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Nyheder2018september11

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Top Breast Cancer Researcher Didn't Disclose Financial Ties

Jose Baselga of Memorial Sloan Kettering took millions of dollars from drug and health care companies but did not report the payments in his research articles.

2h

Researchers resolve a major mystery in 2-D material electronics

Schottky diodes are composed of a metal in contact with a semiconductor. Despite their simple construction, Schottky diodes are tremendously useful components in modern electronics. Schottky diodes fabricated using two-dimensional (2-D) materials have attracted major research attention in recent years due to their potential in transistors, rectifiers, radio frequency generators, logic gates, solar

5h

Amager Bakke stopper energiproduktionen på grund af fejl

Opdateret: Fejl på kompensatorerne har lukket ned for energiproduktionen på forbrændingsanlægget Amager Bakke.

7h

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LATEST

Carbon nanodots do an ultrafine job with in vitro lung tissue

Epidemiological studies have established a strong correlation between inhaling ultrafine particles from incomplete combustion and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Still, relatively little is known about the mechanisms behind how air particulates affect human health. New work with carbon nanodots seeks to provide the first model of how ultrafine carbon-based particles interact with the lung

4min

New insight on rotavirus mechanics could lead to improved treatments

Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanics of a virus that causes severe diarrhea and sickness in young children, according to a report published in eLife.

4min

Tropical Storm Barijat appears disorganized to NASA-NOAA satellite

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the small Tropical Storm Barijat as it continued moving west toward southern China.

4min

'Evil' proteins a force for good in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

University of Arizona Cancer Center researchers clarify questions surrounding estrogen's role in breast cancer, which could lead to more precise treatments for ER-positive breast cancers.

5min

Tropical Storm Barijat appears disorganized to NASA-NOAA satellite

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the small Tropical Storm Barijat as it continued moving west toward southern China.

5min

11min

Banebrydende klimalov vedtaget: Californien trodser Trump

Guvernøren i Californien har underskrevet ny lov, som betyder, at 100 procent af statens strøm i 2045 skal komme fra CO2-neutrale energikilder.

22min

Ok, Google: Giv mig 5 gode grunde til, hvorfor jeg skal snakke med dig

Digitale assistenter virker måske som en dum gimmick, men de kan faktisk være ganske hjælpsomme. Se her hvordan.

22min

New Eye Means Hurricane Florence May Get Stronger Before Slamming into the US

Hurricane Florence's eye wall has grown since yesterday.

23min

Explore “The Senses” Now at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian

A new art exhibit in New York City is taking an innovative approach to how our brains receive and experience sights, sounds, textures, scents, and even taste. The Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in the city’s Upper East Side is open to the public now through October 28 and is definitely worth a visit, no matter your age or background in science. At “ The Senses: Design Beyond Vision ,” v

25min

Changes in mitochondrial DNA control how nuclear DNA mutations are expressed in cardiomyopathy

Differences in the DNA within the mitochondria, the energy-producing structures within cells, can determine the severity and progression of heart disease caused by a nuclear DNA mutation. When combined with a mutation in nuclear DNA in animals, one mitochondrial DNA variant greatly worsened heart disease, while a different variant had a protective effect.

26min

Illinois engineers protect artifacts by graphene gilding

Gilding is the process of coating intricate artifacts with precious metals. Ancient Egyptians and Chinese coated their sculptures with thin metal films using gilding — and these golden sculptures have resisted corrosion, wear, and environmental degradation for thousands of years. In a new study, University of Illinois researcher Sameh Tawfick, inspired by this ancient process, has added a single

26min

For the first time, a neural link between altruism and empathy toward strangers

Using fMRI scans of a brain region called the anterior insula, University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University researchers discovered that people who donated a kidney to an anonymous recipient were more sensitive to a stranger's fear and pain.

26min

Coral bleaching increases disease risk in threatened species

Bleaching events caused by rising water temperatures could increase mortality among a coral species already threatened by disease, says new research by Mote Marine Laboratory and Penn State, US, published in eLife.

26min

New insight on rotavirus mechanics could lead to improved treatments

Researchers have provided new insight on the mechanics of a virus that causes severe diarrhea and sickness in young children, according to a report published in eLife.

26min

NASA sees Tropical Depression Paul's strength sapped

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Depression Paul and found its center pushed away from strongest storms.

26min

Stress linked to more advanced disease in some leukemia patients

Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who feel more stress also have more cancer cells in their blood and elevated levels of three other markers of more advanced disease.

26min

It pays to be nice to your employees, new study shows

New research from Binghamton University, State University at New York finds that showing compassion to subordinates almost always pays off, especially when combined with the enforcement of clear goals and benchmarks.

26min

Regrowing dental tissue with stem cells from baby teeth

In a clinical trial led by Songtao Shi of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues in China, stem cells extracted from children's baby teeth were used to regrow the living tissue in teeth damaged by injury. The promising findings highlight the potential of dental stem cells, which could one day be used in a wide range of dental procedures or even for treating certain systemic diseases.

26min

Miniaturized HTS assay identifies selective modulators of GPR119 to treat type 2 diabetes

A novel high throughput screening (HTS) assay compatible with an ion channel biosensor component was used successfully to identify selective and active small molecule modulators of G protein-coupled receptor 119 (GPR119), a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic disorders.

26min

NASA sees Hurricane Olivia moving toward Hawaii

NASA's Terra satellite provided an inside look at Hurricane Olivia as it continued to track toward Hawaii. Watches and Warnings remain in effect as Olivia nears.

26min

NASA finds wind shear pushing on Tropical Storm Isaac's center

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Isaac that revealed its circulation center was displaced from the bulk of clouds and precipitation. That's an indication that wind shear is affecting the storm.

26min

Montana State study gauges health of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

MSU professor Andrew Hansen and research scientist Linda Phillips released a study that quantified trends in the condition of 35 ecological 'vital signs' dealing with snow, rivers, forests, fire, wildlife and fish.

26min

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite stares Helene in the eye

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of Hurricane Helene in the eastern Atlantic.

26min

New bacterial strain named after Cornish discovery

A new bacterial strain will be named after Cornwall following its identification from a skin infection.

26min

Overlapping copy number variations underlie autism and schizophrenia in Japanese patients

Common genetic variants may underlie autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia across human populations, according to a new study. In line with previous studies in Caucasians, the researchers found that Japanese individuals with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia have overlapping copy number variations (CNVs) — inter-individual variations in the number of copies of a particular gene.

37min

Unusual biosynthetic pathway offers a key to future natural product discovery

Researchers have elucidated a mechanism of nitrogen-nitrogen bond formation shared by two pharmaceutically promising compounds.

37min

The Trenchant Powers of If Beale Street Could Talk and Widows

Speaking at the Toronto International Film Festival after the world premiere of his new film, If Beale Street Could Talk, writer and director Barry Jenkins recalled a moment of stark racism he experienced during the awards campaign for his last film, 2016’s Best Picture Academy Award–winner, Moonlight . At the Academy’s Governors Awards, Jenkins was told by a valet that his driver had referred to

38min

This Squishy Deep-Sea Fish 'Melts' at the Ocean Surface (Video)

Remarkable footage shows the snot-textured fish hunting in the extreme pressures of their alien home environment.

45min

New bacterial strain named after Cornish discovery

A new bacterial strain will be named after Cornwall following its identification from a skin infection.

46min

A New Test for the Leading Big Bang Theory

The leading hypothesis about the universe’s birth — that a quantum speck of space became energized and inflated in a split second, creating a baby cosmos — solves many puzzles and fits all observations to date. Yet this “ cosmic inflation ” hypothesis lacks definitive proof. Telltale ripples that should have formed in the inflating spatial fabric, known as primordial gravitational waves, haven’t

47min

Here’s how graphene could make future electronics superfast

Graphene-based electronics that operate at terahertz frequencies would be much speedier successors to today’s silicon-based devices.

47min

NASA satellite finds Hurricane Florence undergoing eyewall replacement

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at powerful Hurricane Florence early on Sept. 11, 2018 that indicated it was likely undergoing eyewall replacement.

48min

Pain response in babies' brains controlled in 'similar way to adults'

Researchers from the Department of Paediatrics and Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging at the University of Oxford, UK, have identified the neural network that helps control babies' brain activity in response to pain in a similar way to adults.

48min

Prenatal exposure to cannabis impacts sociability of male offspring only

Taking cannabinoids during pregnancy can cause behavioural and neuronal deficits in adult male offspring, while females remain unaffected, says new research published in eLife.

