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Nyheder2018september04

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Going up! Japan to test mini 'space elevator'

A Japanese team working to develop a "space elevator" will conduct a first trial this month, blasting off a miniature version on satellites to test the technology.

8h

Amerikanere advarede uvidende danskere om, at vores pesticider kan give børn kræft

Danmark ligger inde med alle data, men der skulle amerikanske forskere til at koble dem sammen og beregne risikoen for, at danske børn kan få leukæmi ved at bo tæt på sprøjtede marker.

14h

Derfor kan du lugte nyfalden regn

Når sensommer- og efterårsregnen rammer, opstår en karakteristisk duft. Det er der flere forklaringer på, siger forskere.

12h

LATEST

NASA sees Tropical Storm Florence still feeling the shear

NASA's Aqua satellite showed that the center of Tropical Storm Florence's circulation was still displaced to the southeast of the bulk of the storm indicating wind shear was still affecting the storm.

now

Infrared NASA data shows Hurricane Olivia's strongest sides

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Olivia and found bands of thunderstorms wrapping around its eye and improved thunderstorm development over the southern quadrant of the storm. The eastern quadrant also showed strong storms.

now

CDC releases updated guideline on diagnosis and management of pediatric mTBI

In an effort to improve outcomes for patients 18 years and younger who experience concussions and mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI), the CDC recently published the CDC Guideline on the Diagnosis and Management of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Among Children, built from a comprehensive review of 25 years of research on the science behind pediatric mTBI.

4min

Online searches about cardiovascular disease follow strong seasonal and geographical patterns

There is a strong seasonal pattern in seeking cardiovascular health information on Google, with higher search activity during winter months, according to a new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Investigators also found that US states with higher deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) have higher CVD-related search volumes compared with regions with lower CVD mortality. By integrating a

4min

Jumping to scientific conclusions challenges biomedical research

Improving experimental design and statistical analyses alone will not solve the reproducibility crisis in science, argues Ray Dingledine in a societal impact article published in eNeuro. Repeating classic behavioral economics experiments with graduate- to senior-level researchers, the author finds scientists of all career stages are subject to the same biases as undergraduates when interpreting da

4min

Eye movements take edge off traumatic memories

Two human experiments published in JNeurosci demonstrate that a widely used yet controversial psychotherapy technique suppresses fear-related amygdala activity during recall of a traumatic memory.

4min

'Life-Threatening Situation' Expected on Gulf Coast as Gordon Strengthens into a Hurricane

Tropical Storm Gordon is expected to intensify today, morphing into a hurricane just before it hits the Gulf Coast tonight (Sept. 4), according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami, Florida.

5min

State-of-the-art imaging techniques reveal heightened detail and beauty of vertebrate life

A mingling of science and art, the next-generation photographs of vertebrate skeletons are at once fascinating, eerie, intricate and exquisite.

11min

Researchers identify twenty-five genetic changes that could have extended human lifespan

Senescence, or biological ageing, refers to the general deterioration of an organism's physiological functions, leading to increased susceptibility to diseases and ultimately death. It is a complex process that involves many genes. Lifespans vary greatly across different animal species. Thus, for example, flies live for four weeks, horses for thirty years, whereas some hedgehogs may live for up to

11min

The Fire and Its Aftermath at the National Museum of Brazil

Late on September 2, a fire tore through the 200-year-old National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro, burning for more than five hours, and destroying or damaging countless irreplaceable artifacts, fossils, memorabilia, works of art, and more. The museum’s collection reportedly included more than 20 million items. The cause remains under investigation, and salvage efforts are underway, but the l

14min

Person-centered video blogs increase chances of viewer support for cancer patients

As people with cancer use social media to find and develop support systems, a new study looks at YouTube content to determine what kinds of videos elicit an empathetic response from viewers. Researchers have pinpointed several qualities among video diaries that garner the most support from commenters. The study and how it can be applied in a clinical setting are discussed in Cyberpsychology, Behav

18min

5 ways retail stores could work better for online shoppers

As stores close their brick-and-mortar outposts in the hopes of shifting sales to their websites, online purchases could suffer as well, according to new research. Anuj Kumar and his family used to shop at Macy’s, both at the store and online. But when the store at their local mall closed, Kumar, a professor at the University of Florida’s Warrington College of Business, started shopping at the lo

18min

New method speeds up simulations, giving new insights into protein folding

A protein's folding patterns help them perform their dedicated tasks. As the real "doers" of the cell, even a tiny alteration in a protein's amino acid backbone can cause misfolding and hinder the protein's functionality or cause disease. For instance, if tau, a protein that helps stabilize the structure of brain cells, is misfolded, it can form tau-tangles, which are commonly seen in Alzheimer's

23min

How Google Chrome Spent a Decade Making the Web More Secure

Ten years after Chrome debuted, a look back at how the browser redefined security online.

24min

Microwave Weapon Blamed for Apparent Attack on US Embassy in Cuba

Why did dozens of U.S. embassy workers in Cuba hear loud sounds and suffer neurological symptoms in 2016? There's a new, Cold War-era microwave explanation for the mystery.

25min

Cheaper, easier access to fruits and veggies key to college students eating better

A benefit-oriented approach to nutrition increases college students' willingness to consume fruits and vegetables, yet the availability and cost of healthy food on campus are critical to changing their eating habits, according to research published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.

26min

DNA technology provides novel strategy for delivery of complex anti-HIV agent

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have applied their synthetic DNA technology to engineer a novel eCD4-Ig anti-HIV agent and to enhance its potency in vivo, providing a new simple strategy for constructing complex therapeutics for infectious agents as well as for diverse implications in therapeutic delivery.

26min

Is TV advertising for health insurance worth the expense? A new study says, 'maybe not'

A new study to be published in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science has revealed that health insurance has a small effect on brand enrollments, raising the question of whether health insurance television advertising is worth the expense.

26min

AI beats doctors at predicting heart disease deaths

A model developed using artificial intelligence is better at predicting risk of death in patients with heart disease than models designed by medical experts, a new study from the Francis Crick Institute shows.

26min

New technology improves hydrogen manufacturing

INL researchers demonstrated high-performance electrochemical hydrogen production at a lower temperature than had been possible before.

26min

Open-Access Plan in Europe Bans Publishing in Paywalled Journals

Research funding agencies in Europe will require grantees’ papers to be free to read when they are available online.

28min

Engineers are developing a small cooled turbine to make drones more efficient

Southwest Research Institute engineers are developing a cooled, radial gas turbine for a small generator that provides thousands of hours of electricity to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a significant improvement to current UAV turbines that only operate a few hundred hours before wearing out.

28min

Peering into private life of atomic clusters—using the world's tiniest test tubes

Experts in the Nanoscale and Microscale Research Centre (nmRC) at the University of Nottingham have taken a first peak into the private life of atomic clusters.

28min

NASA finds Tropical Storm Gordon's strength east of its center

After drenching south Florida, Tropical Storm Gordon moved into the eastern Gulf of Mexico and is headed to the northwest. NASA's Aqua satellite found three areas of the strongest storms east of Gordon's center when it passed overhead on Sept. 4 .

28min

Google Wants to Kill the URLGoogle Chrome Omnibox

"Whatever we propose is going to be controversial. But it’s important we do something, because everyone is unsatisfied by URLs. They kind of suck."

30min

How kids rank different ways of putting food on a plate

A child’s age and gender affect how they want their food arranged on their plate, research shows. “As a researcher, I have anecdotally heard parents say that their children prefer to have their food served in a particular way, including in a specific order. But we do not have much evidence-based knowledge about how children sort and eat their food, which is very relevant when, for example, we wan

34min

New Natural History Museum room honours Mary Anning

The room has been transformed in honour of pioneering palaeontologist Mary Anning.

35min

New smart materials could open new research field

A group of new smart materials discovered by researchers at Texas A&M University and their colleagues has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of fuel burn in jet engines, cutting the cost of flying. The materials, which could also reduce airplane noise over residential areas, have additional applications in a variety of other industries.

