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Nyheder2018september09

New technique reveals how Zika virus interacts inside our cells

Scientists have developed a new technique that can determine how viruses interact with a host's own RNA. As well as providing insight into how viruses direct the host cell to create new virus particles, this technique, published today in Nature Methods, could allow researchers to design artificial molecules capable of blocking the virus replication process and preventing the virus spreading.

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Discovered: Optimal magnetic fields for suppressing instabilities in tokamaks

Fusion, the power that drives the sun and stars, produces massive amounts of energy. Scientists here on Earth seek to replicate this process, which merges light elements in the form of hot, charged plasma composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei, to create a virtually inexhaustible supply of power to generate electricity in what may be called a "star in a jar."

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Just seven photons can act like billions

A system made of just a handful of particles acts just like larger systems, allowing scientists to study quantum behaviour more easily.

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Peatlands will store more carbon as planet warms

Global warming will cause peatlands to absorb more carbon—but the effect will weaken as warming increases, new research suggests.

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Novel nano material for quantum electronics

An international team led by Assistant Professor Kasper Steen Pedersen, DTU Chemistry, has synthesized a novel nano material with electrical and magnetic properties making it suitable for future quantum computers and other applications in electronics.

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Graphene enables clock rates in the terahertz range

Graphene—an ultrathin material consisting of a single layer of interlinked carbon atoms—is considered a promising candidate for the nanoelectronics of the future. In theory, it should allow clock rates up to a thousand times faster than today's silicon-based electronics. Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) and the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), in cooperation with

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First interactive model of human cell division

Mitosis—how one cell divides and becomes two—is one of the fundamental processes of life. Researchers at EMBL have now produced the first interactive map of proteins that make our cells divide, allowing users to track exactly where and in which groups the proteins drive the division process forward. This first dynamic protein atlas of human cell division is published in Nature on 10 September 2018

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Most Doctors Are Ill-Equipped to Deal With the Opioid Epidemic. Few Medical Schools Teach Addiction.

It’s one of the biggest, most expensive American health crises in memory. But the field of addiction medicine is fairly new.

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Verdens højeste træhus bliver 4,4 meter højere

Den sidste træbjælke er sat på træhuset Mjøstårnet i, som ender med at trone 85,4 meter.

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Large trucks are biggest culprits of near-road air pollution

A new U of T Engineering study reveals large diesel trucks to be the greatest contributors to harmful black carbon emissions close to major roadways, indicating that vehicle types matter more than traffic volume for near-road air pollution.

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Mathematician uses dynamical ideas for insight into the geometry of a space

Steven Frankel is not hungry. He just wants to talk about noodles.

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US braces for 'major' hurricane FlorenceHurricane Florence

The eastern United States braced Monday for the impact of "major" hurricane Florence as it threatened catastrophic flooding in areas already soaked by heavy rain.

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How AI could compose a personalized soundtrack to your life | Pierre Barreau

Meet AIVA, an artificial intelligence that has been trained in the art of music composition by reading more than 30,000 of history's greatest scores. In a mesmerizing talk and demo, Pierre Barreau plays compositions created by AIVA and shares his dream: to create original live soundtracks based on our moods and personalities.

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'Kidnapping' in the Antarctic animal world?

Pteropods or sea snails, also called sea angels, produce chemical deterrents to ward off predators, and some species of amphipods take advantage of this by carrying pteropods piggyback to gain protection from their voracious predators.

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Global warming pushing alpine species higher and higher

For every one-degree-Celsius increase in temperature, mountaintop species shift upslope 100 meters, shrinking their inhabited area and resulting in dramatic population declines, new research by zoologists has found. The study analyzed shifts in elevation range in 975 populations of plants, insects and animals.

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Molecular switches are not just 'on' or 'off'

It is not always easy to see if a switch is on or off! A new study shows that the same can be true of a molecular switch. This knowledge gives a new insight into the molecular switches, the GTPases, many of which have medical potential.

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Mysterious Glowing Clams Could Help Save the Planet

S norkeling amid the tree-tangled rock islands of Ngermid Bay in the western Pacific nation of Palau, Alison Sweeney lingers at a plunging coral ledge, photographing every giant clam she sees along a 50-meter transect. In Palau, as in few other places in the world, this means she is going to be underwater for a skin-wrinkling long time. At least the clams are making it easy for Sweeney, a biophys

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New high-throughput screening study may open up for future Parkinson's disease therapy

Parkinson's disease is the most common neurodegenerative diseases; currently there is no cure. Aggregation of the protein α-synuclein plays a key role in this disease. Together with a US drug company, Researchers from Aarhus University have now carried out a new screening strategy which has identified novel and structurally diverse aggregation inhibitors.

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Understanding deep-sea images with artificial intelligence

More and more data and images are generated during ocean research. In order to be able to evaluate the image data scientifically, automated procedures are necessary. Together with GEOMAR data management, researchers at GEOMAR have now developed a standardized workflow for sustainable marine image analysis for the first time and recently published it in the international journal Scientific Data. Dr

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Three new species of fish discovered in the extreme depths of the Pacific Ocean

An exploration to one of the deepest places on earth has captured rare footage of what is believed to be three new species of the elusive snailfish.

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Active participation in group-hunts earns wild chimpanzees meat access

Wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, hunt in groups to catch monkeys. By observing group-hunts and meat sharing, an international team of researchers found that chimpanzee hunting behavior is a cooperative act that earns participants a fair share of the prey.

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Power of tiny vibrations could inspire novel heating devices

Ultra-fast vibrations can be used to heat tiny amounts of liquid, experts have found, in a discovery that could have a range of engineering applications.

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Study links widely-used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

A drug used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis and vasculitis as well as to prevent organ rejection in transplant patients has been identified as an important contributor to skin cancer development. The research identified a `strong case for an association' between the drug azathioprine and the mutational signature found in cases of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), a common fo

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Politikere kræver svar på afskedigelse af direktører

Regionsrådspolitikere undrer sig over afskedigelsen af to hospitalsdirektører ved Hospitalsenheden Midt. De mangler en begrundelse og kræver nu en redegørelse for forløbet.

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The legacy of NASA's Dawn, near end of mission

NASA's Dawn mission is drawing to a close after 11 years of breaking new ground in planetary science, gathering breathtaking imagery, and performing unprecedented feats of spacecraft engineering.

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Binge drinking affects male and female brains differently

Repeated binge drinking activates genes in an area of the brain linked to addiction differently in males and females. Genes associated with hormone signaling and immune function are affected by repeated binge drinking in female mice, whereas genes associated with nerve signaling are affected in the males. These findings have implications for alcohol abuse treatment, emphasizing the importance of c

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Scientists block RNA silencing protein in liver to prevent obesity and diabetes in mice

Obesity and its related ailments like type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease pose a major global health burden, but researchers report in Nature Communications that blocking an RNA-silencing protein in the livers of mice keeps the animals from getting fat and diabetic conditions.

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SUTD researchers resolve a major mystery in 2D material electronics

SUTD researchers have discovered a one-size-fits-all master equation that shall pave the way towards better design of 2D material electronics.

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Following the tumor DNA trail to crack the secrets of personalized medicine

Individualized therapies that target the specific genetic features of tumors have the potential to transform cancer diagnosis, treatment and care. However, several challenges still need to be overcome before these approaches can be widely used in the clinic. Two DNA testing programs have been implemented in institutes in Spain and the UK, to match patient tumor profiles with targets of early clini

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Don’t miss: Apes get ideas, hole becomes art, games lose boundaries

A 50th-anniversary screening of Planet of the Apes, the latest installment of Neil deGrasse Tyson's podcast, and a game where everything is left to the players to decide

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Global warming pushing alpine species higher and higher

For every one-degree-Celsius increase in temperature, mountaintop species shift upslope 100 metres, shrinking their inhabited area and resulting in dramatic population declines, new research by University of British Columbia zoologists has found.

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Old images give new insight on climate change

When studying climate change, it is often a problem that reliable, comparable data go back just a few decades. Long time series are in high demand, especially when it comes to the Earth's cryosphere, consisting of glaciers, ice and frozen ground.

