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Nyheder2018september03

 

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Little star sheds light on young planets

Astronomers from the Department of Physics at the University of Tokyo discovered a dense disk of material around a young star, which may be a precursor to a planetary system. Their research could vastly improve models of how solar systems form, which would tell us more about our own place in the cosmos.

4h

 

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Kan vi så få ro: Højttalere skal stoppe højttalere ved udendørs koncerter

DTU-elektro vil reducere basfrekvenser i nabo-zoner til udendørskoncerter, uden at spolere musikoplevelsen.

4h

Small fish passes classic self-awareness test

An international team of researchers has found a small tropical fish that is capable of passing a classic test of self-awareness. The results are published on the bioRxiv prepress server.

4h

The Rise of the Zombie Small Businesses

Imagine the farm that raised the chicken that produced the meat that sits in your sandwich: a few workers, thousands of birds, tens of thousands of pounds of white and dark meat, work that starts before dawn and ends after dusk, uncertain revenue, slim profits. There are thousands of these small farms in the United States, and they benefit from millions of dollars of taxpayer support each year. C

4h

Introducing The Atlantic’s Ideas Section

What does it mean for The Atlantic —a magazine that has always emphasized the importance of ideas—to launch a separate section actually called Ideas, as we are doing today? It means that, you, our readers, will have a new destination on the web for incisive and intelligent analysis, essays, and commentary. When news breaks, and you want to understand what it means and why it matters, you’ll have

4h

The Second Redemption Court

W hen the Louisiana State Militia finally arrived at the Colfax courthouse on April 15, 1873, all it could do was bury the bodies. Two days earlier, a large force of white supremacists had taken control of the courthouse from the mostly black faction protecting it. J. R. Beckwith, the U.S. attorney for New Orleans, told Congress that in the aftermath the ground was “strewn with dead negroes,” the

4h

Neuropsychiatric disorders: Dopamine study offers hope for improved treatments

New work sheds light on how dopamine receptors signal within cells, opening the door for more targeted — and more tolerable — therapeutics to treat an array of neuropsychiatric disorders.

4h

Biophysics: Self-centered

Rod-shaped bacterial cells normally divide by constriction midway along their long axis. Physicists have developed a theoretical model to explain how Myxococcus xanthus localizes the plane of division to mid-cell.

4h

How weight loss is linked to future health for older adults

A study evaluated information from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures and looked specifically at health and weight for women who were over age 65. Reviewing more than 20 years' worth of data for study participants, the team of researchers had the chance to examine links between long-term weight gain/loss and health.

4h

Study provides 10-year risk estimates for dementia, which may help with prevention in high-risk individuals who potentially could benefit from early targeted prevention

A Danish study provides 10-year absolute risk estimates for dementia specific to age, sex and common variation in the APOE gene, which may help identify high-risk individuals who potentially could benefit from early targeted prevention. The study is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

4h

Changing the type of silicon etching drops solar power costs by more than 10 percent

Michigan Technological University and Aalto University researchers have found that using dry etched black silicon for passive emitter rear cell (PERC) solar cells increases the cost of individual cell production by 15.8 percent to 25.1 percent, but reduces the cost per unit power by 10.8 percent over those for industrial Czochralski silicon.

4h

New imagery solves mystery of why Mount St. Helens is out of line with other volcanoes

Some of the clearest, most comprehensive images of the top several miles of the Earth's crust have helped scientists solve the mystery of why Mount St. Helens is located outside the main line of the Cascade Arc of volcanoes.

4h

Study: Denver's inequities in park access traced to segregation, funding policies

Current inequities in access to Denver's parks among minorities and low-income residents are the legacies of segregationist land-use and housing policies, as well as funding mechanisms that prioritized investment in wealthy white neighborhoods, according to a new study led by University of Illinois recreation, sport andtourism professor Alessandro Rigolon.

4h

Regulation of Pom cluster dynamics in Myxococcus xanthus

Rod-shaped bacterial cells normally divide by constriction midway along their long axis. LMU physicists have developed a theoretical model to explain how Myxococcus xanthus localizes the plane of division to mid-cell.

4h

Like a zipper: How cells form new blood vessels

Blood vessel formation relies on the ability of vascular cells to move while remaining firmly connected to each other. This enables the vessels to grow and sprout without leaking any blood. In the current issue of Nature Communications, scientists from the Biozentrum at the University of Basel describe how this works. In this process, the cytoskeleton pushes the cell forward, while an adhesion pro

4h

Chemists synthesize ultrafast cyanide detector

Organic chemists at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania have synthesised a new material, which can be used as a detector of cyanides in water. In contact with cyanides it changes colour in half a minute – more than 20 times faster than currently used colorimetric commercial cyanide detection products.

4h

An inside look at a $2,200 pair of custom headphones

Gadgets The Ultimate Ears Live in-ear monitors use hearing aid tech for super-precise sound. Each in-ear unit contains eight speakers, and each of those is tuned to a specific part of the audio spectrum.

4h

Researchers investigate a white dwarf exhibiting transits of planetary debris

An international group of astronomers has conducted a study of a peculiar white dwarf known as WD 1145+017 that showcases periodic transits of planetary debris. The new research, presented in a paper published August 22 on arXiv.org, determines fundamental parameters of this object and provides essential insights into the nature of debris around it.

4h

How Self-Driving Supergroup Aurora Is Making Self-Driving Cars

One of the most respected—and quietest—teams in the race for autonomy reveals its approach to a problem that's much harder than everybody hoped.

4h

Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals predicts lung damage in 9/11 firefighters

Abnormal levels of more than two dozen metabolites — chemicals produced in the body as it breaks down fats, proteins and carbohydrates — can reliably predict which Sept. 11 firefighters developed lung disease and which did not, a new analysis shows.

4h

Mouse models may not accurately mimic severity of gonorrhea infection

The mouse model may not fully reflect the severity of the infection and the types of immune responses seen in humans.

4h

How weight loss is linked to future health for older adults

A study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, evaluated information from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures and looked specifically at health and weight for women who were over age 65. Reviewing more than 20 years' worth of data for study participants, the team of researchers had the chance to examine links between long-term weight gain/loss and health.

4h

Are We Ready for the Future of Warfare?

The way we fight is evolving, and our science and technology must evolve with it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Experiencing homelessness for longer than six months can cause significant damage to a child

Researchers found that children who experienced both pre- and post-natal homelessness and those who experienced homelessness for longer than six months were at highest risk of negative health outcomes. These findings illustrate the urgent need to intervene and rapidly house children and families experiencing homelessness to minimize the negative health outcomes.

4h

Study of monotreme and marsupial brains suggests hemispheres communicated before development of corpus callosum

A team of researchers with The University of Queensland has found evidence suggesting that mammalian brain hemispheres had a means of communicating long before the development of the corpus callosum. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes mammalian brain studies they conducted using MRIs and what they found.

4h

‘Autobiographical memory’ may predict Alzheimer’s risk

Testing how well people remember past events in their lives could help doctors make early predictions about who is at risk for developing Alzheimer’s disease, according to a new study. Researchers administered an “autobiographical memory” test to a group of 35 healthy adults, about half of whom carry the gene variant APOE e4—a known genetic risk factor that nearly doubles the chances of developin

4h

Biophysics: Self-centered

Rod-shaped bacterial cells normally divide by constriction midway along their long axis. LMU physicists have developed a theoretical model to explain how Myxococcus xanthus localizes the plane of division to mid-cell.

4h

Dopamine receptor study offers hope for improved treatments with fewer side effects

New work from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons sheds light on how dopamine receptors signal within cells, opening the door for more targeted — and more tolerable — therapeutics to treat an array of neuropsychiatric disorders.