36min

Boosting gravitational wave detectors with quantum tricks

A group of scientists will soon start developing a new line of technical equipment in order to dramatically improve gravitational wave detectors. If the scientists are able to improve the gravitational wave detectors as much as they 'realistically expect can be done,' the detectors will be able to monitor and carry out measurements in an eight times bigger volume of space than what is currently po

40min

Amazon tops $1 trillion in stock market valueJ. Bezos Amazon Apple US

Amazon became the second big US company to hit $1 trillion in stock market value in the latest demonstration of the rising clout of American technology heavyweights.

48min

'Five Eyes' agencies demand reignites encryption debate

Privacy and human rights organizations expressed concern Tuesday after a coalition of intelligence agencies renewed a call for technology companies to allow so-called "backdoor" access to encrypted content and devices.

48min

Ohio State scientists identify hormone link between diabetes and hypertension

Physician researchers with The Ohio State University College of Medicine at the Wexner Medical Center say increased levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with hypertension, can play a significant role in the development of diabetes, particularly among certain racial groups.

49min

Colorectal cancer: Tipping the scales

Tumors of the colon are among the most prevalent cancers. Researchers at LMU have now shown that a protein promotes the formation of intestinal stem cells and thereby contributes to the initiation of tumorigenesis in the colon.

49min

UT study suggests earlier diagnosis, potential therapy for Huntington's disease

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) suggests that Huntington's disease may take effect much earlier in life than was previously believed, and that a new drug may be key in controlling the disease.

49min

Measuring the nanoworld

Researchers establish a benchmark for accurate determination of internal dimensions within individual molecules.

49min

Novel strategy shows promise for earlier detection of Alzheimer's disease

Finding an effective way to identify people with mild cognitive impairment who are most likely to go on to develop Alzheimer's disease has eluded researchers for years. But now, a team of researchers led by David Loewenstein, Ph.D., director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Aging (CNSA) and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medi

49min

NASA sees Tropical Storm Florence still feeling the shear

NASA's Aqua satellite showed that the center of Tropical Storm Florence's circulation was still displaced to the southeast of the bulk of the storm indicating wind shear was still affecting the storm.

49min

The Proud Corruption of Donald Trump

There are few more volatile combinations than Donald Trump, a long weekend, and Twitter, and on Monday, the president bubbled over as reliably and messily as a baking-soda-and-vinegar volcano. Two long running, Obama era, investigations of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department. Two eas

52min

Russia warns Google against election 'meddling'

Russia on Tuesday said it has officially warned US internet giant Google against "meddling" in next Sunday's local elections by hosting opposition leader Alexei Navalny's videos calling for mass protests.

52min

DNA Analysis Reveals a Genus of Plants Hiding in Plain Sight

For centuries, biologists have used taxonomy to sort living things into groups based on appearance, behavior and other perceptions of identity. They have christened plants and animals with binomials rooted in Latin and Greek that often allude to their distinctive macroscopic features. Beyond their usefulness in identification, those categorizations and name choices reflect prevailing theories abo

59min

New Walls Aim to Hold Back Rising Seas off Tanzania

Coastal erosion and flooding threaten Dar es Salaam, one of Africa’s fastest-growing cities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Fossil teeth show how Jurassic reptiles adapted to changing seas

Marine predators that lived in deep waters during the Jurassic Period thrived as sea levels rose, while species that dwelled in the shallows died out, research suggests.

1h

Mount Sinai launches television series on CUNY TV

The Mount Sinai Health System has launched a new television series called Mount Sinai Future You, featuring clinicians, researchers, and patients discussing how innovations in science, medicine, and new models of care are changing the course of health care.

1h

New study finds patients want more information about their medicine

Many patients want more information on the medicines they're prescribed and greater say in the brands they use, the first major study of the burden of long-term medicine use has concluded.

1h

New smart materials could open new research field

A group of new smart materials discovered by researchers at Texas A&M University and their colleagues has the potential to significantly improve the efficiency of fuel burn in jet engines, cutting the cost of flying. The materials, which could also reduce airplane noise over residential areas, have additional applications in a variety of other industries.

1h

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, September 2018

ORNL story tips: Lab, field tests show improved building insulation performance; ORNL-developed software runs quantum programs on multiple quantum computers; ORNL moved single atoms below a crystal's surface; certain bacteria turns mercury into methylmercury at varying rates across species; ORNL hosts Molten Salt Reactor Workshop in October.

1h

Researchers identify twenty-five genetic changes that could have extended human lifespan

A new method has made it possible to identify twenty-five parallel mutations located in genes associated with wound healing, blood coagulation and cardiovascular disorders. The results could help to develop new drugs to treat ageing-related diseases. The research confirms the theory that some genes that help us in the initial stages of life are harmful to us once the reproductive stage has ended.

1h

Peering into private life of atomic clusters — using the world's tiniest test tubes

Experts in the Nanoscale and Microscale Research Centre (nmRC) at the University of Nottingham have taken a first peak into the private life of atomic clusters.

1h

The gens isiaca in Hispania: Egyptian gods in Roman Spain

Researchers have developed a geo-localized database which enables archaeological pieces from ancient religions to be located on the Iberian Peninsula. This platform, named "The gens isiaca in Hispania", provides a catalogue with more than 200 remains from the Roman age on Isis and other Egyptian gods.

1h

Reducing nitrogen inputs prevents algal blooms in lakes

For decades, experts have debated whether reducing the amount of nitrogen flowing into lakes can improve water quality in the long-term, even though blue-green algae can bind nitrogen from the air. Scientists have now shown that the amount of atmospheric nitrogen bound by blue-green algae is far too small to be used as an argument against the ecologically necessary reduction of nitrogen inputs.

1h

Attention network plays key role in restoring vision after brain damage

About one-third of patients who have suffered a stroke end up with low vision, losing up to half of their visual field. This partial blindness was long considered irreversible, but recent studies have shown that vision training after optic nerve and brain damage can help restore or improve vision. A new study reports on key mechanisms of vision restoration: attention.

1h

A breakthrough for Australia's fish

A research team has made a breakthrough that could help dwindling numbers of Australian freshwater fish species. Researchers say the innovation will allow small and young fish to get past barriers like culverts.

1h

A quantum gate between atoms and photons may help in scaling up quantum computers

The quantum computers of the future will be able to perform computations that cannot be done on today's computers. These may likely include the ability to crack the encryption that is currently used for secure electronic transactions, as well as the means to efficiently solve unwieldy problems in which the number of possible solutions increases exponentially.

1h

Quantum weirdness in 'chicken or egg' paradox

The 'chicken or egg' paradox was first proposed by philosophers in Ancient Greece to describe the problem of determining cause-and-effect. Now, a team of physicists has shown that, as far as quantum physics is concerned, the chicken and the egg can both come first.

1h

Mass. ICU nurse staffing regulations did not improve patient mortality and complications

In 2014, Massachusetts lawmakers passed a law requiring a 1:1 or 2:1 patient-to-nurse staffing ratio in intensive care units (ICU) in the state, as guided by a tool that accounts for patient acuity and anticipated care intensity. The regulations were intended to ensure patient safety in the state's ICUs, but new research led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found th

1h

Infrared NASA data shows Hurricane Olivia's strongest sides

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Hurricane Olivia and found bands of thunderstorms wrapping around its eye and improved thunderstorm development over the southern quadrant of the storm. The eastern quadrant also showed strong storms.

1h

State-of-the-art imaging techniques reveal heightened detail and beauty of vertebrate life

A mingling of science and art, the next-generation photographs of vertebrate skeletons are at once fascinating, eerie, intricate and exquisite.

1h

NASA finds Tropical Storm Gordon's strength east of its center

After drenching south Florida, Tropical Storm Gordon moved into the eastern Gulf of Mexico and is headed to the northwest. NASA's Aqua satellite found three areas of the strongest storms east of Gordon's center when it passed overhead on Sept. 4.