48min

Carbon nanodots do an ultrafine job with in vitro lung tissue

Epidemiological studies have established a strong correlation between inhaling ultrafine particles from incomplete combustion and respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Still, relatively little is known about the mechanisms behind how air particulates affect human health. New work seeks to provide the first model of how ultrafine carbon-based particles interact with the lung tissues. Researchers

48min

Mysteries of deep soil carbon unravelled

Huge amounts of carbon are stored in deep soil. Scientists uncover the conditions that will cause that carbon to stay underground or be emitted into the atmosphere as climate-destabilizing carbon dioxide.

52min

Breakthrough opens door to smartphone powered $100 ultrasound machine

Engineers have developed a new ultrasound transducer, or probe, that could dramatically lower the cost of ultrasound scanners to as little as $100. Their patent-pending innovation — no bigger than a Band-Aid — is portable, wearable and can be powered by a smartphone.

52min

Scientists develop new drug treatment for TB

Scientists have developed the first non-antibiotic drug to successfully treat tuberculosis in animals. The team hope the compound -developed after 10 years of painstaking research will be trialed on humans within three to four years.

52min

As Bees Specialize, So Does Their DNA Packaging

A study of chemical tags on histone proteins hints at how the same genome can yield very different animals.

52min

Postpartum drug could be ‘game changer’ for women

A promising new treatment for postpartum depression could mark a major step forward in women’s health care, researchers say. Brexanolone injection works differently than existing antidepressant medications, and if approved by the US Food and Drug Administration later this year, will be the first new class of antidepressants in decades, and the first drug specifically indicated for PPD. “With curr

53min

Unusual biosynthetic pathway offers a key to future natural product discovery

Bacteria are master engineers of small, biologically useful molecules. A new study in Nature Communications has revealed one of the tricks of this microbial trade: synthesizing and then later inserting a nitrogen-nitrogen bond, like a prefabricated part, into a larger molecule.

58min

How bilingual brains switch between languages

Researchers have uncovered what’s happening in the brain when we switch between different languages. The finding provides new insights into the nature of bilingualism. “A remarkable feature of multilingual individuals is their ability to quickly and accurately switch back and forth between their different languages,” explains Esti Blanco-Elorrieta, a doctoral candidate at New York University and

1h

Designs of the Year nominees: Mars boots and a plastic-free shop

Works featuring in this year’s Design Museum show tackle some of today’s biggest issues From the first plastic-free shopping aisle to a library made from ice-cream containers and gender-fluid clothes, designers are coming up with increasingly innovative responses to today’s biggest issues, say the curators of the Beazley Designs of the Year awards. The Design Museum in London announced 87 nominee

1h

Understanding 6th-century barbarian social organization and migration through paleogenomics

Applying a comprehensive analysis of genetic, historical, and archeological factors in two 6th-century barbarian cemeteries, researchers have gleaned new insights into a key era known as the Migration Period that laid the foundation for modern European society. Spanning the 4th to 8th centuries, this epoch followed the decline of the Western Roman Empire and was a time of major socioeconomic and c

1h

A new study examines use of twitter to spread or debunk conspiracy theories

Researchers investigating the use of Twitter to propagate or debunk conspiracy theories related to the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak analyzed the content of more than 25,000 Tweets and the characteristics of the social networks used to disseminate them. The analysis showed that Tweets intended to propagate conspiracy theories were spread through a more decentralized network than debunking messages

1h

Towards a better understanding of how colon cancer develops and progresses

Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have discovered a molecular mechanism that is responsible for the spread of cancer cells in the body and the development of metastases in patients with colon cancer. Their findings could help to develop treatments that inhibit tumor growth.

1h

Treating sleep apnea greatly improves stroke patients' neurological & functional recovery

A large, randomized controlled trial has found that commencing treatment for sleep apnea as soon as possible after a stroke or a mini-stroke improves speech impairment and other neurological symptoms as well as walking and other physical functioning. Benefits of sleep apnea treatment after stroke are greater than benefits from tPA.

1h

Research devises protocol for measuring distances within biomolecules

A team of 27 labs across the world — including Hugo Sanabria's 'Single Molecule Biophysics' lab at Clemson University — came together to devise a standard protocol for measuring distances in biomolecules.

1h

New approach to conserving tree species

Researchers have developed an evidence-based approach to designing ex situ collections that effectively preserve a target species' genetic diversity, which can be tailored for conservation of any tree species. This will allow for efficient, targeted seed collecting efforts, including number of populations to sample, the appropriate number of seeds to collect from each tree, and best choice of popu

1h

Virus may help combat fire ants, but caution is needed

A specific virus changes dietary behavior of fire ants, leading researchers to rethink control methods for the invasive species.

1h

What catches our eye

Our unconscious gaze is controlled by an automatic selection process computed by a neural network in the brain. Details of this computation have now been studied and could soon become relevant for robotic implementations.

1h

To Make a Droplet into a Bubble, Use Sound

To Make a Droplet into a Bubble, Use Sound Physicists harness ultrasound to make bubbles last longer. Bubbles_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Jeff Kubina via flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Physics Tuesday, September 11, 2018 – 11:00 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) — A bubble floats in the air…and pop! It shatters into tiny droplets. Now, physicists have achieved the reverse pro

1h

Unusual biosynthetic pathway offers a key to future natural product discovery

Researchers at the University of Illinois and Harvard University elucidate a mechanism of nitrogen-nitrogen bond formation shared by two pharmaceutically promising compounds.

1h

Inhaled version of blood pressure drug shows promise in treating anxiety, pain

An inhaled form of a high blood pressure medication has potential to treat certain types of anxiety as well as pain, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH).

1h

Majority of women receive breast cancer diagnosis over the phone

A new study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine reveals an increasing number of women are learning about their breast cancer diagnosis over the phone. It's a finding that has prompted the MU School of Medicine to develop new training methods to better prepare future physicians to deliver negative news without being face-to-face with patients.

1h

Understanding 6th-century barbarian social organization & migration through paleogenomics

Applying a comprehensive analysis of genetic, historical, and archeological factors in two 6th-century barbarian cemeteries, researchers have gleaned new insights into a key era known as the Migration Period that laid the foundation for modern European society. A paper, published today in Nature Communications, seeks to shed new light on how these communities were formed, how people lived, and how

1h

Sarcolipin tricks muscle cells into using more energy, burning fat

Ever wonder why you burn fat and heat up when you exercise or shiver? Now, researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have shown that sarcolipin, a small peptide only found in muscles, increases muscle energy expenditure and fat oxidization. The study was published today in the journal Cell Reports.

1h

High blood sugar during pregnancy ups risk of mother's type 2 diabetes, child's obesity

Mothers with elevated blood glucose during pregnancy — even if not high enough to meet the traditional definition of gestational diabetes — were significantly more likely to have developed type 2 diabetes a decade after pregnancy than their counterparts without high blood glucose.

1h

Association of gestational diabetes, subsequent glucose metabolism disorders in mothers under new criteria

Newer criteria mean more women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes than before. This observational study assessed whether untreated gestational diabetes defined after the fact based on newer criteria was associated with long-term risk of glucose metabolism disorders among 4,700 mothers and overweight or obesity in their children 10 to 14 years after pregnancy.

1h

Lethality of active shooter incidents with vs. without semiautomatic rifles

Semiautomatic rifles, which have been used in some of the largest shootings by individuals in U.S. history, were banned in 1994 under the federal assault weapons ban, but that expired in 2004. This study compared the number of people wounded and killed during active shooter incidents (defined by the FBI as an individual killing or attempting to kill people in a confined or populated area) with, an

1h

Overlapping copy number variations underlie autism and schizophrenia in Japanese patients

Common genetic variants may underlie autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia across human populations, according to a study appearing Sept. 11 in the journal Cell Reports. In line with previous studies in Caucasians, the researchers found that Japanese individuals with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia have overlapping copy number variations (CNVs) — inter-individual variations in the

1h

Fighting the cold virus and other threats, body makes trade-off, says study

A Yale research team has revealed how cells in different parts of the human airway vary in their response to the common cold virus. Their finding, published in Cell Reports, could help solve the mystery of why some people exposed to the cold virus get ill while others don't, said the researchers.