4h

Geoffrey Owens and the Paradox of Fame

One of the more deflating corners of the internet is a website called Cameo, which brokers personalized videos recorded by celebrities. You can, should you wish, commission a birthday wish or greeting for a friend or family member from stars including the comedian Kathy Griffin ($499), the Motley Crue front man Tommy Lee ($250), the former Real Housewife Brandi Glanville ($100), and the actress (

4h

Human eye capable of seeing 'ghosted' images

A team of researchers in the U.K. has found that the human eye and brain are together capable of seeing "ghosted" images. The researchers have published a paper describing their work on the arXiv preprint server.

4h

Sjællands Universitetshospital opretter nationalt videnscenter for knoglesundhed

Nyt nationalt videnscenter for knoglesundhed på Sjællands Universitetshospital skal gennem forskning skabe ny viden, der kan optimere diagnosticeringen og behandlingen af patienter med osteoporose.

5h

German car market surges as manufacturers face emissions crunch

Registrations of new cars on German roads leaped 25 percent in August, official data showed Tuesday, ahead of the introduction of new stricter EU emissions tests that will shut out some older models.

5h

Senator Mark Warner Is Not Happy With Google

The vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee talks about the search giant's glaring absence at this week's committee hearings, and the White House's #stopthebias campaign.

5h

I Invented Autocorrect. Sorry About That; You're Welcome

Opinion: A longtime Apple designer explains why it’s so hard to make phones predict what you’re thinking when you type.

5h

The World Of An Oyster: Scientists Are Using Microphones To Spy On Reef Life

Reefs are being rebuilt along U.S. coastlines, which is good for the oyster. But how does it affect other underwater life? Researchers are listening to find out what animals use the reefs and why. (Image credit: James Morrison/WUNC)

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Image of the Day: Ocean Wonder

Molecules similar to those produced by sea anemones are neuroprotective in a mouse cell model of Alzheimer’s disease.

5h

How to Build a Better Childhood

Design and architecture critic Alexandra Lange examines the material world we’ve created for children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Wellcome Sanger Institute Leaders Accused of Bullying

Several members of senior management at the prestigious UK research center face claims of sexism and mistreatment of staff.

5h

Weapons Against Superbugs Might Lurk in Your Stomach

New research turns up potential antibiotics in the human body.

6h

How Massive Is the Milky Way?

It's a straightforward question, but not an easy one to answer.

6h

Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri får ny lægelig vicedirektør

Speciallæge i psykiatri Ida Hageman er tiltrådt som lægelig vicedirektør i Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri, der årligt behandler ca. 50.000 børn og voksne med psykiske lidelser.

6h

How Well-Intentioned White Families Can Perpetuate Racism

When Margaret Hagerman was trying to recruit white affluent families as subjects for the research she was doing on race, one prospective interviewee told her, “I can try to connect you with my colleague at work who is black. She might be more helpful.” Modern-day segregation in public schools To Hagerman, that response was helpful in itself. She is a sociologist at Mississippi State, and her new

6h

When Postpartum Depression Doesn’t Go Away

After giving birth to her first child, Chelsea Reiswig, like many new mothers, struggled with postpartum depression. But even as her child got older, the condition didn’t go away. “I knew postpartum depression was a thing,” she says, “but I never really thought about it affecting me. I was not myself. I felt scared all the time.” Reiswig was jarred by the thought that this might be a condition th

6h

Like-liderlig og snotforvirret: 5 måder din smartphone fuckr md dn hjerne

Teknologien kan påvirke dine tanker ganske voldsomt, og din smartphone kan svække din stedsans, give dig dårlige vaner og gøre dig i dårligt humør.

6h

From 'Maniac' to 'The First,' the 15 New Fall TV Shows We're Most Excited About

From Netflix mind-benders to Hulu space dramas, the fall is looking good for new TV.

6h

A Clever and Simple Robot Hand

Researchers have developed a simple, yet capable hand that promises to help robots get a grip at a fraction of the price.

6h

Silicon Valley Wants to Use Algorithms for Debt Collection

Startups hope to disrupt the robocalls and boiler rooms by harnessing data to make collection both gentler and more efficient.

6h

Artificial forest air and light-based chemical reactions tackle indoor pollution

The air in our offices and homes can contain a higher mix of chemicals than outdoors, but next-generation purifiers are aiming to absorb the harmful particles and let us all breathe a bit easier.

6h

Why Haven't We Cured The Common Cold Yet?

Researchers think they’re close to a cure for the common cold, but they first need to solve a complex problem that’s perplexed scientists for decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

From Fish to Humans, A Microplastic Invasion May Be Taking a Toll

Tiny bits of plastic have seeped into soil, fish and air, posing a threat to animal and human health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Falling stars hold clue for understanding dying stars

An international team of researchers has proposed a new method to investigate the inner workings of supernovae explosions. This new method uses meteorites, and is unique in that it can determine the contribution from electron anti-neutrinos, enigmatic particles which can't be tracked through other means.

6h

Terahertz spectroscopy enters the single-molecule regime

The interaction of light with matter is the basis of spectroscopy, a set of techniques lying at the heart of physics and chemistry. From infrared light to X-rays, a broad sweep of wavelengths is used to stimulate vibrations, electron transitions, and other processes, thus probing the world of atoms and molecules.

6h

The real danger of deepfake videos is that we may question everything

Realistic fake videos are now easier to make than ever. To fight back we need to find sources of information we can trust

6h

Competition Fuels Schadenfreude, Research Shows

Schadenfreude is an emotion most people try to hide. But research shows people are more likely to exhibit this feeling if they are die-hard fans of a particular sports team.

6h

Eugenia Cheng and Tim Radford on finding solace in science – books podcast

This week, we turn away from the crowds of catastrophist headlines and dystopian fiction and discover hope in the world of science Can advanced mathematics and physics help us navigate a path through today’s social and political turmoil? Eugenia Cheng’s book The Art of Logic: How to Make Sense in a World That Doesn’t shows how mathematical logic can help us see difficult political questions such

6h

Reining In the Excesses of Title IX

What happens when a morally reprehensible administration puts forth morally just reforms? We are about to find out. A New York Times report on Wednesday outlined the Trump administration’s proposed revisions of rules governing how campuses deal with sexual misconduct allegations (the official release is expected by October). A year ago, Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos declared that

7h

Call Them What They Wants

It is certainly the most challenging change in language I have dealt with in my lifetime. Ever more people, rejecting the gender binary, are requesting to be referred to as they rather than as he or she . That is, we now say: Ariella isn't wearing the green one. They think it's time to wear their other one . I expect to get some new practice using they this way as school starts back up, with more

7h

Kavanaugh Has a Strong Chance of Confirmation—and of Becoming an Election Rallying Cry

This week is Brett Kavanaugh’s audition for Supreme Court justice. The Senate Judiciary Committee will hold hearings starting on Tuesday, likely focusing on Kavanaugh’s time as a White House counsel during the George W. Bush administration and his record as a federal appellate-court judge. Barring some explosive revelation, Kavanaugh has strong odds of winning the 51 Senate votes he needs to be c

7h

GRAFIK: Renseanlæg mangler vigtigt trin, før spildevandet kan smides på marken

EU er på vej med fælles regler for brug af renset spildevand. Danmark er tæt på at kunne opfylde kvaliteten allerede i dag.

7h

Sådan kan AI hjælpe med at omstille hele verden til vedvarende energi

Med kunstig intelligens kan den rette placering af og den optimale produktion fra vedvarende energikilder bestemmes. AI er derfor et væsentligt værktøj i en omstilling til fornybar energi, mener stifter af AI Academy.