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Galaxy Punches Through Neighbor to Spawn Giant Ring of Black Holes

A giant ring of black holes has been discovered 300 million light-years away, offering new clues about what happens when galaxies collide.

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Professional mediation can help Everglades restoration

A broker could be the key to saving the Florida Everglades.

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'Internet of animals' spreads its wings

A satellite system that for 30 years has tracked animals will expand to track all manner of objects.

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First truly black solar modules roll off industrial production line

A 2011 invention made by Aalto University's researchers has proceeded from concept to reality. Just a few years ago the researchers obtained the record efficiency of 22% in the lab for nanostructured solar cells using atomic layer deposition, and now with the help of industrial partners and joint European collaboration, the first prototype modules have been manufactured on an industrial production

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Google case set to examine if EU data rules extend globally

Google is taking its legal fight over whether "right to be forgotten" rules should apply to search engines globally all the way to Europe's top court.

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Evolutionary changes in the genetic code of yeasts

Yeasts are some of the most important microbes used in biotechnology. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the type of yeast used for making bread and beer, is just one representative of more than 1,500 yeast species found around the world. Currently, only a fraction of these yeasts has been harnessed for biotechnological applications. However, researchers studying various "non-conventional" yeast species ai

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Warfare spurred on the welfare state in the 20th century – but it probably won't in future

The link between warfare and welfare is counterintuitive. One is about violence and destruction, the other about altruism, support and care. Even the term "welfare state" – at least in the English-speaking world – was popularised as a progressive and democratic alternative to the Nazi "warfare state" during World War II.

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AI speeds up climate computations

Realistic climate simulations require huge reserves of computational power. An LMU study now shows that new algorithms allow interactions in the atmosphere to be modeled more rapidly without loss of reliability.

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Farvelægning af data kræver omtanke og gode algoritmer

Regnbuefarvede illustrationer kan give et misvisende indtryk af faktuelle data. En ny farveskala er velegnet til både normaltseende og farveblinde personer.

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Kidnapping in the Antarctic animal world?

Pteropods or sea snails, also called sea angels, produce chemical deterrents to ward off predators, and some species of amphipods take advantage of this by carrying pteropods piggyback to gain protection from their voracious predators.

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Reliability, learnability and efficiency of two tools for cement crowns retrieval in dentistry

This research work aims to help other researchers in the field to set up an experimental bench to assess the performance of different tools for the retrieval of cement crowns, in terms of reliability, learnability and efficiency.

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Can you tell fact from fiction in the news? Most students can't

Have you clicked through to this article from your news feed? Are you checking it on your phone? More of us are consuming news online, and increasingly we're turning to social media for news. Social media platforms are now the main source of news for Australians aged 18 to 24.

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Mechano-sensing and resistance during development of the fruitfly wing

Research about mechanical control of tissue development is published in Nature Communications this week. The article identifies the protein that regulates cell rearrangement in response to increasing tissue tension. This protein, AIP1, and its cofactor cofilin, could be involved in tissue tension-driven cell rearrangement across species, and the activity could apply to cell proliferation and death

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New High-Res Map of Antarctica Shows the Icy Continent in Astonishing Detail

Researchers have released the most detailed terrain map of Antarctica to date.

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Happy Birthday, LHC: Here's to 10 Years of Atom Smashing at the Large Hadron Collider

Ten years ago, the world's largest scientific instrument was turned on and the start of a research dynasty began.

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Photoelectrode that can harvest 85 percent of visible light

Scientists have developed a photoelectrode that can harvest 85 percent of visible light in a 30 nanometers-thin semiconductor layer between gold layers, converting light energy 11 times more efficiently than previous methods.

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Study reveals principles behind electron heating in weakly ionized collisional plasmas

A KAIST research team successfully identified the underlying principles behind electron heating, which is one of the most important phenomena in plasmas. As the electric heating determines wide range of physical and chemical properties of plasmas, this outcome will allow relevant industries to extend and effectively customize a range of plasma characteristics for their specific needs.

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Researchers develop a solid material with mobile particles that react to the environment

Inside most materials, little is moving. But a new "active nanocomposite" is teeming with motion: small particles connect or separate, thus changing the color of the entire material. It was made by scientists of the Leibniz Institute for New Materials in Saarbrücken in an attempt to lend materials more dynamics. The transparent material can "answer" temperature changes or, in the future, the prese

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Birds help each other partly for selfish reasons

Up to now, researchers have believed that birds stay at home and altruistically help raise younger siblings because this is the only way to pass on genes when you cannot breed yourself. But this idea is only partially true. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that birds benefit from being helpful because it also increases their chances of reproducing in the future.

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How fast can Antarctica rise when the ice melts?

Earth is finally free to rise after hundreds of thousands of years of ice suppression.

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Three new species of fish discovered in the extreme depths of the Pacific Ocean

An exploration to one of the deepest places on earth has captured rare footage of what is believed to be three new species of the elusive Snailfish.

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Hurricane Florence Intensifies Into Category 4 Storm As It Barrels Toward US East Coast

Florence was upgraded to a major Category 4 hurricane as it heads toward the Carolinas.

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How the West Was Lost

O ne hundred thirty years ago , an immigrant froze to death during a blizzard that hit southwestern Kansas. A flyer tucked into the pocket of his light linen overcoat advertised Kansas as the “Italy of America”; it promised a verdant land full of opportunity. This unfortunate man, duped by powerful boosters who sold the undeveloped West as a serpentless Eden, was among the first victims of Americ

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The Problem With Parents and Social Media

“So much of parents’ fear around social media use comes from this fear that their kids’ lives will be ruined forever,” says Ana Homayoun in the latest episode of Home School , The Atlantic ’s animated video series about parenting. In episode five of the series, Homayoun, the author of Social Media Wellness, explains why this fear is mostly unfounded—and reveals the empowering alternative to restr

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Birds help each other partly for selfish reasons

Up to now, researchers have believed that birds stay at home and altruistically help raise younger siblings because this is the only way to pass on genes when you cannot breed yourself. But this idea is only partially true. A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that birds benefit from being helpful because it also increases their chances of reproducing in the future.

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Research by the UPNA states that muscle strength training improves cardiovascular health

A paper published recently in the scientific journal Nature Reviews Cardiology shows that regular physical exercise and, specifically, that which is undertaken to increase muscle strength, improves cardiovascular health through non-traditional mechanisms, such as, for example, the release through the skeletal muscles of substances that are healthy for the heart (known as myokines) or the improveme

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Molecular switches are not just 'on' or 'off'

It is not always easy to see if a switch is on or off! A new study shows that the same can be true of a molecular switch. This knowledge gives a new insight into the molecular switches, the GTPases, many of which have medical potential.

11h

Study links widely used drug azathioprine to skin cancers

A drug used to treat inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis and vasculitis as well as to prevent organ rejection in transplant patients has been identified as an important contributor to skin cancer development.The research, published in Nature Communications, identified a 'strong case for an association' between the drug azathioprine and the mutational signature found in cases of cutaneous squamou

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Chip controlling exoskeleton keeps patients' brains cool

Scientists developed a model for predicting hand movement trajectories. The predictions relies on lineal model, not neural networks. It has the same accuracy of predictions, requires less memory and fewer computations, so the sensor keeps patient's brain cool. This technology could drive exoskeletons that would allow patients with impaired mobility to regain movement.

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I became a cyborg to manage my chronic pain

Health Implanting a new generation of spinal stimulators. I had a spinal cord stimulator, an electronic device used to treat chronic pain, implanted into my body. This type of therapy might help some of the other 100 million…

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People are knowingly taking placebos—and its working

The placebo effect has been exhaustively researched over the years, but scientists haven't gotten much closer to explaining what causes it. Now, additional research is showing that the placebo effect is even stranger than we thought. Read More

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Fynsk bioreaktor fjerner medicinrester fra spildevandet

Mikroorganismer bliver sat på stoffer i Assens, hvor man tester ny bioreaktor, der skal komme medicinresterne i spildevandet til livs.

