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Nyheder2018september10

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Trump Administration Wants to Make It Easier to Release Methane Into Air

In a victory for energy companies, the administration plans to roll back rules covering methane leaks and the “flaring,” or burning, of the potent greenhouse gas.

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Hurricane Florence Could Be the Worst Storm to Ever Hit North of Florida

As Hurricane Florence continues its charge toward the southeastern coast of the United States, it now almost certainly will make landfall in North or South Carolina on Thursday. As of 5 p.m. Monday, Florence’s maximum sustained winds had approached 140 miles an hour. The most recent update from the National Hurricane Center said that Florence is expected to strengthen even further, and to retain

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Medical cannabis effective in treating a wide range of health conditions

Utilizing new mobile application technology, researchers found that medical cannabis provides immediate symptom relief across dozens of health symptoms with relatively minimal negative side effects.

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Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries

The discovery shows that plant sex regions can 'jump' and indicates that the phenomenon may be adaptive by gathering and locking new genes into linkage with sex.

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How to eat well – and save the planet

Shifting to a healthier diet can reduce a person's water footprint by as much as 55%, according to a study.

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Endangered water voles return to Somerset river after 30 years

The National Trust conservation project aims to boost wildlife on the Holnicote Estate in Exmoor.

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Study links BAP1 protein to tumor suppression in kidney, eye, bile duct and mesothelioma cancers

Researchers have shown how BRCA-associated protein 1 (BAP1) serves as a tumor suppressor gene in kidney, eye, bile duct, mesothelioma and other cancers by regulating a form of cell death called ferroptosis, opening up a potential new area of therapy research.

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First interactive model of human cell division

Mitosis — how one cell divides and becomes two — is one of the fundamental processes of life. Researchers have now produced an interactive map of proteins that make our cells divide, allowing users to track exactly where and in which groups the proteins drive the division process forward.

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Decoupling stress and corrosion to predict metal failure

The research challenges the traditional viewpoint that the simultaneous presence of stress and a corrosive environment is a requirement for SCC and demonstrates that stress and corrosion can act independently.

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Encouraging scientists to collaborate on the tropics

A new study investigates collaboration among scientists, researchers, and other figures whose work advances the field of tropical ecology.

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Prescribing antibiotics for children with cough does not reduce hospitalization risk

Doctors and nurses often prescribe antibiotics for children with cough and respiratory infection to avoid return visits, symptoms getting worse or hospitalization. In a study published in the British Journal of General Practice today, researchers from the universities of Bristol, Southampton, Oxford and Kings College London found little evidence that antibiotics reduce the risk of children with co

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‘Maxwell’s demon’ could pave the way for quantum computers

Reduced entropy in a three-dimensional lattice of super-cooled, laser-trapped atoms could help speed progress toward creating quantum computers, according to a new report. Researchers have figured out how to rearrange a randomly distributed array of atoms into neatly organized blocks, performing the function of a “Maxwell’s demon”—a thought experiment from the 1870s that challenged the second law

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Survey the Wildlife of the 'Great Indoors'

Biologists are enlisting citizen scientists to poke around under the sink and behind the curtains, for wildlife living in the ‘great indoors.’ Karen Hopkin reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Marine aquaculture and the need to protect global food security

First analysis of impacts to marine aquaculture production warns proactive measures needed to protect global food security.

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A subway map for diabetes

High or low concentrations of insulin activate different cell signaling pathways, according to a new scientific method that combines data from multiple databases and large-scale lab experiments. This ongoing research project may help unveil better approaches to understand the causes of and potential therapies for type 2 diabetes.

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Novel nano material for quantum electronics

An international team has synthesized a novel nano material with electrical and magnetic properties making it suitable for future quantum computers and other applications in electronics.

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The universality of shame

An implicit mental map of how negatively others will perceive them sets the level of shame people feel about a potential action.

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Optimizing technologies for discovering cancer cell mutations

Cancer cells often have mutations in their DNA that can give scientists clues about how the cancer started or which treatment may be most effective. Finding these mutations can be difficult, but a new method may offer more complete, comprehensive results. A team of researchers has developed a new framework that can combine three existing methods of finding these large mutations — or structural va

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Canine melanoma study identifies genetic basis of disease; potential drug targets

Medical researchers have used multiple genomic analysis techniques to identify several gene mutations that could be the keys to what drives melanoma in dogs. Following the path from human melanoma, the findings of recurring molecular changes in canine melanoma can help veterinary physicians pinpoint potential new treatments for dogs. Likewise, human physicians will view these changes in light of t

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Solar power: Golden sandwich could make the world more sustainable

Scientists have developed a photoelectrode that can harvest 85 percent of visible light in a 30 nanometers-thin semiconductor layer between gold layers, converting light energy 11 times more efficiently than previous methods.

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Screen strategies for off-target liability prediction and ID small-molecule pharmaceuticals

A new review explores how improved safety screening strategies and methods are improving the pharmaceutical discovery and development process. The authors outline several fundamental methods of the current drug screening processes and emerging techniques and technologies that promise to improve molecule selection. In addition, the authors discuss integrated screening strategies and provide example

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Fitness, physical activity and low sedentary time all associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), high-intensity physical activity (HPA) and low sedentary time (ST) are all associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes.

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This new blood test can figure out what time it is inside your cells

Health There are tiny clocks inside you, and they're all out of whack. Your body has a clock—and thanks to the travails of modern life, that clock may not line up with the timing of the outside world.

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Drought, conflict and migration in Kenya

A new study is the first to use a nationwide survey representing an entire country in sub-Saharan Africa to find connections between droughts, migration and violence. The team surveyed 1400 respondents in 175 locations across Kenya, asking if they had relocated either permanently or temporarily because of drought, if they had been victims of violence, and, using an indirect questioning method, whe

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Warming: Peatlands will store more carbon initially, but that will change

Peatlands are extremely effective at storing carbon, but an international study has found climate change could stop that. The group investigated how peatlands – swamps and bogs with organic rich soils – have responded to climate variability between 850 BCE and 1850 CE.

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East Coast Scientists Win Patent Case Over Medical Research Technology

Scientists affiliated with Harvard and MIT have been battling with colleagues at University of California, Berkeley over who deserves patents for a revolutionary technology used in medical research. On Monday, the east coast scientists won their case in a federal appeals court.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Gone DeSantis

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines The Trump administration announced the closure of the Palestine Liberation Organization office in Washington, D.C., as part of a series of punitive measures designed to force the Palestinians to return to negotiations with Israel. In a letter to Speaker Paul Ryan, Florida Representative Ron DeSantis said he’s resigning from Congress t

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California governor signs law for clean energy by 2045

Governor Jerry Brown signs legislation committing California to carbon-free electricity by 2045.

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'Climate change moving faster than we are,' says UN Secretary General

Antonio Guterres calls for leadership to break the paralysis on the "defining issue" of our time.

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UNM study shows medical cannabis effective in treating a wide range of health conditions

Utilizing new mobile application technology, researchers at The University of New Mexico found that medical cannabis provides immediate symptom relief across dozens of health symptoms with relatively minimal negative side effects.

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Transparency may improve US home buyout programs

New research finds government buyouts of homes in floodplains have often lacked transparency. This could deter residents from participating in managed retreat, one of the main strategies for adapting to areas becoming more flood-prone, Stanford researcher suggests.

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The universality of shame

An implicit mental map of how negatively others will perceive them sets the level of shame people feel about a potential action.