1h

Separating the sound from the noise in hot plasma fusion

For fusion power plants to be effective, scientists must find a way to trigger the low-to-high confinement transition, associated with zonal flows of plasma. Theoretically, these consist of both a stationary flow and one that oscillates at the geodesic acoustic mode. For the first time, researchers have detected GAM at two different points simultaneously within the reactor. This experimental setup

1h

New Scientist Live: explore the soundscape of the deep sea

Why do fish sing a dawn chorus? Blue Planet II advisor Steve Simpson will be exploring this and other underwater phenomena at New Scientist live next week

1h

America Wakes Up From Its Dream of Free College

C lassrooms full of crying students. That’s how the scene is often described. In November 2005, at Kalamazoo Central High School in Michigan, every classroom was full of teary-eyed students— jubilant , but teary-eyed. They had good reason to be happy. The vice-principal had just announced over the P.A. system that anonymous benefactors would be paying the students’ college tuition— all of the stu

1h

At Private Colleges, Students Pay for Prestige

Americans tend to think of colleges as falling somewhere on a vast hierarchy based largely on their status and brand recognition. At the top are the Harvards and the Stanfords with their celebrated faculty, groundbreaking research, and perfectly manicured quads. Toward the bottom are the chronically underfunded community colleges and obscure state schools where part-time students and drab buildin

1h

Why Is College in America So Expensive?

B efore the automobile , before the Statue of Liberty, before the vast majority of contemporary colleges existed, the rising cost of higher education was shocking the American conscience: “Gentlemen have to pay for their sons in one year more than they spent themselves in the whole four years of their course,” The New York Times lamented in 1875. Decadence was to blame, the writer argued: fancy s

1h

Of course semi-automatic guns are deadlier. Here’s why scientists took so long to say so.

Health We desperately need research on firearms—but the federal government can't fund it. Today, researchers added another scrap of knowledge to the small pile of what we know about guns in America: semi-automatic rifles allow shooters to wound and kill more…

1h

Team model may leave fewer students feeling left out

A new model could help make college students working together in teams feel more included, according to a new paper. When Joel Geske, a professor in the Greenlee School of Journalism and Communication at Iowa State University, asked his students a question about feeling left out from a team project or class discussion, a common theme emerged in their responses: “I felt left out due to personality

1h

Highest resolution of any continent: A stunning new map of Antarctica

Not so long ago, we had better maps of Mars than of Antarctica. Now, Antarctica is the best-mapped continent in the world. Read More

1h

Watch Moritz Simon Geist's Sonic Robots Play Thumping Techno Music in His Video for 'Entropy'

The German musician builds robots that make sound, then orchestrates them to create unique and funky dance tracks.

1h

Sound waves can make bubbles in levitated drops of liquid

A new technique reveals how to make bubbles from droplets suspended in the air.

1h

Separating the sound from the noise in hot plasma fusion

In the search for abundant clean energy, scientists around the globe look to fusion power, where isotopes of hydrogen combine to form a larger particle, helium, and release large amounts of energy in the process. For fusion power plants to be effective, however, scientists must find a way to trigger the low-to-high confinement transition, or "L-H transition" for short. After a L-H transition, the

1h

Data Confirm Semiautomatic Rifles Linked to More Deaths, Injuries

An analysis of FBI records supports anecdotal evidence in policy debate on gun control — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Study reveals which transgender teens have highest suicide risk

Existing research has shown that transgender teens are at greater risk for attempting suicide that other teens. New University of Arizona research finds that teens who were born female but identify as male and teens who don't identify as exclusively male or female are most at risk.

1h

Engrafted stem cell-derived lung organoids that model human lung development

Researchers have now grown lung organoids from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that, after implantation in mice, can develop mature alveolar type 1 (AT1) and AT2 cells and architecture approximating that of human lungs.

1h

Barriers and opportunities in renewable biofuels production

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have identified two main challenges for renewable biofuel production from cheap sources. Firstly, lowering the cost of developing microbial cell factories, and secondly, establishing more efficient methods for hydrolysis of biomass to sugars for fermentation. Their study was recently published in the journal Nature Energy.

1h

A new study examines use of twitter to spread or debunk conspiracy theories

Researchers investigating the use of Twitter to propagate or debunk conspiracy theories related to the 2015-2016 Zika virus outbreak analyzed the content of more than 25,000 Tweets and the characteristics of the social networks used to disseminate them.

1h

Did the global response to 9/11 make us safer? | Benedetta Berti

If we want sustainable, long-term security to be the norm in the world, it's time to radically rethink how we can achieve it, says TED Fellow and conflict researcher Benedetta Berti. In an eye-opening talk, Berti explains how building a safer world has a lot less to do with crushing enemies on the battlefield and a lot more to do with protecting civilians — no matter where they're from or where t

1h

Evaluating the contribution of black carbon to climate change

Scientists have developed an improved model to accurately assess the effect of black carbon on Earth's atmosphere.

1h

What's in the Amazon box? Maybe a real 7-foot Christmas tree

Watch out for the 7-foot box on the doorstep. Amazon plans to sell and ship fresh, full-size Christmas trees this year.

1h

Breakthrough opens door to $100 ultrasound machine

Engineers at the University of British Columbia have developed a new ultrasound transducer, or probe, that could dramatically lower the cost of ultrasound scanners to as little as $100. Their patent-pending innovation—no bigger than a Band-Aid—is portable, wearable and can be powered by a smartphone.

1h

Industry-certified masks offer better protection from volcanic ash exposure

Industry-certified particle masks are most effective at protecting people from volcanic ash, whilst commonly used surgical masks offer less protection.

1h

Researchers develop new approach to conserving tree species

Globally, forest trees are increasingly at risk from habitat destruction, pests and disease, and a changing climate. But the guidelines for effective preservation of a tree species' genetic diversity and adaptive potential have been limited to simple mathematical equations for crop collections from the 1970s, or best guesses based on intuitions.

2h

Immunology

Mononuclear phagocytes can both promote and inhibit inflammation. A Team from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich has now shown that individual phagocytes in the central nervous system can play both roles, sequentially adopting different phenotypes with distinct functions.

2h

UBC breakthrough opens door to $100 ultrasound machine

Engineers at the University of British Columbia have developed a new ultrasound transducer, or probe, that could dramatically lower the cost of ultrasound scanners to as little as $100. Their patent-pending innovation — no bigger than a Band-Aid — is portable, wearable and can be powered by a smartphone.

2h

Predictability of the EAP teleconnection pattern can improve climate services over East Asia

A group of scientists from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and the UK Met Office Hadley Center, investigated the absence of the East Asia-Pacific pattern in the extratropics using state-of-the-art coupled seasonal forecast systems. Their results indicate that the extratropical circulation is much less predictable, compared to the tropical component, owing to the

2h

New genetic compound marker could help early diagnosis of aggressive prostate cancer

A research team at the University of Turku in Finland discovered a link between the interplay of certain simultaneously occurring genetic changes in the HOXB13 and CIP2A genes, aggressiveness of prostate cancer, high risk of developing the disease, and poorer survival rates of patients. Prostate cancer is a major challenge in health care with over one million new cases and 300,000 deaths from it e

2h

Hvem ejer patentet på gensaksen Crispr? Den amerikanske domstol har talt.

Der er prestige – og mange penge – på spil i det voldsomme slagsmål mellem amerikanske universiteter.

2h

Biologists checked out this NBA player’s DNA for clues to his immense height

Gene scores can pick most people likely to be extremely tall, super smart, or out of the ordinary.

2h

Farewell flat biology: Tackling infectious disease using 3-D tissue engineering

Microbiologists and tissue engineers discuss the development and application of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture models as they pertain to infectious disease in a new review. They describe these models as predictive pre-clinical platforms to study host-pathogen interactions, infectious disease mechanisms, and antimicrobial drug development.

2h

Variation in cancer-causing KRAS mutations greater than thought

The effects of KRAS mutations underlying many different types of cancer are more diverse than previously thought, according to a new study. Different mutations in the same amino acid of the KRAS protein have so varied effects on protein function that they may require different approaches when it comes to treatment and drug development.

2h

New color-generation mechanism discovered in 'rainbow' weevil

Researchers have discovered a novel color-generation mechanism in nature, which if harnessed, has the potential to create cosmetics and paints with purer and more vivid hues, screen displays that project the same true image when viewed from any angle, and even reduce the signal loss in optical fibers.

2h

Artificial anti-oxidant may be the next go-to supplement

Naturally-derived anti-oxidants have become the 'it' health ingredient to look for in food. But researchers have now discovered that TEMPO — a well-known artificial anti-oxidant — is up to 100 times more powerful than nature's best and could help counteract everything from skin damage to Alzheimer's Disease.

2h

Wetlands are key for accurate greenhouse gas measurements in the Arctic

The Arctic is rapidly warming, with stronger effects than observed elsewhere in the world. Determining whether the Arctic is continuing to take up carbon from the atmosphere or instead releasing it to the atmosphere is an urgent research priority, particularly as the climate warms. A new study now provides the first estimate of regional carbon budget for tundra in Western Russia for the 10-year pe

2h

Industry-certified masks offer better protection from volcanic ash exposure

Industry-certified particle masks are most effective at protecting people from volcanic ash, whilst commonly used surgical masks offer less protection. A first of its kind study, led by Dr. Claire Horwell of the Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience at Durham University, UK, has measured the effectiveness of different types of respiratory protection against volcanic ash.