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Mussel-inspired material is elastic—but rigid, too

Rigidity and elasticity are usually at opposite ends of the continuum. You can have one, but not the other. Now, scientists have taken a step closer to a material that has both. Typically, the more elastic a material, the less able it is to bear loads and resist forces. The more rigid it is, the more prone it is to rupture at lower strains when the load or force exceeds its capacity. “You can see

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Power of tiny vibrations could inspire novel heating devices

Ultra-fast vibrations can be used to heat tiny amounts of liquid, experts have found, in a discovery that could have a range of engineering applications.

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Study reveals 'dark motives' behind brain teaser questions in job interviews

A new Applied Psychology study asks why brain teaser questions are often used in employment interviews despite their known lack of validity and reliability. The authors provide evidence that these questions may be used because they give the interviewers power and speak to their 'dark personality traits.'

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Reward of labor in wild chimpanzees

Wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, hunt in groups to catch monkeys. By observing group-hunts and meat sharing, an international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, found that chimpanzee hunting behavior is a cooperative act that earns participants a fair share of the prey.

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In gut we trust when it comes to choices

Why do some people trust their gut instincts over logic? It could be that they see those snap decisions as a more accurate reflection of their true selves and therefore are more likely to hold them with conviction, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Screen strategies for off-target liability prediction & ID small-molecule pharmaceuticals

A new review in SLAS Discovery explores how improved safety screening strategies and methods are improving the pharmaceutical discovery and development process. The authors outline several fundamental methods of the current drug screening processes and emerging techniques and technologies that promise to improve molecule selection. In addition, the authors discuss integrated screening strategies a

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Golden sandwich could make the world more sustainable

Scientists have developed a photoelectrode that can harvest 85 percent of visible light in a 30 nanometers-thin semiconductor layer between gold layers, converting light energy 11 times more efficiently than previous methods.

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What we signal when we wear brands ironically

Buying or wearing brands ironically is a way to secretly signal our identity or beliefs to people who know us, according to new research. Caleb Warren, assistant professor of marketing in the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona, and his coauthor, Gina Mohr, associate professor of marketing at Colorado State University, define ironic consumption as using a brand or adopting a

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The inside story of the vaginal mesh scandal, from top removal surgeon

Mesh implants have injured thousands of women. Surgeon Sohier Elneil explains how the crisis happened and why women turned to her for treatment

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Star Wars News: 'Episode IX' Just Recruited a Doctor

Not, like, a medical doctor, though. The time-traveling kind.

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Global warming pushing alpine species higher and higher

For every one-degree-Celsius increase in temperature, mountaintop species shift upslope 100 metres, shrinking their inhabited area and resulting in dramatic population declines, new research by University of British Columbia zoologists has found.The study — the first broad review of its kind — analyzed shifts in elevation range in 975 populations of plants, insects and animals.

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TGen-led canine melanoma study identifies genetic basis of disease; potential drug targets

TGen and its collaborators from across the nation used multiple genomic analysis techniques to identify several gene mutations that could be the keys to what drives melanoma in dogs. Following the path from human melanoma, the findings of recurring molecular changes in canine melanoma can help veterinary physicians pinpoint potential new treatments for dogs. Likewise, human physicians will view th

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Large-scale wind and solar farms in the Sahara would increase rain and vegetation

A new UMD-led study published in Science shows large-scale solar and wind farms in the Sahara could greatly increase rainfall in the Sahara and the adjacent Sahel, while also substantially reducing of human-generated greenhouse gas emissions and the resulting mitigation of climate change.

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Meet Sweden’s New Populist Kingmakers

STOCKHOLM —It wasn’t quite the populist surge that the experts predicted. But in Sweden’s election on Sunday, the anti-immigration Sweden Democrats still managed to expand their influence, setting the stage for an uncertain government-formation process among the country’s eight political parties. After a tense and unusually divisive campaign focusing on immigration and crime, Sweden will now cont

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Kræftdødeligheden i Grønland er langt højere end i resten af Norden

Grønlænderne bliver nu ramt af kræft lige så ofte som i de andre nordiske lande. Men risikoen for at dø af sygdommen er langt større.

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Patients with sepsis at higher risk of stroke, heart attack after hospital discharge

Patients with sepsis are at increased risk of stroke or myocardial infarction (heart attack) in the first 4 weeks after hospital discharge, according to a large study.

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Understanding origami in 2-D materials

One in five mobile phone users in the UK have cracked their screen by dropping the phone in a three year period, according to a YouGov poll. The mobile screens break easily because they are usually made from an oxide material which allows the touch screen to function but breaks easily. In contrast, graphene and other 2-D materials could also function as as efficient mobile touch screens but are hi

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Coastal erosion in the Arctic intensifies global warming

The loss of Arctic permafrost deposits by coastal erosion could amplify climate warming via the greenhouse effect. A study using sediment samples from the Sea of Okhotsk on the eastern coast of Russia led by AWI researchers revealed that the loss of Arctic permafrost at the end of the last glacial period led to repeated sudden increases in carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere.

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Mechano-sensing and resistance during development of the fruitfly wing

How cells arrange themselves into precise tissue structures like wings is a response, and a resistance, to global mechanical patterning in a tissue.

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Coastal erosion in the Arctic intensifies global warming

The loss of arctic permafrost deposits by coastal erosion could amplify climate warming via the greenhouse effect. A study using sediment samples from the Sea of Okhotsk on the eastern coast of Russia revealed that the loss of Arctic permafrost at the end of the last glacial period led to repeated sudden increases in the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere.

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Algorithm accurately predicts how electromagnetic waves and magnetic materials interact

Engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies.

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New innovation improves the diagnosis of dizziness

Half of over-65s suffer from dizziness and problems with balance. But some tests to identify the causes of such problems are painful and can risk hearing damage. Now, researchers have developed a new testing device using bone conduction technology, that offers significant advantages over the current tests.

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Family genetics vital for understanding autism progression

Research shows that the total amount of rare mutations — deletions, duplications, or other changes to the DNA sequence — in a person's genome can explain why individuals with a disease-associated mutation can have vastly different symptoms.

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Evaluation of fitness for transport of cull cows varies

Assessment of whether a cull cow is fit for transport to the slaughterhouse can vary according to who is doing the assessment. This was indicated in a study carried out by researchers from Aarhus University, in which they asked farmers, livestock drivers and veterinarians to evaluate cow lameness and fitness for transport based on video sequences.

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Artificial synaptic device simulates the function of the human brain

A research team led by Director Myoung-Jae Lee from the Intelligent Devices and Systems Research Group at DGIST has succeeded in developing an artificial synaptic device that mimics the function of the nerve cells (neurons) and synapses that are responsible for memory in human brains.

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Superbugs jumping frequently between humans and animals

MRSA staphylococcus is an example of a superbug. These bacterial strains are resistant to most antibiotics and can cause serious infections.

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Changes in the architecture around cancer cells can fuel their spread

UCLA researchers have found that the extracellular matrix, the dense network of proteins and carbohydrates that surround a cell, can influence how cells move within the body by regulating their sugar consumption.

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Predicting Suicides—Beyond STARRS

Guest post by Kayt Sukel Image: Shutterstock Over the past few years, America has lost several celebrities, including actor/comedian Robin Williams and fashion designer Kate Spade, to suicide. It’s not a surprise: Suicide rates have been increasing across the board in the United States. According to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 1.3 million people in the US attempted suicide in

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Robot can pick up any object after inspecting it

Robots could one day be able to 'see' well enough to be in people's homes and offices.

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BioIVT publishes new research on the mechanisms underlying the C-DILI assay

BioIVT, a leading provider of research models and services for drug development, today announced its research into the mechanisms involved in cholestatic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) has been published in Applied In Vitro Toxicology. DILI is one of the primary causes of drug development failures. As a result, sponsors endeavor to identify new drug candidates with a high DILI risk early in the

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Facebook animal trade exposed in Thailand

A wildlife trafficking watchdog says it has found hundreds of examples of animal trading.

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Remember when a glass of wine a day was good for you? Here's why that changed.