7h

Cyberkriminelle udnytter sårbarhed i faxfunktion

En sårbarhed i udbredt kommunikationsprotokol til fax-kommunikation kan være bagdør for cyberkriminelle til hele netværk

7h

USA og fire andre regeringer: Der skal bagdøre i krypterede enheder

Fem regeringer verden over anmoder teknologivirksomheder om at lave bagdøre i deres krypterede produkter.

7h

Data science hos TDC: Vi har ikke tid til hobby-projekter

TDC vil have data scientists, der interesserer sig for forretningen og ikke kun for at køre algoritmer af.

7h

Boeing er klar med ubemandet tankfly

Flyvende tankstation leverer flybrændstof 500 sømil fra hangarskibet.

7h

Slut med forsøgsdyr: Tyndtarm 3D-printes på DTU til test af medicin

Serie om 3D-print i sundhedssektoren: Små stykker tarmvæg på 1 cm3 er nok til forsøg.

7h

The New Health Care: What the Experts Want Us to Know About Public Health

Things like clean water, immunization and mosquito control are crucial, yet easily overlooked or taken for granted.

7h

Huge ‘word gap’ holding back low-income children may not exist after all

The claim that poor children hear fewer words than kids from higher-income families faces a challenge.

7h

Nearly 100 elephants killed for ivory in Botswana

Ninety elephant carcasses have been discovered in Botswana with their tusks hacked off, a charity said Tuesday, in what is believed to be one of Africa's worst mass poaching sprees.

8h

Russia says space station leak could be deliberate sabotageRussia Soyuz ISS Space

Russia launched checks Tuesday after its space chief said an air leak on the International Space Station last week could have been deliberate sabotage.

8h

China's Jaw-Dropping Family Separation Policy

Tahir Imin is the type of father who likes to take a video of his daughter each and every week. His phone is full of clips and photos of her: in a tutu, holding up a drawing, on a merry-go-round. Even at age six, she would ride piggyback on him as they made-believe she was a princess and he, a king. She’s seven years old now, and he’d probably still carry her aloft on his back if he could. But sh

8h

Dansk topforsker: Nye katalysatorer kan revolutionere kemi-industrien

Central kemisk produktion med naturgas som energi­kilde kan på sigt decentraliseres og baseres på solenergi, mener internationalt førende dansk forsker.

8h

Bangkok climate conference sounds alarm ahead of UN summit

Time is running out to save the Paris Agreement, UN climate experts warned Tuesday at a key Bangkok meeting, as rich nations were accused of shirking their responsibility for environmental damage.

8h

China’s spectacular rainbow lake disguises trouble below the surface

The colourful algal blooms of Yuncheng Salt Lake are made up of the most salt-tolerant complex cells known – but as they spread they throttle life beneath

9h

China's online service giant Meituan aims to raise $4.4 bn

Chinese restaurant review and food delivery giant Meituan-Dianping said it aims to raise up to $4.4 billion for its initial public offering in Hong Kong, despite a lukewarm response to other recent IPOs in the city.

9h

Strongest typhoon in quarter century hits Japan

The strongest typhoon to hit Japan in 25 years made landfall Tuesday, the country's weather agency said, bringing violent winds and heavy rainfall that prompted evacuation warnings.

9h

Brief Facebook outage after 'networking issues'

Facebook users around the world reported the social network was briefly inaccessible Monday, with many taking to Twitter to voice their frustration.

9h

Matter: Scientists Are Retooling Bacteria to Cure Disease

By manipulating DNA, researchers are trying to create microbes that, once ingested, work to treat a rare genetic condition — a milestone in synthetic biology.

9h

Europe's news agencies blast Google, Facebook for 'plundering' content

Europe's biggest news agencies accused Google and Facebook of "plundering" news for free on Tuesday in a joint statement that called on the internet giants to share more of their revenues with the media.

10h

After Trump bashing, tech firms gird for congressional grilling

After days of vitriol from President Donald Trump, big Silicon Valley firms face lawmakers in the coming week with a chance to burnish their image—or face a fresh bashing.

10h

Most people don't change their views after seeing racial disparities in police statistics

What people believe is the cause of racial disparities in police stops does influence whether they generally view police officers as trustworthy or not, but most people also don't change their views in light of reading those statistics, according to a study led by a University of Kansas researcher of political behavior and public policy.

10h

Estrogen Matters

Hormone replacement therapy in menopause is safer and more effective than we have been led to believe. A new book examines the evidence and sets the record straight.

10h

Ministerium: Forkert indsamlede cpr-numre fra dette års trivselsmåling slettes

Omkring 21 elever fik fejlagtigt sporbar trivselsmåling i år. Nu slettes identiteterne fra ministeriets database.

11h

Australsk studie: Ny superbakterie spreder sig over hele verden

På hospitaler over hele verden har forskere fundet en ny superbakterie, der er resistent over for antibiotika.

11h

Most people don't change their views after seeing racial disparities in police statistics

What people believe is the cause of racial disparities in police stops does influence whether they generally view police officers as trustworthy or not, but most people also don't change their views in light of reading those statistics, according to a study led by a University of Kansas researcher of political behavior and public policy.

13h

Study provides 10-year risk estimates for dementia, which may help with prevention in high-risk individuals who potentially could benefit from early targeted prevention

A Danish study provides 10-year absolute risk estimates for dementia specific to age, sex and common variation in the APOE gene, which may help identify high-risk individuals who potentially could benefit from early targeted prevention. The study is published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

13h

Little star sheds light on young planets

Astronomers from the Department of Physics at the University of Tokyo discovered a dense disk of material around a young star, which may be a precursor to a planetary system. Their research could vastly improve models of how solar systems form, which would tell us more about our own place in the cosmos.

13h

It’s Time for the Press to Stop Complaining—And to Start Fighting Back

I’ve devoted much of my professional life to the study of political campaigns, not as a historian or an academic but as a reporter and an analyst. I thought I’d seen it all, from the bizarre upset that handed a professional wrestler the governorship of Minnesota to the California recall that gave us the Governator to candidates who die but stay on the ballot and win. But there’s a new kind of cam

15h

Double Blow to Brazil Museum: Neglect, Then Flames

When Brazilians look at the shell of their National Museum, some see a symbol of the hollowing out of their country and the near-abandonment of basic services.

15h

UN treaty would protect high seas from over exploitation

Over the next two years, the UN hopes to secure a treaty to protect two-thirds of the world's oceans.

16h

The famous last words of 10 big thinkers

Karl Marx's famous last words were, quite poetically, "Last words are for fools who haven't said enough." But some of science's greats have had some great parting words as they slipped off this mortal coil. Apropos of nothing, here's a collection of our favorites: escape-to-a-parallel-universe … Read More

16h

Natural 'breakdown' of chemicals predicts lung damage in 9/11 firefighters

Abnormal levels of more than two dozen metabolites — chemicals produced in the body as it breaks down fats, proteins and carbohydrates — can reliably predict which Sept. 11 firefighters developed lung disease and which did not, a new analysis shows.

17h

What really happens to 'recycling' plastic?

Many Japanese people who recycle their household plastic would be shocked to know where it ends up.

18h

Four in five adults at risk of early death, heart-age test shows

Doctors call figures for England alarming and urge people to adopt healthier lifestyles How do I find out my heart age? Four out of five adults have hearts that are more damaged than they should be for their age, putting them at greater risk of early death, a major study has shown. The disclosure prompted calls for Britons to ditch their unhealthy lifestyles and monitor their own health more clos

18h

Make space great again: Why the International Space Station still mattersRussia Soyuz ISS Space

As one of the biggest manmade structures in the sky and at a cost of over $100b, it's the place where the space age dream is still alive. Read More

18h

The American Dream is slipping away faster than we thought

Anyone is supposed to be able to get ahead in the US – but social mobility is powerfully influenced by your parents socioeconomic status

19h

Last week in tech: A huge pile of new gadgets to close out the summer

Technology Who will sit in the giant Acer gaming throne once winter comes? Catch up on our podcasts!