1h

Person-centered video blogs increase chances of viewer support for cancer patients

As people with cancer use social media to find and develop support systems, a new study looks at YouTube content to determine what kinds of videos elicit an empathetic response from viewers.

1h

Gestational diabetes may predispose to postpartum depression symptoms

Mothers diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an elevated risk of developing postpartum depression symptoms, according to a new Finnish study. Moreover, GDM increases the mother's risk of developing type two diabetes later in life.

1h

Genome-wide study identifies genes linked to diverticular disease

A genome wide association study reveals potential genes behind the common painful intestinal condition diverticulitis, and could point the way toward new treatment options.

1h

Attention network plays key role in restoring vision after brain damage

About one-third of patients who have suffered a stroke end up with low vision, losing up to half of their visual field. This partial blindness was long considered irreversible, but recent studies have shown that vision training after optic nerve and brain damage can help restore or improve vision. A new study published in the journal Clinical Neurophysiology reports on key mechanisms of vision res

1h

Reducing nitrogen inputs prevents algal blooms in lakes

For decades, experts have debated whether reducing the amount of nitrogen flowing into lakes can improve water quality in the long-term, even though blue-green algae can bind nitrogen from the air. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) showed that the amount of atmospheric nitrogen bound by blue-green algae is far too small to be used as an argument

1h

Monthly Stats for Eyewire: August 2018

As folks start heading back to school, August has drawn to a close. Here’s how we capped off summer break: 22 cells completed, a 32 hour 28 minute marathon, our Eyewire Brain Zoo challenge week, and 2 new names (Theia & Hyperion) selected by Eyewirers for identifying some of the cell types discovered in our recent publication ! Thank you, one and all, for your contributions to science, and check

1h

Pruitt’s Spending on Security More Than Doubled in 11 Months, E.P.A. Investigator Says

The agency’s inspector general also found that the E.P.A. lacked methods for assessing safety needs. The spending helped lead to Mr. Pruitt’s resignation.

1h

Scores of Dead Elephants Found in Botswana ‘Poaching Frenzy’

At least 87 corpses were counted during aerial surveys over the past few months, all with their tusks hacked off.

1h

Increased chances of successful IVF with 18-20 eggs

The likelihood of childbirth after in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment increases if 18 to 20 eggs are stimulated to mature in a woman's ovaries, new research shows. That is more eggs than the number aimed at in today's IVF treatments.

1h

Greenhouse emissions from Siberian rivers peak as permafrost thaws

Permafrost soils store large quantities of frozen carbon and play an important role in regulating Earth's climate. Researchers now show that river greenhouse gas emissions rise high in areas where Siberian permafrost is actively thawing.

1h

Anti-inflammatory use during surgery could improve cancer outcomes

The world's first clinical trial (SURGUVANT) evaluating anti-inflammatory use at the time of surgery in colon cancer patients to improve their cancer outcome.

1h

Concussions loosen insulation around brain cells

Detailed scans of concussed hockey players found that the protective fatty tissue surrounding brain cell fibers was loosened two weeks after the injury — even though the athletes felt fine and were deemed ready to return to the ice. A loosening of that insulation, called myelin, slows the transmission of electrical signals between neurons, and shows that passing a concussion test may not be a rel

1h

Internet and telephone assisted training for child disruptive behavior found to be effective

Positive long-term outcomes, such as a reduction in child disruptive behavior and increased parental skills, have been reported in a new study.

1h

Improving operations for the brain's most malignant tumor

Neurosurgeons and scientists evaluated use of state-of-the-art optical technology built into commercial grade operating microscopes used in neurosurgery to detect the glow produced by adding the pro-drug 5-ALA to experimental malignant brain tumors. 5-ALA is approved for administration to patients to increase the detection of the margin of invading brain glioma tumors, and thereby allow for a wide

1h

Brain scans could distinguish bipolar from depression

New research has found that neurons deep inside the brain could hold the key to accurately diagnosing bipolar disorder and depression.

1h

Artificial cells are tiny bacteria fighters

Newly created artificial cells can kill bacteria.

1h

The gens isiaca in Hispania: Egyptian gods in Roman Spain

Researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have developed a geo-localized database which enables archaeological pieces from ancient religions to be located on the Iberian Peninsula. This platform, named "The gens isiaca in Hispania", provides a catalogue with more than 200 remains from the Roman age on Isis and other Egyptian gods.

1h

New lentivirus-based tool assesses effect of Wnt/ß-Catenin signaling on bone regeneration

Researchers have developed a novel tool for determining the sensitivity of bone healing to inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway and have validated its use in a study of bone regeneration in mice.

1h

SwRI engineers are developing a small cooled turbine to make drones more efficient

Southwest Research Institute engineers are developing a cooled, radial gas turbine for a small generator that provides thousands of hours of electricity to an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), a significant improvement to current UAV turbines that only operate a few hundred hours before wearing out.

1h

Scientists find a neurological synergy in explaining the processing of an optical illusion

A team of scientists has uncovered a neurological synergy that occurs in visual adaptation, a phenomenon in which perception is altered by prolonged exposure to a stimulus.

1h

Discovery: Mechanical properties of viral DNA determine the course of infection

A new study reveals a previously unknown mechanism that governs whether viruses that infect bacteria will quickly kill their hosts or remain latent inside the cell. The discovery, reported in the journal eLife, also may apply to viruses that infect humans and other animals, the researcher said.

1h

Chromatin structure: Slip-sliding away…

The DNA in the cell nucleus is highly condensed, and genes must be rendered accessible before they can be activated. An LMU team has now described the action of a protein complex that serves as a yardstick to measure lengths of exposed DNA.

1h

Zika virus study reveals possible causes of brain pathology

In healthy individuals, the Zika virus causes flu-like symptoms. If a pregnant woman becomes infected, the unborn child can suffer from severe brain abnormalities as a result of mechanisms that have not yet been explained. A study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPI-B) shows that Zika virus proteins bind to cellular proteins that are requir

1h

Episodic and intense rain caused by ancient global warming

A new study by scientists at the University of Bristol has shown that ancient global warming was associated with intense rainfall events that had a profound impact on the land and coastal seas.

1h

'What is not just a thing': an alternative inquiry into 'what is life'

S. Bai and H. Ge at Peking University, together with H. Qian at University of Washington, identified a 'live' process as embedded in a special interaction between a pair of specific components under a particular, corresponding environmental conditions. The interaction exists as an inter-molecular-force-bond complex (IMFBC) that couples two separate chemical processes, which can be considered as th

1h

Scientists developing way of using waste plastic to create car fuel

Discarded plastic could be used to fuel cars in the future thanks to a ground-breaking process developed by scientists from Swansea University.They have been able to transform unwanted plastic into hydrogen which in turn could be used to run cars.

2h

Tilted pulses

Physicists from Konstanz produced extremely short and specifically-shaped electron pulses for materials studies in the femtosecond and attosecond range in collaboration with Munich-based institutes.

2h

S, N co-doped carbon nanotube-encapsulated CoS2@Co

Researchers report cobalt disulphide encapsulated in self-catalyzed carbon nanotubes (S, N-CNTs/CoS2@Co) serving as a bifunctional catalyst, which exhibits excellent OER and HER performance, as well as strong stability at various current densities. In-depth study reveals that the excellent catalytic properties can be mainly attributed to the increased catalytic sites induced by S, N co-doping, the

2h

B cells among factors leading to brain lesions in multiple sclerosis

A team of researchers from UZH and USZ has shown that in multiple sclerosis, it is not only specific T cells that cause inflammation and lesions in the brain. B cells, a different type of immune cell, also play a role. These cells activate T cells in the blood. This discovery explains how new MS drugs take effect, opening up novel options for treating the disease.

2h

How much insects eat

A first-of-its-kind study used herbarium specimens to track insect herbivory across more than a century, and found that, across four species — shagbark hickory (Carya ovata), swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor), showy tick trefoil (Desmodium canadense) and wild lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium) — specimens collected in the early 2000s were 23 percent more likely to be damaged by insect h

2h

Urgent care visits increase as emergency room visits fall

New findings suggest that patients are more likely to visit urgent care centers over emergency rooms for treatment of low-acuity conditions.