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Study identifies key features of interventions to help patients in need find jobs

Health care organizations can play a key role in supporting unemployed patients find a job, suggests a new study from the Centre for Urban Health Solutions (C-UHS) of St. Michael's Hospital.

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Clinical need absent, unclear in nearly 30 percent of outpatient opioid prescriptions

Nearly 30 percent of outpatient opioid prescriptions in the United States lack documented clinical reasons to justify dispensing the drugs. Findings raise concerns about lax documentation, overprescribing or both.

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Chronic pain may be an important contributor to suicide

Chronic pain may be an important contributor to suicide. Nearly 9 percent of people who died by suicide in 18 states from 2003 to 2014 had documentation of chronic pain in their incident records. Findings from the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS) are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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'They dammed everything'

Hundreds of hydropower projects threaten to harm Bosnia's rivers, protesters say.

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The 8 Most Revealing Quotes from the Big Zuckerberg Profile

Mark Zuckerberg is impossible to profile. He’s a narrative anti-catalyst, who takes all the elements of a fantastic story, and renders them lifeless, probably on purpose. The latest New Yorker contains about 14,000 exceedingly well-crafted words about Zuckerberg, and yet, not once do we catch a glimpse the man outside his carefully managed cocoon of self-awareness. When there is a reporter around

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The Atlantic Daily: When Time Spent Online Was Less Anxious

What We’re Following Trump Closes the PLO Office: Today, the Trump administration announced the closure of the Palestine Liberation Organization office in order to pressure the Arab state into peace negotiations with Israel. The cessation of operations at the PLO office, which serves as the effective embassy, means there will be no Palestinian representation in Washington, D.C. Systemic Problems:

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Watch: Dolphin Superpod Chases Billions of Baitfish in Monterey Bay

Though the site was spectacular for onlookers nearshore, to the dolphins, it was probably just another Monday.

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U.N. Chief Warns of a Dangerous Tipping Point on Climate Change

Calling climate change the defining issue of our time, António Guterres said “the time has come for our leaders to show they care about the people whose fate they hold in their hands.”

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Istanbul’s ‘reverse vending machines’ trade recyclables for metro fare

Istanbul's "Smart Mobile Waste Transfer Centers" scan and assign a value to recyclables before crushing, shredding, and sorting the material. Will they help to prevent littering? Read More

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Real Madrid’s new football shirt is garbage – in a good way

To raise awareness on one of the biggest environmental challenges of our time, the team partnered up with Adidas and Parley, a campaign group working to stop waste plastic getting into the oceans. Read More

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Giant Trash Collector Launched to Scoop Up Ocean Waste

The 600-meter-long structure will tackle the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, a huge buildup of trash floating between California and Hawaii, but not everyone thinks it will work.

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‘FedEx’ stem cells may deliver drugs to kids’ brain cancer

Cancer-hunting stem cells developed from skin cells can track down and deliver a drug to destroy medulloblastoma cells that hide after surgery, according to results from early studies. Medulloblastoma is the most common brain cancer in children. Previously, researchers showed in preclinical studies they could flip skin cells into stem cells that hunt and deliver cancer-killing drugs to glioblasto

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Often-overlooked Natural Killer cells may be key to cancer immunotherapy

Immune checkpoint inhibitors are revolutionizing the treatment of cancer, but new research challenges the central dogma of how these drugs work. This research shows for the first time that often-overlooked immune cells called Natural Killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in responding to checkpoint inhibitors.

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Unexpected cell population key to blood cancer relapse

A study suggests that leukemia cells change in unique ways in response to chemotherapy allowing them to masquerade for a short time so they are able to start disease regeneration.

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Mental imagery manages pain independent of opioid system

Mentally reframing pain as a pleasant experience is an effective regulation strategy that acts independently of the opioid system, finds new human research. The study supports clinical use of mental imagery techniques, such as imagining a new context or consequence of a painful event, in conjunction with pain-relieving drugs.

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Positive psychological well-being can improve overall heart health

Maintaining positive thoughts and feelings through intervention programs can help patients achieve better overall outcomes when it comes to their cardiovascular health, according to a review article.

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Immune cells destroy healthy brain connections, diminish cognitive function in obese mice

Obesity leads to cognitive impairment by activating microglial cells, which consume otherwise functional synapses in the hippocampus, according to a study of male mice. The research suggests that microglia may be a potential therapeutic target for one of the lesser known effects of this global health epidemic on the brain.

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Toxic Red Tide Kills Countless Fish as It Moves Up Florida’s Coast

Officials in one county are running operations to clean up the rotting fish.

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Hurricane Florence could stall out over the East Coast for days, bringing intense floodingHurricane Florence

Environment It's looking an awful lot like Harvey. The threat posed by destructive winds and storm surge at the coast is just part of the equation. The hurricane will stall once it’s inland, leading to flooding.

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Monkeys have been shown to have vowel-ready vocal tract!

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Checkpoint-targeting immunotherapies get a helping hand from natural killer cells

Immunotherapies targeting the immune checkpoint receptor PD-1 and its ligand, PD-L1, have been shown to successfully activate T cells against certain cancers, but their efficacy varies between cancer types and between individual patients. An article published in this week's issue of the JCI describes an important role for natural killer in PD-1/PD-L1-targeting immunotherapy, a discovery that may h

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Often-overlooked Natural Killer cells may be key to cancer immunotherapy

Immune checkpoint inhibitors are revolutionizing the treatment of cancer, but new research challenges the central dogma of how these drugs work. This research shows for the first time that often-overlooked immune cells called Natural Killer (NK) cells play a crucial role in responding to checkpoint inhibitors.

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Tesla shares bounce as Musk risk seen as overblown

Tesla shares bounced Monday following an upbeat analyst note that suggested worries about chief executive Elon Musk and his various controversies were exaggerated.

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These Dolphins Taught Each Other to Moonwalk — But It Was Just a Fad

A pod of wild dolphins living Down Under can literally walk on water, thanks to some instruction from "Billie," a wild dolphin who learned the trick while she was briefly held in captivity, a new study finds.

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A new way to fund health care for the most vulnerable | Andrew Bastawrous

In 2011, eye surgeon and TED Fellow Andrew Bastawrous developed a smartphone app that brings quality eye care to remote communities, helping people avoid losing their sight to curable or preventable conditions. Along the way, he noticed a problem: strict funding regulations meant that he could only operate on people with specific diseases, leaving many others without resources for treatment. In th

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The Blessing and the Curse of Being ‘Different’

“Why can’t you be different? Why does everyone have to look the same and do as the group does?” 13-year-old Ninnoc wants to know. The headstrong Dutch middle-school student is the subject of Niki Padidar ’s award-winning short documentary, Ninnoc , an experimental window into a personal struggle with nonconformity. In the film, Ninnoc attempts to reconcile her need to belong—and to feel seen—with

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California Sets Goal Of 100 Percent Renewable Electric Power By 2045

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill mandating that ambitious goal on Monday. He also issued an executive order calling for statewide carbon neutrality by the same year. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

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Special antibodies could lead to HIV vaccine

Around one percent of people infected with HIV produce antibodies that block most strains of the virus. These broadly acting antibodies provide the key to developing an effective vaccine against HIV. Researchers have now shown that the genome of the HI virus is a decisive factor in determining which antibodies are formed.

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In gut we trust when it comes to choices

Why do some people trust their gut instincts over logic? It could be that they see those snap decisions as a more accurate reflection of their true selves and therefore are more likely to hold them with conviction, according to new research.