Health It all comes down to the way we used to study drinking. It seems like opinions on the health benefits of booze are shifting. Suddenly moderate drinking is unhealthy. What happened?

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Alibaba's Zhang prepares to step from Jack Ma's shadow

Both in personality and skillset, Alibaba's Daniel Zhang will herald a new era for the Chinese e-commerce giant when he takes over full leadership from charismatic founder Jack Ma.

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A study of ants provides information on the evolution of social insects

One of the great puzzles of evolutionary biology is what induced certain living creatures to abandon solitary existence in favor of living in collaborative societies, as seen in the case of ants and other social, colony-forming insects. A major characteristic of so-called eusocial species is the division of labor between queens that lay eggs and workers that take care of the brood and perform othe

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007 carmaker speeds towards October listing

Aston Martin, the luxury British sports car brand driven by fictional spy James Bond, said Monday that it will launch next month on the London stock market.

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Pro- and anti- whaling nations set for clash in Brazil

Nations on either side of the whale hunting debate are set for a standoff as the International Whaling Commission (IWC) meets Monday, with Japan hoping to overturn the 32-year-old ban on commercial whale hunting.

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New El Niño weather event likely this winter says WMO

The World Meteorological Organisation says there's a 70% chance of a weak El Niño event by the end of this year.

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Image of the Day: Switch Gears

A gene responsible for the free-moving, primitive nature of fetal cells is expressed in some breast cancer cells in mice and humans.

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Nye mobiler vælter sig i kameralinser

En, to, tre, fem, ni. Antallet af kameralinser på smartphones vokser markant. Bilproducenter med selvkørende køretøjer følger udviklingen med interesse.

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The Man Who Raised a Fist, 50 Years Later

ASSOCIATED PRESS In the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, tucked between a gas station and what looks to be an abandoned warehouse, sits a former ceramics factory that now houses the studio of Glenn Kaino, a prominent conceptual artist. One morning in April, Kaino opened the back door and ushered inside the Olympic gold medalist Tommie Smith; Smith’s wife, Delois; and me. We were greeted

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Emmy Endorsement: In Praise of "Barbershop," the Other Genius 'Atlanta' Episode

The shaggy-dog tale is so stylistically at odds with fellow nominee "Teddy Perkins" that it proves just how elastic this show can be.

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HP's New 3-D Printers Build Items Not of Plastic but of Steel

For now, the company's new Metal Jet printers make key fobs and other doodads. But one day they could create car parts.

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New Space Robots Will Fix Satellites, or Maybe Destroy Them

Upcoming "service" satellites will be like doctors for older, ailing satellites. Should they take the Hippocratic oath?

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What to Expect from Apple's iPhone Event on Wednesday, September 12

New iPhones are on their way, and probably a new Watch too.

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UN sees 70% chance of El Nino event this year

An El Nino event that could disrupt global weather is likely by the end of what has already been a hot year, the UN said Monday.

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Sexual Synesthesia Survey (for those that experience it ONLY)

submitted by /u/iLikeToKeepMySexAnon [link] [comments]

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New Scientist Live: why hasn’t the LHC found anything new?

When CERN detected the Higg’s Boson, the finding actually raised far more questions than it answered, physicist Tara Shears will argue at New Scientist Live

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We’re not unique – lots of species can recognise themselves

We should be open to the idea that human intelligence isn't as special as we like to think it is

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Facial Recognition Tech Is Ready for Its Post-Phone Future

Apple’s Face ID turned facial recognition into the iPhone’s hottest feature. A year later, the technology is ready to break through to new applications.

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A new hydrogen-rich compound may be a record-breaking superconductor

The record for the highest-temperature superconductor may be toast.

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Dear Therapist: My Son’s In-Laws Invite My Ex-Husband to Dinner but Not Me

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My son’s father and I have been divorced for 21 years and we both remarried soon after. My husband is quite introverted, but is genuinely a very nice person and all three of my sons are very fond of him. I am

14h

The Democrat Who Could Lead Trump’s Impeachment Isn’t Sure It’s Warranted

BROOKLYN—“Right now, I don’t want to talk about it,” Jerry Nadler told his curious, concerned constituent. “ We don’t want to talk about it.” The man positioned to lead the House of Representatives’ impeachment effort against President Donald Trump next year was holding court on a suffocating early August afternoon outside a Walgreens in the Brooklyn half of his New York City congressional distri

14h

The Fate of Free Will: When Science Crosses Swords with Philosophy

In some domains the two knowledge systems are complementary, but in others they might be headed for conflict — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

IT-lektor: Nem-ID gør det lettere at blive snydt

NemID er så udbredt, at vores sunde skepsis næsten er sat ud af funktion, vurderer IT-forsker. Et nødvendigt onde, svarer Digitaliseringsstyrelsen.

14h

The Search for ET May Be Missing Life on Low-Oxygen Worlds

Microbes thrived on ancient Earth, even with very little of the life-giving gas — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Godt med flere læger, men forkert at skære ned på andre

Statsministeren har ret i, at der er kommet flere hospitalslæger, men samtidig har man fyret sygeplejersker, SOSU-assistenter og lægesekretærer med den anden hånd. Og vi behandler 50.000 flere patienter på hospitalerne.

14h

Region Midtjylland afskediger to hospitalsdirektører

Hospitalsdirektør Lars Dahl Pedersen og sygeplejefaglig direktør Tove Kristensen fratræder øjeblikkeligt deres stillinger ved Hospitalsenhed Midt. Det sker efter længere tids uenigheder, forklarer regionsdirektør Jacob Stengaard Madsen.

14h

NRC To Inspect San Onofre Nuclear Plant After Waste Canister Incident

The transfer of nuclear waste to storage canisters at the San Onofre nuclear power plant in southern California has been put on hold, after a near accident last month. The plant closed in 2013.

14h

Blissed out: the 13 steps to becoming happy

I enrolled in University of California, Berkeley’s online Science of Happiness course. This is what I learned Last autumn, I enrolled in the University of California, Berkeley’s massive open online Science of Happiness course to see if I might goose my felicity quotient through an understanding of the edicts dispensed almost daily by the US’s happiness industrial complex. The course is free. It’s

15h

A Conversation With: A Battle Plan for a War on Rare Diseases

Dr. Matthew Might is developing a strategy for people seeking treatments for little-known ailments.

15h

Mike Pence Swears His Loyalty on the Sunday Shows

By all rights, Brett Kavanaugh’s dramatic confirmation hearings should have been the big story last week. But if the Sunday shows are a reliable barometer, the Senate Democrats’ concerted, if mostly ineffectual, assault on the very conservative D.C. appellate-court judge couldn’t compete with Bob Woodward’s incendiary new book, Fear , or the New York Times op-ed by an anonymous Trump administrati

15h

What The X-Files Understood About the Search for Truth

P. T. Barnum once exhibited a mummified monkey head attached to the tail of a fish. He called the grotesque hybrid the Fiji mermaid and advertised it as a “genuine fake,” a PR move that only fueled the public’s curiosity. It didn’t matter how the creature came to be. A hoax that draws crowds is still a kind of truth. The legend of the Fiji mermaid reaches the FBI agents Fox Mulder and Dana Scully

15h

Techtopia #69: Elektriske løbehjul disrupter Uber

Elektriske løbehjul er den store dille i Californien. Folk dropper bilkøer og Uber for at trille afsted på kinesiske løbehjul. Og nu lander de også i Skandinavien.

15h

Brugere om ny it-platform hos domstolene: En 'skandale' og 'fucked'

Både advokater, dommere og dommerfuldmægtige er stærkt utilfredse med ventetider og teknisk formåen ved det nye digitale sagsbehandlingssystem og selvbetjeningsportal til civile sager.

15h

Boeings nye langdistancefly folder vingerne

Ny flytype kan folde vingerne ind, fordi den er for bred til at holde på standpladsen.

15h

DTU’s nye supercomputer skal regne på batterier og solceller

Klynge-arkitektur giver DTU Fysik mest computerkraft for pengene.