2h

New clues found to understanding relapse in breast cancer

A large genomic analysis has linked certain DNA mutations to a high risk of relapse in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer, while other mutations were associated with better outcomes, according to researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, the Baylor College of Medicine and the University of British Columbia.

2h

New method speeds up simulations, giving new insights into protein folding

Scientists seek to better understand protein folding to cure misfolding diseases, but this incredibly complex process requires sophisticated algorithms to identify the folding mechanisms. Computational biophysicists have proposed a new way to identify the most crucial factors for protein folding. They demonstrated the short simulation time of their approach on a small but intriguing protein, 'GB1

2h

Researchers discover key differences between the exercise-trained heart and failing heart

A study by scientists from Australia's Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute has examined what is happening to the lipids in the heart and circulating blood plasma during exercise compared to a failing heart as a novel way to advance prediction and treatment of heart failure.

2h

USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for syphilis infection in pregnant women

The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends early screening for syphilis infection in all pregnant women.

2h

What is the effect on biomarkers of smoke exposure of immediate reduction of nicotine content in cigarettes vs. gradual?

The optimal approach for reducing nicotine to minimally or nonaddictive levels in all cigarettes sold in the United States has not been determined. In this randomized clinical trial of 1,250 smokers, compared with gradual nicotine reduction, immediate reduction to 0.4 mg of nicotine per gram of tobacco cigarettes was associated with lower toxicant exposure across time, smoking fewer cigarettes per

2h

The brain's tiny thrill-seekers

Microglia, the immune cells of the central nervous system, differ in male and female mice. MDC researchers report on the sex-specific features in Cell Reports. Their findings could change how we treat neurological diseases.

2h

Study says coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef not limited to shallow depths

A new study demonstrates that the recent mass coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef was not restricted to shallow depths, but also impacted deep reefs. Although deep reefs are often considered a refuge from thermal anomalies, the new research highlights limitations to this role and argues that both shallow and deep reefs are under threat of mass bleaching events.

2h

CDC Guideline on diagnosis, management of mild traumatic brain injury in children

A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention evidence-based guideline on the diagnosis and management of mild traumatic brain injury (concussion) in children is detailed in a special communication article. The guideline includes 19 sets of recommendations on the diagnosis, prognosis, management and treatment of pediatric mild traumatic brain injury, including return to school and symptom managemen

2h

Simulations reveal role of calcium in titanium implant acceptance

Titanium-based materials are widely used in medical implant technology, and coating the surface of titanium materials with biologically active molecules has recently shown promise to improve how cells adhere to implants. The mechanisms behind how peptides stick to titanium, however, are not fully understood. Researchers have now found how calcium ions present at the interface between titanium oxid

2h

Study uses Herbarium samples to understand link between climate change and insect herbivory

When she set out to understand whether climate changes over the past century might be effecting how much insects were eating various plants, Emily Meineke decided to go straight to the source—the plants themselves.

2h

Researchers expose the dirty secrets hidden under glaciers

UO researchers have found a way to account for how varying sediments underneath the world's glaciers control how fast glaciers slide.

2h

Not everyone hits the Snooze button like you do

A survey asks 1,060 people how they handle the alarm clock when it goes off in the morning, and how long it takes them to get ready for the day. Read More

2h

Ahmadinejad’s Quarterback Sneak

What prompted Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to start talking about the NFL? Iran’s former president marked the coming pro-football season on Monday, writing on Twitter that “unfortunately once again [Colin Kaepernick] is not on an NFL roster. Even though he is one of the best Quarterbacks in the league.” This was a surprise. In a decade of reporting on and visiting Iran, I had missed Ahmadinejad’s interest

2h

A New Kind of Labor Movement in Silicon Valley

In August, not long after The Intercept revealed that Google has been working with the Chinese government to launch a censored search engine, workers at Google drafted a letter demanding that their bosses stop their plans and put in place a “concrete transparency and oversight process” to avoid being blindsided in the future by projects that conflict ethically with the employees working on them.

2h

Satellites more at risk from fast solar wind than a major space storm

Satellites are more likely to be at risk from high-speed solar wind than a major geomagnetic storm according to a new study.

2h

Like a zipper — how cells form new blood vessels

Blood vessel formation relies on the ability of vascular cells to move while remaining firmly connected to each other. This enables the vessels to grow and sprout without leaking any blood. Scientists now describe how this works. In this process, the cytoskeleton pushes the cell forward, while an adhesion protein subsequently closes the gap to the neighboring cell, like a zipper.

2h

Blue-green algae promises to help boost food crop yields

Scientists have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants, in a breakthrough that promises to help boost the yields of important food crops such as wheat, cowpeas and cassava.

2h

A quantum gate between atoms and photons may help in scaling up quantum computers

The quantum computers of the future will be able to perform computations that cannot be done on today's computers. These may likely include the ability to crack the encryption that is currently used for secure electronic transactions, as well as the means to efficiently solve unwieldy problems in which the number of possible solutions increases exponentially. Research in the quantum optics lab of

2h

At last, a simple 3-D printer for metal

Used to produce three-dimensional objects of almost any type, across a range of industries, including healthcare, aviation and engineering, 3-D printed materials have come of age during the last decade. Research published in the journal Materials Today demonstrates a new approach to 3-D printing to fuse metallic filaments made from metallic glass into metallic objects.

2h

California leads on sustainability innovation while Trump digs coal

Last week, the California legislature voted to move to completely decarbonize its electric grid by 2045. As Ivan Penn observed in the New York Times:

2h

Fossil teeth show how reptiles adapted to change

Marine predators that lived in deep waters during the Jurassic Period thrived as sea levels rose, while species that dwelled in the shallows died out, research suggests.

2h

Something called ‘squeezed light’ is about to give us a closer look at cosmic goldmines

Space Gravitational wave detection is going through an even tighter squeeze. Gravitational wave detectors work by looking for teeny tiny movements caused by massive cosmic collisions, but quantum mechanics mean things can get even more precise.

2h

Veiled supernovae provide clue to stellar evolution

At the end of its life, a red supergiant star explodes in a hydrogen-rich supernova. By comparing observation results to simulation models, an international research team found that in many cases this explosion takes place inside a thick cloud of circumstellar matter shrouding the star. This result completely changes our understanding of the last stage of stellar evolution.

2h

Physicists produce extremely short and specifically shaped electron pulses for materials studies

Matter is made up of atoms and electrons. Although seeing atoms is now possible, for example with modern electron microscopes, tracking atomic movements requires ultrashort measurement periods in the femtosecond and attosecond range, as well. Such extremely fast "camera shutter speeds" can be reached through ultrashort electron pulses, which are shorter than the time scale of the motion. The short

2h

Reducing nitrogen inputs prevents algal blooms in lakes

For decades, experts have debated whether reducing the amount of nitrogen flowing into lakes can improve water quality in the long-term, even though blue-green algae can bind nitrogen from the air. However, no lakes with decreased nitrogen inputs have been monitored for long enough to clarify this – until now: scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) h

2h

Victorians enjoyed rudimentary version of Netflix, new research shows

Victorian families were able to enjoy their own version of Netflix by utilising an early form of 'pay-per-view' entertainment to while away winter evenings, new research has found.

2h

Veiled supernovae provide clue to stellar evolution

At the end of its life, a red supergiant star explodes in a hydrogen-rich supernova. By comparing observation results to simulation models, an international research team found that in many cases this explosion takes place inside a thick cloud of circumstellar matter shrouding the star. This result completely changes our understanding of the last stage of stellar evolution.

2h

Superradiance: Quantum effect detected in tiny diamonds

An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now bean measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms.