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After 11 years, NASA's asteroid-hopping spacecraft is running out of fuel

Space Here are some highlights from its journey Running low on fuel, NASA’s Dawn mission is about to come to an end after 11 successful years in space.

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Modern antiplatelet therapy: When is clopidogrel the right choice?

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 149-162(14); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0049 Punag Divanji and Kendrick Shunk from the University of California San Francisco and The San Francisco Veteran Affairs Hospital, San Francisco, Calif., USA consider when clopidogrel is the right choice in modern antiplatelet therapy.

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Use of bivalirudin for anticoagulation in interventional cardiovascular procedures

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 149-162(14); DOI: 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0045 Zhen Ge, Jaya Chandrasekhar and Roxana Mehran from the Zena and Michael A. Wiener Cardiovascular Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, N.Y., USA consider the use of bivalirudin for anticoagulation in interventional cardiovascular proced

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The current state of transradial access

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 149-162(14); DOI: doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2017.0032 Jennifer A. Rymer and Sunil V. Rao from the Duke Clinical Research Institute, Durham, N.C., USA consider the current state of transradial access.

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The role of cardiac catheterization after cardiac arrest

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 137-148(12); DOI. Ahmed Harhash, Prashant Rao, and Karl B. Kern from the University of Arizona Sarver Heart Center, Tucson, Ariz., USA consider the role of cardiac catheterization after cardiac arrest.

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Intravascular ultrasound-guided percutaneous coronary intervention: An updated review

In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 2, 2018, pp. 127-136(10); DOI, Dhruv Mahtta, Ahmed N. Mahmoud, Mohammad K. Mojadidi and Islam Y. Elgendy from the University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., USA consider intravascular ultrasound-guided percutaneous coronary intervention.

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Dye gets amyloids to ‘blink’ to make them easier to spot

A new technique causes amyloids in the brain to flash or “blink” so scientists can better spot them. Amyloids are tiny protein structures that are key to understanding certain devastating age-related diseases. Aggregates, or sticky clumped-up amyloids, form plaques in the brain, and are the main culprits in the progression of Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s diseases. Amyloids are so tiny, however, t

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Artificial intelligence helps track down mysterious cosmic radio bursts

Artificial intelligence is invading many fields, most recently astronomy and the search for intelligent life in the universe, or SETI.

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Racial wealth inequality overlooked as cause of urban unrest, study says

More than 50 years ago, riots tore through many U.S. cities, prompting national scrutiny of the root causes. Yet a half-century later, says new research, a key contributor to the social upheaval of the 1960s remains under-explored: racial wealth inequality.

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Here's Why There Are Hundreds of Ancient, Mummified Penguins in Antarctica

The bodies of hundreds of mummified penguins in Antarctica aren't a sign of an ancient illness that swept through the icy continent, nor are they the remains of a penguin massacre by a ravenous predator.

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Zika virus strips immune cells of their identity

Macrophages are immune cells that are supposed to protect the body from infection by viruses and bacteria. Yet Zika virus preferentially infects these cells. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have now unraveled how the virus shuts down the genes that make macrophages function as immune cells.

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Racial wealth inequality overlooked as cause of urban unrest, study says

More than 50 years ago, riots tore through many U.S. cities, prompting national scrutiny of the root causes. Yet a half-century later, says new research, a key contributor to the social upheaval of the 1960s remains under-explored: racial wealth inequality. Meanwhile, the racial wealth gap that helped fuel the urban violence of the 1960s has only grown, says new research from Duke University, UCLA

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Researchers identify molecule with anti-aging effects on vascular system, study finds

A molecule produced during fasting or calorie restriction has anti-aging effects on the vascular system, which could reduce the occurrence and severity of human diseases related to blood vessels, such as cardiovascular disease, according to a study led by Georgia State University.

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Artificial intelligence helps track down mysterious cosmic radio bursts

Fast radio bursts are powerful blasts of energy from across the cosmos caused by unknown events, perhaps emissions from a collapsed and highly magnetized neutron star. One FRB source has attracted attention because it repeats. Breakthrough Listen researchers at UC Berkeley recorded radio data from this source and scraped it with a new machine learning algorithm that uncovered 72 new bursts undetec

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Primary care is an untapped resource for depression screening

A new study has identified at-risk populations for whom depression screening combined with hazardous alcohol use screening could detect depressive symptoms that might otherwise go untreated. These populations include non-White and more medically ill patients, and men in general, for whom screening rates are particularly low.

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What time is it in your body?

The first simple blood test to identify your body's precise internal time clock as compared to the external time has been developed by scientists. The test, which requires only two blood draws, can tell physicians and researchers the time in your body despite the time in the external world. The new test for the first time will provide the opportunity to easily examine the impact of misaligned circ

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Nitrous oxide emissions from rice farms are a cause for concern for global climate

Intermittently flooded rice farms can emit 45 times more nitrous oxide as compared to the maximum from continuously flooded farms that predominantly emit methane, according to a new study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This raises the prospect that rice farming across the world could be responsible for up to twice the level of climate impact relative to what was prev

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New research shows how we turn on and off languages

A team of researchers has uncovered the distinct computations that occur when we switch between different languages, a finding that provides new insights into the nature of bilingualism.

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Mass Games and Parades: North Korea Celebrates Its 70th Anniversary

To mark its 70th birthday, North Korea held a military parade, put on a massive show with its first “mass games” artistic and gymnastic display in five years, and finished with a torchlight parade. Tens of thousands of military personnel and performers had been preparing for months for the displays in Kim Il Sung Square and May Day Stadium in Pyongyang. According to those in attendance, the theme

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Change your diet to save both water and your health

Shifting to a healthy diet is not only good for us, but it also saves a lot of fresh water, according to a new study. Compared to existing diets, the water required to produce our food could be reduced by up to 55 percent for healthy pescetarian and vegetarian diets.

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US wildfire smoke deaths could double by 2100

A new study simulating the effects of wildfire smoke on human health finds continued increases in wildfire activity in the continental United States due to climate change could worsen air quality over the coming decades.

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Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection

Engineers have created a device that dramatically reduces the energy needed to power magnetic field detectors, which could revolutionize how we measure the magnetic fields that flow through our electronics, our planet, and even our bodies. The researchers found a new way to excite tiny diamonds with microwaves using 1,000 times less power, making it feasible to create magnetic-sensing devices that

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How Benjamin Franklin's daily schedule can make you more productive

How do great people get so much done? If you're Ben Franklin, you lay out a detailed schedule. Read More

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OxyContin maker patents new drug that helps addicts wean off opioids

The maker of OxyContin, one of the world's most widely abused opioids, has patented a drug that aims to help addicts wean off opioids. Read More

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Solar and wind farms may make the Sahara Desert verdant and lush

A new study asks the question: can a massive solar and wind farm be implemented in the Sahara? According to at least one of the authors, it's possible to create these solar and wind farms with technology available right now. Read More

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California commits to 100% clean electricity by 2045: governor

California Governor Jerry Brown signed landmark legislation Monday committing his state to a 100 percent clean electricity grid by 2045.

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Greenhouse gases from rice paddies may be 2x higher than thought

The way some irrigated rice paddies are managed worldwide, with cycles of flooding followed by dry periods, may lead to twice the planet-warming greenhouse gas pollution as previously thought, researchers said Monday.

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Blood Test Could Tell You What Time It Is In Your Body

Tick tock, what says your body clock?

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Federal Court Sides with Broad in CRISPR Patent Dispute

The higher court's decision to uphold the ruling of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board essentially ends the intellectual property battle in the US.