2h

Wealthy countries less concerned about energy security, study suggests

People in wealthy countries are less concerned about the reliability, vulnerability and affordability of their energy supplies, a new study has shown.

2h

Newborns with congenital heart disease have enlarged kidneys

The hearts and brains of babies born with congenital heart disease are not the only organs affected by this common medical condition. Surprisingly, their kidneys tend to be enlarged at birth, says Gemma Scholes of the University of Melbourne in Australia, who is lead author of a study in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research.

2h

What catches our eye

Our unconscious gaze is controlled by an automatic selection process computed by a neural network in the brain. Details of this computation have now been studied by an international team collaborating with the Technical University of Munich (TUM). This finding could soon become relevant for robotic implementations.

2h

New research unravels the mysteries of deep soil carbon

Huge amounts of carbon are stored in deep soil. Scientists uncover the conditions that will cause that carbon to stay underground or be emitted into the atmosphere as climate-destabilizing carbon dioxide.

2h

Virus may help combat fire ants, but caution is needed

A specific virus changes dietary behavior of fire ants, leading researchers to rethink control methods for the invasive species.

2h

Molecules imagined using next-generation artificial intelligence validated experimentally

Insilico Medicine presented an original deep neural network architecture, Entangled Conditional Adversarial Autoencoder (ECAAE), which generates molecular structures based on various properties such as activity against a specific protein, solubility, and ease of synthesis. ECAAE was used to generate a novel inhibitor of Janus Kinase 3 (JAK3), implicated in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and viti

2h

Researchers develop new approach to conserving tree species

Researchers from The Morton Arboretum and The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew have developed an evidence-based approach to designing ex situ collections that effectively preserve a target species' genetic diversity, which can be tailored for conservation of any tree species. This will allow for efficient, targeted seed collecting efforts, including number of populations to sample, the appropriate numbe

2h

New colour-generation mechanism discovered in 'rainbow' weevil

Researchers from Yale-NUS College and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland have discovered a novel colour-generation mechanism in nature, which if harnessed, has the potential to create cosmetics and paints with purer and more vivid hues, screen displays that project the same true image when viewed from any angle, and even reduce the signal loss in optical fibres.

2h

When MSNBC or Fox News airs in public places, how do people react?

Have you been traveling and noticed that all the televisions in an airport terminal were set to CNN? Or grabbed a drink at a bar and realized that Fox News was being broadcast to its customers?

2h

Total of 21 new parasitoid wasps following the first ever revision of their genus

As many as twenty-one species of parasitoid wasps are described as new to science, following the first ever revision of their genus since its establishment back in 1893.

2h

Artificial anti-oxidant may be the next go-to supplement

Naturally-derived anti-oxidants have become the 'it' health ingredient to look for in food. But researchers from UBC Okanagan and the University of Bologna have discovered that TEMPO—a well-known artificial anti-oxidant—is up to 100 times more powerful than nature's best and could help counteract everything from skin damage to Alzheimer's Disease.

2h

How caged molecules 'rattle and sing'

A team of energy researchers has discovered that molecular motion can be predicted with high accuracy when confining molecules in small nanocages. Their theoretical method is suitable for screening millions of possible nanomaterials and could improve production of fuels and chemicals.

2h

New research unravels the mysteries of deep soil carbon

Energy-starved microbes may be the force that causes huge amounts of carbon to be stored in deep soils, according to a Dartmouth College study. The research finds that less food energy at depth makes it more difficult to decompose deposits of organic carbon, creating an underground storehouse for the climate-destabilizing chemical element.

2h

The benefits of prison chess clubs

Chess is a cheap and tactical game, and is claimed to develop the part of the brain responsible for planning, judgement and self control, and even to help prevent dementia. So it's no wonder that thousands of prisoners in the UK are now part of chess clubs.

2h

The size of the nucleolus plays an important role in protecting cells against infection

All cells in the body have the basic ability to protect themselves from infection, called the innate immune response. But how cells do this is not very well understood. Recently, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing and the University of Cologne, found that the size of the nucleolus plays an important role in protecting cells against infection.

2h

Bioinformaticians examine new genes the moment they are born

Accumulating evidence suggests that new genes can arise spontaneously from previously non-coding DNA instead of through the gradual mutation of established genes. Bioinformaticians at the University of Münster (Germany) are now, for the first time, studying the earliest stages in the emergence of such 'genes out of thin air,' also known as de novo genes.

2h

DNA test for predicing risk of leukemia relapse

The DNA-based test paves the way for precision medicine by giving leukemia patients personal disease prognosis based on mutation frequency in their cancer cells.

2h

Chemists accelerated vinyl sulphides reaction 10 times

A team of scientists created and tested a more efficient catalyst for obtaining vinyl sulphides. These compounds may be used for the development of new materials and stabilization of gold and silver nanoparticles. The article about the study was published in the Catalysis Science & Technology journal.

2h

Where to place a rainwater harvesting system

On any given day, Zoubaida Salman instructs a classroom of 15-year-olds at the Sur Baher Girls School in East Jerusalem, where she has served as the science teacher and Environment and Health Coordinator for the past 22 years. One of the most important lessons comes from their backyard: water is scarce and precious in this region.

3h

Perfect patterns pave path to faster, cheaper MRI

A discovery by a University of Queensland researcher could speed up MRI scanning times and make the scans more affordable.

3h

Good cop, bad cop?

When police officer Jason Van Dyke shot Laquan McDonald in 2014, he already had more than 20 civilian allegations lodged against him for police misconduct, dating back to 2000.

3h

New colour-generation mechanism discovered in 'rainbow' weevil

Researchers from Yale-NUS College and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland have discovered a novel color-generation mechanism in nature, which if harnessed, has the potential to create cosmetics and paints with purer and more vivid hues, screen displays that project the same true image when viewed from any angle, and even reduce the signal loss in optical fibers.

3h

Variation in cancer-causing KRAS mutations greater than thought

The effects of KRAS mutations underlying many different types of cancer are more diverse than previously thought, according to a new study led by the University of Eastern Finland. Different mutations in the same amino acid of the KRAS protein have so varied effects on protein function that they may require different approaches when it comes to treatment and drug development.

3h

Wetlands are key for accurate greenhouse gas measurements in the Arctic

The Arctic is rapidly warming, with stronger effects than observed elsewhere in the world. Determining whether the Arctic is continuing to take up carbon from the atmosphere or instead releasing it to the atmosphere is an urgent research priority, particularly as the climate warms. A new study by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland now provides the first estimate of regional carbon bu

3h

Evaluating the contribution of black carbon to climate change

Collaboration between Nagoya University and Cornell University develops improved model to assess the ability of black carbon to warm the Earth's atmosphere.

3h

Farewell flat biology — Tackling infectious disease using 3-D tissue engineering

In a new invited review article, ASU Biodesign microbiologists and tissue engineers Cheryl Nickerson, Jennifer Barrila and colleagues discuss the development and application of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture models as they pertain to infectious disease. They describe these models as predictive pre-clinical platforms to study host-pathogen interactions, infectious disease mechanisms, and an

3h

Researchers discover how caged molecules 'rattle and sing'

A team of energy researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Massachusetts Amherst has discovered that molecular motion can be predicted with high accuracy when confining molecules in small nanocages. Their theoretical method is suitable for screening millions of possible nanomaterials and could improve production of fuels and chemicals.

3h

Adolescents whose religious mothers die are likely to be less religious as young adults

Bereaved children whose late mothers were very religious are likely to be less religious after their mother dies than youths who did not suffer a maternal loss. Conversely, children whose late mothers placed no importance on religion are more likely to become religious—especially when it comes to praying often.

3h

Innovative combination of hard and soft materials improves adhesion to rough surfaces

Scientists have developed a new adhesive structure that improves adhesion, even to rough surface. Adhesion is involved whenever industrial components are moved without leaving any residues behind. But the surfaces of these objects are never completely smooth. Even those surfaces that appear smooth to the human eye tend to be rough when observed under a microscope. Scientists at the Leibniz Institu

3h

Welcome to the new Meghalayan age – here's how it fits with the rest of Earth's geologic history

Jurassic, Pleistocene, Precambrian. The named times in Earth's history might inspire mental images of dinosaurs, trilobites or other enigmatic animals unlike anything in our modern world.