2h

Cathode fabrication for oxide solid-state batteries at room temperature

Researchers have successfully fabricated a lithium trivanadate (LVO) cathode thick film on a garnet-type oxide solid electrolyte using the aerosol deposition method. The LVO cathode thick-film fabricated on the solid electrolyte showed a large reversible charge and discharge capacity as high as 300 mAh/g and a good cycling stability at 100 ºC. This finding may contribute to the realization of high

2h

Powerful tools to solve challenges in bio- and circular economy

Researchers have developed an efficient synthetic biology toolbox for industry and research organizations. This toolbox enables, in an unprecedented way, engineering of a diverse range of yeasts and fungi.

2h

Body temperature regulation: How fever comes

Researchers performed a microdialysis study on mice to determine mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response in the brain associated with fever that might be used to develop new strategies for treatment.

2h

Sexual development in fungi

Biologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen have gained new insights into specific enzymes that effect the specialisation of fungal cells. Analysing the microscopic fungus Sordaria macrospora, they demonstrated that the KIN3 enzyme connects different cellular signalling pathways that are involved in developmental processes. Thus, it is crucial for the sexual life c

2h

At last, a simple 3D printer for metal

Research published in the journal Materials Today demonstrates a new approach to 3D printing to fuse metallic filaments made from metallic glass into metallic objects.

2h

Disaster leaves unexpected impact on rural Japan's marriage migrants

The devastating 2011 tsunami that struck the northeast of Japan led to a surprising outcome — empowering some migrant women, while further isolating others.

2h

Fast vs slow water: explaining the fragile-to-strong transition

A Japanese research team led by The University of Tokyo investigated the fragile-to-strong transition of water. Unlike most liquids, when water is cooled, the rate of increase of its viscosity reaches a maximum at a certain low temperature. The team showed that modeling water as a temperature-dependent mixture of two states — disordered 'fast' water and locally ordered 'slow' water — explained t

2h

Breaking osteoporosis: New mechanism activates bone-building cells

The number of osteoporosis medications that promote bone formation are few compared to those that suppress bone resorption. A research group led by Kumamoto University scientists has discovered that the gene SIRT7 is important for bone formation, and have succeeded in finding a new mechanism to activate gene functions essential for bone formation. The researchers expect that the 'SIRT7-regulated o

2h

Boosting gravitational wave detectors with quantum tricks

A group of scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) at the University of Copenhagen will soon start developing a new line of technical equipment in order to dramatically improve gravitational wave detectors. If the NBI-scientists are able to improve the gravitational wave detectors as much as they 'realistically expect can be done,' the detectors will be able to monitor and carry out measure

2h

3-D models from cheap video cameras

Hannes Ovrén shows in his doctoral thesis in computer vision at Linköping University how 3-D models can be created from video films recorded with simple body- or robot-mounted cameras. The research opens new possibilities for both robots and humans, not least for the police and rescue services.

2h

Simulations reveal role of calcium in titanium implant acceptance

Titanium-based materials are widely used in medical implant technology. Coating the surface of titanium materials with biologically active molecules has recently shown promise to improve how cells adhere to implants and promote tissue regeneration. The mechanisms behind how peptides stick to titanium, however, are not fully understood.

2h

'Children belong in the suburbs'—with more families in apartments, such attitudes are changing

Australian cities are growing rapidly. Echoing international trends, higher-density housing will accommodate much of this growth in the inner city. Such housing – mostly apartments, townhouses and blocks of flats – is usually associated with young urban professionals and the childless elite. But families with children do live in apartments and even more will do so in the future.

2h

Study says coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef not limited to shallow depths

A new study demonstrates that the recent mass coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef was not restricted to shallow depths, but also affected deep reefs. Although deep reefs are often considered a refuge from thermal anomalies, the new research highlights limitations to this role and argues that both shallow and deep reefs are under threat of mass bleaching events. Published today in the journal

2h

Don't Be Fooled: Weather Is Not Climate

But climate affects weather — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Nyt stresspanel beder danskerne om konkrete ideer

Send os korte, konkrete forslag, der nemt kan sættes i værk. Sådan lyder invitationen fra regeringens stresspanel, der håber, at danskerne vil komme med bidrage til en anti-stress-strategi.

2h

Bogs are unique records of history – here's why

Peat bogs, which cover 3% of the world's land surface, are special places. While historically often considered as worthless morasses, today they are recognised as beautiful habitats providing environmental benefits from biodiversity to climate regulation. However, they are threatened by drainage, land reclamation for agriculture and peat cutting for fuel, which has significantly reduced the extent

2h

How to detect a sinkhole – before it swallows you up

It comes as quite a shock when the ground beneath your feet, your house or your field suddenly disappears leaving a hole. This hole may be tens of metres or more deep, and it will eventually lead into a cavity which may extend downwards for hundreds of metres below the ground.

2h

Slip-sliding away…

In the cell nucleus, the genomic DNA is packaged into a tightly condensed form, which is referred to as chromatin. The basic unit of chromatin organization is the nucleosome, a DNA-protein complex consisting of a defined length of DNA wrapped around a bead-like structure which is made of histone proteins. The individual nucleosomes are connected by a short length of linker DNA, forming a string of

2h

Mechanical properties of viral DNA determine the course of infection

A new study reveals a previously unknown mechanism that governs whether viruses that infect bacteria will quickly kill their hosts or remain latent inside the cell. The discovery, reported in the journal eLife, also may apply to viruses that infect humans and other animals, the researcher said.

2h

Saturn's famous hexagon may tower above the clouds

The long-lived international Cassini mission has revealed a surprising feature emerging at Saturn's northern pole as it nears summertime: a warming, high-altitude vortex with a hexagonal shape, akin to the famous hexagon seen deeper down in Saturn's clouds. This suggests that the lower-altitude hexagon may influence what happens up above, and that it could be a towering structure spanning hundreds

2h

Research helps make buses smarter

A rather unusual trolleybus has been navigating the streets of Zurich in recent months. With its large windscreen and covered wheels, it could easily be mistaken for a tram – but it's not just the design that makes this bus so unique. For a start, it features a hybrid electric drive system that allows it to draw power from an on-board traction battery as well as overhead wires. But this bus is als

2h

The rise of machine learning in astronomy

When mapping the universe, it pays to have some smart programming. Experts share how machine learning is changing the future of astronomy.

2h

Machine learning, and how it helps researchers make scientific discoveries much faster

Jillian Buriak and her team spent years developing cost-effective plastic solar cells that can be printed like newspapers. Then she chatted with fellow chemistry researcher Arthur Mar, and in a just a few weeks his machine learning team enabled her group to boost the efficiency of these solar cells by 30 per cent.

2h

Discovery aids disease elimination efforts

Researchers at the University of Dundee have identified a new drug target in parasites that cause major neglected tropical diseases, a discovery that contributes towards a global drive to eliminate these diseases by 2030.

2h

2h

Modelling shows what causes abyssal hills 2.5km below sea level

Computer modelling shows climate- and sea-level cycles are not responsible for the 'hills' and 'valleys' at the bottom of the sea—a hypothesis that would have mapped a path to uncovering Earth's climate history.

2h

How data is helping us unravel the mysteries of the brain | Steve McCarroll

Geneticist Steve McCarroll wants to make an atlas of all the cells in the human body so that we can understand in precise detail how specific genes work, especially in the brain. In this fascinating talk, he shares his team's progress — including their invention of "Drop-seq," a technology that allows scientists to analyze individual cells at a scale that was never before possible — and describe

2h

Superradiance quantum effect detected in tiny diamonds

Under certain conditions, an atom can cause other atoms to emit a flash of light. At TU Wien (Vienna), this quantum effect has now been measured.

2h

Reducing food waste can protect our health, as well as the planet's

Globally, one-third of food produced for human consumption is wasted. Food waste costs Australia A$20 billion each year and is damaging our planet's resources by contributing to climate change and inefficient land, fertiliser and freshwater use.

2h

How maths can answer questions we haven't thought of yet

Maths is considered an instrument that produces correct answers to our questions about the universe. For example, maths can predict correctly that if you have two apples and eat an apple a day, they will last you precisely two days.