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You probably made a better first impression than you think

After we have conversations with new people, our conversation partners like us and enjoy our company more than we think, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Low-severity wildfires impact soils more than previously believed

Low-severity wildland fires and prescribed burns have long been presumed by scientists and resource managers to be harmless to soils, but this may not be the case, new research shows.

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Three new species of fish discovered in the extreme depths of the Pacific Ocean

An exploration to one of the deepest places on earth has captured rare footage of what is believed to be three new species of the elusive snailfish.

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Can you evolve while being robust?

Biophysical constraints on evolvability and robustness have been uncovered.

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Breakthrough brain research could yield new treatments for depression

By developing a novel decoding technology, a team of engineers and physicians have discovered how mood variations can be decoded from neural signals in the human brain — a process that has not been demonstrated to date.

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Analyzing roadside dust to identify potential health concerns

Everyone knows that cars contribute to air pollution. And when most people consider the source, exhaust is usually what comes to mind.

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Aquafarmers on the front lines

Many of the world's future farmers will likely be farming oceans, as aquaculture—the cultivation of fish and other aquatic species—continues its expansion as the fastest growing food sector. New research shows that in order for this next generation of farmers to thrive, there is an urgent need to prepare them for climate change.

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Drought, conflict and migration in Kenya

As droughts worsen across the globe, more people who earn their living through farming and owning livestock are forced to leave their homes. Many academics and policymakers predict that the rise in migration may lead to an increase in violent conflict. However, most existing studies on the topic use country-level or regional data that fail to capture how water shortages directly impact the risk of

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Encouraging scientists to collaborate on the tropics

Timothy Perez, a biology Ph.D. student at the University of Miami, left snowflakes behind to pursue his dream of becoming a tropical botanist in the Sunshine State. His latest study, "The changing nature of collaboration in tropical ecology and conservation," recently published in Biotropica, investigates collaboration among scientists, researchers, and other figures whose work advances the field

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Computer model reveals effect of increased cholesterol on specific ion channel in heart

Using a computer model, researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Illinois at Chicago have revealed the effect of increased amounts of cholesterol on a specific ion channel involved in regulating potassium levels in the heart. The work sheds further light on interactions between cholesterol and heart function and could have an impact on future cardiac therapies.

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TB treatment guidelines get a complete overhaul

Several new medicines are more effective than traditional ones used to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a new study reports. The new research has led the World Health Organization to announce landmark changes in line with the study’s findings. Tuberculosis is among the top 10 causes of worldwide deaths and the leading global infectious disease killer. Approximately 600,000 cases o

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Genetic studies intend to help people with autism, not wipe them out

There are fears genetics research into autism will lead to eugenics and eradication of the condition. That must never come to pass, says Simon Baron-Cohen

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Syrian War study yields new predictive model for attrition dynamics in multilateral war

Three researchers have conducted a study of war, specifically the current conflict in Syria that's been raging since 2011, to arrive at the creation of a new predictive model for multilateral war, which is called the Lanchester multiduel.

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NASA satellites show Hurricane Florence strengtheningFlorence HF East Coast US

NASA satellites are providing a lot of different kinds of data to forecasters at the National Hurricane Center to help them understand what's happening Hurricane Florence. NASA's Aqua satellite is providing visible, infrared and microwave imagery while the GPM core satellite is providing additional data like rain rates throughout the storm and cloud heights.

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Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection

UC Berkeley engineers have created a device that dramatically reduces the energy needed to power magnetic field detectors, which could revolutionize how we measure the magnetic fields that flow through our electronics, our planet, and even our bodies.

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NASA tracking Hurricane Olivia's track toward Hawaii

Hurricane Olivia moved from the Eastern Pacific into the Central Pacific and is expected to affect Hawaii. NASA's Aqua satellite the northeast and southwestern quadrants of the storm to be the most powerful on Sept. 10.

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Low-severity wildfires impact soils more than previously believed

Low-severity wildland fires and prescribed burns have long been presumed by scientists and resource managers to be harmless to soils, but this may not be the case, new research shows. According to two new studies by a team from the University of California, Merced (UCM) and the Desert Research Institute (DRI), low-severity burns cause damage to soil structure and organic matter in ways that are no

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Analyzing roadside dust to identify potential health concerns

Car and truck pollution isn't confined to the exhaust that comes from their tail pipes. Particles from tires, brakes, and road material also wind up in the air, according to studies led by the University of Pennsylvania's Reto Gieré. "To understand the potential health implications," he says, "it's really important to understand what's on the road."

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Computer model reveals effect of increased cholesterol on specific ion channel in heart

Using a computer model, researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Illinois at Chicago have revealed the effect of increased amounts of cholesterol on a specific ion channel involved in regulating potassium levels in the heart.

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How to Evacuate Cities before Dangerous Hurricanes

With new risk maps, authorities hope avoid mass exoduses and blocked exits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Evidence of early planetary shake-up

Scientists have studied an unusual pair of asteroids and discovered that their existence points to an early planetary rearrangement in our solar system.

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The Light and Dark in Mac Miller

Mac Miller mumbled. His words trailed off, blended, and arrived in a parched-throat croak. The cover of 2015’s GO:OD AM showed him mid-yawn , which seemed like his usual state. “Feel like I do this in my sleep / Literally, I do this in my sleep,” Miller bragged over boom-bap and piano on 2013’s “Avian.” “Yeah, yeah, whoawhoawhoa,” he murmured, as if to an alarm clock, in this year’s “Hurt Feeling

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I’m Still Confused About ‘Miss America 2.0’

It wasn’t until about halfway through the competition that I realized how different things really were this time around. I can pinpoint the moment precisely, because it was the one when a young woman, clad in a deep-blue evening gown with a high, jewel-necked collar and saucily cut-out sides, started to talk about garbage. Callie Walker, Miss Alabama, had been taking her turn on the Miss America

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Trump’s New Attempt to Push Palestinians to Negotiate With Israel

The Trump administration announced Monday the closure of the Palestine Liberation Organization office, which serves as the de facto Palestinian Embassy, in Washington. It was the latest in a series of punitive measures the administration says is designed to force the Palestinians to return to negotiations with Israel. And the announcement from the U.S. State Department came the same day that John

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Farmers on the front lines

First analysis of impacts to marine aquaculture production warns proactive measures needed to protect global food security.

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Significant amount of cancer-causing chemicals stays in lungs during e-cigarette use

E-cigarettes have become increasingly popular as a smoke-free alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes, but the health effects of 'vaping' on humans have been debated in the scientific and tobacco manufacturing communities. A recently published pilot study by a team of researchers from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) and the University of Nevada, Reno shows that significant amounts of ca

6h

NASA tracking Hurricane Olivia's track toward Hawaii

Hurricane Olivia moved from the Eastern Pacific into the Central Pacific and is expected to affect Hawaii. NASA's Aqua satellite the northeast and southwestern quadrants of the storm to be the most powerful on Sept. 10.

6h

Positive psychological well-being can improve overall heart health

Maintaining positive thoughts and feelings through intervention programs can help patients achieve better overall outcomes when it comes to their cardiovascular health, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. This paper is part of an eight-part health promotion series where each paper will focus on a different risk factor for cardiovascular

6h

This Federal Lab Works to Make Cars More Efficient, As Trump Pumps the Brakes

The National Transportation Research Center develops technology that informs tailpipe emissions standards — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Wait, So How Much of the Ocean Is Actually Fished?