3h

Skærpet advarsel skal forhindre overdosering med farligt gigtmiddel

Lægemiddelstyrelsen vil kræve tydeligere mærkning af gigtmedicinen methotrexat efter flere dødsfald på plejehjem som følge af fejldosering.

3h

24 vil være Region Hovedstadens nye direktør

Region Hovedstaden har modtaget 24 ansøgninger til stillingen som regionsdirektør.

3h

3h

Most EU countries miss air quality targets: report

Most EU countries fail to meet the bloc's air quality standards and more than 1,000 Europeans die prematurely each day, ten times more than in road accidents, a watchdog said Tuesday.

3h

Ryanair warns of job cuts in Germany if strikes persist

Ryanair warned Tuesday that it may slash jobs and close some bases in Germany if it is hit with more strikes, a day before a planned work stoppage for better pay and conditions.

3h

1 in 4 older adults may take sedatives for way too long

Prescriptions for sedatives known as benzodiazepines may start as well-intentioned efforts to calm anxiety, improve sleep, or ease depression. But for one in four older adults who receive a prescription for them, benzodiazepines may lead to long-term use, a new study shows. That’s despite warnings against long-term use, especially among older people, because benzodiazepines can increase the risk

3h

Google fights French 'right to be forgotten' in EU court

Google clashed with France in a top EU court on Tuesday arguing it feared for freedom of speech if forced to apply Europe's "right to be forgotten" principle worldwide.

3h

Researchers conduct chemical analysis of six extremely metal-poor star candidates

An international team of researchers has conducted a chemical study of six new very metal-poor star candidates in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12). The new research, available in a paper published August 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository, could help researchers better understand the early stages of chemical evolution of the galaxy.

3h

When anti-waste campaigns backfire

Waste has become a serious problem in Western societies. About a third of the food produced in countries such as the [United Kingdom](http://foodawarecic.org.uk/stats-2/](http://foodawarecic.org.uk/stats-2/), Australia and the United States is wasted. About 40% is wasted by consumers, who buy too much, forget what's in their refrigerator or cupboards, or throw away food that is past its expiration

3h

Updated California Climate Tracker tool provides more than 120 years of climate data

Reno, NV (Sept 10, 2018): Scientists from the Western Regional Climate Center (WRCC) at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Reno, Nev. are pleased to announce the release of a long-awaited update to a climate mapping tool called the California Climate Tracker.

3h

Total of 21 new parasitoid wasps following the first ever revision of their genus

As many as 21 species of parasitoid wasps are described as new to science, following the first ever revision of their genus since its establishment back in 1893. Currently amounting to 27 in total, all species inhabit the Neotropical region, apart from a single species known from west Africa. With their paper, published in the open access journal ZooKeys, the scientists also expand the biogeograph

3h

Artificial anti-oxidant may be the next go-to supplement

Naturally-derived anti-oxidants have become the 'it' health ingredient to look for in food. But researchers from UBC Okanagan and the University of Bologna have discovered that TEMPO — a well-known artificial anti-oxidant — is up to 100 times more powerful than nature's best and could help counteract everything from skin damage to Alzheimer's Disease.

3h

Adolescents whose religious mothers die are likely to be less religious as young adults

Bereaved children whose late mothers were very religious are likely to be less religious after their mother dies than youths who did not suffer a maternal loss. Conversely, children whose late mothers placed no importance on religion are more likely to become religious — especially when it comes to praying often.

3h

Researchers discover how caged molecules 'rattle and sing'

A team of energy researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Massachusetts Amherst has discovered that molecular motion can be predicted with high accuracy when confining molecules in small nanocages. Their theoretical method is suitable for screening millions of possible nanomaterials and could improve production of fuels and chemicals.

3h

Chinese government announces it will begin genetic testing of Olympic hopefuls

The Chinese government announced it will be genetic testing potential Olympic athletes for the 2022 Games. What could possibly go wrong? Read More

3h

Worms in space—the molecular muscle experiment

Thousands of worms are being flown to the International Space Station later this year for scientists to understand more about spaceflight-induced muscle loss—the first UK experiment to take place on the International Space Station.

3h

Report recommends revisiting federal safety regulations for liquid petroleum gas distribution systems

Current federal safety regulations for small distribution systems used for propane and other liquefied petroleum gases (LPGs) should be improved for clarity, efficiency, enforceability, and applicability to risk, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Because compliance with the federal regulations is not enforced consistently by states, there is litt

3h

Meat-free diets could cut our 'water footprint' in half, say scientists

Three thousand litres of water – that is the amount needed to produce the food each British person eats every day. This is according to a new study into the "water footprint" of diets in Western Europe, conducted by the European Commission and published in Nature Sustainability.

3h

A Japanese company is about to test a tiny space elevator in space

Let's be honest, launching things into space with rockets is a pretty inefficient way to do things. Not only are rockets expensive to build, they also need a ton of fuel in order to achieve escape velocity. And while the costs of individual launches are being reduced thanks to concepts like reusable rockets and space planes, a more permanent solution could be to build a Space Elevator.

3h

Cool ways of studying the cryosphere

One of the key elements of Earth's climate system is the cryosphere – the many forms of ice found on Earth. Two new NASA missions use different technologies to help scientists better understand how frozen water is affecting our planet. Both will continue satellite data records that have greatly improved our understanding of Earth's frozen regions.

3h

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Paul

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that newly developed tropical storm Paul in the Eastern Pacific is dealing with wind shear.

3h

Alibaba, Russian tech firm Mail.ru agree joint e-commerce venture

Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba and Russian technology group Mail.ru on Tuesday said they would launch a joint e-commerce venture in Russia and former Soviet countries.

3h

Plejehjem levede ikke op til krav, da tre ældre omkom i brand

Plejecenter Farsøhthus i Norddjurs Kommune overholdt ikke brandkravene, da en brand tog livet af tre ældre beboere i august, siger bygningsminister Ole Birk Olesen i et samråd.

3h

Hurricane Florence: Photos of a Monster Storm

Hurricane Florence strengthened into a Category 4 storm, with maximum sustained winds reaching 140 mph (220 km/h). Here's a look at the monster storm as it heads toward the U.S. East Coast.

3h

Global nutrition group issues first-ever consensus criteria for diagnosing malnutrition

Despite the serious concern associated with malnutrition's adverse outcomes and cost, no single existing approach to malnutrition diagnosis has achieved broad global acceptance. A new consensus report, the result of more than two years' work by members of the Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) working group, is the first to outline five criteria for malnutrition

3h

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Paul

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that newly developed tropical storm Paul in the Eastern Pacific is dealing with wind shear.

3h

Lessons from cities that plan for their rivers

In Nairobi, Kenya, the government is destroying buildings constructed on riparian land in a bid to mitigate the impact of floods. This is just one example of a growing African city that hasn't adequately protected its rivers. Kefa Otiso spoke to Jessica Kavonic, an expert in helping local governments in sub-Saharan Africa on mainstream natural assets – like rivers – into policy and planning.

3h

Why Nigeria urgently needs to grow non-oil exports

The economy of Nigeria has had to navigate a major crisis that started with the collapse of oil prices in 2014 and was worsened by the ongoing restiveness in the oil rich Niger-Delta region.

3h

Climate extremes 'key driver' behind rising global hunger: UN

Extreme weather events were a leading cause of global hunger rising last year, with women, babies, and old people particularly vulnerable to the worsening trend, a UN report said Tuesday.

3h

Chinese auto sales fall for second month in August

Chinese auto sales fell for a second month in August, an industry group reported Tuesday, adding to signs of economic malaise amid a worsening tariff battle with Washington.

3h

Tesla cuts number of stock colors to streamline production

Tesla is dropping two of the seven standard colors it had offered to customers as it tries to streamline production.

3h

NASA covers Hurricane Isaac's ragged center

NASA's Aqua satellite found a thick ring of powerful storms around Hurricane Isaac's ragged eye and southwest of center on Sept. 10.

3h

NASA sees an organized Hurricane Helene near Africa

Visible imagefrom NASA's Aqua satellite showed that newly developed Hurricane Helene had strengthened and organized quickly.

3h

Insulator becomes conductor at the push of a button

Ionic liquids are important in scientific research because they can apply a lot of charge over a surface. Physicists from Leiden University have now found that the charging process of ionic liquids depends purely on opposite charges attracting each other. Chemical reactions are sometimes involved, but not essential.

