1d

Waymo Can Finally Bring Truly Driverless Cars to California

The company born as Google's self-driving car project is the first with the right to test human-free cars on public roads in the Golden State.

1d

Rose geranium oil may ease common painful nasal symptoms linked to cancer treatment

Rose geranium oil may help to ease the symptoms of a common and painful nasal condition that is linked to cancer drug treatment, indicate the results of a small observational study, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.

1d

Childhood antibiotics and antacids may be linked to heightened obesity risk

Young children prescribed antibiotics and, to a lesser extent, drugs to curb excess stomach acid, may be at heightened risk of obesity, suggests research published online in the journal Gut.

1d

Plant-based or vegan diet may be best for keeping type 2 diabetes in check

A predominantly plant-based or vegan diet may be best for keeping type 2 diabetes in check, not least because of its potential impact on mood, suggests a systematic review of the available evidence, published in the journal BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.

1d

Gender inequality could be driving the deaths of girls under 5

Levels of gender inequality across the world are associated with disproportionate death rates among girls under 5 years old, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London.

1d

200 Google workers will walk out on Thursday over sexual misconduct handling

48 people have been terminated from Google for sexual misconduct in the last two years. 13 of those were senior management. The highest-level senior manager manager accused—creator of the Android OS Andy Rubin—is the only one who received a $90-million "golden parachute". None Google has a bit of a PR problem on its hands. The exit of Android creator Andy Rubin in 2014 was accompanied by talk of

1d

Do doctors warn patients enough about opioids?

More than 130 people die every day from opioid-related overdoses, and some 11.4 million Americans have an opioid disorder. Americans remain wary of opioids and want more guidance; about a third of doctors need to explain options better. Patients have to pro-actively question subscribing physicians. The statistics that describe America's opioid epidemic are sobering. According to Health and Human

1d

Halloween history: The ancient origins of these dark traditions

Halloween was influenced heavily by Celtic, Pagan and Christian traditions. The holiday has always celebrated the strange and scary, but festivities as we know them have changed over the years. Current Halloween traditions were brought by immigrants to the United States in the early 20th century. Halloween is a holiday that's celebrated every year on October 31st. While its tradition in the Unite

1d

4 psychological techniques cults use to recruit members

The beliefs of cults and other extreme ideologies are patently bizarre to any outsider observer. Despite how strange their beliefs are and the stereotype, most people who get sucked into cults are relatively normal and healthy at first. Watching out for these four manipulative tactics can help you from getting suckered by cults, scams, and other extreme organizations. None Scientologists believe

1d

Vitamin D levels in the blood linked to cardiorespiratory fitness

New research finds that higher levels of vitamin D are associated with better exercise capacity.

1d

Inquiry Into Ryan Zinke Land Deal Is Said to Escalate

The move, if confirmed, is a sign that the federal government is considering a criminal investigation of the interior secretary’s conduct.

1d

Hawaiian Supreme Court Approves Giant Telescope on Mauna Kea

The court granted a building permit for a roughly $2 billion observatory, which activists had protested would further degrade the site of an ancient volcano.

1d

Chevy's Electric eCOPO Camaro Is Made to Rule the Drag Strip

Buy into the heresy of the eCOPO Camaro and you get more than 700 horsepower, 600 pound-feet of torque, and a quarter-mile time in the 9-second range.

1d

Humanity's obsession with chocolate may go back much further than we thought

Science Some delicious new research. The new findings paint a more complicated and deeper picture of humans’ relationship with cacao, one of the world’s biggest economic crops to date…

1d

Brecon project gives water vole a fighting chance

A Powys captive breeding project aims to give water voles a fighting chance of a revival.

1d

New brain region that suppresses fear identified

A new study has identified a new area in the brain involved in inhibiting fear, a discovery that holds potential for clinical interventions in patients with psychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

1d

How some heart cells cope with high blood pressure

Individual cells within the same heart cope differently with high blood pressure, according to a new study. This is the first time researchers have identified distinct differences between heart muscle cells that fail and those that adapt to high blood pressure.

