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Nyheder2018september13

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Americans Aren’t Practicing Democracy Anymore

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series that attempts to answer the question: Is democracy dying? Democracy is a most unnatural act. People have no innate democratic instinct; we are not born yearning to set aside our own desires in favor of the majority’s. Democracy is, instead, an acquired habit. Like most habits, democratic behavior develops slowly over time, through constant repetitio

8min

Magnetic waves create chaos in star-forming clouds

New research by Stella Offner, assistant professor of astronomy at The University of Texas at Austin, finds that magnetic waves are an important factor driving the process of star formation within the enormous clouds that birth stars. Her research sheds light on the processes that are responsible for setting the properties of stars, which in turn affects the formation of planets orbiting them, and

2h

Ingeniører snupper oftere en lederpost end andre højtuddannede

Andelen af ingeniører med lederansvar er 30 procent større end blandt den samlede gruppe af højtuddannede, viser tal fra Danmarks Statistik. Ingeniørledere skal vogte sig for teknologifokus, advarer AAU-professor

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Magnetic bacteria and their unique superpower attract researchers

As a graduate student in the 1970s, microbiologist Richard Blakemore probably wasn't expecting to discover a new bacterial species with a never-before-seen ability. While studying bacteria that live in muddy swamps, he observed that some tended to swim reliably toward the same geographical direction. Even when he rotated the microscope, they persisted in wiggling toward one direction. After confir

4min

The next phase: Using neural networks to identify gas-phase molecules

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have begun to use neural networks to identify the structural signatures of molecular gases, potentially providing new and more accurate sensing techniques for researchers, the defense industry and drug manufacturers.

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Roscosmos and NASA chiefs discuss mysterious space leak

The Russian space agency's chief has talked to his NASA counterpart about a mysterious leak at the International Space Station.

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Cause of Mystery Mouse Disease Discovered

Lab mice suffering from inexplicable renal failure turn out to be infected with a hitherto unknown virus.

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Bio-Rad Launches CHT Ceramic Hydroxyapatite XT Media and Nuvia HP-Q Resin for Process Protein Purification

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of two new chromatography media for process protein purification: CHT Ceramic Hydroxyapatite XT Media and Nuvia HP-Q Resin.

7min

Europe Finally Calls Out its ‘Trump Before Trump’

Yesterday, the European Parliament overwhelmingly voted to approve a report detailing the threats to democracy and the rule of law in Hungary, triggering a process which could result in the suspension of Budapest’s voting rights in the European Union. This is a serious setback for Viktor Orbán, the prime minister of Hungary and the pioneer of authoritarian populism in Europe—not least because man

8min

The Future of Chicken, Without Antibiotics

For decades, farmers have used low doses of human antibiotics to fatten their chickens. In the future, if one company has its way, farmers will use a fungal extract originally found in a Japanese pigsty. Welcome to poultry farming in 2018. In the past few years, with evidence linking antibiotics on animal farms to drug resistance in humans , poultry producers ( Perdue , Tyson , etc.) and restaura

8min

Should Your Watch Monitor Your Heart?

The new Apple Watch, unveiled yesterday in Cupertino, possesses a new and startling capability: It can monitor the electrical pulses that drive the heart’s activity, and proactively alert users who it has determined might have a condition called atrial fibrillation. The FDA has voiced its approval , Apple said, and the new product goes on sale this fall. Reaction was predictably positive: Atrial

8min

The New iPhones Are Big So You Won’t Put Them Down

“Big news,” Apple’s website reads today, in text set over a photo of the new smartphone models the company just announced. Two big iPhones display what look like gaseous planets. Big ones, like Jupiter, but maybe bigger than that, even. These phones are big. Big money, for one thing—almost $1,500 for the top-of-the-line. But more than that, big screens. The biggest one boasts a 6.5-inch display.

8min

California’s Record on Climate Change Is a Stark Rebuttal to Trump

It’s just a coincidence that as another hurricane turbocharged by unusually warm waters slams into the East Coast, California Governor Jerry Brown is convening a global summit on fighting climate change on the West Coast. But it’s still revealing. On climate, Brown, a former Jesuit seminarian, has become America’s most insistent apostle for action, the antithesis to President Trump. While Trump i

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UN Secretary General: American Power Is in Decline, the World Is ‘in Pieces’

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series that attempts to answer the question: Is democracy dying? For the past two years, the secretary-general of the United Nations, Antonio Guterres, has watched as President Donald Trump upends American foreign policy, engaging in trade wars while simultaneously disengaging from international agreements and alliances. And now Guterres has reached a verd

8min

Can Science Cure Aging?