15h

Ældre praksislæger kan blive fritaget fra akkreditering

Ny aftale mellem PLO og RLTN medfører, at praktiserende læger, der i august 2019 er fyldt 65 år, kan blive fritaget for akkreditering.

15h

Coastal erosion in the Arctic intensifies global warming

The loss of arctic permafrost deposits by coastal erosion could amplify climate warming via the greenhouse effect. A study using sediment samples from the Sea of Okhotsk on the eastern coast of Russia led by AWI researchers revealed that the loss of Arctic permafrost at the end of the last glacial period led to repeated sudden increases in the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere.

15h

Mechano-sensing and resistance during development of the fruitfly wing

How cells arrange themselves into precise tissue structures like wings is a response, and a resistance, to global mechanical patterning in a tissue.

15h

Automationspris: Vasketøjsrobot tømmer lægens kittel for kanyler og kuglepenne

Med røntgen og avanceret software har Inwatec i Odense specialiseret sig i at sortere og tjekke vasketøj for fremmedlegemer og præsterer årlige vækstrater på 40 procent.

16h

Brain stimulation during sleep does not enhance memory for learned material

“Learn while you sleep” has been the claim of snake oil salesmen since the 1950s. The old pseudoscience methods involved listening to tapes and records. From a 1958 article by Lester David : Max Sherover, president of the Linguaphone Institute of New York … coined the word “ dormiphonics ,” defining it as a “new scientific method that makes quick relaxed learning possible, awake or asleep.” Dor

17h

Acupuncture versus breast cancer treatment-induced joint pain: Spinning another essentially negative study

The investigators behind a recent clinical trial testing acupuncture to treat joint pain caused by aromatase inhibitors used to treat breast cancer are spinning it as a positive study. As is usually the case for acupuncture studies. It isn't

17h

Devil in the deep blue sea a rare sight

Video footage of a rare, protected fish in water almost twice the depth it is thought to inhabit has raised questions about how marine life is responding to climate change and how much we really know about the deep ocean.

17h

Predicting how electromagnetic waves interact with materials at the smallest scales

UCLA Samueli engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies.

18h

'Hunger stones' tell Elbe's centuries-old tale of drought

Once an ominous harbinger of hard times and even famine due to critically low water levels, a massive "hunger stone" embedded deep in the Elbe River has reappeared in the Czech Republic after Europe's long, dry summer.

18h

New construction boom threatens Spanish coastline

Sandwiched between the crystalline blue sea and green pine trees lies Aiguafreda, one of Spain's last largely unspoiled Mediterranean coves, which is threatened by a new building frenzy.

18h

Can you solve it? The dating game

Find your perfect match UPDATE: Click here for the solution Hi guzzlers, Today’s puzzle is about dating strategy. Continue reading…

18h

VW faces first big German court date over 'dieselgate'

The first major German court case against Volkswagen over the "dieselgate" scandal that has shaken up the car industry gets under way Monday, as investors pursue the world's largest automaker for billions in compensation.

18h

Alibaba's Jack Ma to step down in 2019, pledges smooth transition

Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma announced on Monday he would step down as head of the pioneering Chinese e-commerce giant in one year, a departure already drawing comparisons to the retirement of late Apple founder Steve Jobs.

19h

Derfor skal du vente en time på godkendelse i NemID-app

Det tager en time, og papkortet skal bruges to gange, før nøglekort-appen kan bruges.

19h

New innovation improves the diagnosis of dizziness

Half of over-65s suffer from dizziness and problems with balance. But some tests to identify the causes of such problems are painful and can risk hearing damage. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a new testing device using bone conduction technology, that offers significant advantages over the current tests.

19h

Dansk virksomhed skubber grænserne for internettets udbredelse

Store dele af verdens befolkning er ikke på internettet, men det forsøger danske Bluetown at lave om på.

20h

Algorithm accurately predicts how electromagnetic waves and magnetic materials interact

UCLA Samueli engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies.

20h

Social support is critical to life satisfaction in young patients with cancer

Among adolescents and young adults with cancer, social support was the most decisive factor associated with life satisfaction. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that social support and how young cancer patients process the experience of being ill have far greater importance for their life satisfaction than sociodemograph

20h

Robot can pick up any object after inspecting it

MIT CSAIL system suggests that robots could one day be able to 'see' well enough to be in people's homes and offices.

20h

Smart technology to help diagnose sepsis in children in Canada

Smart technology and artificial intelligence could be used to improve detection of sepsis in children in Canada, write authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

20h

Acute critical illness increases risk of kidney complications and death

Acute critical illness in people without previous renal disease puts them at risk of kidney complications as well as death, according to a study in published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

20h

Patients with sepsis at higher risk of stroke, heart attack after hospital discharge

Patients with sepsis are at increased risk of stroke or myocardial infarction (heart attack) in the first 4 weeks after hospital discharge, according to a large Taiwanese study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

20h

This One-Armed Robot Is Super Manipulative (in a Good Way)

Researchers have taught a robot to fish for boots, like in the cartoons. That could be big news for robots still struggling to get a grip on our complicated world.

21h

Kasserede elektroniske trafiktavler har kostet staten omkring 80 millioner kroner

Først blev de danske motorveje udstyret med elektroniske trafiktavler for at reducere trængsel og ulykker. Så blev tavlerne slukket på grund af pengemangel. Efter et års usikkerhed om tavlernes skæbne bliver de fleste nu pillet ned.

21h

Veterans of the Long Wars: ‘Of course it’s a good thing we’ve begun entering politics.’

William Henry Harrison was a veteran-politician. Should we have more? (A.S. Southworth and J.J. Hawes, at Metropolitan Museum of Art, via Wikimedia) One more round, on whether in this Chickenhawk era—when the United States is always at war, but 99% of its population is not directly touched by the physical or even financial consequences of combat—having more “young veterans” in politics would impr

22h

A fun video about information overload and cognitive psychology.

submitted by /u/ChierHu [link] [comments]

22h

Nasal spray could deliver cancer drugs right to the brain

Researchers have developed a noninvasive way to deliver drugs to the brainstem in patients with tumors in that part of the brain. A person’s brainstem controls some of the body’s most important functions, including heartbeat, respiration, blood pressure, and swallowing. Tumor growth in this part of the brain is therefore twice as devastating. Not only can such a growth disrupt vital functions, bu

1d

How plants build the perfect ventilation system

A single hormone pathway regulates how leaves build the right number of breathing pores to help plants optimize productivity while taking into account changes in the environment, according to new research. As the world heats up, plants face a dilemma—the same tiny holes they have to open to exchange gases also let out water. They can close the holes, called stomata, to stay hydrated in hotter, dr

1d

Climate change will increase deaths by suicide

Climate change poses a threat to our mental health. Building connected communities is one way to combat a rise in suicide rates as global temperatures increase. Read More

1d

Starwatch: dust is beautiful – when caught in scattered sunlight

Make the effort to visit a rural area with dark skies – and admire the haunting, fragile beauty of zodiacal light Early autumn is one of the best times to see the zodiacal light . This is a glow in the sky caused by sunlight scattering off dust in our solar system. The dust comes from the tails of comets and the occasional collision between asteroids; some may even date to the formation of the so

1d

MSK Cancer Center Orders Staff to ‘Do a Better Job’ of Disclosing Industry Ties

In an email to staff members, chief executives at Memorial Sloan Kettering responded to news that a top doctor had failed to report links to companies in research articles.

1d

Dangerous blood pressure spikes among blacks happen five times more often than average

Blacks with high blood pressure experience hypertensive crisis, a life-threatening condition where blood pressure surges severely and quickly, at a rate five times the national average. Hypertensive crisis can lead to organ damage and death. Factors that predict organ damage from hypertensive crisis include age, male gender, anemia, chronic kidney disease and having a history of stroke or cardiova

1d

New guidelines for traumatic brain injury — Built with input from rehabilitation professionals

Clinical practice guidelines play a critical role in promoting quality care for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). A new set of guidelines for rehabilitation of patients with moderate to severe TBI — incorporating insights from the rehabilitation professionals responsible for providing care from initial assessment through long-term follow-up — has just been introduced.