How much of the world’s oceans are affected by fishing? In February, a team of scientists led by David Kroodsma from the Global Fishing Watch published a paper that put the figure at 55 percent—an area four times larger than that covered by land-based agriculture. The paper was widely covered , with several outlets leading with the eye-popping stat that “ half the world’s oceans [are] now fished

7h

Half of US foreign profits booked in tax havens: paper

About half of all the foreign profits of US multinationals are booked in tax havens with Ireland topping the charts as the favorite, according to a new economic study on Monday.

7h

Syrian War study yields new predictive model for attrition dynamics in multilateral war

According to new study of Syrian War in INFORMS journal Operations Research, unless there is a player so strong it can guarantee a win regardless of what others do, the likely outcome of multilateral war is a gradual stalemate that leads to mutual annihilation of all players.

7h

Last week in tech: New iPhones inbound, Twitter went to Congress, and Google turned 20

Technology This week's round-up of technology news is pumpkin spice flavor Don't let Apple's upcoming iPhone announcement overshadow an exciting week in the tech world.

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Dogs and suicide vests: how 2018's great metaphor war reveals our political vacuum | Suzanne Moore

Words matter. The spluttering over Chuku Umunna’s use of a common phrase shows what happens when we detach language from meaning It is raining cats and dogs. Fat cats and aggressive dogs; filthy capitalists and canine lackeys on the left. There are dog whistles and righteously offended people who, when Chuka Umunna calls on Jeremy Corbyn to “call off the dogs” , point out that Labour members are

7h

US approves Winklevoss dollar-linked cryptocurrenciesNew York Tyler Winklevoss

New York state regulators gave the green light Monday to a pair of cryptocurrencies linked to the dollar, providing a boost of credibility to the ventures.

7h

What’s the point of feeling pride?

Pride may not be such a bad thing, according to new research. In fact, it may be how humans stay connected. Human nature evolved to have pride, researchers argue, because it served an important function for our foraging ancestors who lived in small, highly interdependent bands and faced frequent life-threatening reversals. Foraging humans needed their fellow band members to value them enough duri

7h

S.Africa's Cape Town eases water rationing

South Africa's second city Cape Town, battling its worst drought in 100 years, announced Monday that it would ease severe water rationing after significant rains in the region.

7h

The Last of the Universe’s Ordinary Matter Has Been Found

Astronomers have finally found the last of the missing universe. It’s been hiding since the mid-1990s, when researchers decided to inventory all the “ordinary” matter in the cosmos — stars and planets and gas, anything made out of atomic parts. (This isn’t “ dark matter ,” which remains a wholly separate enigma.) They had a pretty good idea of how much should be out there, based on theoretical st

7h

'All is calm': Russian cosmonaut shows space station hole

Sergey Prokopyev posts video on social media of repaired leak to ‘dispel rumours’ A cosmonaut showed off a hole in the International Space Station on Monday that caused loss of oxygen, after Russia suggested the leak could have been caused deliberately. Sergey Prokopyev posted a video on social media where he revealed the small sealed hole in the wall of a Russian-made Soyuz space capsule docked

7h

NASA satellites show Hurricane Florence strengthening

NASA satellites are providing a lot of different kinds of data to forecasters at the National Hurricane Center to help them understand what's happening Hurricane Florence. NASA's Aqua satellite is providing visible, infrared and microwave imagery while the GPM core satellite is providing additional data like rain rates throughout the storm and cloud heights.

7h

Scientists suggested a new method for detecting dangerous nitrogen-containing liquids

A team of researchers from the Institute of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Information Technologies of Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU) together with their colleagues from Gebze Technical University used the nuclear magnetic resonance method to detect toxic and flammable nitrogen-containing liquids. The article was published in the Chemical Physics journal.

7h

Encouraging scientists to collaborate on the tropics

'The changing nature of collaboration in tropical ecology and conservation,' recently published in Biotropica, investigates collaboration among scientists, researchers, and other figures whose work advances the field of tropical ecology.

7h

Drought, conflict and migration in Kenya

A new study is the first to use a nationwide survey representing an entire country in sub-Saharan Africa to find connections between droughts, migration and violence. The team surveyed 1400 respondents in 175 locations across Kenya, asking if they had relocated either permanently or temporarily because of drought, if they had been victims of violence, and, using an indirect questioning method, whe

7h

Diamond dust enables low-cost, high-efficiency magnetic field detection

UC Berkeley engineers have created a device that dramatically reduces the energy needed to power magnetic field detectors, which could revolutionize how we measure the magnetic fields that flow through our electronics, our planet, and even our bodies. The researchers found a new way to excite tiny diamonds with microwaves using 1,000 times less power, making it feasible to create magnetic-sensing

7h

NASA finds Typhoon Mangkhut lashing Guam and the Northern Marianas Islands

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Typhoon Mangkhut lashing Guam and the Northern Marianas Islands.

7h

NASA sees Tropical Storm 27W moving through Luzon Strait

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Luzon Strait and captured a visible image of the latest tropical storm to form in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm 27W. 27W is expected to be renamed Tropical Storm Barijat.

7h

Most Americans get news from social media, despite doubts: survey

Two-thirds of American adults get at least some of their news from social media, even though many are skeptical about the accuracy of that information, a survey showed Monday.

7h

Trade war sees Volvo put brakes on IPO plans: Bloomberg

Auto giant Volvo has fallen prey to growing concerns over the US' rumbling trade war with China, and has had to postpone plans for a share sale, the group's CEO told Bloomberg Monday.

7h

Nuclear energy may see role wane, UN agency says

The UN's nuclear agency on Monday said global capacity for electricity generation through nuclear power may be shrinking over the coming decades.

7h

Cosmonaut shows space station hole to calm public

A cosmonaut on Monday showed off a hole in the International Space Station that caused loss of oxygen after Russia suggested the leak could have been caused deliberately.

7h

When You Go with Your Gut, You Feel Like You

Going with your gut might make you feel like your "true self" made the choice.

7h

EU copyright war 'a shame', says big tech lobby

Tech giants and open-internet activists, not always natural bedfellows, are fighting a proposed copyright law that returns for approval at the European Parliament on Wednesday.

7h

US wildfire smoke deaths could double by 2100

The number of deaths associated with the inhalation of wildfire smoke in the U.S. could double by the end of the century, according to new research.

7h

Change your diet to save both water and your health

Shifting to a healthy diet is not only good for us, but it also saves a lot of precious fresh water, according to a new study by the JRC published in Nature Sustainability.

7h

NASA finds Typhoon Mangkhut lashing Guam and the Northern Marianas Islands

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Typhoon Mangkhut lashing Guam and the Northern Marianas Islands.

7h

NASA sees Tropical Storm 27W moving through Luzon Strait

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Luzon Strait and captured a visible image of the latest tropical storm to form in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean, Tropical Storm 27W. 27W is expected to be renamed Tropical Storm Barijat.

7h

Mental imagery manages pain independent of opioid system

Mentally reframing pain as a pleasant experience is an effective regulation strategy that acts independently of the opioid system, finds new human research published in JNeurosci. The study supports clinical use of mental imagery techniques, such as imagining a new context or consequence of a painful event, in conjunction with pain-relieving drugs.

7h

Immune cells destroy healthy brain connections, diminish cognitive function in obese mice

Obesity leads to cognitive impairment by activating microglial cells, which consume otherwise functional synapses in the hippocampus, according to a study of male mice published in JNeurosci. The research suggests that microglia may be a potential therapeutic target for one of the lesser known effects of this global health epidemic on the brain.