19h

Nalbuphine may help manage opioid-induced urine retention

Nalbuphine may help to manage opioid-induced urine retention. Findings from a brief case report are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

20h

When will I be me? Why a sense of authenticity takes its time

What does it mean to live authentically and to be your authentic self? Most importantly, how long does it take to get there? Read More

20h

Grizzlies Have Recovered, Officials Say; Now Montanans Have To Get Along With Them

A healthy population of grizzlies in and around Glacier National Park means the bear may soon come off the Endangered Species List. But more bears mean more confrontations with humans. (Image credit: Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks, via AP)

20h

US Companies Launch CRISPR Clinical Trial

The Germany-based study will test an ex vivo genome-editing therapy for the inherited blood disorder beta-thalassemia.

20h

Targeted and population-based strategies both necessary for blood pressure control

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is the leading risk factor for heart disease, and improvements in both targeted and population-based strategies for blood pressure control can lead to better prevention and control of hypertension, according to a review paper.

21h

France begins vaccinating cows, sheep against anthrax

The eastern French region of Hautes-Alpes said Monday it has begun vaccinating cows and sheep against anthrax after an outbreak of the fatal infection in the region.

21h

London show explores hidden world of facial recognition

Don't judge by appearances. It's an age-old piece of advice that is being roundly ignored by corporations, governments and law-enforcement agencies around the globe.

21h

Brazil court lifts ban on glyphosate weedkiller

An appellate court on Monday lifted a court-ordered suspension of licenses in Brazil for products containing glyphosate, an industrial weedkiller in common use in Latin America's agricultural powerhouse.

21h

Patients with new-onset AFib after TAVR at highest risk for complications

Patients developing AFib after TAVR are at higher risk of death, stroke and heart attack compared to patients who already had AFib prior to the procedure, according to a new study.

21h

Children born through IVF may have higher risk of hypertension

Children conceived through assisted reproductive technologies may be at an increased risk of developing arterial hypertension early in life, among other cardiovascular complications, according to a new study.

21h

How sickled red blood cells stick to blood vessels

An MIT study describes how sickled red blood cells get stuck in tiny blood vessels of patients with sickle-cell disease. The findings may help researchers predict more accurately when such a vaso-occlusive pain crisis might occur.

22h

Can social media networks reduce political polarization on climate change?

Political bias often leads to polarization on topics like climate change. But a new study from Damon Centola of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication has shown that exposure to anonymous, bipartisan social networks can make a striking difference, leading both liberals and conservatives to improve their forecasting of climate-change trends.

22h

Infants can distinguish between leaders and bullies, study finds

A new study finds that 21-month-old infants can distinguish between respect-based power asserted by a leader and fear-based power wielded by a bully.

22h

Evolutionary origins of animal biodiversity

A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has revealed the origins and evolution of animal body plans.

22h

Stanford scientists engineer way to prevent immune response to gene therapy in mice

Stanford University School of Medicine researchers have demonstrated that gene therapy can be effective without causing a dangerous side effect common to all gene therapy: an autoimmune reaction to the normal protein, which the patient's immune system is encountering for the first time.

22h

Lack of social mobility more of an 'occupational hazard' than previously known

American workers' occupational status reflects that of their parents more than previously known, reaffirming more starkly that the lack of mobility in the United States is in large part due to the occupation of our parents.

22h

Kidnapping movie stars to killing family: North Korea's 5 craziest plots

To put it mildly, North Korea has had a complicated relationship with the world. In chronological order, here are five of North Korea’s most incredible plots. Read More

22h

Procrastinator's brains are different than those who get things done

Daydreaming is good. But if you're doing too much of it, you might have a totally different brain. Read More

22h

Nonfiction: The Sniping Scientists Whose Work Saved Millions of Lives

Michael Kinch’s “Between Hope and Fear: A History of Vaccines and Human Immunity” recounts the brilliant insights and bitter rivalries behind the discoveries of lifesaving vaccines.

22h

Evolutionary origins of animal biodiversity

A new study by an international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, has revealed the origins and evolution of animal body plans.

22h

Lack of social mobility more of an 'occupational hazard' than previously known

American workers' occupational status reflects that of their parents more than previously known, reaffirming more starkly that the lack of mobility in the United States is in large part due to the occupation of our parents, finds a new study by New York University's Michael Hout.

22h

Can social media networks reduce political polarization on climate change?

Social media networks, which often foster partisan antagonism, may also offer a solution to reducing political polarization, according to new findings published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from a team led by University of Pennsylvania sociologist Damon Centola.

22h

The Numbers behind a Fields Medalist's Math

Inside the p-adic numbers that make Peter Scholze's work tick — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Tropical Storm Gordon could hit hurricane status before it next hits the U.S.

Environment The weak storm is on its way out of Florida, but it's gaining strength. The weak tropical storm will eventually make landfall somewhere between New Orleans and Mobile—possibly on the verge of hurricane strength.

23h

Patients with new-onset AFib after TAVR at highest risk for complications

Patients developing AFib after TAVR are at higher risk of death, stroke and heart attack compared to patients who already had AFib prior to the procedure, according to a study today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. The paper is the first nationwide examination of patients who developed AFib for the first time following TAVR.

23h

Children born through IVF may have higher risk of hypertension

Children conceived through assisted reproductive technologies may be at an increased risk of developing arterial hypertension early in life, among other cardiovascular complications, according to a Swiss study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

23h

Targeted and population-based strategies both necessary for blood pressure control

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is the leading risk factor for heart disease, and improvements in both targeted and population-based strategies for blood pressure control can lead to better prevention and control of hypertension, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. This paper is part of an eight-part health promotion series where

23h

23h

‘Invisible’ Ebola transmission in the DRC may make it a bigger threat

An outbreak of Ebola in the Democratic Republic of the Congo has killed 78 people and epidemic watchers are waiting to see whether it can be controlled

23h

Elk gamble with their lives in spring to win a mate in autumn

Elk who shed antlers early have more time to grow a large new pair for the autumn mating season – but early shedding makes them more likely to be eaten by wolves

23h

Terahertz spectroscopy enters the single-molecule regime

Researchers showed that long-wavelength terahertz (THz) spectroscopy can detect motion of single molecules, not just molecular ensembles. They used a single-molecule transistor design, where pairs of metal electrodes trap isolated C60 molecules, focus the THz beam onto them, and measure current change caused by THz-induced oscillation. Two vibrational peaks were recorded. The measurement was sensi

1d

Neil Armstrong biopic not unpatriotic, say sons as Aldrin fuels controversy

First Man does not show the astronauts planting US flag, sparking anger on the right – but second man’s views are unclear Neil Armstrong’s sons do not think First Man , a Ryan Gosling-starring biopic about their father, is anti-American. Some American conservatives do . Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon , may agree with them. Or he may not. Related: First Man review: Ryan Gosling shoots for

1d

Falling stars hold clue for understanding dying stars

An international team of researchers has proposed a new method to investigate the inner workings of supernovae explosions. This new method uses meteorites and is unique in that it can determine the contribution from electron anti-neutrinos, enigmatic particles which can't be tracked through other means.

1d

When you should eat breakfast—and when you can probably skip it

Health Your first meal of the day isn’t as simple as you might think. Since childhood, we’ve constantly been told that breakfast—compared to all other meals—is the by far the most important one. But research hasn’t always shown that to be…

1d

Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

Engineers have developed neutrophil 'nanosponges' that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing. The nanosponges are nanoparticles of biodegra

1d

Tracking marine migrations across geopolitical boundaries aids conservation

A new study uses tracking data for 14 species of migratory marine predators, from leatherback turtles to blue whales and white sharks, to show how their movements relate to the geopolitical boundaries of the Pacific Ocean. The results provide critical information for designing international cooperative agreements needed to manage these species.