2h

Blue-green algae promises to boost food crop yields

Scientists at ANU have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants, in a breakthrough that promises to help boost the yields of important food crops such as wheat, cowpeas and cassava.

2h

Regulator protein key to malaria parasite's lifecycle

Malaria remains a significant threat to human health with approximately 216 million cases annually and over 400,000 deaths worldwide. It is caused by the Plasmodium parasite, which has a complex lifecycle involving transmission to humans via the Anopheles mosquito.

2h

Highly durable silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductor TED-MOS for energy saving in electric vehicle motors

Hitachi, Ltd. today announced the development of an original energy saving power semiconductor structure, TED-MOS, using next-generation silicon carbide (SiC) material that contributes to saving energy in electric vehicles (EV). This power semiconductor is a new device using a fin-structured trench MOSFET based on the conventional DMOS-FET, a SiC transistor of power semiconductor. Using this new d

2h

Alpine ecosystems struggle to recover from nitrogen deposition

A new CU research study finds that degraded alpine ecosystems showed limited recovery years after long-term inputs of human-caused nitrogen air pollution, with soil acidification and effects on biodiversity lingering even after a decade of much lower nitrogen input levels.

2h

Mechanism of biological noise cancellation revealed

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Scientific Reports how a particular biochemical signaling pathway cancels biological noise, ensuring the proper stem cell differentiation during development. The conclusions are based on a combination of mathematical modeling and genetic experiments on fruit flies.

2h

Telescope maps cosmic rays in large and small magellanic clouds

A radio telescope in outback Western Australia has been used to observe radiation from cosmic rays in two neighbouring galaxies, showing areas of star formation and echoes of past supernovae.The research was published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, one of the world's leading astronomy journals.

2h

Light exchange

The quantum computers of the future will be able to perform computations that cannot be done on today's computers. These may likely include the ability to crack the encryption that is currently used for secure electronic transactions, as well as the means to efficiently solve unwieldy problems in which the number of possible solutions increases exponentially.

2h

Oregon researchers offer new way to see dirty underside of glaciers

Accurate projections of sea level rise require sophisticated models for glacier flow, but current approaches do a poor job capturing the physical processes that control how fast glaciers slide over sediments, according to University of Oregon researchers. In a new study, they've proposed a theoretical approach that sheds light on the dirty, dark undersides of glaciers and improve the modeling of i

2h

Individual metering of heating consumption could lead to savings of up to 20 percent

The UPV/EHU's ENEDI group has conducted a detailed study of the changes in habits brought about by individual metering and charging of heating and domestic hot water in a community of residents in Bilbao, a measure that is due to become compulsory once a Royal Decree currently being drawn up has been passed. As has been seen, this change could lead to savings of 20 percent, similar to ones found i

2h

Quantum weirdness in 'chicken or egg' paradox

The 'chicken or egg' paradox was first proposed by philosophers in Ancient Greece to describe the problem of determining cause-and-effect. Now, a team of physicists from The University of Queensland and the NÉEL Institute has shown that, as far as quantum physics is concerned, the chicken and the egg can both come first.

2h

Severely traumatized refugees may not necessarily develop PTSD — study

Heavily traumatized people such as refugees fleeing war, torture and natural catastrophes may not necessarily develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new study reveals.

2h

Brain scans could distinguish bipolar from depression

New research has found that neurons deep inside the brain could hold the key to accurately diagnosing bipolar disorder and depression.

2h

Anti-inflammatory use during surgery could improve cancer outcomes

The world's first clinical trial (SURGUVANT) evaluating anti-inflammatory use at the time of surgery in colon cancer patients to improve their cancer outcome has been published in scientific journal, BMC Cancer.

2h

4-D printing reversible shape changing materials with light-based grayscale patterning

Reversible shape change is a highly desirable property for many biomedical applications, including mechanical actuators, soft robotics and artificial muscles. Some materials can change size or shape when irradiated with light, triggering mechanical deformation without direct contact offering prospects for remote control. To engineer reversible, shape changing (RSC) structures—active materials that

2h

Mobile tutoring improves the education of Mexico's poorest children

The education available to thousands of Mexico's poorest school children will be significantly improved thanks to a new mobile tutoring programme designed by experts at the University of Surrey.

2h

2h

Concussions loosen insulation around brain cells

Detailed scans of concussed hockey players found that the protective fatty tissue surrounding brain cell fibers was loosened two weeks after the injury — even though the athletes felt fine and were deemed ready to return to the ice. A loosening of that insulation, called myelin, slows the transmission of electrical signals between neurons, and shows that passing a concussion test may not be a rel

3h

Seven steps to success and what's holding women back: Study

From the 'maternal wall' to the 'boys' club' and beyond the glass ceiling, a group of geoscientists have taken the microscope to their backyard. The results are revealing.

3h

Greenhouse emissions from Siberian rivers peak as permafrost thaws

Permafrost soils store large quantities of frozen carbon and play an important role in regulating Earth's climate. In a study published in Nature Geoscience, researchers from Umeå University, Sweden, in collaboration with an international team, now show that river greenhouse gas emissions rise high in areas where Siberian permafrost is actively thawing.

3h

Blue-green algae promises to help boost food crop yields

Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have engineered tiny carbon-capturing engines from blue-green algae into plants, in a breakthrough that promises to help boost the yields of important food crops such as wheat, cowpeas and cassava.

3h

Enhancers are easier to predict in the adult stage than those in the fetal stage

Enhancers are short DNA regions that improve transcription efficiency by recruiting transcription factors. Identifying enhancer regions is important to understand the process of gene expression. In this paper, authors proposed a method based on support vector machines (SVMs) to investigate enhancer prediction on cell lines and tissues from EnhancerAtlas. Specifically, authors focused on predicting

3h

Seven steps to success and what's holding women back: study

A group of international female scientists has taken a close look at their profession and discovered the barriers to success—while also pinpointing the sometimes simple changes that can be made to attract more women into innovative industries and make the world a better place.

3h

Sexual development in fungi

Biologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen have gained new insights into specific enzymes that effect the specialisation of fungal cells. Analysing the microscopic fungus Sordaria macrospora, they demonstrated that the KIN3 enzyme connects different cellular signalling pathways that are involved in developmental processes. Thus, it is crucial for the sexual life c

3h

Nature's whims cause water crises—green infrastructure can stop them

Across Asia, man-made structures have stood powerless to avert tragedy after tragedy during 2018's rainy season. Hundreds remain missing in Laos following the collapse of the partially built Xe-Pian Xe-Namnoy hydroelectric dam, which followed relentless rainfall.

3h

Regeringen slår et slag for bedre udnyttelse af biomassen

Bioraffinering skal være med til at skabe nye typer afgrøder og nye værdikæder for landbruget, hedder det i regeringens ny strategi for cirkulær økonomi. Et potentielt guldæg, vurderer bioøkonomichef.

3h

How Aretha Franklin changed American music

As family, friends, and fans pay their final respects to Aretha Franklin, whose funeral was August 31, Charles Kronengold argues that Franklin defined her time in many ways. Franklin, who died August 16 at age 76, figures extensively in Kronengold’s upcoming book, Crediting Thinking in Soul and Dance Music . Kronengold shows how the “Queen of Soul” changed the way people listen to music, to Afric

3h

Gene discovery may prevent preterm births

Researchers have discovered that a specific gene called Nodal appears to determine when a pregnant woman will go into labor. The finding could offer new ways to prevent preterm births. Preterm birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy) is a major global public health problem. Every year, 15 million babies are born prematurely and many will suffer from neurodegenerative disorders, including cerebral pal

3h

The life of a shark scientist

Marine biologist Melissa Marquez shares a dive on the Great Barrier Reef, and tips for swimming with sharks.

3h

3h

Boosting gravitational wave detectors with quantum tricks

A group of scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute (NBI) at the University of Copenhagen will soon start developing a new line of technical equipment in order to dramatically improve gravitational wave detectors.

3h

Telescope maps cosmic rays in Magellanic clouds

A radio telescope in outback Western Australia has been used to observe radiation from cosmic rays in two neighbouring galaxies, showing areas of star formation and echoes of past supernovae.