7h

Why some say a secret mind ray attacked U.S. embassies

Some scientists feel that the attacks on U.S. embassy workers in Cuba and China were carried out by secret microwave weapons. Others think that’s just silly. Read More

7h

How obesity may harm memory and learning

In obese mice, immune cells chomp nerve cell connections and harm brainpower.

8h

Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries

The transfer of gene cassettes across generations of strawberry plants has been shown to drive changes in sex chromosomes, according to a team led by a researcher from the University of Pittsburgh Department of Biological Sciences.

8h

SDO spots two lunar transits in space

On Sept. 9, 2018, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO, saw two lunar transits as the Moon passed in front of the Sun. A transit happens when a celestial body passes between a larger body and an observer. This first lunar transit lasted one hour, from 4:30 pm to 5:30 p.m. EDT and obscured 92 percent of the Sun at the peak of its journey. The second transit happened several hours later at 9:52 p.

8h

Hackers Can Steal a Tesla Model S in Seconds by Cloning Its Key Fob

Weak encryption in the cars' key fobs allows all-too-easy theft, but you can set a PIN code on your Tesla to protect it.

8h

Scientists find stable sea levels during last interglacial

Visualize the following: The Earth's climate swings between cold glacial and warm interglacial periods; the last glacial interval was about 20,000 years ago; sea level was about 126 meters (413 feet) below modern sea level at that time; and the Holocene, which represents the last 12,000 years of climatic change, is an interglacial period.

8h

Microglia Cause Cognitive Decline in Obese Mice

The brain's immune cells gobble up synapses in the hippocampi of rodents fed high-fat or high-sugar diets.

8h

‘The pain was instant’: The devastating impact of vaginal mesh surgery

Kath Sansom used to enjoy boxing and high-board diving, but after having a vaginal mesh implant, her life took a dramatic turn for the worse

8h

We’ve cracked the brain’s emotion code and it may help depression

Eavesdropping on someone’s mood in real time is a major first step towards permanent brain implants to both detect and treat depression

8h

France going veggie would save 1m litres of water per person each year

Nationwide conversion to vegetarianism in France, Germany or the UK would halve the amount of water needed to produce each country’s food

8h

Antimatter seen in two places at once thanks to quantum experiment

The double-slit experiment is a classic demonstration that all particles of light and matter are also waves – and now it’s been done with antimatter particles

8h

Active participation in group-hunts earns wild chimpanzees meat access

Wild chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, hunt in groups to catch monkeys. By observing group-hunts and meat sharing, an international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, found that chimpanzee hunting behavior is a cooperative act that earns participants a fair share of the prey.

8h

Scientists find evidence for early planetary shake-up

Scientists at Southwest Research Institute studied an unusual pair of asteroids and discovered that their existence points to an early planetary rearrangement in our solar system.

8h

Forskere finder tre nye fiskearter på ekstrem dybde

De tre nyopdagede arter lever på 7.500 meters dybde ud for Chile, hvor forskere har filmet dem.

8h

Large trucks are biggest culprits of near-road air pollution

For the 30 per cent of Canadians who live within 500 metres of a major roadway, a new study reveals that the type of vehicles rolling past their homes can matter more than total traffic volume in determining the amount of air pollution they breathe.

8h

Power of tiny vibrations could inspire novel heating devices

Ultra-fast vibrations can be used to heat tiny amounts of liquid, experts have found, in a discovery that could have a range of engineering applications.

8h

The Left Stumbles in Sweden, Social Democracy's Heartland

ENKÖPING , Sweden — Four days before Swedish voters went to the polls, Pedro Sánchez, the prime minister of Spain, took the stage at a rally in this small town 40 miles northwest of Stockholm. Sánchez was in town to offer his pitch for Sweden’s Prime Minister Stefan Löfven, a fellow center-left politician and the head of Sweden’s Social Democrats. The Swedish Social Democrats, Sanchez argued, wer

8h

Decoupling stress and corrosion to predict metal failure

An Arizona State University research team has released new insights about intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (SCC), an environmental cause of premature failure in engineered structures, including bridges, aircraft and nuclear power generating plants.

8h

US wildfire smoke deaths could double by 2100

A new study simulating the effects of wildfire smoke on human health finds continued increases in wildfire activity in the continental United States due to climate change could worsen air quality over the coming decades.

8h

Large trucks are biggest culprits of near-road air pollution

A new study reveals large diesel trucks to be the greatest contributors to harmful black carbon emissions close to major roadways, indicating that vehicle types matter more than traffic volume for near-road air pollution.

8h

Researchers decode mood from human brain signals

By developing a novel decoding technology, a team of engineers and physicians at the University of Southern California (USC) and UC San Francisco have discovered how mood variations can be decoded from neural signals in the human brain–a process that has not been demonstrated to date.

8h

Change your diet to save both water and your health

Shifting to a healthy diet is not only good for us, but it also saves a lot of fresh water, according to a new study by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC), published in Nature Sustainability. Compared to existing diets, the water required to produce our food could be reduced by up to 55 percent for healthy pescetarian and vegetarian diets.

8h

Jumping genes drive sex chromosome changes in strawberries

The discovery shows that plant sex regions can 'jump' and indicates that the phenomenon may be adaptive by gathering and locking new genes into linkage with sex.

8h

Following Twitter conversations around hacked diabetes tools to manage blood sugar

Researchers at University of Utah Health examined the diabetes community's online Twitter conversation to understand their thoughts concerning open source artificial pancreas (OpenAPS) technology.

8h

Brain Cancer's 'Immortality Switch' Turned Off with CRISPR

Researchers have found a way to short-circuit the "immortality switch" that cancer cells use to divide indefinitely.

8h

7 Quantum Particles Act Like Billions in Weird Physics Experiment

Just seven photons in a mirrored trap formed a Bose-Einstein condensate, one of the more exotic particle states — and one usually reserved for matter.

8h

Did you solve it? The dating game

The solution to today’s puzzle Earlier today I asked you the following puzzle : You’re single and looking for love. In front of you are three doors. Behind each door is a prospective partner. Your mission is to couple up with your best possible match. Continue reading…

9h

Graphene enables clock rates in the terahertz range

Graphene is considered a promising candidate for the nanoelectronics of the future. In theory, it should allow clock rates up to a thousand times faster than today's silicon-based electronics. Scientists have now shown that graphene can actually convert electronic signals with frequencies in the gigahertz range extremely efficiently into signals with several times higher frequency.

9h

New technique reveals how Zika virus interacts inside our cells

Scientists have developed a new technique that can determine how viruses interact with a host's own RNA. As well as providing insight into how viruses direct the host cell to create new virus particles, this technique could allow researchers to design artificial molecules capable of blocking the virus replication process and preventing the virus spreading.

9h

Scientists block RNA silencing protein in liver to prevent obesity and diabetes in mice

Obesity and its related ailments like type 2 diabetes and fatty liver disease pose a major global health burden, but researchers report that blocking an RNA-silencing protein in the livers of mice keeps the animals from getting fat-related and diabetic conditions.

9h

Binge drinking affects male and female brains differently

Repeated binge drinking activates genes in an area of the brain linked to addiction differently in males and females. Genes associated with hormone signaling and immune function are affected by repeated binge drinking in female mice, whereas genes associated with nerve signaling are affected in the males. These findings have implications for alcohol abuse treatment, emphasizing the importance of c

9h

Understanding deep-sea images with artificial intelligence

More and more data and images are generated during ocean research. In order to be able to evaluate the image data scientifically, automated procedures are necessary. Researchers have now developed a standardized workflow for sustainable marine image analysis for the first time.