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play David Sinclair is an Australian geneticist and a professor at Harvard Medical School. He has a soft-spoken, almost tranquil tone, which has the effect of mellowing the audacity of his proclamations. Like this one: “I don't see any reason why a child born today couldn't make it to 150.” Or this: “I actually think it will

8min

Don’t Pay Attention to the Hurricane Category

On Wednesday, Hurricane Florence weakened to a Category 3 storm, and then again to a Category 2. Simultaneously, meteorologists warned that Florence looked even more dangerous than it did before. How can a storm weaken and also look more life-threatening? The answer lies in the “hurricane category” system, and how it can distort the most important information about a tropical cyclone. As a storm

8min

Bacteria in a Dinosaur Bone Reignite a Heated Debate

Around 76 million years ago, a massive herd of the horned dinosaur Centrosaurus died in what is now Alberta, Canada. While they were still alive, these creatures, like all other animals, would have had trillions of microbes living inside their bodies and on their skin. And even now, long after their demise, their remains still harbor life. Within pieces of fossilized bone from a newly uncovered C

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Andrew Cuomo Won’t Be Satisfied Unless He Trounces Cynthia Nixon

NEW YORK —If you were a Democratic primary voter in New York this summer, you would have assumed Governor Andrew Cuomo was in the fight of his political life. You would have seen the television airwaves blanketed with ads for his campaign, including an urgent, direct-to-camera plea from former Vice President Joe Biden. Your mailbox would have been inundated with glossy fliers touting the two-term

8min

Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Call to Save America

The Civil War was still young in April 1862, and the question of how to restore national unity and confront the divisive specter of slavery remained open. Since the United States’ founding nearly a century earlier, the federal government had made repeated concessions to the Southern slave power in the hopes of maintaining peace and holding the nation together. In the wake of the South’s secession

8min

The NRA’s Catch-22 for Black Men Shot by Police

The city of Dallas, Texas, has been rocked by news of an off-duty police officer shooting a black man in his own apartment. On September 6, the off-duty police officer Amber Guyger entered Botham Jean’s apartment and shot him dead. She has since claimed—after a number of shifting accounts—that she mistakenly thought she was entering her own apartment and believed it was being burglarized. Most pe

8min

Florida Felons Want Their Voting Rights Restored

This November, Florida voters will choose a new governor in one of the nation’s most contested—and consequential—races. But if they look to the bottom of the ballot, they will also be asked to decide whether the right to vote should be granted to 1.5 million former felons who live in the state. With Iowa and Kentucky, Florida is one of just three states in the nation to automatically and permanen

8min

The Emmys Don’t Get Modern TV

In July, the comedian and Saturday Night Live “Weekend Update” anchor Michael Che took to Instagram Stories with some opinions. First of all, Che explained, he hadn’t watched Nanette , Hannah Gadsby’s searing Netflix special about (among other things) the limitations of comedy as a vehicle for exploring trauma. Second, despite having not seen Nanette , Che firmly believed that it and similar show

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Where America’s Civic Reawakening Is Happening

Editor’s Note: This photo essay is part of a series that attempts to answer the question: Is democracy dying? Whatever the overall state of America’s civic health, political enthusiasms appear to be proliferating—for good and ill. Some of these enthusiasms are visible to anyone with an internet connection, but they are also showing themselves in classic demonstrations of democracy. The photos tha

8min

A House Still Divided

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series that attempts to answer the question: Is democracy dying? He stood on the outer edge of the sidewalk, hands clasped behind him—handcuffed, perhaps, by the immensity of the moment. He knew the city of Springfield, Illinois, well. But on June 16, 1858, Abraham Lincoln was learning his new place in American politics, and possibly dreading what it now d