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Red tide may be 'natural' but scientists believe coastal pollution is making it worse

Vince Lovko, a phytoplantkon ecologist at Mote Marine Lab, crisscrossed the waters off Longboat Key in his lab's Yellowfin fishing boat with a crew of researchers, sampling sea water from a red tide that has slushed around Southwest Florida for nearly a year and littered beaches with dead manatees, sea turtles and rotting marine life.

1d

Scientists pioneer a new way to turn sunlight into fuel

A new study used semi-artificial photosynthesis to explore new ways to produce and store solar energy. They used natural sunlight to convert water into hydrogen and oxygen using a mixture of biological components and human-made technologies.

1d

Mud from the deep sea reveals clues about ancient monsoon

The Sonoran Desert is one of the world's most biodiverse deserts, thanks to the annual monsoon, which provide a source of moisture in addition to seasonal winter rains. Researchers were able to access untapped clues about the monsoon's activity during the last ice age, about 20,000 years ago. Their findings help scientists predict how regional climates may respond to future conditions.

1d

Mennesket vs. maskinen: Derfor er din hjerne vildere end de bedste computere

Din hjerne er mere kompliceret end verdens vildeste computere. Alligevel forsøger forskere at skabe en digital udgave af intelligens.

1d

How to Fix the Kavanaugh Confirmation Hearings

Why do the members of the Senate Judiciary Committee think they’re qualified to cross-examine a Supreme Court nominee effectively? They aren’t—they just can’t bear to give up airtime. But if they’re honest enough to admit it, they have an alternative. Even though they’re in the minority, they’re fully allowed to hire their own counsel. They ought to retain a professional to do the job. When Brett

1d

Apple buying Tesla? A 'poor idea,' says Warren Buffett

When Warren Buffett talks, everybody listens. And one person who might want to listen closely is Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook.

1d

Misreporting and Confirmation Bias in Psychedelic Research

What do images of the brain under psychedelics really tell us about its relation to the mind? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

EU lifts restrictions on solar panels from China

The European Union will end its five-year-old restrictions on solar panel imports from China, officials said Monday, as Brussels and Beijing increase their own trade cooperation in the face of protectionist steps from the United States.

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Berlin fair a dreamland for wannabe sandmen of 'sleep tech'

As people in developed nations increasingly obsess over the quality of their 40 winks, technology companies are cashing in with so-called "sleep tech"—gadgets to stop wearers snoring or collect data on their sleep cycles.

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How Marine Reptiles Reacted to Changing Conditions During Age of Dinosaurs

How Marine Reptiles Reacted to Changing Conditions During Age of Dinosaurs Deep water reptiles diversified as Mesozoic sea levels rose. Their shallow water counterparts declined. AncientSeas.jpg An artistic reconstruction of the Oxford Clay Formation, depicting a Middle Jurassic ecosystem with a plesiosaur (upper left), a large predatory pliosaurid (center), a metriorhynchid crocodyliform (bottom

1d

Mud from the deep sea reveals clues about ancient monsoon

The Sonoran Desert is one of the world's most biodiverse deserts, thanks to the annual monsoon, which provide a source of moisture in addition to seasonal winter rains. UA researchers were able to access untapped clues about the monsoon's activity during the last ice age, about 20,000 years ago. Their findings help scientists predict how regional climates may respond to future conditions.

1d

Scientists pioneer a new way to turn sunlight into fuel

A new study, led by academics at St John's College, University of Cambridge, used semi-artificial photosynthesis to explore new ways to produce and store solar energy. They used natural sunlight to convert water into hydrogen and oxygen using a mixture of biological components and manmade technologies.

1d

Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

Engineers have developed neutrophil 'nanosponges' that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing. The nanosponges are nanoparticles of biodegra

1d

Tracking marine migrations across geopolitical boundaries aids conservation

A new study uses tracking data for 14 species of migratory marine predators, from leatherback turtles to blue whales and white sharks, to show how their movements relate to the geopolitical boundaries of the Pacific Ocean. The results provide critical information for designing international cooperative agreements needed to manage these species.

1d

Terahertz spectroscopy enters the single-molecule regime

University of Tokyo-led researchers showed that long-wavelength terahertz (THz) spectroscopy can detect motion of single molecules, not just molecular ensembles. They used a single-molecule transistor design, where pairs of metal electrodes trap isolated C60 molecules, focus the THz beam onto them, and measure current change caused by THz-induced oscillation. Two vibrational peaks were recorded. T

1d

Minister: Genbrug skal give forrang til statslige byggeprojekter

Entreprenører, der kan genanvende deres byggematerialer, skal have en konkurrencefordel i statslige byggeprojekter.

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Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed neutrophil "nanosponges" that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing.

1d

Mud from the deep sea reveals clues about ancient monsoon

Analyzing traces of leaf waxes from land plants that over millennia accumulated in deep sea sediments, a team of researchers led by the University of Arizona reconstructed the history of monsoon activity in northern Mexico. Their results, published online on Sept. 3 in the journal Nature Geoscience, help settle a long-standing debate over whether monsoon activity shut down completely under the inf

1d

Tracking marine migrations across geopolitical boundaries aids conservation

The leatherback sea turtle is the largest living turtle and a critically endangered species. Saving leatherback turtles from extinction in the Pacific Ocean will require a lot of international cooperation, however, because the massive turtles may visit more than 30 different countries during their migrations.

1d

Age, race or need for instant gratification — which best predicts how much you will earn?

Traditional statistics have allowed researchers to understand which things — like education, occupation and gender — predict how much a person will earn. Now, in the first study of its kind, researchers have used machine learning to rank the importance of these factors, finding that a person's ability to delay immediate gratification is among the best predictors of affluence.

1d

Pathology and social interactions: Safety in numbers

What if social behavior affected the progression of even noncontagious diseases? This is precisely what has now been demonstrated. Using a fly model of intestinal cancer, the researchers have shown that disease progression is impacted both by social isolation — which has a negative effect — and the composition of the social group with which individuals associate.

1d

Chaos-inducing genetic approach stymies antibiotic-resistant superbugs

A genetic disruption strategy effectively stymies the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as E. coli, giving scientists a crucial leg up in the ongoing battle against deadly superbugs.

1d

8,000 new antibiotic combinations are surprisingly effective

Biologists have identified more than 8,00 new combinations of antibiotics that are surprisingly effective. 'We expect several of these combinations, or more, will work much better than existing antibiotics,' said one of the researchers, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology.

1d

The next iPhones, Apple Watch leak as Apple preps for Sept. 12 event

Apple may be preparing to announce new iPhones, iPads and Apple Watches on Sept. 12, but it looks like someone has decided to share the images of the new products a bit early.

1d

Now we can see brain cells 'talk' and that will shed light on neurological diseases

Scientists have developed a way to see brain cells talk — to actually see neurons communicate in bright, vivid color. The new lab technique is set to provide long-needed answers about the brain and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and depression.

1d

New research shows how children want their food served

Getting children to eat their food is a challenge for many parents and new research could help. It turns out that children have different preferences for how food should be arranged on the plate to make them want to eat it, depending on gender and age.

1d

Pilotanlæg skal teste produktion af grøn ammoniak

Grøn ammoniak fra vindmøllestrøm kan erstatte fossil-tung traditionel ammoniak og bruges som brændsel i skibe.

1d

Sikkerhedshul i NemID: Kriminelle kan få adgang til din netbank

Softwareudvikler demonstrer svaghed ved NemID, der muliggør svindel.