1d

Hot streak: Finding patterns in creative career breakthroughs

You've likely heard of hot hands or hot streaks — periods of repeated successes — in sports, financial markets and gambling. But do hot streaks exist in individual creative careers?

1d

National survey shows ocean and coastal recreation is big business

A new report by social scientists reveals that viewing or photographing the ocean was the top activity for ocean lovers in the U.S. in number of participants, days spent, and how much people paid to do it.

1d

Monitoring at home yields better blood pressure control

People with high blood pressure are more likely to get it under control if they record blood pressure readings at home and share the data with their healthcare provider. At-home monitoring gives providers a better sense of patients' true blood pressure readings, leading to more customized treatment and better hypertension control. Combining at-home readings with traditional provider care saves mon

1d

Lifestyle changes reduce the need for blood pressure medications

Men and women with high blood pressure reduced the need for antihypertensive medications by making lifestyle changes. A 16-week program, focused on the DASH diet, weight management and exercise, resulted in the most dramatic declines in blood pressure.

1d

Effective TB, HIV, malaria vaccines missing from pipeline

Many of the vaccines critically needed to fight the world's most prevalent infectious diseases are not likely to be developed. A financial modeling study of 538 candidate products for 35 neglected diseases estimated the costs and likelihood that each would progress to a product launch. Using a new tool known as Portfolio-to-Impact (P2I), the researchers found only 128 of those candidates would mak

1d

6 security systems no hacker can crack

Among the hundreds and thousands of codes that have been broken by cryptographers, the government, and even self-taught amateurs tinkering around at home, there remain a small few of codes and devices which have yet to be cracked by anyone. Read More

1d

Chronic diseases driven by metabolic dysfunction

Progress in treating chronic illness, where the cause of the problem is often unknown, has lagged. Chronic conditions like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease defy easy explanation, let alone remedy. Medical researchers now posit that chronic disease is essentially the consequence of the natural healing cycle becoming blocked, specifically by disruptions at the metabolic and cellular level

1d

Japan culls livestock after hog cholera outbreak

Japan is suffering its first outbreak of pig cholera in more than 25 years, authorities said Sunday after culling more than 600 animals and suspending pork exports.

1d

Florence approaches US, set to become 'extremely dangerous' stormHurricane Florence

Tropical Storm Florence is expected to grow into an "extremely dangerous" hurricane by Monday as it approaches the US East Coast, the National Hurricane Center said, urging residents to make preparations.

1d

Cyber insurance market to double by 2020, says Munich Re

The market for insurance against cyber threats will double by 2020 to over 8 billion dollars, German reinsurance giant Munich Re told a conference in Monaco on Sunday.

1d

Bangkok meet fails to finalize draft on climate change rules

An international meeting in Bangkok fell short of its aim of completing fruitful preparations to help an agreement be reached in December on guidelines for implementing the 2015 Paris climate change agreement.

1d

10 reasons why Finland's education system is the best in the world

No standardized tests, no private schools, no stress. Finland's education system is consistently ranked best in the world. Why isn't America copying it? Read More

1d

California Tries New Tack on Gun Violence: Ammunition Control

The state already has some of the strictest gun control legislation. Now it's pushing to limit the unfettered sale of ammunition.

1d

Noah Builds a Mole Ridding Device | Alaskan Bush People

To help deter moles, Noah designs and builds a percussion device from scratch! Catch an all-new ALASKAN BUSH PEOPLE Sunday 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskanBushPPL https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow

1d

American Democracy Can’t Fix Itself

The claims this past week that high-level officials are secretly undercutting the president in an effort to restrain a commander in chief they no longer feel is fit for office has left many Americans deeply unsettled. “Just a glance at recent headlines should tell you that this moment really is different,” former President Barack Obama said on Friday. “The stakes really are higher, the consequenc

1d

What Lucid Dreams Look Like

Eye tracking reveals the answer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Is buying experiences better than buying things? Not for everyone

Everybody is made happiest by purchasing experiences, right? A new study tells us to rethink our cliche. Read More

1d

Giant Trap Is Deployed to Catch Plastic Littering the Pacific Ocean

Organizers hope a 2,000-foot-long unmanned boom will collect 150,000 pounds of plastic from the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in a year.

1d

1d

Despite Many Threats, Some Coral Reefs Are Thriving

Learning the secrets of these survivors could help scientists rehabilitate other reefs as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Cook meals in coffee makers, dishwashers, and other unexpected appliances

DIY You don't need a full kitchen to make dinner. You can cook a variety of unexpected meals with your dishwasher, coffee maker, and even an iron. The question remains: Is it worth the hassle?

1d

Ceramic art is a clever foil for a collector’s science teaching aids

At the Surreal Science show cunningly crafted ceramic art create a fantastical experiment out of a master collection of 19th-century scientific teaching aids

1d

Veterans in Politics: ‘They Are Your Best Bet’

Following this item on a new PAC that is supporting “young veterans” running for Congress, and this round of reader response (pro and con), another set of reactions. First, a reader with an angle I had not thought about, involving the way people considering a life in politics handle their first decade or so of adulthood. The reader’s conclusion is, “If you want people in Congress who have done so

1d

The Most Honest Book About Climate Change Yet

A uthors like to flatter themselves by imagining for their work an “ideal reader,” a cherubic presence endowed with bottomless generosity, the sympathy of a parent, and the wisdom of, well, the authors themselves. In Carbon Ideologies , William T. Vollmann imagines for himself the opposite: a murderously hostile reader who sneers at his arguments, ridicules his feeblemindedness, scorns his pathet

1d

This Week in the Future of Cars: What Happened at Tesla, Uber, and Chevy this week

Elon Musk is smoking something, doppler lidar helps cars see better, and the Diplomatic Security Service braves Ebola

1d

White House Secrets Top This Week's Internet News Roundup

Last week the internet was preoccupied with sleuthing who was telling White House secrets.

1d

Ritual Sacrifice May Have Shaped Dog Domestication

An ancient Arctic site suggests a complex relationship between humans and canines — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

The Win-Win Fallacy

Justin Rosenstein was largely unknown to the broader world, but he was a star in Silicon Valley. He had been instrumental in inventing several of its seminal technologies. A programming and product design phenom, he helped start Google Drive and was the co-inventor of Gmail chat. Then he moved to Facebook, where he was the co-inventor of Pages and the “like” button. More than a billion people wer

1d

Mysterious Swirls on the Moon Finally Explained

Light and dark markings swirl over the moon, looking like cream swirled into coffee or clouds against a slate gray sky. These lunar swirls may result from ancient, magnetic lava just below the moon's surface, according to one new study.

1d

Astrophysicist Awarded $3 Million Prize

Jocelyn Bell Burnell may not have won a Nobel Prize, but she has received another major science prize. She tells NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro she plans to help others in the field.

1d

The 'Mona Lisa' Allure: Could It Be the Result of Thyroid Disease?

Mona Lisa's smile is often described as enigmatic, but could the mysterious allure of this iconic painting actually be due to an underlying illness in "Lisa" herself?

1d

Because it’s Beautiful | Dont' Blink

In a winter storm it's difficult to appreciate snow. Through the lens of photographer Don Komarechka's snowflake images, the world becomes a more beautiful place. Non-linear physicist Stephen W. Morris unravels how a snowflake is formed. Stream Don't Blink on Discovery GO: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/dont-blink/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook:

1d

Coravin Model Eleven Review: The Best Way to Keep Wine Fresh Gets an Upgrade

Pour as much or as little wine as you like without spoiling the rest of the bottle, and pay handsomely for the privilege.