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The Threat of Tribalism

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series that attempts to answer the question: Is democracy dying? The U.S. Constitution was and is imperfect. It took a civil war to establish that the principles enumerated in its Bill of Rights extended to all Americans, and the struggle to live up to those principles continues today. But focusing on the Constitution’s flaws can overshadow what it did ach

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America’s Slide Toward Autocracy

Editor’s Note: This article is part of a series that attempts to answer the question: Is democracy dying? Tyler Comrie Twenty-one months into the Trump presidency, how far has the country rolled down the road to autocracy ? It’s been such a distracting drive—so many crazy moments!—who can keep an eye on the odometer? Yet measuring the distance traveled is vital. As Abraham Lincoln superbly said i

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How social networks can save lives when disasters strike

Soon after my family moved to New Orleans in the summer of 2005, we heard Mayor Ray Nagin's first warnings about Hurricane Katrina. With two young children, a job I hadn't started yet, and little in the way of savings, my wife and I couldn't wrap our heads around leaving our freshly furnished home to spend money on a hotel in some distant city. So we ignored the call for evacuation.

16min

Why a weaker, Category 2 hurricane is still dangerous

Hurricane Florence was downgraded to Category 2 storm on Thursday, but forecasters cautioned that the mammoth storm still poses a major threat to millions of people. Here's why.

16min

NASA space lasers to reveal new depths of planet's ice loss

NASA is poised to launch Saturday its most advanced space laser ever, ICESat-2, a $1 billion dollar mission to reveal the depths of the Earth's melting ice as the climate warms.

16min

The art of storytelling: researchers explore why we relate to characters

For thousands of years, humans have relied on storytelling to engage, to share emotions and to relate personal experiences. Now, psychologists at McMaster University are exploring the mechanisms deep within the brain to better understand just what happens when we communicate.

18min

A new frame for the sky

The sky gets a new reference frame. On Aug. 30 the International Astronomical Union adopted the International Celestial Reference Frame 3 (ICRF-3) during their general assembly in Vienna, Austria. As of Jan. 1, 2019, this reference frame has global validity. It serves for example for the orientation of GPS systems as well as the navigation of space probes.

18min

Researchers managed to prevent the disappearing of quantum information

The properties of quantum mechanics can be utilized, for example, in technology and encrypting messages, but the disadvantage is the occasional disappearing of information. For the first time, a research group consisting of Finnish and Chinese scientists has found a way to fully control the information escaping the qubit.

18min

RUDN biochemists found out how ROS affect cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells

A team of sciences from RUDN Institute of Medicine found out how reactive oxygen species affect the resistance of ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy on the example of cisplatin — an antitumor drug used to treat this type of malignant growth. Practical application of the research results would help improve medical treatment schemes for cancer patients. The article of the scientists was published

18min

Hemidystrophic thorax mimicking scoliosis

Pectus excavatum, pectus carinatum, Poland syndrome, sunken chest deformity, barrel chest deformity, body builder deformity, and long upper chest wall are chest wall deformities that are documented in the medical literature.

18min

Disrupting genetic processes reverses aging in human cells

Research has shed new light on genetic processes that may one day lead to the development of therapies that can slow, or even reverse, how our cells age.

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Clinical early warning scores: New clinical tools in evolution

Doctors and nurses are always grateful when they are given advance notice that a patient is about to seriously deteriorate (or 'crash,' to use today's clinical vernacular). Recent years have seen important advances towards this goal in the form of what are known as 'Clinical Early Warning Scores.'

18min

Open insulin, 'DIY bio' and the future of pharma

The development, manufacture and sale of pharmaceutical drugs in the United States is a complex landscape of intellectual property and federal regulation. The status quo of the US pharmaceutical market may soon be turned on its head. That's due in part to a growing community of do-it-yourself 'biohackers' who are disrupting business-as-usual for pharmaceutical discovery, development and distributi

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How I'm using LEGO to teach Arabic | Ghada Wali

After a visit to a European library in search of Arabic and Middle Eastern texts turned up only titles about fear, terrorism and destruction, Ghada Wali resolved to represent her culture in a fun, accessible way. The result: a colorful, engaging project that uses LEGO to teach Arabic script, harnessing the power of graphic design to create connection and positive change. "Effective communication a

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If a pill could replace exercise's benefits, would it be worth it?