1d

The 10-foot-tall microscopes helping combat world's worst diseases

The century-old mission to understand how the proteins responsible for amyloid-based diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntingdon's and Parkinson's work has taken major steps forward in the last 12 months, thanks to a revolution in a powerful microscopy technique used by scientists.

1d

High levels of previously unsuspected pollutant uncovered in homes, environment

Scientists have found high levels of a previously unsuspected pollutant in homes, in an electronic waste recycling facility and in the natural environment. People are likely to be exposed to this pollutant by breathing contaminated dust or through skin contact.

1d

Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier Just Lost Enough Ice to Cover Manhattan 5 Times Over

An enormous iceberg about five times the size of Manhattan broke off Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier yesterday (Oct. 29), a mere month after a crack first appeared, satellite imagery shows.

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A City in Mourning

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In an interview with Axios , part of which aired Tuesday, President Donald Trump said he plans to sign an executive order that would end birthright citizenship—a move that would spark a fierce debate over the Fourteenth Amendment. He did not provide a tim

1d

Google spinoff to test fully driverless cars in California

Google's robotic car spin-off Waymo is poised to become the first to test fully driverless vehicles on California's public roads.

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Lyft and Uber out to be everyday rides with passes

US ride-share rivals Lyft and Uber are out to lure everyday riders with monthly passes for discounted or free rides, dabbling with a subscription model aimed at commuters.

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Hawaii Supreme Court upholds permit for giant telescope

Hawaii's Supreme Court upheld a decision to grant a construction permit for an embattled, international giant telescope project planned for a mountain Native Hawaiians consider sacred.

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Integrated quantum chip operations possible, tests show

For the first time, an Australian team has combined two fundamental quantum techniques on an integrated silicon platform, confirming the promise of silicon — the basis of all modern computer chips — for quantum computing.

1d

The Echoes of Kristallnacht

Just before midnight on November 9, 1938, the Gestapo chief, Heinrich Müller, sent a telegram to every police unit in Nazi Germany. “In shortest order,” it read , “actions against Jews and especially their synagogues will take place in all of Germany. These are not to be interfered with.” Firefighters stood by as synagogues and Jewish-owned homes, schools, and businesses burned to the ground. Wit

1d

An Ode to the Spacecraft That Filled the Galaxy With Planets

In 2009, a NASA spacecraft, fresh off the launchpad, drifted into an orbit high above Earth. The Kepler telescope would circle the sun, but its attention would be focused elsewhere, far beyond the edges of our solar system, on the Milky Way’s other stars. As Kepler settled into its perch, engineers on the ground commanded the spacecraft to overheat one of its wires until it snapped apart. The man

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The planet-hunting Kepler space telescope is dead

The Kepler space telescope is officially out of fuel and will hunt planets no more, NASA announced.

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Kepler, the Little NASA Spacecraft That Could, No Longer CanNASA Kepler Space Earth

After nine and a half years in orbit, 530,506 stars observed and 2,662 planets around other stars discovered, the telescope will be left to drift forever around the sun.

1d

Tiny light detectors work like gecko ears

By structuring nanowires in a way that mimics geckos' ears, researchers have found a way to record the incoming angle of light. This technology could have applications in robotic vision, photography and augmented reality.

1d

A Giant Midterms Spending Gulf on Facebook

If a blue wave does not materialize in the upcoming midterm elections, it won’t be for Democrats’ lack of spending on Facebook. According to an Atlantic analysis of the top 100 spenders, left-leaning candidates and causes spent $9.43 million from October 21 to October 27 alone, the most recent period for which Facebook data is available. The big spenders on the right spent only $2.65 million. The

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Texas A&M professor identifies new brain region that suppresses fear

A study conducted at Texas A&M University has identified a new area in the brain involved in inhibiting fear, a discovery that holds potential for clinical interventions in patients with psychiatric diseases such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The article was published in Nature Communications on Oct. 30.

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Army, university study suggests brain structure could influence behavior

New research focusing on how brain structure may impact brain activity and ultimately human behavior could one day lead to technology that can be catered to an individual Soldier in a training environment or operational setting.