1d

Say a fond farewell to the small smartphone

Let's take a moment this weekend to praise and fondly remember the compact smartphone.

1d

Caught in a political echo chamber? Listening to the opposition can make partisanship even worse

Dwelling in a political echo chamber—where you encounter only people who agree with you—is hardly conducive to a healthy democracy.

1d

Tech nostalgia on show at Berlin's IFA

For many consumers, rewinding cassettes, carefully placing a needle on a record or shaking dry a Polaroid photo may all feel like long-forgotten gestures from a bygone era.

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Heatwave: 2018 was the joint hottest summer for UK

It was also the hottest summer for England since records began in 1910, the Met Office says.

1d

Dagens Medicin og Netdoktor bliver søstre

Bonnier AB har købt den danske udgave af Netdoktor.

1d

Tiltalt for assisteret selvmord nægter sig skyldig

To tidligere læger står tiltalt i en retssag om aktiv dødshjælp. Den ene tiltalte erklærer sig skyldig, mens den anden nægter sig skyldig.

1d

Rigshospitalet vil udvide operationskapacitet til bugspytkirtelkræft

Rigshospitalet vil forkorte ventetiden operationer for patienter med bugspytkirtelkræft ved at lave en aftale med det nuværende personale om ekstraarbejde.

1d

Sundhedsminister: Regioner skal gennemføre flere kræftpakkeforløb til tiden

Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) gør det klart, at regionerne trods en forbedring af behandlingstiden for kræftpakkeforløbene ikke leverer en tilfredsstillende indsats.

1d

#48 Rusturen

Stetoskopet er taget til Rusland, hvor thoraxkirurg Mikhail Medvedchikov-Ardiya fortæller om det russiske sundhedsvæsen.

1d

Techtopia# 68: Data tager magten

Hvad sker der, når vi reducerer alt til data? Vores caféer, byer, relationer, kroppe, hjerner og følelser er data, som maskiner kan læse. Hvad er konsekvensen?

1d

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan vand forekomme andre steder end på Jorden?

En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor man kan finde vand andre steder i universet. Det kræver jo ilt? Det svarer postdoc på NBI på.

1d

Beautiful Minds: The Next Generation

Beautiful Minds is getting an upgrade — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Five tools for meticulous measurements

Technology Distance, weight, and even color have dedicated measuring tools. Miniscule measurements can make all the difference with pernickety processes like hanging a perfectly level picture.

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Trump's pollution rules rollback to hit coal country hard

It's coal people like miner Steve Knotts, 62, who make West Virginia Trump Country.

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UK demands action from tech giants over online child abuse

Britain warned Monday that internet giants could face new laws if they fail to tackle online child abuse content, with up to 80,000 people in the country deemed to pose a threat.

1d

A portrait of ancient elephant-like mammals drawn from multiproxy analysis

Although world-famous consulting detective Sherlock Holmes prided himself on his deductive prowess, in truth, a great many of his astounding observations resulted from inductive reasoning, by which he arrived at conclusions about events that he did not observe based on the evidence at hand. Similarly, biologists, ecologists and paleontologists strive to describe the world that existed before human

1d

The US Army is making a laser-powered drone that can fly indefinitely

Drones use so much power they can only fly in the air for a short period. So the US Army is creating a system to power them in mid-air from lasers on the ground

1d

Now we can see brain cells 'talk' — and that will shed light on neurological diseases

Scientists have developed a way to see brain cells talk — to actually see neurons communicate in bright, vivid color. The new lab technique is set to provide long-needed answers about the brain and neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia and depression.

1d

Kavanaugh’s Unsettling Use of ‘Settled Law’

Senator Susan Collins of Maine reported that President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, had assured her that Roe v. Wade , the 1973 case affirming a woman’s constitutional right to choose abortion, was “settled law.” The implication was that Collins, who has indicated support for a right to choose, could vote for his confirmation without worrying about Roe or women’s reprodu

1d

How to Make a Western Movie With No Heroes

“I was sitting outside the Commodore’s mansion, waiting for my brother Charlie to come out with news of the job. It was threatening to snow and I was cold and for want of something to do I studied Charlie’s new horse, Nimble. My new horse was called Tub.” So opens Patrick deWitt’s 2011 novel The Sisters Brothers , a darkly comic Western narrated by a cold-blooded, but warm-hearted assassin named

1d

Coloring Books And Worksheets: What's The Value Of 'Staying In The Lines'?

submitted by /u/parrishthethought [link] [comments]

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The Terrifying Paintings by ArtificiaI Intelligence

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

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2 Streaming Amps for Audiophiles: Naim Uniti, Bluesound

Streaming music doesn’t have to mean compromised sound. Here are two picks to help you find cloud-connected aural ecstasy.

1d

Mystery cold spot on Jupiter’s moon Europa could be ‘almost anything’

The first full temperature map of Jupiter’s icy moon Europa has revealed one spot that seems colder than anywhere else on the surface – but we have no clue why

1d

Regeringen vil lette regioners ansøgning af statsmidler

Der skal være færre men større puljer, når landets kommuner og regioner skal søge midler fra staten. Regeringen søger at indgå en tværpolitisk aftale for at nedbringe de administrative udgifter, der er forbundet med de nuværende ansøgningspuljer.

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Medicinforum: Lægers efteruddannelse skal struktureres bedre i regionerne

Lægers efteruddannelse er efterladt i »et vakuum«, efter flere regioner har vedtaget nye initiativer i forbindelse med habilitetsregler, så de ikke er afhængige af lægemiddelindustrien. Det mener formand for Tværregionalt Forum for Koordination af Medicin.

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New research shows how children want their food served

Getting children to eat their food is a challenge for many parents and new research from Future Consumer Lab at the Department of Food Science at the University of Copenhagen could help. It turns out that children have different preferences for how food should be arranged on the plate to make them want to eat it, depending on gender and age.

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Could This Slimy Corn 'Fix' One of Earth's Biggest Pollution Problems?

Nitrogen fixation is a process that plants use to take nitrogen from the air and transform it into a usable form such as ammonia or nitrate.

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Newly sequenced golden eagle genome will help its conservation

Conservation and monitoring efforts for the golden eagle will benefit from the newly-completed golden eagle genome sequence – the first of 25 species' genomes sequenced by the Wellcome Sanger Institute, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh.

1d

Godt, at Region H vil tage ansvar for efteruddannelse af speciallæger

Den store forkromede plan for systematisk efteruddannelse, med prioritering af Region Hovedstadens egne midler til området, mangler vi dog stadig.

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Under the Hood: Monza & the Sinister Split Bumper | Street Outlaws

Monza's an OG 405 racer, but that doesn't mean his car stays the same. Find out what modifications he's made in the off season to take his street car to the next level. Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/Stree

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UAE announces first astronauts to go to space (Update)

The United Arab Emirates has selected its first two astronauts to go on a mission to the International Space Station, Dubai's ruler said Monday.

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Are the Paleozoic era's giant dragonflies still among us?

Don't worry. This isn't an announcement of a new invasion from elsewhere, but a leap into the past in the Paleozoic: the time of giant insects, 100 million years before the dinosaurs, during which insects also had their T-Rex: Carboniferous and Permian giant dragonflies that terrorised the skies of those times, sometimes call "griffenflies"). A short trip back in time to a kind of another Earth in

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Samsung Q8FN 4K Review: A Pretty But Pricey 4K Television

This bright, beautiful TV makes Marvel movies pop, but standard-def sitcoms suffer.

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Group: US, Russia block consensus at 'killer robots' meeting

A key opponent of high-tech, automated weapons known as "killer robots" is blaming countries like the U.S. and Russia for blocking consensus at a U.N.-backed conference, where most countries wanted to ensure that humans stay at the controls of lethal machines.