For sufferers of Alzheimer's, the answer is yes. But replacing movement with a pill is not the best option. Read More

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Hurricanes can cause enormous damage inland, but emergency plans focus on coasts

As Hurricane Florence approaches the U.S. coast, over a million people have been ordered to evacuate from barrier islands and low-lying areas from South Carolina to Virginia. Precautions like this have been part of common hurricane preparations since the 1950s.

22min

New devices based on rust could reduce excess heat in computers

Scientists have succeeded in observing the first long-distance transfer of information in a magnetic group of materials known as antiferromagnets. These materials make it possible to achieve computing speeds much faster than existing devices. Conventional devices using current technologies have the unwelcome side effect of getting hot and being limited in speed. This is slowing down the progress o

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Just one tiny piece of plastic may be enough to kill a baby turtle

Post-mortems show that some sea turtles die from eating just one fragment of plastic – and it’s post-hatchlings that seem to be particularly vulnerable

22min

New Scientist Live: what will gravitational waves tell us next?

Gravitational waves are constantly stretching and squeezing everything in the universe. Find out what they’re telling us about the cosmos at New Scientist Live

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'The Dinosaur Artist' Dusts Off The Debate Over Who Should Own Fossils

Author Paige Williams brings the discussion to life by recounting the exploits of commercial fossil hunter Eric Prokopi, highlighting one find — a 24-ft.-long Tarbosaurus fossil, the book's star. (Image credit: NPR)

25min

Heads up: no-deal Brexit would mean less warning of space debris

Briefing paper notes UK would no longer be part of EU space tracking programme One decidedly unexpected effect of a no-deal Brexit would be the UK potentially getting less warning about space debris plummeting towards Earth. The warning comes in a briefing paper on space and satellites, which notes the UK’s involvement in the EU Space Surveillance and Tracking (EUSST) programme. Set up in 2014, t

28min

Researchers prevent the disappearance of quantum information

The properties of quantum mechanics could be used in technology and encrypting messages, but the disadvantage is the occasional disappearance of information. For the first time, a research group consisting of Finnish and Chinese scientists has found a way to fully control the information escaping the qubit.

34min

Out of control means off the menu

Fishing pressure on threatened shark populations has increased dramatically in recent years and it is urgent that consumers reject shark fin products altogether—a study in Marine Policy by researchers from the Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS), School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU), the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and WildAid

34min

Open insulin, 'DIY bio' and the future of pharma

The development, manufacture and sale of pharmaceutical drugs in the United States is a complex landscape involving intellectual property and strict federal regulations.

34min

Thousands of objects discovered in Scandinavia's first Viking city

If you want to know anything about the Viking Age, Ribe, in west Denmark, is the place to go.

34min

Study sheds light on why the US and China don't see eye-to-eye on e-commerce

The U.S. and China take contrasting approaches to digital trade, according to new research published in the Journal of International Economic Law. By acknowledging and understanding the different stance each country takes, policy makers may find ways to bring down trade barriers, says Associate Professor Henry Gao of the Singapore Management University School of Law, who led the first-ever compara

34min

New knowledge on the condition of cull sows prior to transportation to the abattoir

About half of Danish sows are culled and destined for slaughter each year—approximately 500,000 animals—and are sent on their last journey to the abattoir. So far, this group of animals has received almost no scientific attention. Recently, researchers from Aarhus University carried out one of the first studies of the clinical condition of cull sows on the day of transportation to slaughter, and t

34min

New devices based on rust could reduce excess heat in computers

Scientists have succeeded in observing the first long-distance transfer of information in a magnetic group of materials known as antiferromagnets.

40min

Enhanced 3D imaging poised to advance treatments for brain diseases

Researchers have developed a combination of commercially available hardware and open-source software, named PySight, which improves rapid 2D and 3D imaging of the brain and other tissues.

40min

40min

Climate-induced soil changes may cause more erosion and flash flooding

The earth beneath our feet isn't usually the first thing that comes to mind when people think about the impacts of climate change. However, a study by a UC Riverside-led team of researchers predicts a climate-induced reduction in large soil pores, which may intensify the water cycle and contribute to more flash flooding and soil erosion by the end of the 21st century.