3h

Pristine quantum light source created at the edge of silicon chip

The smallest amount of light you can have is one photon, so dim that it's pretty much invisible to humans. While imperceptible, these tiny blips of energy are useful for carrying quantum information around. Ideally, every quantum courier would be the same, but there isn't a straightforward way to produce a stream of identical photons. This is particularly challenging when individual photons come f

3h

Wetlands are key for accurate greenhouse gas measurements in the Arctic

The Arctic is rapidly warming, with stronger effects than observed elsewhere in the world. The Arctic regions are particularly important with respect to climate change, as permafrost soils store huge amounts of the Earth's soil carbon (C). Warming of Arctic soils and thawing of permafrost can have substantial consequences for the global climate, as the large C stored in soils could be released to

3h

Researchers show that nucleosomes can inhibit CRISPR-Cas9 cleavage efficiency

A team of researchers at the University of Utah has found that nucleosomes can inhibit CRISPR/Cas9 cleavage efficiency. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes testing the gene editing technique on yeast samples and what they found.

3h

Wastewater recycling instead of disposal

Wastewater smells foul and is full of pathogens. For these reasons it is usually removed and disposed of quickly. The out-of-sight-out-of-mind strategy is, however, costly and opportunities are lost. At Eawag's Info Day, experts in practice come together with researchers who are seeking new answers – for example, on how nutrients or heat can be recovered from wastewater.

3h

Researchers aim to help Colombia communities hit by illegal gold mining

A University of Portsmouth expert in space technologies and disaster risk reduction is involved in a new project in the UK and Colombia on illegal gold mining.

3h

The myth of a vegetarian India

India has a reputation as a vegetarian nation, and Indians certainly consume far less meat than the global average. But the view of India as a predominantly vegetarian nation may not be quite accurate.

4h

How to boost sustainable and resilient agriculture?

Researchers from the group of GESPLAN at Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have applied the Working with People methodology to rethink sustainability, resilience and rural development in Europe.

4h

Ketamine fights depression in a surprising way

Ketamine works as an antidepressant at least in part by activating the brain’s opioid system, new research reports. The finding overturns previously held beliefs that the drug’s antidepressant effects stemmed solely from its impact on the glutamate system. These beliefs led to the widespread use of ketamine to treat depression and spurred the development of glutamate-blocking drugs for use as ant

4h

NASA sees an organized Hurricane Helene near Africa

Visible image from NASA's Aqua satellite showed that newly developed Hurricane Helene had strengthened and organized quickly.

4h

NASA covers Hurricane Isaac's ragged center

NASA's Aqua satellite found a thick ring of powerful storms around Hurricane Isaac's ragged eye and southwest of center on Sept. 10, 2018.

4h

Hurricane Florence: Mass evacuation of 1.5 million residents ordered

As Hurricane Florence comes closer to land and approaches the highest possible storm rating, a state of emergency has been declared in four US states

4h

Study shows how beetle larvae adapt to different bee hosts

A team of researchers at the University of California has discovered adaptations made by a species of beetle to survive in different geographic locations. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of a parasitic blister beetle and their digger bee hosts living in different areas on the West Coast of the United States.

4h

Lønforhøjelse skal bremse lægeflugt fra Psykiatrisk Hospital i Risskov

Et månedligt tillæg på 2.000 kr. skal lokke overlægerne til at blive på de psykiatriske afdelinger i Risskov, der har været hårdt ramt af opsigelser.

4h

4h

First use of microscopic sound waves to study cell abnormalities

A University of Nottingham academic has won a prestigious five-year fellowship to explore the use of harmless sound waves to view deep inside living cells to aid early diagnose in diseases such as cancer.

4h

Evaluating the contribution of black carbon to climate change

Japanese and US researchers developed an advanced model to assess the ability of black carbon particles to absorb sunlight and contribute to global warming. The model achieved higher sensitivity than obtained by previous models because it considered both particle size and the complex mixing states of black carbon in air. This advanced model will aid in the assessment of the effectiveness of removi

4h

Cape Town Is an Omen

R ainfall in Cape Town is a dramatic affair. In the winter wet season, ominous clouds and strong winds rumble in from the northwest, carrying with them the life-saving moisture of the Atlantic Ocean and dumping it in cold buckets on the city bowl. For days at a time, storms batter and flood the city and surrounding areas, so much so that the region’s first Portuguese moniker was Cabo das Tormenta

4h

A Powerful Force That Shapes All of our Decisions

Psychologist Michele Gelfand’s grand unified theory of cultural “tightness” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Florence is for the birds—and that's both good and badHurricane Florence

As Hurricane Florence tracks toward the East Coast with predicted windspeeds up to 150 mph when it makes landfall Thursday, storm prognosticators are busy trying to forecast its effects for local residents. But one William & Mary ornithologist has his own predictions on what Florence will mean for birds and birders.

4h

Low-severity wildfires impact soils more than previously believed

Low-severity wildland fires and prescribed burns have long been presumed by scientists and resource managers to be harmless to soils, but this may not be the case, new research shows. According to two new studies, low-severity burns cause damage to soil structure and organic matter in ways that are not immediately apparent after a fire.

4h

Duchenne muscular dystrophy: How muscle cells journey to the dark side

Answers to treating muscular dystrophies could lie in better understanding muscle repair–which resembles a delicate cellular dance choreographed by special cells called fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs). Now, scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have revealed that FAPs don't have just one identity–but several distinct identities that emerge during key stages o

4h

High-speed quantum cryptographic communications with key distribution speeds exceeding 10 Mbps

Toshiba and the Tohoku Medical Megabank Organization at Tohoku University have successfully applied high-speed quantum cryptographic communications technologies developed at Toshiba and Toshiba Research Europe's Cambridge Research Laboratory to achieve world-first quantum cryptography communication at one-month-average key distribution speeds exceeding 10 Mbps over installed optical fiber lines.

4h

Soil could filter antibiotics from treated wastewater, protecting groundwater

Soil may be a natural filter that can act as a tertiary treatment for wastewater, preventing antibiotics from contaminating groundwater, according to researchers who conducted a study at Penn State's Living Filter.

4h

Choosing the Right Filtration Solutions to Complete Your Laboratory

Ductless fume hoods, laminar flow hoods, and biological safety cabinets are all designed to meet the needs of highly specific, yet extremely diverse situations. Find out which hood is right for you with this guide from Air Science!

4h

Chemists develop nanocatalysts for continuous biofuel synthesis

A chemist from RUDN synthesized new catalysts with ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles for producing biofuel from organic biowaste. Nanocatalysts support more intensive and sustained reactions than the compounds currently available in the market. The results of the study were published in the ChemSusChem journal.

4h

A Diesel Brothers Dually Truck for Jacob deGrom

The Diesel Brothers reveal the Ford they built for New York Mets All-Star pitcher Jacob deGrom. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/DieselBrosTV htt

4h

'Atmospheric Brick Wall' Steers Hurricane Florence Toward US East Coast

If the hurricane makes landfall, this so-called brick wall will likely play the villain again.

4h

South Koreans Love Their ‘Stress Cafés’

M idday on a Monday, I walked briskly into the Shim Story Public Convenience Lounge, hoping to take a quick peek at the café craze sweeping Seoul before resuming my reporting on North Korea’s nuclear weapons. Then I lost my shoes. They were taken by a bubbly, bespectacled man named Jung Oon-mo, who handed me slippers and guided me past curtained massage chairs and cubicles containing heated beds

4h

Region Hovedstaden vil forbedre Sundhedsplatformen og akutområdet i ny budgetaftale

Region Hovedstadens budget for 2019 er på plads, efter et politisk flertal har forhandlet en aftale hjem, der giver flere penge til Sundhedsplatformen og akutområdet.

4h

New trackers will help scientists follow elusive critters

Animals Researchers hope to map the path of bird flu and other pathogens. Researchers hope to map the path of bird flu and other pathogens—not to mention birds, bats, and baby sea turtles. These little beings have historically been too small…

4h

We Know Exactly How to Stop Wildfires—With Money

Wildfires would be much less destructive if forests were managed actively, with controlled burns and by culling trees and undergrowth. But someone has to pay for that.

4h

LA's Teaming up With Other Cities to Get Cheaper EVs

It's leading a group of 30 cities that will work together to get better deals on electric cars.

4h

Why an Army of Small Companies Is Defending The Sprint/T-Mobile Merger

Mobile Virtual Network Operators, which serve largely low-income users, have little to gain from the Sprint/T-Mobile merger. They're advocating for it because of a secret agenda: fear of the new telecom overlords.

4h

Landslides, avalanches may be key to long-term comet activity

The release of gases through sublimation is the defining process of comets, but a new paper by Planetary Science Institute Research Scientist Jordan K. Steckloff and Senior Scientist Nalin H. Samarasinha says that periodic landslides and avalanches, known as mass wasting, may be responsible for keeping comets active over a long time.