9h

NASA's SDO spots 2 lunar transits in space

On Sept. 9, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory saw two lunar transits over the course of just six hours.

9h

3 Ways to Create More Resilient Communities

A doctor and an architect team up to find solutions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Scientists find stable sea levels during last interglacial

The magnitude and trajectory of sea-level change during the Last Interglacial, more specifically Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e, is uncertain. To date the consensus view has been that sea-level may have been six to nine meters above present sea level. However, scientists are now questioning if those sea level fluctuations are accurate.

9h

Just seven photons can act like billions

A system made of just a handful of particles acts just like larger systems, allowing scientists to study quantum behavior more easily.

9h

Toward fusion power: Optimal magnetic fields for suppressing instabilities in tokamaks

Scientists have developed a new method for reducing instabilities in fusion plasmas without triggering a fresh problem.

9h

Seeing food wasted makes us mad – but should it?

There is currently a grand consensus of academics, policymakers and food campaign groups that "something must be done" to reduce food wastage. Malnutrition is real, but so too is the obesity crisis. But when everyone agrees, you can afford to be a little sceptical. Because food is about much more than just calories and nutrients. Food is also part of a wider cycle of products and services that we

9h

Device to corral viable sperm may speed IVF process

For couples hoping for a baby via in vitro fertilization, chances have improved. A process that once took hours now takes minutes: Cornell University scientists have created a microfluidic device that quickly corrals strong and speedy sperm viable for fertilization.

9h

Birds help each other partly for selfish reasons

Up to now, researchers have believed that birds stay at home and altruistically help raise younger siblings because this is the only way to pass on genes when you cannot breed yourself. But this idea is only partially true. A new study shows that birds benefit from being helpful because it also increases their chances of reproducing in the future.

9h

Researchers resolve a major mystery in 2D material electronics

Researchers have discovered a one-size-fits-all master equation that shall pave the way towards better design of 2D material electronics.

9h

Climate change conflicts are here – and 'scallop wars' are just the beginning

As the planet warms, species are moving further north to climate zones which are closer in temperature to what they originally evolved in. The oceans have absorbed most of this temperature increase, and so many marine species, including commercially fished scallops, are under particular stress to migrate northwards to cooler waters.

9h

Is the universe a graveyard? This theory suggests humanity may be alone

Ever since we've had the technology, we've looked to the stars in search of alien life. It's assumed that we're looking because we want to find other life in the universe, but what if we're looking to make sure there isn't any? Read More

9h

The hunt for the nearly undetectable neutrino is taking place deep underground

Quantum particles are mysterious and difficult to track down, but neutrinos may be the most elusive quantum particles yet. The facilities designed to observe neutrinos are feats of engineering, and what they hope to uncover is profound. Read More

9h

Dark matter clusters could reveal nature of dark energy

Scientists are hoping to understand one of the most enduring mysteries in cosmology by simulating its effect on the clustering of galaxies.

9h

Legacy of NASA's dawn, near the end of its mission

NASA's Dawn mission is drawing to a close after 11 years of breaking new ground in planetary science, gathering breathtaking imagery, and performing unprecedented feats of spacecraft engineering.

9h

OTELO reveals a population of "ghost galaxies" in the universe

The OSIRIS instrument on the Gran Telescopio Ganarias has made the deepest survey of galaxies to date, the OSIRIS Tunable Emission Line Object survey (OTELO), and the results could change what we currently know about the formation and evolution of galaxies.

9h

People are more likely to invest in solar energy technology when they see it being used in their communities

Governments at all levels need to invest more heavily in promoting renewable energy if they want citizens to adopt these technologies, new research suggests.

9h

Switch in the climatic factors controlling vegetation dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau

The dominant climate factor controlling the vegetation activity over Tibetan Plateau may have switched from precipitation to temperature in the mid-1990s.

9h

A 'reset' of regulatory T-cells reverses chronic heart failure in mouse model

A severe heart attack, however, can cause chronic and sustained inflammation that leads to heart failure and death. In mouse experiments, scientists now have shown a way to hit an immunological 'reset button' that ends that inappropriately sustained inflammation. This reset reverses the pathologic enlargement and pumping failure of the heart, and it suggests a therapeutic approach to treating huma

9h

Parkinson matters: A call to action to improve patient care

Deaths associated with Parkinson's disease and related disorders increased substantially between 2001 and 2014. Parkinson's disease was in fact the most common cause of death associated with a neurological condition, according to a report by Public Health England. International experts reporting in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease evaluate these findings and address important implications for fu

9h

SwRI scientists find evidence for early planetary shake-up

Scientists at Southwest Research Institute studied an unusual pair of asteroids and discovered that their existence points to an early planetary rearrangement in our solar system.

9h

Optimizing technologies for discovering cancer cell mutations

Cancer cells often have mutations in their DNA that can give scientists clues about how the cancer started or which treatment may be most effective. Finding these mutations can be difficult, but a new method may offer more complete, comprehensive results. A team of researchers has developed a new framework that can combine three existing methods of finding these large mutations — or structural va

9h

Can you evolve while being robust?

Biophysical constraints on evolvability and robustness are uncovered in a study published in Nature Ecology and Evolution.

9h

Decoupling stress and corrosion to predict metal failure

The research challenges the traditional viewpoint that the simultaneous presence of stress and a corrosive environment is a requirement for SCC and demonstrates that stress and corrosion can act independently.

9h

UNM, USF scientists find stable sea levels during last interglacial

The magnitude and trajectory of sea-level change during the Last Interglacial, more specifically Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e, is uncertain. To date the consensus view has been that sea-level may have been six to nine meters above present sea level. However, scientists at The University of New Mexico (UNM) and the University of South Florida (USF) and their international team of collaborators are

9h

Peatland carbon sinks at risk

Peatlands are extremely effective at storing carbon, but an international study featuring a University of Queensland researcher has found climate change could stop that. The group investigated how peatlands — swamps and bogs with organic rich soils — have responded to climate variability between 850 BCE and 1850 CE.

9h

Researchers unlock secret of deadly brain cancer's 'immortality'

UC San Francisco researchers have discovered how a mutation in a gene regulator called the TERT promoter — the third most common mutation among all human cancers and the most common mutation in the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma — confers 'immortality' on tumor cells, enabling the unchecked cell division that powers their aggressive growth.

9h

One in four older adults prescribed a benzodiazepine goes on to risky long-term use

They may start as well-intentioned efforts to calm anxiety, improve sleep or ease depression. But prescriptions for sedatives known as benzodiazepines may lead to long-term use among one in four older adults who receive them, according to new research. That's despite warnings against long-term use of these drugs, especially among older people, because they can increase the risk of car crashes, fal

9h

Peatlands will store more carbon as planet warms

Global warming will cause peatlands to absorb more carbon — but the effect will weaken as warming increases, new research suggests.

9h

Just seven photons can act like billions

A system made of just a handful of particles acts just like larger systems, allowing scientists to study quantum behavior more easily.

9h

Novel nano material for quantum electronics

An international team led by Assistant Professor Kasper Steen Pedersen, DTU Chemistry, has synthesized a novel nano material with electrical and magnetic properties making it suitable for future quantum computers and other applications in electronics.