1d

The Mystery of Alexander Hamilton’s Bank Clock

On a spring day in 1858, the president of the New York Historical Society shared a letter from another New York institution offering an unusual donation from the Bank of New York: an elaborate clock. To convince his fellow members of the storied history of the bank and, by association, the clock, the president singled out one man from the bank’s original board. “Among the directors,” said the pre

1d

Letters: What Cold War Nuclear-Arms Treaties Mean Today

The U.S. Must Engage With Russia In August, Senator Rand Paul reflected on his recent conversation with Mikhail Gorbachev about the former Soviet leader’s role in passing landmark nuclear-arms agreements with the United States. Dialogue between the U.S. and Russia, Paul argued, remains essential to nuclear-arms reduction today. I appreciated Rand Paul’s piece on nuclear-arms treaties. His rhetori

1d

Dræber-droner, fupnumre og fake news: Her er 3 udfordringer ved kunstig intelligens

Kunstig intelligens overtager ikke verden lige foreløbig. Men den "tænkende" teknologi har en bagside.

1d

Infectious Theory Of Alzheimer's Disease Draws Fresh Interest

Money has poured into Alzheimer's research, but until very recently not much of it went toward investigating infection in causing dementia. A million dollar prize may lead more scientists to try. (Image credit: Ariel Davis for NPR)

1d

A Scientist Dreams Up A Plan To Stop The Sahara From Expanding

It involves a super solar farm the size of the United States. (Image credit: Fadel Senna /AFP/Getty Images)

1d

Italy Defied Starbucks—Until It Didn’t

“We arrive with humility and respect in the country of coffee,” Howard Schultz, the founder of Starbucks, told Corriere della Sera , Italy’s leading daily, last week. He was about to inaugurate, in Milan, the first Italian outpost of the global chain that supersized coffee and now vies with McDonald’s and Coca Cola as a symbol of American gastronomic imperialism. Even, of course, if Italy has one

1d

America’s System for Resettling Refugees Is Collapsing

BALTIMORE , Md.— A young girl hangs from a chair, swinging her legs and watching a fidget spinner spiral around her small finger. A couple huddles together, sifting through paperwork. A woman quietly speaks into her cellphone. A new life in America begins with quotidian routine here in this waiting room. But the placid, ordinary moment at the International Rescue Committee’s office in Baltimore i

1d

Learning From Laura Ingalls Wilder

Just over a century ago, Rose Wilder Lane wrote to her mother, Laura Ingalls Wilder, and suggested that she write about her memories growing up on the American frontier. At the time, Wilder was living in Missouri and writing columns for a regional farm magazine . It took several years before she heeded her daughter’s advice and began recording her childhood experiences in a manuscript titled Pion

1d

Can Facebook Really Drive Violence?

Facebook representatives have been hauled before Congress three times in the past year —including testimony this week from Sheryl Sandberg —to answer uncomfortable questions about technology’s role in the spread of misinformation and its threat to U.S. democracy. But those questions aren’t the extent of the company’s public-relations problems. Facebook has also been accused of playing a role in p

1d

Meet The Four-Dimensional Numbers That Led to Modern Algebra

Strange, long-forgotten numbers called quaternions are undergoing a revival in computer graphics, math, and physics.

1d

Uuni Pro Oven Review: Flatbreads and Pizza, Done Quick

The stainless steel Ooni Pro can bake pizzas, or whatever else your heart desires.

1d

I Am a Data Scientist and a Mom. But Facebook Made Me Choose.

Why Facebook needs to do better by families.

1d

Everything You Should Do Before You Lose Your Phone

Misplacing your smartphone—or worse, having it stolen—is awful. But you can at least minimize the damage with a few easy steps.

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1d

3D-print skal gøre dansk sygehusmad mere appetitlig

SERIE – 3D-print i sundhedssektoren: Teknologisk Institut bygger på en 3D-printer, der skal gøre sygehusmad næringsrig og let at spise.

1d

Wildfires make their own weather, and that matters for fire management

Mathematical equations describing interactions between wildfires and the air around them help explain their power and destruction.

1d

Skal fjerne plastik i tonsvis: Det første affaldssystem til verdenshavene er søsat

The Ocean Cleanup er lykkedes med at sende et 600 meter langt flydesystem af sted.

1d

Mark Miodownik: ‘Liquids are not to be trusted’

The scientist and prize-winning author on miracle materials, the real problem with plastics and the ‘naughty’ nature of liquids Materials scientist Mark Miodownik ’s first book, Stuff Matters , won the 2014 Royal Society book prize. His second, Liquid: The Delightful and Dangerous Substances That Flow Through Our Lives , has been shortlisted for the 2018 award . He has presented science programme

1d

Autonom drone er et årvågent eye in the sky

Dansk virksomhed satser på succes på det boomende dronemarked med en autonom drone.

1d

Jack Ma to unveil succession plans, not imminent retirement: SCMP

Alibaba co-founder and chairman Jack Ma will unveil a succession plan on Monday, the South China Morning Post reported Sunday, with a company spokesman denying a New York Times report that he would retire that day.

1d

Australia to ditch climate targets bill after PM ousting

Australia's new prime minister will not revive plans to embed carbon emissions targets in law, a thorny issue that triggered the ousting of his predecessor in a party coup.

1d

Australia drought extends despite 'widespread, significant rain'

A devastating drought that has left Australian farmers struggling to stay afloat is set to persist despite widespread and significant rain last month, authorities have said.

1d

Spanish flu: the killer that still stalks us, 100 years on

The pandemic wiped out up to 100 million lives, but scientists still struggle to explain what caused it. The answers could ensure that it never strikes again One hundred years ago this month, just as the first world war was drawing to a fitful close, an influenza virus unlike any before or since swept across the British Isles, felling soldiers and civilians alike. One of the first casualties was t

1d

Helmig i hørebøfferne: Derfor kan du ikke koncentrere dig, når du hører musik

Vores korttidshukommelse kan ikke klare for mange opgaver på én gang, og lyd i ørerne kan være med til at overbelaste den.

1d

The Buddha of Brixton whose spiritual quest started when his sister was shot

When police injured his beloved sister, triggering race riots, Tony Moo-Young’s ‘rebirth’ as Mooji began It was 6.30am on a Saturday when Anthony Moo-Young’s phone rang and a voice told him his sister Cherry had been shot. It made no sense – “I said, ‘What are you speaking about?’” – but the caller just told him to get himself down to Cherry’s house in Brixton as quickly as possible. The date was

1d

Serena Williams's U.S. Open Loss Was Humiliating—But Not for Her

On Saturday, many tennis fans witnessed an emotional, gut-wrenching conclusion to the U.S. Open. They also witnessed exactly what women of color lifting each other up looks like—even during personal devastation. In this case, 20-year-old Naomi Osaka, who was born in Japan to a Japanese mother and Haitian father, won her first ever Grand Slam title by defeating her tennis idol, Serena Williams. Bu

2d

If you want to spot a narcissist, look at the eyebrows

Life is already hard enough, but some people seem hell-bent on making it harder. We’ve all met people who refuse to accept blame, exploit their relationships, or elevate themselves by knocking everyone else down a peg or two. You might be able to minimize contact with these folks, but it’s … Read More

2d

See Spot heal: CRISPR heals muscular dystrophy in dogs

Love dogs? So does science. Read More

2d

Can we understand other minds? Novels and stories say: no

The way we represent other genders or ethnicities in literary fiction shows the limitations of our capacity for empathy and compassion. Read More

2d

Lifelong Learning in Unexpected Places

Perspective can be the difference between seeing a burden or an opportunity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d

Lifestyle changes reduce the need for blood pressure medications

Men and women with high blood pressure reduced the need for antihypertensive medications by making lifestyle changes. A 16-week program, focused on the DASH diet, weight management and exercise, resulted in the most dramatic declines in blood pressure.

2d

Monitoring at home yields better blood pressure control

People with high blood pressure are more likely to get it under control if they record blood pressure readings at home and share the data with their healthcare provider. At-home monitoring gives providers a better sense of patients' true blood pressure readings, leading to more customized treatment and better hypertension control. Combining at-home readings with traditional provider care saves mon

2d

Top Cancer Researcher Fails to Disclose Corporate Financial Ties in Major Research Journals

A senior official at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center has received millions of dollars in payments from companies that are involved in medical research.