4h

Researchers develop a toxin-free adhesive system inspired by underwater creatures

Purdue University researchers have developed a unique, toxin-free adhesive system developed from underwater creatures. They hope it will make plywood, cardboard boxes and other packaging – combined $100 billion industries – both safer and easier to use.

4h

Image of the Day: Flying High

Researchers analyzed pigeons’ head movements in flight.

4h

Are Digital Devices Altering Our Brains?

Some say our gadgets and computers can help improve intelligence. Others say they make us stupid and violent. Which is it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Volcanic eruption may have helped drive real-life hobbits extinct

The diminutive Homo floresiensis died out about 50,000 years ago just as a volcano exploded – but are the two connected or was extinction down to other factors?

4h

Linear equations system will restore impaired hand motion

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a model for predicting hand movement trajectories based on cortical activity: Signals are measured directly from a human brain. The predictions rely on linear models. This offloads the processor, since it requires less memory and fewer computations in comparison with neural networks. As a result, the processor can be co

4h

Scientists propose a new method for detecting dangerous nitrogen-containing liquids

A team of researchers from the Institute of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Information Technologies of Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University (BFU), together with their colleagues from Gebze Technical University, used nuclear magnetic resonance to detect toxic and flammable nitrogen-containing liquids. The study was published in Chemical Physics.

4h

Bright streaks on the moon are a product of space weathering

The long, bright streaks that reach out from craters on the moon are actually much longer than they appear, according to research published in the journal Icarus.

5h

Scientists to develop long-lasting battery with unorthodox methods

Researchers from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) are developing radio isotope beta-voltaic batteries with nickel-63 nano-cluster radio isotope films. The concept is to develop safe nuclear batteries with a service life of 100 years for pacemakers, miniature glucose sensors, arterial blood pressure monitoring systems, and for controlling remote objects and micro-robots, and

5h

Age bias exists even in outer space—in samples collected by Apollo astronauts

Because much of the evidence from Earth's early history has been destroyed by plate tectonics and weathering, astronomers often look to the moon and Mars for clues about our beginnings. But what if some of our information from those planets is biased?

5h

Switch in the climatic factors controlling vegetation dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau

The ecosystem of the Tibetan Plateau (often referred as the "third pole of the Earth") is highly susceptible to climate change. Using precipitation and temperature records along with Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, Dr. Ting Hua from the Northwest Institute of Eco-Environment and Resources and Prof. Xunming Wang from the Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Res

5h

Kidnapping in the Antarctic animal world?

Pteropods or sea snails, also called sea angels, produce chemical deterrents to ward off predators, and some species of amphipods take advantage of this by carrying pteropods piggyback to gain protection from predators. There is no recognisable benefit for the pteropod. On the contrary, they starve: Captured between the amphipod's legs, they are unable to feed. Biologists working with Dr. Charlott

5h

Can Sexual-Harassment Training Stop the Next Les Moonves?

For the past 12 years, I’ve offered a two-hour sexual-harassment-prevention course to supervisors at corporations and churches, schools and charities, police departments and law firms. I’ve talked about sexual harassment in sweltering community centers and classrooms that smelled of feet, hushed chapels, and posh executive boardrooms. I’ve been met with disconcerting enthusiasm and glaring hostil

5h

Can you evolve while being robust?

It was long thought that DNA, together with the genes encoded in it, determined genetic destiny. But equally important is coordinating when genes are turned on and off. In fact, the regulation of gene expression defines life by allowing organisms to react to their surroundings rather than being static automatons. As even the smallest organisms like bacteria have many genes, coordinating their expr

5h

Molecular switches are not just 'on' or 'off'

The GTPases constitute a very large protein family, whose members are involved in the control of cell growth, transport of molecules, synthesis of other proteins, etc. Despite the many functions of the GTPases, they follow a common cyclic pattern (Figure 1). The activity of the GTPases is regulated by factors that control their ability to bind and hydrolyse guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosin

5h

Understanding deep-sea images with artificial intelligence

The evaluation of very large amounts of data is becoming increasingly relevant in ocean research. Diving robots or autonomous underwater vehicles that carry out measurements independently in the deep sea can now record large quantities of high-resolution images. To evaluate these images scientifically in a sustainable manner, a number of prerequisites have to be fulfilled in data acquisition, cura

5h

First 'Monkeypox' Case Reported in UK. Why You Shouldn't Worry

A rare disease that's related to smallpox has shown up in the United Kingdom for the first time.

5h

A Huge Noodle Could Leave the Ocean Cleaner — If It Works

Is the goal of the Ocean Cleanup as admirable as it sounds?

5h

Sygehus Sønderjylland får professor i akutmedicin

Christian Backer Mogensen er udnævnt som professor i akutmedicin ved Sygehus Sønderjylland.

5h

Construction Crew Finds Stash of Ancient Gold Coins in Abandoned Italian Cinema

The 300 coins date to a time when part of the Roman Empire was collapsing.

5h

What is Virtual Reality (VR)? The Complete WIRED Guide

Everything you ever wanted to know about headsets, Oculus, Magic Leap, and simulator sickness.

5h

Mercedes' Urbanetic Concept Is a Shape-Shifting Future Van

It's a cargo van! It's a passenger van! It's the Vision Urbanetic, and it's part of Mercedes' bid for the future of transportation.

5h

The Psychology of Flipd, the Digital Detox App

Flipd is designed to build awareness of all the ways you subconsciously waste time on your phone.

5h

iOS 12 Tips and Tricks, and What to Expect When You Upgrade

Your iPhone's software is about to get a refresh. Here are the most important new features to learn about now.

5h

Marijuana use among pregnant women is rising, and so are concerns

Pediatricians are urging caution as data show more pregnant women are using marijuana. More research is urgently needed on the drug’s effects during pregnancy.

5h

We Need New Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease

They're essential to coming up with better treatments, and a new initiative could provide them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Sierra Burgess Gets Wrong About Consent

It was hard not to want Sierra Burgess Is a Loser to win. The teen rom-com, which began streaming on Netflix last Friday, seems strategically constructed for maximum likability. Written by Lindsey Beer and directed by Ian Samuels, the film stars Shannon Purser, who won a cult following as Stranger Things ’ Barb Holland, as the titular character. Sierra is shy, unassuming, and outrageously smart—t

5h

Peter Geisling prøver botox: Jeg kan ikke rynke brynene

TV-værten får botox-indsprøjtning i panden som et eksperiment.

5h

Rigsrevision: Hullet grundlag for F-35-køb blev lappet på målstregen

Forsvarsministeriet gjorde rede for usikkerhederne ved kampflykøbet, så politikerne kunne tage stilling på et oplyst grundlag. Men usikkerhederne er der stadig, konkluderer Rigsrevisionen.

6h

Decoding robotic surgery skills

Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC are looking to technology to help deconstruct expert surgeons' robotic surgery skills so they can create an objective, standardized way to train the next generation of surgeons.

6h

Stuck Fighting the Last War

Seventeen years after 9/11, the outcome of the War on Terror that followed seems indisputable. Al-Qaeda operates in many more countries and has a larger number of followers than it did before 2001. Other threats have emerged, as well. The Islamic State overshadowed its former patron in al-Qaeda in 2014, when it controlled vast areas in multiple countries, and has left behind misery, devastation,

6h

Linak vinder automatiseringspris 2018

Aktuatorvirksomheden Linak vinder prisen foran Inrotech og Inwatec, der beskæftiger sig med henholdsvis svejserobotter og automatiske løsninger til industrivaskerier.

6h

Med 38 nye robotter kan Linak konkurrere med Kina

På fem år har Linak inve­steret over 100 millioner kroner i 38 industrirobotter. Det har givet plads til store ordrer og flere medarbejdere.

6h

RNA Expert Wins "American Nobel"

Interview: Joan Argetsinger Steitz weighs in on #MeToo and working with James Watson — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Flere iOS-apps sælger din lokalitet til tredjemænd

Et stigende antal iOS-apps sælger brugernes præcise lokalitetshistorik, uden at brugerne får det at vide.

7h

VTCRI research team identifies a potential strategy in fight against brain cancer

Scientists with the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute say a gene involved in the body's circadian rhythms is a potential target for therapies to help patients with a deadly form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma.