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Video: Stretchy wires for the future

Scientists at Duke Chemistry, NC State Engineering and the University of California – San Diego have teamed up to create stretchable, flexible wires that conduct current and change colors to indicate they're about to reach the breaking point.

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US firefighters battle suicidal thoughts after the blaze

Matt Shobert opens his eyes and wishes he was dead, a recurrent thought that started four years ago when the former firefighter first contemplated taking his own life.

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Fire destroys priceless artefacts at Brazil’s National Museum

Brazil's National Museum has been consumed by fire, along with 20 million scientific artefacts

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Newly discovered dinosaurs fill in evolutionary gap spanning 70 million years

Two newly discovered dinosaurs may be missing links in an unusual lineage of predators that lived between 160 million and 90 million years ago, new research suggests.

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What is fake honey and why didn't the official tests pick it up?

Australia has been rocked this week by reports that many products labelled as honey are actually fake or "adulterated" honey.

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What Artifacts Were in the National Museum of Brazil?

The items feared lost to a fire on Sunday include one of the world’s largest meteorites and the oldest human fossil from the region.

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Why splitting the energy and climate portfolios makes sense

Scott Morrison has an honours degree in economic geography, and it shows. On Thursday the prime minister split apart the ministerial responsibilities for energy and climate, which were previously part of a united portfolio under Josh Frydenberg.

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Scientists must keep fighting fake news, not retreat to their ivory towers | Fiona Fox

Scientists have the public’s trust, so the swell of fake news shouldn’t put them off communicating, says CEO of Science Media Centre I am sorry to see Jenny Rohn penning her last piece for the Guardian’s science blog network (“ I was deluded. You can’t beat fake news with science communication ”). I have enjoyed her columns and often shared the links. But I cannot agree with her swan song. Rohn u

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Color-changing sensor detects signs of eye damage in tears

A new point-of-care rapid-sensing device can detect a key marker of eye injury in minutes – a time frame crucial to treating eye trauma.

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Underwater robots help NASA plan future deep-space missions

An expedition that will help NASA search for life in deep space launched today – not with a rocket's roar, but with a gentle splash into the deep Pacific Ocean. The project, called the Systematic Underwater Biogeochemical Science and Exploration Analog, or SUBSEA, will use underwater robots to explore the biology, geology and chemistry of the environment around a deep-sea volcano off the coast of

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Dear Therapist: I Want a Second Kid. My Husband Doesn't.

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My husband and I have been married for six years and have a one-year-old daughter. Before we got married, we agreed that we’d like two children. Recently my husband has been saying that he only wants one child

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Apple satser på smartbriller: Har opkøbt startup, der laver AR-linser

Apples næste store produkt vil være smarte AR-briller, vidner et nyt virksomhedsopkøb om.

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From Nicki Minaj to Blood Orange, the Best Albums of the Summer Were Exercises in Reinvention

The strongest projects rattled with discovery, whether excavations of personal triumph or exorcisms of public trauma.

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IPUs? These New Chips Are Minted For Marketing

Intelligence processing units—computer chips optimized for AI—signal a shift in finding speed through specialization.

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Geology Is Like Augmented Reality for the Planet

Rock slabs may seem boring, but a geologic lens can immerse you in Earth's deep past and future.

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New images reveal how an ancient monster galaxy fueled furious star formation

Scientists were able to see the abundance of star-forming gas and dust in a giant galaxy from when the universe was less than 2 billion years old.

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One secret to building affordable nuclear: stick with tried-and-true designs

But first we need to convince companies to build nuclear plants at all.

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Antarctic Glacier's Breakup Is Controlled by Seafloor Topography

Submerged rock features near Pine Island Glacier—a major contributor to global sea-level rise—play a critical role in the ice’s movement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kritikere: Affredning af Vikingeskibshallen er en glidebane

Kulturministerens beslutning om at affrede Vikingeskibsmuseet kan friste ejere af fredede bygninger til at misligholde dem for at kunne få ophævet fredningen, frygter både tilhængere og modstandere af affredningen.

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Europe's new privacy law causes influx of cookie notices, many of which likely fall short legally

Chances are in the past few months you may have had a message or two pop up on a major website informing you of an update in their privacy policy or asking if you understand that the company is using cookies to collect data about you.

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Strong economy prompts higher inflation concerns

Consumer sentiment has remained virtually unchanged despite more positive news about growth in the U.S. economy, according to the University of Michigan Surveys of Consumers.

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Satellites more at risk from fast solar wind than a major space storm

Satellites are more likely to be at risk from high-speed solar wind than a major geomagnetic storm according to a new UK-US study published this week in the Journal Space Weather.

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8,000 new antibiotic combinations are surprisingly effective, UCLA biologists report

UCLA biologists have identified more than 8,00 new combinations of antibiotics that are surprisingly effective. 'We expect several of these combinations, or more, will work much better than existing antibiotics,' said Pamela Yeh, one of the study's two senior authors and a UCLA assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology.

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We have the power to halt evolution itself – should we use it?

Unwanted mutations are undermining food security and medicine. Controlling such evolution is now possible and tempting, but there will be unintended consequences

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Kavanaugh Will Give Roe v. Wade ‘Deference’ but Could Vote to Overturn the Ruling

Official Washington came together last week to honor John McCain. A memorial service for the Republican senator from Arizona on Friday at the Capitol felt like a throwback to a different, more civil time in America. On Saturday, two former presidents—one a Democrat, one a Republican, both of whom defeated McCain to reach the Oval Office—delivered stirring eulogies at the Washington National Cathe

1d

The Republican Leadership Member Most Likely to Lose

Look over Speaker Paul Ryan’s shoulder at a press conference. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the representative for Washington’s Fifth District and the chair of the House Republican Conference, will often be there. Frequently, she’s the only woman at House Republicans’ press conferences, though it’s usually Ryan’s words, not hers, that make the news. This year, McMorris Rodgers is fighting for her polit

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Image: Hubble's lucky observation of an enigmatic cloud

The little-known nebula IRAS 05437+2502 billows out among the bright stars and dark dust clouds that surround it in this striking image from the Hubble Space Telescope. It is located in the constellation of Taurus (the Bull), close to the central plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Unlike many of Hubble's targets, this object has not been studied in detail and its exact nature is unclear.

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Quantum weirdness in 'chicken or egg' paradox

The "chicken or egg" paradox was first proposed by philosophers in Ancient Greece to describe the problem of determining cause-and-effect.

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Elbusser overtager to ruter i København

I 2019 vil dieselbusserne på to københavnske busruter blive erstattet af 41 rene elbusser. Det er første skridt mod 2030, hvor alle københavnske busser skal køre på el.

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Hierarchical 3-D printing of nanoporous gold could 'revolutionize' electrochemical reactor design

Nanoporous metals are superior catalysts for chemical reactions due to their large surface area and high electrical conductivity, making them perfect candidates for applications such as electrochemical reactors, sensors and actuators.

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Are these humpback whales too close for comfort?

As many as six humpback whales were spotted in Boston Harbor on Wednesday, a rare sight in the congested shipping port. But the whales probably weren't lost, according to Joseph Ayers, a professor at Northeastern's Marine Science Center in Nahant, Massachusetts. They were probably just looking for a snack.

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NCCIH has a new director, and she’s a true believer in acupuncture.

Helene Langevin has been named the new director of the National Center for Complemenary and Integrative Health. Given her history of dodgy acupuncture research, my prediction is that the quackery will flow again at NCCIH, the way it did in the 1990s when Tom Harkin zealously protected it from any attempt to impose scientific rigor.

1d

A breakthrough for Australia's fish

A research team from the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has made a breakthrough that could help dwindling numbers of Australian freshwater fish species.