1d

Facebook posts strong 3Q profit, lukewarm revenue

Facebook didn't hit it out of the ballpark with its latest quarterly report, but the bar isn't so high these days for the image-battered social networking giant.

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How people perceive cities and suburbs is not merely a matter of boundary lines

Individual perceptions about safety and school quality play critical roles in how people define their communities, and these subjective social factors can influence the notion of what separates a city from its suburbs just as physical boundaries traditionally make that distinction, according to the results of a new study co-written by a University at Buffalo researcher.

1d

New technologies in the ocean energy sector

While the ocean energy sector is still at an early stage of development, a new report analyses ten future emerging technologies to generate energy from the ocean tides and waves.

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New technologies in the ocean energy sector

Analysis of ten future emerging technologies to generate energy from the ocean tides and waves.

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Economic impact of excess weight now exceeds $1.7 trillion

The impact of obesity and overweight on the U.S. economy has eclipsed $1.7 trillion, an amount equivalent to 9.3 percent of the nation's gross domestic product, according to a new Milken Institute report on the role excess weight plays in the prevalence and cost of chronic diseases.

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Our best planet-hunting telescope has come to the end of its missionNASA Kepler Space Earth

The Kepler Space Telescope has found thousands of planets beyond our solar system in the last decade. Now it has run out of fuel and will be turned off for good

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Kepler, NASA's Revolutionary Planet-Hunting Telescope, Is Dead

After running out of fuel, the mission leaves behind a legacy of thousands of exoplanets and a new understanding of Earth’s cosmic context — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How people perceive cities and suburbs is not merely a matter of boundary lines

What separates cities and suburbs isn't always a geographic boundary. Subjective social factors also play a role, particularly school quality and public safety, according to a new study.

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Florida man sues Tesla over autopilot feature, crash

A Florida man says the autopilot feature of his Tesla vehicle failed to detect a disabled car on a highway, leading to a collision that left him with permanent injuries, according to a negligence lawsuit filed Tuesday.

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Commercial shellfish landings decline likely linked to environmental factors

Researchers studying the sharp decline between 1980 and 2010 in documented landings of the four most commercially-important bivalve mollusks—eastern oysters, northern quahogs, softshell clams and northern bay scallops—have identified the causes.

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Plants respond to environmental stress by 'tagging' RNA molecules they need to withstand the difficult conditions

The future looks challenging for plants. Climate change is forecast to bring widespread drought to parts of the planet already struggling with dry conditions. To mitigate the potentially devastating effects to agriculture, researchers are seeking strategies to help plants withstand extreme environmental hazards including drought and salt stress, a problem exacerbated when irrigated water passes th

1d

Instagram Is Teeming With Anti-Semitism

On Saturday afternoon, as the media descended upon the alleged Pittsburgh shooter’s long trail of anti-Semitic social-media posts, Kate Friedman Siegel began to feel frustrated. To her, it all felt familiar. In fact, she had reported similar messages to Instagram just last month, and watched the platform do nothing about them. Siegel shared screenshots of two anti-Semitic memes she had received v

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NASA’s Parker Solar Probe just smashed two all-time records on its way to the sun

Space And it's going to keep on smashing them. The Parker Space Probe just broke a 40-year-old speed record during its ongoing plunge toward the sun. And that's not all.

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Laser technique may open door to more efficient clean fuels

Research by the University of Liverpool could help scientists unlock the full potential of new clean energy technologies.

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New fin-recognition technology a boon for global dolphin conservation

The National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF) and Western EcoSystems Technology, Inc. (WEST) today announced the release of an innovative, automated system, 'finFindR', that identifies wild dolphins using photographs of the nicks and notches on their dorsal fins.

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Lifespan and sexual maturity depends on your brain more than your body

New research finds how long humans and other warm-blooded animals live — and when they reach sexual maturity — may have more to do with their brain than their body. More specifically, it is not animals with larger bodies or slower metabolic rates that live longer; it is animals with more neurons in the cerebral cortex, whatever the size of the body.