9h

First interactive model of human cell division

Mitosis — how one cell divides and becomes two — is one of the fundamental processes of life. Researchers at EMBL have now produced the first interactive map of proteins that make our cells divide, allowing users to track exactly where and in which groups the proteins drive the division process forward. This first dynamic protein atlas of human cell division is published in Nature on Sept. 10, 2

9h

Study links BAP1 protein to tumor suppression in kidney, eye, bile duct and mesothelioma cancers

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have shown how BRCA-associated protein 1 (BAP1) serves as a tumor suppressor gene in kidney, eye, bile duct, mesothelioma and other cancers by regulating a form of cell death called ferroptosis, opening up a potential new area of therapy research. Findings from the study, led by Boyi Gan, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Exp

9h

Did tai ji quan balance training program reduce fall risk for older adults?

A program of tai ji quan balance training classes, developed on the classic concept of tai chi, was more effective at reducing falls among older adults at high risk for them than stretching exercises or a training program that incorporated aerobic, strength, balance and flexibility exercises after six months. This randomized clinical trial included 670 adults (70 and older) in Oregon who had falle

9h

Articles focus on Medicaid work requirements

Two research letters and an invited commentary examine work requirements for Medicaid recipients, a move favored by some states that have federal waivers or have applied for them to impose work rules.

9h

Discovered: Optimal magnetic fields for suppressing instabilities in tokamaks

Embargoed release reports new method for reducing instabilities in fusion plasmas without triggering fresh problem.

9h

Study prevents cognitive decline in older blacks with memory loss

A behavioral treatment that helps adults set goals toward a more active social, cognitive, and physical lifestyle can reduce memory decline, in a randomized controlled trial.

9h

Special antibodies could lead to HIV vaccine

Around one percent of people infected with HIV produce antibodies that block most strains of the virus. These broadly acting antibodies provide the key to developing an effective vaccine against HIV. Researchers from the University of Zurich and the University Hospital Zurich have now shown that the genome of the HI virus is a decisive factor in determining which antibodies are formed.

9h

Graphene enables clock rates in the terahertz range

Graphene is considered a promising candidate for the nanoelectronics of the future. In theory, it should allow clock rates up to a thousand times faster than today's silicon-based electronics. Scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), the University of Duisburg-Essen (UDE), and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P), have now shown that graphene can actually c

9h

New technique reveals how Zika virus interacts inside our cells

Scientists have developed a new technique that can determine how viruses interact with a host's own RNA. As well as providing insight into how viruses direct the host cell to create new virus particles, this technique, published today in Nature Methods, could allow researchers to design artificial molecules capable of blocking the virus replication process and preventing the virus spreading.

9h

A subway map for diabetes

High or low concentrations of insulin activate different cell signaling pathways, according to a new scientific method that combines data from multiple databases and large-scale lab experiments. This ongoing research project may help unveil better approaches to understand the causes of and potential therapies for type 2 diabetes.

9h

McMaster study identifies an unexpected cell population key to blood cancer relapse

The study published today in the journal Cancer Cell suggests that leukemia cells change in unique ways in response to chemotherapy allowing them to masquerade for a short time so they are able to start disease regeneration.

9h

250-year-old Leidenfrost Effect May Help Design Future Self-Propelled Devices

250-year-old Leidenfrost Effect May Help Design Future Self-Propelled Devices Scientists discovered that water droplets don’t just passively roll around on a hot skillet. Leidenfrost.jpg The successive states of a water droplet gently deposited on a hot plate (with constant temperature, about 300 degrees Celsius), and spontaneously propelled. Colors are used to better distinguish the successive i

9h

People with disabilities bear the brunt of turf wars between conventional and online taxis

It was 8.45am when the Prambanan Express train from Surakarta arrived at Lempuyangan Station, Yogyakarta. My wife and I stepped out from the station and walked hurriedly to a spot under an overpass, 100 metres east of the station, where we could usually order an online taxi.

10h

Blast tube tests at Sandia simulate shock wave conditions nuclear weapons could face

You can learn a lot from a blast tube. You can learn more when you couple blast experiments with computer modeling.

10h

Children's genes uncover potential school league table bias

A new examination of the role of children's genomes in their education progress reveals their impact on both school league tables and how teacher performance is assessed.

10h

You're not as good at multitasking as you think

Science And why you should doodle in class. All of us multitask. But psychologists have been warning us about it for decades. Some say it’s harmful to productivity and others say you can’t do it at all.

10h

Plant compound may shut down eye cancer

In human cells grown in the lab, a natural plant compound halts the overactive signaling that drives growth of uveal melanoma, a cancer of the eye, researchers report. Uveal, or ocular, melanoma arises from the layer of pigmented cells of the eye that includes the iris. Fatal in about half of the patients who develop it, the cancer represents about 3 to 5 percent of all melanoma cases. Unlike ski

10h

Scientists sketch out the foundations of a colony on Mars

EPFL scientists have mapped out the steps required to build a self-sustaining research base on Mars that would be habitable for the long term. Their work can help researchers set priorities for space programs exploring Mars as well as the solar system as a whole.

10h

Team of researchers challenge bold astronomical prediction

Calvin College professor of astronomy Larry Molnar made a bold announcement in 2017—he and his team had identified a binary star in the constellation Cygnus, the Swan, that was a strong candidate to merge and explode in the near future. Known by its Kepler mission number, KIC 9832227, the pair of stars is about 1800 light years from Earth and has an orbit so close that it takes just 11 hours to go

10h

Why the Les Moonves Departure Is Not Enough

“CBS takes these allegations very seriously. Our Board of Directors is conducting a thorough investigation of these matters, which is ongoing.” That was one of the several statements CBS issued on Sunday , in response to a story published that morning in The New Yorker : Ronan Farrow’s follow-up to the report he had published in July , a story detailing allegations from six different women about

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A Star Is Born Will Take the Fall Movie Season by Storm

Prerelease hype often consumes a movie before it’s even out in theaters. Trailer speculation, plot rumors, and awards-season predictions all help fuel the film-journalism industry. But even by that yardstick, the groundswell of interest in A Star Is Born , a rock musical starring Lady Gaga that’s also Bradley Cooper’s debut as a writer and director, has been fascinating to behold. It’s rare that

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Startup developing software to anazlyze vast data of microbiomes

A Purdue University-affiliated startup is developing an intelligent software platform aimed at helping biologists to use microbes, the microscopic organisms that live in, on and around humans, plants, animals and more to cure diseases, improve crops and make livestock healthier.

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Hubble peers into a galaxy's dusty haze

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image showcases the galaxy NGC 4036, a lenticular galaxy some 70 million light-years away in the constellation of Ursa Major (the Great Bear).

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Video: What Google can learn from your Android phone

Google collects data around the clock from the phones of Android users in particular – their location, shopping habits, music, searches and more, a Vanderbilt computer science professor found.

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Biculturalism starts in the classroom

Language is a key component, and with more Pākehā opting to learn te reo Māori, Victoria University of Wellington pukenga (lecturer), Dr. Awanui Te Huia, is researching how learning the language helps develop a truly bicultural relationship.

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Image: Bright spots on Ceres

Bright surface features on the dwarf planet Ceres known as faculae were first discovered by NASA's Dawn spacecraft in 2015. This mosaic of one such feature, Cerealia Facula, combines images obtained from altitudes as low as 22 miles (35 km) above Ceres' surface. The mosaic is overlain on a topography model based on images obtained during Dawn's low altitude mapping orbit (240 miles or 385 km altit

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Oceanographer's hurricane models deliver more precise forecasts

Isaac Ginis said that it is notoriously difficult to forecast hurricanes in New England. When storms move north, they develop a more complex wind structure than those remaining in the Southeast and Gulf of Mexico, their paths become more erratic, and the region's complicated topography makes predicting their movement over land especially challenging. In addition, the relatively short rivers in New

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