40min

Cladding tests show moisture may have sped up Grenfell flames

Tests on aluminium cladding panels, of the type used on the Grenfell Tower, have shown that the presence of water may cause violent chemical reactions and accelerate flames.

46min

A new dimension for batteries

Engineers at the University of Maryland have created a thin battery, made of a few million carefully constructed "microbatteries" in a square inch. Each microbattery is shaped like a very tall, round room, providing much surface area – like wall space – on which nano-thin battery layers are assembled. The thin layers together with large surface area produces very high power along with high energy.

46min

International Vertebrate Genomes Project releases first 15 high-quality reference genomes

The Genome 10K (G10K) announces the official launch of a new project, the international Vertebrate Genomes Project (VGP), and its first release of 15 new, high-quality reference genomes for 14 species representing all five vertebrate classes—mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes. The mission of the VGP is to provide high-quality, near error-free, and complete genome assemblies of all 66

46min

Regeringen: Vi vil gå efter en helt grøn transportsektor

Minister lover ambitiøst klimaudspil i efteråret med fokus på grøn transport og trækker i land på en tidligere afvisning af at lette afgifterne på elbiler til en start. Det fremgik af et åbent samråd torsdag.

47min

Older adults face serious risks during hurricanes

Natural disasters are often particularly hard on vulnerable members of the community and hurricanes are no exception. David Dosa, a faculty member at the School of Public Health at Brown University, studies the impact of hurricanes on residents of nursing homes and assisted living facilities in particular. With Hurricane Florence bearing down on the Southeast coast and the potential for major dis

48min

Heat-related deaths likely to increase significantly as global temperatures rise, warn researchers

The world needs to keep global temperatures in check by meeting the goals set out in the Paris Agreement, or more people could die because of extreme temperatures, say authors of a new study in the letters section of Springer's journal Climatic Change.

53min

Emotionally stable people spend more during the holidays, according to new study

Christmas holidays offer a time for families to get together, but for retailers, holiday sales can represent up to 20% of annual revenue. How consumers spend money during this time period is of interest for retailers as well as for individuals who are looking to better understand and control their spending habits. New research suggests more emotionally stable people spend more during the holiday s

53min

Uncovering the birthplaces of stars in the Milky Way

An international team of scientists led by Ivan Minchev of the Leibniz Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP) has found a way to recover the birth places of stars in our Galaxy. This is one of the major goals in the field of Galactic Archaeology, whose aim is to reconstruct the formation history of the Milky Way.

53min

Study shows racial stereotyping toward young children

New research from The Australian National University (ANU), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and the University of Michigan have documented young children and youth of colour in the US face significant racial stereotyping from adults who work with them.

53min

Earth's health could benefit from space solar power, self-sustaining farms and your diet

What will it take to save this blue marble we call Earth?

53min

400 years of genetic records cast new light on the parents of heritage apple varieties

The humble apple may well be one of the most written about and important fruits in modern history, contributing to everything from the fabled discovery of the gravitational pull of the Earth, to its mythological status as a forbidden or magical fruit.

58min

Testosterone replacement therapy may slow the progression of COPD

GALVESTON, Texas — Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that testosterone replacement therapy may slow disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The paper is currently available in Chronic Respiratory Disease.

1h

Study sheds light on why the US and China don't see eye-to-eye on e-commerce

New research from Singapore Management University has found that the US is more concerned with digital barriers like internet censorship and cross-border data flow, while China cares more about traditional trade barriers like tariffs.

1h

Database shines a bright light on Washington lobbying

Follow the money. It's a famous phrase from the Watergate era, but it applies to everyday life in modern Washington as well. That advice just got easier for everyone to carry out, thanks to the launch of LobbyView.org, a new public database created by MIT political scientist In Song Kim.

1h

Enhanced 3-D imaging poised to advance treatments for brain diseases

Researchers have developed a combination of commercially available hardware and open-source software, named PySight, which improves rapid 2-D and 3-D imaging of the brain and other tissues. By seamlessly enabling integration of the fastest 3-D imaging solution available today, the advance in microscopy could help scientists to better understand brain dynamics and discover new treatments for health

1h

Booming electric car sales drive lithium rush in Portugal

Mining firms are racing to open new lithium mines in Portugal, already Europe's biggest producer of the commodity, thanks to the surge in popularity of electric vehicles powered by lithium-ion batteries.