3h

How animals went from single cells to over 30 different body types

Whilst this planet has gone cycling on according to the fixed law of gravity, from so simple a beginning endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved.

3h

Veiled supernovae provide clue to stellar evolution

At the end of its life, a red supergiant star explodes in a hydrogen-rich supernova. By comparing observation results to simulation models, an international research team found that in many cases this explosion takes place inside a thick cloud of circumstellar matter shrouding the star. This result completely changes our understanding of the last stage of stellar evolution.

3h

Dueling pickups, popular SUV among new models coming in 2018

From new top-selling pickup trucks to an essential range extension for an electric car to the most popular SUV in the country, the 2019 model year for new vehicles has something for everyone.

3h

Brown bear saliva found to contain chemical that kills Staphylococcus aureus

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Russia and the U.S. has found that Siberian brown bears have a chemical in their saliva that has been found able to kill Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of the microbiome of a subspecies of brown bear and what they found.

3h

‘Accessory to War’ probes the uneasy alliance between space science and the military

Neil deGrasse Tyson and Avis Lang’s ‘Accessory to War’ grapples with the millennia-old partnership between space science and warfare.

3h

Greenhouse emissions from Siberian rivers peak as permafrost thaws

Permafrost soils store large quantities of frozen carbon and play an important role in regulating Earth's climate. In a study published in Nature Geoscience, researchers from Umeå University, Sweden, in collaboration with an international team, now show that river greenhouse gas emissions rise high in areas where Siberian permafrost is actively thawing.

3h

Testing whether Planck's radiation law applies at a very small scale

A recent discovery by William & Mary and University of Michigan researchers transforms our understanding of one of the most important laws of modern physics. The discovery, published in the journal Nature, has broad implications for science, impacting everything from nanotechnology to our understanding of the solar system.

3h

Rare earth orthoferrite LnFeO3 nanoparticles for bioimaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as one of the most powerful clinical imaging tools because of its superb spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast, especially when using contrast agents. In the European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, scientists have presented a new kind of nanoparticle contrast agent combining two contrast agent classes – iron oxide and rare earth metal ions – into

3h

Hurricane warnings as US Gulf Coast braces for Gordon

Tropical Storm Gordon gained strength as it moved steadily toward the US Gulf Coast Tuesday, on track to make landfall just east of New Orleans with hurricane force winds.

3h

Mouse models may not accurately mimic severity of gonorrhea infection

The mouse model may not fully reflect the severity of the infection and the types of immune responses seen in humans.

3h

New imagery solves mystery of why Mount St. Helens is out of line with other volcanoes

Some of the clearest, most comprehensive images of the top several miles of the Earth's crust have helped scientists solve the mystery of why Mount St. Helens is located outside the main line of the Cascade Arc of volcanoes.

3h

Confining mature cells ‘reprograms’ them into stem cells

Researchers have found how to reprogram mature cells into redeployable stem cells without direct genetic modification by confining them to a defined space for an extended period of time. “Our breakthrough findings will usher in a new generation of stem cell technologies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine that may overcome the negative effects of genomic manipulation,” says G.V. Shiv

3h

Internet & telephone assisted training for child disruptive behavior found to be effective

Positive long-term outcomes, such as a reduction in child disruptive behavior and increased parental skills, have been reported in a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP).

3h

Satellites more at risk from fast solar wind than a major space storm

Satellites are more likely to be at risk from high-speed solar wind than a major geomagnetic storm according to a new UK-US study published this week in the journal Space Weather.

3h

Superradiance: Quantum effect detected in tiny diamonds

An atom gives off energy and causes many other atoms in its vicinity to emit light as well. This phenomenon is called 'superradiance'. For the first time, this phenomenon has now bean measured in a solid-state system, consisting of tiny diamonds with built-in nitrogen atoms.

3h

Induced changes to political attitude can last over time

Cognitive scientists at Lund University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have demonstrated that experimentally induced changes in political attitudes can last over time. Notably, participants who verbally motivated these 'false attitudes' exhibited the largest changes. This is the first time a lasting effect of the choice blindness phenomenon has been observed.

3h

Like a zipper — how cells form new blood vessels

Blood vessel formation relies on the ability of vascular cells to move while remaining firmly connected to each other. This enables the vessels to grow and sprout without leaking any blood. In Nature Communications, scientists from the Biozentrum at the University of Basel describe how this works. In this process, the cytoskeleton pushes the cell forward, while an adhesion protein subsequently clo

3h

Tiny microbes playing a big (and even bigger in the future) role in the carbon cycle of China Seas

Although microbial carbon pump (MCP) in the ocean was reported very important in the carbon sequestration, it has not yet been quantified in the China Seas. A recent research published in SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences used a numerical model to explicitly simulate the MCP process in the South China Sea. Moreover, the sequestration rate from MCP was estimated at about 1/6 of the biological pump and c

3h

Cathode fabrication for oxide solid-state batteries at room temperature

Researchers at the Toyohashi University of Technology have successfully fabricated a lithium trivanadate (LVO) cathode thick film on a garnet-type oxide solid electrolyte using the aerosol deposition method. The LVO cathode thick-film fabricated on the solid electrolyte showed a large reversible charge and discharge capacity as high as 300 mAh/g and a good cycling stability at 100 ºC. This finding

3h

Regeringen vil fjerne bøvl og bureaukrati i den offentlige sektor

Regeringen vil fjerne mange administrative regler i ny plan for afbureaukratisering af den offentlige sektor. Lægeforeningen bakker op om færre regler, men mener, at andet står i vejen for afbureaukratiseringen.

3h

Psykiater: Fælles akutmodtagelse sidestiller ikke somatik og psykiatri – tværtimod

Det er at gøre vold på den psykiatriske akutmodtagelse at forsøge at mase den ind i en somatisk kontekst. Det mener psykiater og regionsrådspolitiker, der advarer om, at en sådan model vil tabe mennesker med angst og depression på gulvet.

3h

Hovedstaden freder Sundhedsplatformen i budgetforhandlinger

Et politisk flertal i Region Hovedstaden giver håndslag på at frede Sundhedsplatformen for at få ro på budgetforhandlingerne. Det ærgrer formanden for Yngre Læger.

3h

Researchers report the first natural example of a fossilised earthquake in serpentinite

The first natural example of a fossilised earthquake in serpentinite (type of rock) is providing new knowledge about the extreme forces and chemical reactions that occur during seismic ruptures.

3h

New policy models and cost-cutting technologies could help nuclear play vital role in climate solutions

How can the world achieve the deep carbon emissions reductions that are necessary to slow or reverse the impacts of climate change? The authors of a new MIT study say that unless nuclear energy is meaningfully incorporated into the global mix of low-carbon energy technologies, the challenge of climate change will be much more difficult and costly to solve. For nuclear energy to take its place as a

3h

Official retirement age is not the only factor that determines the duration of working life

The life expectancy of human beings continues to increase. While this is good news for the individual, it does cause difficulties for the pension system. This is why experts as well as some politicians call for the retirement age to be raised further. However, the actual duration of working life is determined only in part by the retirement age defined by the government. Scientists at the Max Planc

3h

Image: SMART-1's crash site

This greyscale, mottled image shows a patch of the moon's surface, and features an intriguing shape towards the top of the frame. This was actually made by a spacecraft – it marks the final resting place of ESA's SMART-1 (Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology-1).

3h

Mathematicians suggest exchanging wireless energy for data collected by sensors in mobile devices

RUDN mathematicians have suggested an incentive to encourage participants in mobile crowd-sensing. The data collected by sensors built into personal mobile devices (such as smartphones) can be exchanged for wireless battery charging services. The work was published in IEEE Wireless Communications.

3h

Humans still heft groceries on-demand, for now

A self-driving car that delivers your groceries seems like a great idea: a robot vehicle that uses artificial intelligence to replicate the service of yesteryear's milkman and grocery store delivery kid.