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Potential flaw in our assumptions about unknown opinions of others

Findings from a new study suggest that people assume that those who are silent in a conversation would agree with their own opinion, even if the majority of the speakers in the group have a different opinion. This has implications for how people form opinions about products, politics, and much more.

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Laser technique may open door to more efficient clean fuels

Electrocatalysts have shown promise as a way to efficiently convert waste CO2 into clean fuels, but the mechanisms by which they operate are often unknown making it hard for researchers to design new ones in a rational manner. New research demonstrates a laser-based spectroscopy technique that can be used to study the electrochemical reduction of CO2 in-situ and provide much-needed insights into t

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Is war between China and the US inevitable? | Graham Allison

Taking lessons from a historical pattern called "Thucydides's Trap," political scientist Graham Allison shows why a rising China and a dominant United States could be headed towards a violent collision no one wants — and how we can summon the common sense and courage to avoid it.

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Apple debuts new iPad Pro alongside revamped MacBook Airs

Inside the new iPad Pros are the new A12x Bionic chip, which are apparently faster than 92% of the laptops out there. MacBook Airs come with Retina display, first true update in 8 years. The iPad Pro starts at $799 while the MacBook Air starts at $1,199. Apple product launches are sort of like sports drafts in that there's a lot of pageantry and hullabaloo surrounding what is ostensibly just an i

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Fertilitetsprojekt på tværs af Øresund og siloer

ReproUnion forsøger at skaber en helt ny tilgang til forskning og udvikling indenfor fertilitetsområdet. Det kræver bl.a. tillid og fællesøkonomi, og blandt de foreløbige resultater er 22 ph.d.-studerende og en aftale om patientmobilitet mellem Region Skåne og Hovedstaden.

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The 'Quantum Vampire' Effect Is Spookier Than Ever

The 'Quantum Vampire' Effect Is Spookier Than Ever New research finds the optical effect previously produced using strictly quantum techniques may have broader applications. quantumvampire_final1.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Physics Tuesday, October 30, 2018 – 15:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Legends and folklores often bend the laws of physics, but every o

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Kepler telescope dead after finding thousands of worldsNASA Kepler Space Earth

NASA's elite planet-hunting spacecraft has been declared dead, just a few months shy of its 10th anniversary.

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Animal species becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation nearly complete

Species of reptiles, amphibians and other vertebrates are becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation has claimed more than 99 percent of the country's original wooded areas.

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Truck driver pain and discomfort can be alleviated

Almost 60 per cent of truck drivers in a recent Canadian study reported experiencing musculoskeletal (MSD) pain and discomfort on the job, even though it may be preventable.

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These dogs know you have malaria before you do

Animals Reporting for the dog detection unit A group of researchers proved dogs can be trained to detect malaria in people infected with the disease but who had no fever or physical symptoms.

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Apple's T2 Security Chip Makes It Harder to Tap MacBook Mics

By cutting off the microphone at the hardware level, recent MacBook devices minimize the chance that someone can eavesdrop

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University of Miami Miller School of Medicine — managing common ankle fractures

'Management of Isolated Lateral Malleous Fractures' written by Aimethab A. Aiyer was published in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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Thermo Fisher Scientific: The Right Tube for Your Experiment: Minimizing Leachables

When working in a biobank, it’s important to consider the possibility that storage containers, which are sterile, pyrogen-free, and disposable, can potentially still harm your valuable biological samples.

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Making a transparent flexible material of silk and nanotubes

The silk fibers produced by Bombyx mori, the domestic silkworm, has been prized for millennia as a strong yet lightweight and luxurious material. Although synthetic polymers like nylon and polyester are less costly, they do not compare to silk's natural qualities and mechanical properties. And according to new research, silk combined with carbon nanotubes may lead to a new generation of biomedical

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Increasing frequency of ocean storms could alter kelp forest ecosystems

A future with stormier seas may bring strong changes to the biodiversity of coastal sea life, according to new research.

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