1h

Study shows adult kids who get parental cash aren't happier or healthier

Adult children who have access to the 'bank of mum and dad' do not exhibit better health and wellbeing than those who do not receive financial support from their parents, new research led by Curtin University has found.

1h

How to record a phone call

DIY Log video and audio conversations on any device. When you call a friend, you might use FaceTime, Skype, or a variety of other apps. Here's how to save those audio and video conversations.

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Franck Marchis is connecting amateur astronomers to extraterrestrial researchers

Space Seeing color in a nebula from a garden in San Francisco? That's pretty cool.' Marchis has spent his career getting clear pictures of comets, Uranus, and Neptune. Still, he says, "Seeing color in a nebula from a garden in San Francisco? That's…

1h

Hospitalsansatte udvandrer fra møde i protest over direktørafskedigelser

Hospitalsmedarbejdere er utrygge ved Region Midtjyllands ledelsesstil efter to hospitalsdirektørers afskedigelser.

1h

Qualcomm to repurchase $16 billion of its shares from banks

Qualcomm is buying back $16 billion of its own stock as part of a broader goal of repurchasing up to $30 billion of its shares.

1h

New defence against 'superbug' infections

Tiny implanted 3-D printed scaffolds infused with antibiotics could revolutionise the way doctors prevent deadly 'superbug' infections post-surgery, saving lives and long hospital stays.

1h

Research team pioneers faster, cheaper and greener way to produce amino acids from plant-based waste

An international team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Yan Ning, who is from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the National University of Singapore (NUS), has developed a new sustainable chemical approach to produce a series of amino acids from woody biomass derivatives. The work is a collaboration with Professor Wang Ye's research group at Xiamen University, alon

1h

Why driverless vehicles should not be given unchecked access to our cities

Autonomous, or driverless, vehicles can support and promote active travel, such as walking and cycling, when two basic conditions are met:

1h

København får hotel i træ: 208 værelser skal være klar på tre måneder

I Københavns Sydhavn bliver det ene massivtræsmodul efter det andet hejst på plads i disse dage. Råhuset til det fem etager høje Moxy Hotel skal være klar om kun tre måneder.

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Out of control means off the menu

Fishing pressure on threatened shark populations has increased dramatically in recent years and it is urgent that consumers reject shark fin products altogether — a study in Marine Policy by researchers from the Swire Institute of Marine Science (SWIMS), School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU), the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and WildA

1h

Russian and German physicists developed a mathematical model of trapped atoms and ions

Physicists from RUDN, JINR (Dubna), and the University of Hamburg (Germany) developed a mathematical model for describing physical processes in hybrid systems that consists of atoms and ions cooled down to temperatures close to absolute zero. Such systems might be used in the quantum computer — a device with exceptional calculation speed. The results of the study were presented at the 22nd Intern

1h

New means to fight 'un-killable' bacteria in healthcare settings

Scientists at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in Montreal have identified new means of fighting drug-tolerant bacteria, a growing global threat as menacing as drug-resistant microbes. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to tolerance, a strategy that makes bacteria 'indifferent' to antibiotics and almost 'un-killable,' which results in chronic infect

1h

Computer avatars play a part in dementia detection

A joint group of researchers from Osaka University and Nara Institute of Science and Technology demonstrated that it was possible to detect dementia from conversations in human-agent interaction. This technique has been realized through machine-learning: a machine learns characteristics of sounds of elderly people who answered easy questions from avatars on a computer.

1h

Otago researchers find answers as to why some people are at risk of gout

University of Otago researchers have helped characterize a genetic variant that enables new understanding of why some people are at risk of gout, a painful and debilitating arthritic disease.

1h

GM recalls over 1M pickups, SUVs for power steering problem

General Motors is recalling more than a million big pickup trucks and SUVs in the U.S. because of power-assisted steering problems that have been cited in a number of accidents.

1h

What is energy security, and how has it changed?

The idea of energy security has been at the centre of much policy debate recently. The federal government defines energy security as the adequate supply of energy across the electricity, gas and liquid fuel sectors.

1h

Pigments in butterfly wings lead scientists to colorful conclusions

A study of the pigment molecules that give color to the wings of butterflies, led by two City College of New York professors and two former students, was published in the science journal PLOS ONE.