3h

Cars are cruising down the monthly subscription highway

If you already subscribe to digital services like Netflix to binge on TV shows and Spotify to groove to an endless mix of music, the auto industry might have a deal for you: Subscribe to your next car as well.

3h

Denver's inequities in park access traced to segregation, funding policies

Current inequities in access to Denver's parks that are found among the city's minorities and low-income residents are the legacy of exclusionary local and state zoning codes, and funding policies that favored investment in wealthy neighborhoods, a new study found.

3h

The Mona Lisa decrypted

Summarized possible medical conditions visible in portrait of Lisa Gherardini, woman pictured in Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, and proposed his own interpretations.

3h

Body temperature regulation: how fever comes

Researchers from Kanazawa University report in Journal of Neuroscience performed a microdialysis study on mice to determine mechanisms underlying the inflammatory response in the brain associated with fever that might be used to develop new strategies for treatment.

3h

Powerful tools from VTT to solve challenges in bio- and circular economy

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed an efficient synthetic biology toolbox for industry and research organizations. This toolbox enables, in an unprecedented way, engineering of a diverse range of yeasts and fungi.

3h

Veiled supernovae provide clue to stellar evolution

At the end of its life, a red supergiant star explodes in a hydrogen-rich supernova. By comparing observation results to simulation models, an international research team found that in many cases this explosion takes place inside a thick cloud of circumstellar matter shrouding the star. This result completely changes our understanding of the last stage of stellar evolution.

3h

A breakthrough for Australia's fish

A research team from the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has made a breakthrough that could help dwindling numbers of Australian freshwater fish species.Dr Jabin Watson from the University of Queensland says the innovation will allow small and young fish to get past barriers like culverts.

3h

Brain scans could distinguish bipolar from depression

New research has found that neurons deep inside the brain could hold the key to accurately diagnosing bipolar disorder and depression.

3h

Research finds troubling disadvantages, including bias, against women in business

A two-and-a-half-year research study documents bias against women seeking CEO jobs in the workforce.

3h

Artificial cells are tiny bacteria fighters

Artificial cells that can kill bacteria have been created by researchers at the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering.

3h

Improving operations for the brain's most malignant tumor

Important research by Barrow Neurological Institute neurosurgeons and University of Washington (UW) scientists on novel imaging technology for malignant brain tumors was published in the August issue of the Nature journal, Scientific Reports.

3h

The Americas' Oldest Human Remains Lost in Brazil Museum Fire

The fire swept through Brazil's 200-year-old National Museum, destroying uncounted millions of treasured and important artifacts.

3h

America to Me Tackles Race in New Ways

Watching TV these days, it often feels like we’re in the middle of a messy moment of self-reflection on the state of the nation. Earlier this summer, Orange Is the New Black ’s sixth season delved more deeply than it previously had into issues of racial inequity within the justice system, both in prison and in court. The second season of Dear White People did the same thing with a fictional Ivy L

3h

New imagery solves mystery of why Mount St. Helens is out of line with other volcanoes

Some of the clearest, most comprehensive images of the top several miles of the Earth's crust have helped scientists solve the mystery of why Mount St. Helens is located outside the main line of the Cascade Arc of volcanoes.

3h

Cable cars could ease Australian traffic woes

Sections of cities all over the world are being demolished to meet increasing demand for transport infrastructure. The process of building new roads, harbour crossings, metro systems and light rail lines seems unending. Large-scale construction includes loss of public space, housing and backyards.

3h

As temps rise, bugs will eat more of our food

Insect activity in today’s temperate, agriculture regions will rise along with temperatures, researchers say. And that could make it harder to grow crops for an ever growing population. Scientists have already warned that climate change likely will impact the food we grow. Rising global temperatures and more frequent “extreme” weather events like droughts and floods are expected to negatively aff

4h

Should writers only write what they know? What I learned from my research

As an academic in creative writing, I attend a lot of literary events. One question I can always count on being asked is, "can I write characters of other backgrounds?" This has been a growing concern since Lionel Shriver at the 2016 Brisbane Writers Festival unleashed a tirade against what she called "censorship" in writing – referring to criticism of her book The Mandibles.

4h

How we showed Homer's Odyssey is not pure fiction, with a little help from Facebook

When you look at networks of people, whether it's architects or table tennis players or a regular bunch of Facebook friends, they will have certain similarities. They tend to confirm the "six degrees of separation" idea that most people are connected in a few very short steps. Each person tends to have large numbers of connections and to associate with people who are similar to them. The networks

4h

Want to solve the world's problems? Try working together across disciplines

Labor Day is our New Year's Eve. Rather than vowing to lose weight or spend less time on our phones, as college professors we head into the new school year with a different kind of resolution: to inspire and prepare our students to become agents of positive change.

4h

The beginning of a revolution in packaging

Humankind has already produced more than eight billion tons of plastic. Every year, we add another 80 million tons of plastic packaging to the total, only half of which is recycled. The rest ends up in a garbage incinerator or as trash that pollutes forests, meadows, lakes and oceans. Dr. Sabine Amberg-Schwab from the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC in Wurzburg is on to something th

4h

Predicting the magnetic properties of materials

Permanent magnets used in electric cars and wind turbines currently contain rare earth metals. Reducing the amount of these elements in magnets is important, as mining them is harmful both to health and the environment. Researchers have now developed a new machine learning tool to assist in quickly and easily predicting the ferromagnetic crystal properties of novel material compositions.

4h

Pandemic prevention at airports

Global air travel isn't restricted to people and goods – infectious agents, too, can make their way on board as unwelcome passengers and travel great distances within a matter of hours. In the air, the germs can spread unchecked. The HyFly joint research project aims to establish the scientific foundation for breaking chains of infection and, if possible, prevent pandemics. One way they hope to ac

4h

New wood-metal hybrid for lightweight construction

Wood foam and metal sponge – can they be combined? That was the question that experts at the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research, Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut WKI delved into in a project entitled "HoMe Foam" – with HoMe being a German acronym for wood-metal – together with scientists from the Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU and the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufa

4h

Machine learning algorithm automatically sorts zebrafish eggs

Zebrafish possess almost all of the same genes we humans do—and that makes their eggs the perfect model organisms for use in genetic and drug research. Previously, samples have had to be prepared manually, which is a very time-consuming task. Now, however, a clever machine learning algorithm will be able to separate and sort the fish eggs automatically. From November 6-8, researchers from the Frau

4h

Environmentally friendly and efficient propane-burning heat pump

Heat pumps use environmental energy to provide us with heat. However, they generally require synthetic refrigerants, which contain environmentally harmful fluorinated greenhouse gases (F-gases). Fraunhofer researchers have now contributed to the development of a heat pump that uses propane instead. The pump is both more climate-friendly and more efficient.

4h

Patent mining indicates promising routes for research

A group of researchers affiliated with the University of São Paulo (USP) campus in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, has used big data tools such as data mining and network analysis to develop a method to identify technological routes, trends and partnerships in any knowledge area. For this purpose, it collected information from patent databases around the world.

4h

Scientists increase internet speed up to one and a half times

Scientists from Samara University and the University of Missouri (Columbia, Missouri) have developed an algorithm that provides fast and reliable access to powerful data processing centers for solving high-tech tasks. Their work has been reported in IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management.

4h

Team successfully analyzes the structure of the protein FAT10 toward potential cancer therapy

FAT10 is a small protein with a huge effect. Its attachment to a target protein is a signal for its degradation. FAT10 is a marking system for degradation that seems to be inefficient. In contrast to its biological competitor, ubiquitin, which is recycled, FAT10 is degraded along with its target protein, which appears wasteful at first glance.

4h

Research team increases adhesiveness of silicone using the example of beetles

Thanks to special adhesive elements on their feet, geckos, spiders and beetles can easily run along ceilings or walls. The science of bionics has attempted to imitate and control such bio-inspired abilities for technological applications and the creation of artificial materials. A research team from Kiel University (CAU) has now succeeded in boosting the adhesive effect of a silicone material sign

4h

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