7h

Critically ill patients supported by respirators in ICUs may develop weakness from drug treatment, not illness

At least 25 percent of critically ill patients who receive mechanical ventilation in intensive care units (ICUs) develop muscular weakness severe enough to impair their quality of life. In a new study published in the journal CHEST® designed to investigate possible causes, researchers found that mechanically ventilated patients treated with vasopressor medications had a more than three-fold increa

7h

No End in Sight

John Dailey recalls the events of September 11, 2001, well. “We were in Darwin, Australia, training, and it was actually the first night that we got to go out” on the town, Dailey, who was the platoon sergeant for the force reconnaissance platoon for the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, told me recently. He and his men had finished training and were preparing to get back on their boat. “We were al

7h

A Trumpian 'War on Terror' That Just Keeps Getting Bigger

MOGADISHU —On August 29, U.S. forces carried out their 21st confirmed air strike in Somalia this year. The short U.S. Africa Command (Africom) press release announcing the strike on al-Shabaab, the al-Qaeda–linked insurgency that has sought to implement a hard-line Islamic state in Somalia, resembled those that had come before it: It did not specify the kind of aircraft used, the exact location o

7h

Climate Change Drives Bigger, Wetter Storms — Storms Like FlorenceHurricane Florence

Hurricane Florence — large, slow and full of moisture — is threatening to inundate the Southeast. It's a type of storm that's getting more likely to form. (Image credit: NOAA/GOES/Getty Images)

7h

Dozens of rare Hermann's tortoises stolen in Corsica

A turtle conservation park on the French island of Corsica is asking the public for help after 56 rare Hermann's tortoises, considered a nearly threatened species, were stolen from the site.

7h

Kirstine havde akne: Jeg ønskede, jeg var usynlig

Kirstine Birk har brugt over 90.000 kroner i ind- og udland for at få sin akne behandlet.

8h

UTSA researchers develop tools to prepare for chemical attacks

New plume dispersal model alerts authorities how much time people have to flee after an attack.

8h

MHI Vestas leverer verdens største flydende havmøller til Portugal

Et fuldskala demonstrationsanlæg med tre flydende havmøller ud for Portugals kyst skal udstyres med MHI Vestas' allerstørste vindmøller på 8,4 MW. Anlægget skal efter planen sættes i drift sidst i 2019.

8h

Basics: How Teeth Became Tusks, and Tusks Became Liabilities

Humans, mice, narwhals — most mammals rely on ancient genes to produce teeth and tusks. But the tuskless elephants of Africa show that nature can quickly alter the code.

8h

World must act by 2020 to avoid runaway climate change: UN chief

With 2018 shaping up as the fourth hottest year on record, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Monday that the world must take action in the next two years to avert the disastrous consequences of runaway climate change.

9h

Japan proposes end to commercial whaling ban, faces pushback

Japan proposed an end to a decades-old ban on commercial whaling at an international conference Monday, arguing there is no longer a scientific reason for what was supposed to be a temporary measure.

9h

An extreme close-up with a beautiful furry moth

Look into the giant eyes of this poplar hawkmoth and you might be scared, but this hairy insect lacks any means to bite or hurt you

9h

China suspends carpool services following murders

China has ordered the suspension of carpool services offered by ride-hailing firms until tighter safety measures are implemented, seeking to ease fears after two users of sector leader Didi Chuxing's Hitch service were murdered.

9h

Japan semiconductor company Renesas to buy US firm IDT for $6.7bn

Japanese semiconductor firm Renesas on Tuesday announced a deal to buy California-based IDT in a cash deal valued at $6.7 billion.

9h

How Hackers Slipped by British Airways' Data Defenses

Security researchers have detailed how a criminal hacking gang used just 22 lines of code to steal credit card info from hundreds of thousands of British Airways customers.

9h

Poll: Teens say social media makes them feel better

Today's teens are always on their smartphones, many check social media "constantly" and prefer texting over face-to-face communication.

9h

Lava flow seen on restless Alaska volcano

A lava flow has been spotted on an Alaska volcano that recently became active again.

9h

Gender Dysphoria in Children

Gender transitions are becoming more and more common. Adults can make informed decisions about hormone treatments and gender reassignment surgeries, but what about children?

9h

German unions call for strike against Ryanair Wednesday

Unions representing pilots and cabin crew of Irish no-frills airline Ryanair In Germany have called for a strike on Wednesday over better pay and working conditions.

9h

Chinese companies flee overseas to avoid US tariffs

A growing number of Chinese companies are adopting a crafty way to evade US President Donald Trump's tariffs: remove the "Made in China" label by shifting production to countries such as Vietnam, Serbia and Mexico.

9h

Finding Nemo's genes

An international team of researchers has mapped Nemo's genome, providing the research community with an invaluable resource to decode the response of fish to environmental changes, including climate change.

10h

Research finds transparency may improve US home buyout programs

Imagine a major storm hits your neighborhood and the government offers to purchase homes with "a history of flood damage." Your basement is completely flooded. Will you qualify for the buyout? What about your neighbors?

10h

ScienceTake: Parrots Think They’re So Smart. Now They’re Bartering Tokens for Food.

Parrots can judge the relative value of food, holding out for tasty walnut slivers.

10h

Do Parrots Know Economics? Kind Of.

A test of four different species shows they can accurately assign value to food and tokens, swapping lower value items for higher value food.

10h

Finding Nemo's genes

An international team of researchers has mapped Nemo's genome, providing the research community with an invaluable resource to decode the response of fish to environmental changes, including climate change.

10h

Lasker Awards Given for Work in Genetics, Anesthesia and Promoting Women in Science

The coveted prize was awarded to a Scottish veterinarian, two scientists who championed an overlooked protein and a pioneering researcher who helped advance the careers of other women.

11h

I morgen er det skæbnedag for EU’s kontroversielle copyright-reform

5. juni nedstemte EU-Parlamentet forslaget til ophavsretsreformen, som indeholder de kontroversielle artikler 11 og 13. Men reformen er ikke nødvendigvis død. Onsdag stemmer EU-Parlamentet om 252 ændringsforslag.

11h

Forget the headlines – the best diet is the one that works for you | Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz

Do whole grains prevent diabetes? Is moderate drinking good or bad for you? Nutritional studies are more complex than you are told There’s a news cycle that we have all become attuned to. It’s what has led various publications to conclude that broccoli is both causing and preventing cancer, that chocolate is a weight-loss food and a diet killer, and that diet soft drinks, against all odds, are ca

11h

Hej Danmark: Nu taler Googles digitale assistent dansk

To år efter Google Assistant første gang blev præsenteret, kan den digitale assistent nu tale og forstå vores modersmål – ligesom Apples Siri.

11h

Scientists develop new drug treatment for TB

Scientists at The University of Manchester have developed the first non-antibiotic drug to successfully treat tuberculosis in animals.The team hope the compound -developed after 10 years of painstaking research will be trialled on humans within three to four years.

12h

Low fitness may indicate poor arterial health in adolescents

A recent Finnish study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä showed that adolescents with better aerobic fitness have more compliant arteries than their lower fit peers do. The study also suggests that a higher anaerobic threshold is linked to better arterial health. The results were published in the European Journal of Applied Physiology.

12h

Beyond deep fakes: Transforming video content into another video's style, automatically

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a way to automatically transform the content of one video into the style of another, making it possible to transfer the facial expressions of comedian John Oliver to those of a cartoon character, or to make a daffodil bloom in much the same way a hibiscus would.

12h

Back pain is associated with mental health problems and risky behaviors in teenagers

A new study in the Journal of Public Health indicates that adolescents who experience back pain more frequently are also more likely to smoke cigarettes, drink alcohol, and report problems like anxiety and depression.

12h

Widely used youth behavior treatment may be ineffective — study

A long-established treatment used around the world to help troubled young people and their families tackle behavioral problems may not be as effective as its practitioners claim — a new study reveals.

12h

British vet wins top research award for breakthrough anaesthetic

John Glen given 2018 Lasker award for discovery of propofol, now used in 90 countries, enabling millions of surgical operations every year A British veterinarian has won America’s top biomedical research prize for his discovery of a new way to knock people out. Continue reading…

12h

Native American Tribes File Lawsuit Seeking To Invalidate Keystone XL Pipeline Permit

The Fort Belknap Indian Community and the Rosebud Sioux Tribe contend there was no effort to study how the 1,200-mile pipeline project could affect their water systems and sacred lands. (Image credit: Evan Vucci/AP)

12h

Computer model reveals effect of increased cholesterol on specific ion channel in heart

Using a computer model, researchers have revealed the effect of increased amounts of cholesterol on a specific ion channel involved in regulating potassium levels in the heart.

13h

Device to corral viable sperm may speed IVF process

For couples hoping for a baby via in vitro fertilization, chances have improved. A process that once took hours now takes minutes: scientists have created a microfluidic device that quickly corrals strong and speedy sperm viable for fertilization.

13h

God forretning: København giver træerne renset spildevand

Hovedstaden har som et forsøg vandet unge træer med genvundet vand med næringsstoffer i sommerens hedebølge, og erfaringerne er så gode, at man håber at fortsætte med det.

13h

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