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8,000 new antibiotic combinations are surprisingly effective, biologists report

Scientists have traditionally believed that combining more than two drugs to fight harmful bacteria would yield diminishing returns. The prevailing theory is that that the incremental benefits of combining three or more drugs would be too small to matter, or that the interactions among the drugs would cause their benefits to cancel one another out.

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Artificial cells are tiny bacteria fighters

"Lego block" artificial cells that can kill bacteria have been created by researchers at the University of California, Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering. The work is reported Aug. 29 in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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Brazil's national museum hit by huge fire

The National Museum of Brazil, home to some 20m items spanning centuries, is devastated.

1d

Artificial intelligence used to predict cancer growth

A new technique picks out patterns in DNA mutation within cancers to forecast future genetic changes.

1d

Sådan skal de studerende bekæmpe stress

Bedre søvnkultur, bonus til holdspillere og en omfortolkning af begrebet stress kan være med til at mindske presset, mener eksperter.

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Pathology and social interactions: Safety in numbers

What if social behavior affected the progression of even noncontagious diseases? This is precisely what has been demonstrated by French CNRS teams, with support from IRD, CEA, Paris-Sud and Montpellier universities, and colleagues from Spain and Australia. Using a fly model of intestinal cancer, the researchers have shown that disease progression is impacted both by social isolation — which has a

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Chaos-inducing genetic approach stymies antibiotic-resistant superbugs

A genetic disruption strategy developed by University of Colorado Boulder researchers effectively stymies the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as E. coli, giving scientists a crucial leg up in the ongoing battle against deadly superbugs.

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Age, race or need for instant gratification — which best predicts how much you will earn?

Traditional statistics have allowed researchers to understand which things — like education, occupation and gender — predict how much a person will earn. Now, in the first study of its kind, researchers have used machine learning to rank the importance of these factors, finding that a person's ability to delay immediate gratification is among the best predictors of affluence.

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To Raise Confident, Independent Kids, Some Parents Are Trying To 'Let Grow'

Research suggests kids who have more freedom and independence grow up to be less anxious and depressed. But in the age of helicopter parenting, giving kids freedom to roam can be difficult. (Image credit: Beth Nakamura for NPR)

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Sri Lanka probes deaths of wild elephants

Sri Lankan authorities on Monday began investigating the deaths of wild elephants in the east of the island after pulling seven carcasses out of a marsh, a minister said.

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Easy-to-make videos can show you dancing like the stars

Want to dance like a professional ballerina or strut like a rapper? A new machine-learning technique can transfer one person’s motion to another in a simple process.

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Chaos-inducing genetic approach stymies antibiotic-resistant superbugs

A genetic disruption strategy developed by University of Colorado Boulder researchers effectively stymies the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as E. coli, giving scientists a crucial leg up in the ongoing battle against deadly superbugs.

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MYTEDRÆBER: Udbredt argument i klimadebatten holder ikke

Detektor afliver myten om, at klimaet altid har forandret sig, og at forandringerne, vi oplever i dag, derfor udelukkende er naturlige. Det passer ikke, siger eksperter.

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Dansk superklud kan gøre sæbe og vand overflødigt

Kluden kan fjerne 99,9 procent af bakterierne på dine hænder. Det skal hjælpe i områder uden rent vand.

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Back to school for French kids… without their phones

Texting under the table should be a thing of the past when French children return to class Monday following a nationwide ban on mobile phones in schools.

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China blocks Australian state broadcaster's website: ABC

China has blocked access to the website of Australia's national broadcaster for breaching Beijing's internet rules and regulations, ABC said on Monday.

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Firefighters try to save relics as fire engulfs Rio museum

A huge fire engulfed Brazil's 200-year-old National Museum in Rio de Janeiro, lighting up the night sky with towering flames as firefighters and museum workers raced to save historical relics from the blaze.

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Driven by climate change, fire reshapes US West

Wildfires in the U.S. have charred more than 10,000 square miles so far this year, an area larger than the state of Maryland, with large fires still burning in every Western state including many that are not fully contained.

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From diet pills to driverless cars: why we need to debate the politics of science and technology

It’s time to say goodbye to the Political Science blog at the Guardian – but we’re moving to a new home Last week, the results of a successful trial of a new diet pill – lorcaserin – were published in the New England Journal of Medicine and immediately hailed by some as a “holy grail” in the fight against obesity. The study of 12,000 people in the US who were obese or overweight found that those

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Scientists hunt mysterious 'dark force' to explain hidden realm of the cosmos

Physicists say a fifth force of nature would ‘completely change the paradigm’ Scientists are about to launch an ambitious search for a “dark force” of nature which, if found, would open the door to a realm of the universe that lies hidden from view. The hunt will seek evidence for a new fundamental force that forms a bridge between the ordinary matter of the world around us and the invisible “dar

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Sad summer’s over? 18 ways to keep the health, humour and happiness of your holiday alive

Join a club, take a detour – and buy a carafe: positive psychologists on how you can take the novelty and openness of your vacation and apply it to your daily routine It’s over. The air is cooling. School is the opposite of out. You can probably feel the holiday spirit leaving your body. But what if you could capitalise on your holiday momentum and apply some of your novelty-seeking break from rou

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Demonstration: Så nemt er det at franarre os NemID-oplysninger

Danskerne har i udgangspunktet ikke en chance for at gennemskue, hvorvidt en NemID-login-boks er et phishing-forsøg eller ej.

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Experiencing homelessness for longer than 6 months can cause significant damage to a child's health

Researchers at Children's HealthWatch, based out of Boston Medical Center (BMC), found that children who experienced both pre- and post-natal homelessness and those who experienced homelessness for longer than six months were at highest risk of negative health outcomes. These findings, published in Pediatrics, illustrate the urgent need to intervene and rapidly house children and families experien

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Brazil Museum Fire Threatens Hundreds of Years of History

The National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro housed more than 20 million items, including Egyptian mummies, dinosaur fossils and the oldest human fossil in the region.

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Return to Reason: The Science of Thought

Why do facts fail to change people’s minds? In this eBook, we examine how we form our beliefs and maintain them with a host of cognitive biases, the difference between intelligence and thinking… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dansk reaktion: Uambitiøst EU-forslag om genbrug af spildevand til markvanding

EU vil have ens regler for brug af renset spildevand på markerne. Men reglerne bør omfatte vand til parker og teknisk vand, lyder danske høringssvar.

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Eyewire Brain Zoo: Awards

This concludes our journey through the Eyewire Brain Zoo. Thanks to all who participated. We hope you had fun and learned some interesting animal brain facts along the way! Awards presented below. Lion + Sloth Accuracy Happy Hours Anaconda Evil Cubes Evil Cube Curators Primate Trivia Ostrich vs. Giraffe Honey Bee Marathon Participation Artwork by Daniela Gamba

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Eyewire Release Report 8/31/2018

Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. We pushed a major new feature, Live Overview . This lets you see in real-time where your fellow Eyewirers are tracing, reaping, and Scythe Completing! We’ve fixed bugs that were causing issues for some users, such as not seeing the Live Overview icons or not

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Model can more naturally detect depression in conversations

Neural network learns speech patterns that predict depression in clinical interviews. Read More

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Starwatch: planets on parade

After a summer in which Mars and Saturn have been at their closest to Earth, they are now receding. Catch them this week lining up with Jupiter just after sunset Throughout the week, three bright planets will line-up along the horizon just after sunset. The brightest of the planets will be Mars . Fresh from its closest approach to Earth in late July, it remains a stunning jewel: a blazing red bea

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Bitcoin 101: Everything you need to know about investing, buying, and mining digital currency

Big Think's Bitcoin and crypto correspondent Reuben Jackson answers some of digital currency's biggest questions. Read More

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