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First ever case of monkeypox recorded in the UK

The person is believed to have contracted the rare viral infection in Nigeria The first ever case of monkeypox has been recorded in the UK. The rare viral infection was recorded on Friday in a Nigerian national staying at a naval base in Cornwall, Public Health England said. The patient was transferred to the infectious disease unit at the Royal Free hospital in London on Saturday morning. They a

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What Bored These Tunnels inside Thai Garnets?

Nothing quite like the branching, fusing and synchronously turning tunnels has ever been seen before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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EU ministers do 'battle' over digital tax

EU finance ministers battled Saturday over a controversial proposal to slap a European tax on US tech giants amid rising worries that it is ineffective and protectionist.

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Trump calls on Apple to move production from China to US

US President Donald Trump called Saturday for Apple to make its products in the US instead of China to avoid suffering the consequences of his trade war with Beijing.

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Massive boom hopes to corral Pacific Ocean's plastic trash

Engineers are deploying a trash collection device to corral plastic litter floating between California and Hawaii in an attempt to clean up the world's largest garbage patch in the heart of the Pacific Ocean.

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Nikolaj Sonne: Giv dine data til forskning i stedet for Facebook og Google

Vil du vide mere om dine styrker og svagheder? Så spil computerspil og hjælp samtidig forskere med at blive klogere på menneskehjernen.

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Shooting with Canon's impressive EOS R full-frame mirrorless camera

Gadgets The first shots and initial thoughts on Canon’s new mirrorless full-frame system We’ve spent the last few days shooting with the new EOS R system, here is what we think so far.

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Gabe Learns How to Drive a Car | Alaskan Bush People

Billy has his work cut out for him when it comes to teaching Gabe how to drive a car! Catch an all-new ALASKAN BUSH PEOPLE Sunday 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Alaskan Bush People: http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/alaskan-bush-people/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AlaskanBushPPL https://www.facebook.com/Discovery

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IQ and Society

The deeply interconnected web of IQ and societal outcomes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Exclusive: Chinese sci-fi genius Cixin Liu on humanity’s deadly future

The future is bright for our species, mostly because we kill everything in our path, says China's only winner of the Hugo science-fiction award

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Running quantum algorithms in the cloud just got a lot faster

A startup called Rigetti Computing is linking quantum computers with classical ones in a new cloud service

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Ugens debat: Så gik der igen ild i debatten om brænderøg

I sit oplæg til en ny budget­aftale for Københavns Kommune foreslår overborgmester Frank Jensen (S) at forbyde installation af nye brændeovne og præmiere skrotning af gamle. Brændeovne og deres helbredskonsekvenser sætter traditionelt ild i læserne på ing.dk – og denne gang var ingen undtagelse, …

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Derfor vinder kunstig intelligens over dig i skak – men taber i StarCraft

Kunstig intelligens vinder over verdensmestre i skak og det kinesiske Go. Men i nogle spil er mennesket stadig overlegen, siger forsker.

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The 19th Century Argument for a 21st Century Space Force

In an orbital world, nations must protect their satellites the way they once guarded sea lanes.

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Your computer's graphics card isn't just for gaming. Here's how to upgrade it.

DIY For everyone from amateurs to expert PC builders. You know that improving the graphics on your computer will provide a much better picture—but you're not sure where to start. Here's everything you need to know.

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Why Sweden’s Far Right Is on the Rise

The worst of Europe’s migration crisis is over . Fewer migrants are coming to seek asylum, and many of those who have had their applications rejected have been deported. Yet immigration continues to spark rancorous debate, over everything from economic dislocation, to crime, to social integration, reshaping Europe’s political landscape. On Sunday, it is Sweden’s turn. Polls show that about one in

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Biologist Wants Americans To Taste A Rainbow Of Pomegranates

As a child, John Chater remembers trying different kinds of pomegranates in his grandfather's yard. It spurred him to pursue a dream of diversifying America's crop beyond the red Wonderful variety. (Image credit: Sean Nealon/University of California, Riverside)

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Facial Recognition, a British Airways Hack, and More Security News This Week

A British Airways breach, a fake Army site, and more of the week's top security news.

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Why Science Fiction Is the Most Important Genre

Historian Yuval Noah Harari believes sci-fi has the power to shape public opinion.

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A Shocking Number of Killers Murder Their Co-workers

James Graham H ere’s an icebreaker for the next office party: The third leading cause of workplace death—behind “falls to a lower level” and “roadway collisions with other vehicles”—is homicide. This sobering data point comes courtesy of the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics study on fatal occupational injuries. What’s behind all this shooting (the leading m.o. of workplace murderers, according t

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The Quest to Conquer Earth's Space Junk Problem

Zombie satellites, rocket shards and collision debris are creating major traffic risks in orbits around the planet. Researchers are working to reduce the threats posed by more than 20,000 objects in… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Warnings Abounded Before Massive Alaska Landslide and Tsunami

A 2015 landslide and tsunami in Alaska came after two decades of warning signs.

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What Is a Fecal Transplant?

What is a fecal transplant and who would want one? It all boils down to your gut microbiota — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Bug Black Market

Thousands of insects were stolen from a Philadelphia museum. North Carolina entomologist Bill Reynolds says one place they could end up is the international black market.

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Discreetly Tracking Down Sex Partners To Stop A Surge In STDs

In response to a spike in syphilis and gonorrhea cases, one Oregon county is sending medical sleuths to break the bad news in-person. Some people have no idea they've been exposed to an infection. (Image credit: Kristian Foden-Vencil/OPB)

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Smiling doesn't necessarily mean you're happy

Smiling does not necessarily indicate that we are happy, according to new research.

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Space Photos of the Week: Saturn's Mysterious Hexagon

Secrets of massive six-sided cloud structure stump scientists.

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The 'Liquidators' Who Risked It All to Clean Up Chernobyl

Photographer Tom Skipp pays tribute to the 600,000 men and women tasked with the job.

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending September 8, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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What the Heck Happened on the International Space Station?

A story emerged this week involving a surprising leak, a Russian investigation, and suggestions of sabotage, but it wasn’t set in Washington. The story unfolded about 250 miles above Earth, where a mysterious hole was discovered leaking pressurized air out of a capsule on the International Space Station. Officials said the people on board the station—three Americans, two Russians, and one German—

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The Lost Art of Resigning in Protest

The Trump administration was barely six months old when Walter Shaub decided that he could not abide its corruption any longer, that his job as the federal ethics watchdog had been neutered by the regime’s mockery of ethics. Then he did something exceedingly rare in Washington: He resigned in protest, and explained himself on national television. In an interview with ABC News, he said: “I really

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The Family Weekly: School-Day Schedules Don’t Work for Families

This Week in Family Despite their best intentions, progressive-minded white families often perpetuate racial inequality through the day-to-day decisions they make for their children. There are ways to change that, the sociologist Margaret Hagerman tells the Atlantic staff writer Joe Pinsker, but it requires a serious examination of the ways that white parents talk about race with their children,

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Wisconsin's Floods Are Catastrophic—and Only Getting Worse

Record rainfall and flooding have been "absolutely unbelievable to witness," says a local climate scientist.

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15 Best Tech & Gaming Deals: Switch, Fire HD, Roomba, PS4 DualShock

From Amazon’s newest tablet to an affordable Nokia phone, these are the deals worth clicking.

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Brett Kavanaugh’s Confirmation Hearing Didn’t Change Anything

Democrats seemed to have one goal throughout the Brett Kavanaugh hearings this week: to catch him in a lie. A steady drumbeat of leaked emails purported to show that he was less than honest in the way he framed his views to senators. Kavanaugh told Dianne Feinstein that Roe v. Wade and subsequent abortion-related cases are “important precedent.” The next day, The New York Times published a “secre

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The Ecstatic Sound of Midlife Melancholy

“Miracle” is a word leached of awe by overuse. It is not a miracle , really, when the harried barista gets one’s order correct, even if one might call it such. And so for many listeners, the use of that term on “A Perfect Miracle,” the opener to Spiritualized’s eighth album, And Nothing Hurt , might signal a sort of love song they’ve heard before. A cursory listen to the song’s crests of twee uku

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