1h

Biochemists discover how reactive oxygen species affect cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells

A team of sciences from the RUDN Institute of Medicine has reported how reactive oxygen species (ROSs) affect the resistance of ovarian cancer cells to chemotherapy on the example of cisplatin—an antitumor drug used to treat this type of malignant growth. Practical application of the research results would help improve medical treatment schemes for cancer patients. The article was published in the

1h

New knowledge on the condition of cull sows prior to transportation to the abattoir

Researchers from Aarhus University are among the first to study the condition of cull sows on the day of transportation to slaughter.

1h

One in three college freshmen worldwide reports mental health disorder

As if college were not difficult enough, more than one-third of first-year university students in eight industrialized countries around the globe report symptoms consistent with a diagnosable mental health disorder, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

1h

With STDs at an all-time high, why aren't more people getting a proven treatment?

Nearly 2.3 million times last year, Americans learned they had a sexually transmitted disease. But despite these record-high infection rates for chlamydia and gonorrhea, most patients only receive treatment for their own infection — when they probably could get antibiotics or a prescription for their partner at the same time. A team of physicians looks at the barriers that stand in the way of get

1h

For women with genetic risk, twice-a-year MRI beats mammograms

Getting magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans twice a year instead of one annual mammogram is far more effective at detecting early breast cancers in young women with a high-risk genetic profile than mammograms alone, according to a research team based at the University of Chicago Medicine and the University of Washington, Seattle.

1h

Climate-induced soil changes may cause more erosion and flash flooding

The Earth beneath our feet isn't usually the first thing that comes to mind when people think about the impacts of climate change. However, a study by a UC Riverside-led team of researchers predicts a climate-induced reduction in large soil pores, which may intensify the water cycle and contribute to more flash flooding and soil erosion by the end of the 21st century.

1h

Scientific institutions continue to lag behind the #TimesUp movement

Scientific and medical institutions must fundamentally reconsider how they address sexual harassment in the workplace, three national leaders in gender equity in medicine argue in a Perspective published today in The New England Journal of Medicine.

1h

Regionens topchef vil have dristige ledere

Jacob Stengaard Madsen, direktøren for Region Midtjylland, giver sin version af ledelseskomissionens anbefalinger.

1h

Potholes: How engineers are working to fill in the gaps

Potholes are a perennial problem. They are dangerous to road users, and the damage they cause to vehicles can be hugely expensive. The cost of repairing them is also vast. But still they appear, and reappear, in countless places. So why do these pesky crevices pose such a difficult challenge? And is there any light at the end of this pothole-filled tunnel?

1h

Who Invented the iPhone?

It all depends on what you mean by “invented” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Reaction buries carbon in the ocean faster than we thought

New research shows organic matter sulfurization, a process previously thought to occur over tens of thousands of years, can actually occur in a matter of hours or days. This change in timescales may have sizable implications for how scientists understand the past and future of the Earth’s climate. About 94 million years ago, something happened that led to an unusually high amount of organic mater

1h

Waste plastic in concrete could support sustainable construction in India

Research at the University of Bath has shown waste plastic to be a viable partial replacement for sand in structural concrete, providing one possible solution for future sustainable construction whilst addressing sand shortages in India.

1h

Yes, AI may take some jobs – but it could also mean more men doing care work

It's now generally accepted that as artificial intelligence (AI) advances into fields of work that were formerly considered skilled labour, a huge number of manual and white collar jobs are likely to disappear.

1h

Nintendo Labo Review: Which Kit is Best? (Vehicle, Variety, Robot)Nintendo Switch SSB

We review every Nintendo Labo kit for Switch: the Vehicle Kit, Variety Kit, and Robot Kit. Which should you buy?

1h

'The Americans' Deserves an Emmy For Its Look Inside Putin's Mind

For five seasons, the spy drama gave American viewers a grasp of Soviet thinking—one that's shockingly relevant today.

1h

Wild Icelandic Landscapes As You've Never Seen Them

Charlotta Hauksdóttir developed her own visual vocabulary to represent the natural beauty of her native country.

1h

A Behind the Scenes Look at Rothy's New Sneaker

The company made its name on a line of footwear made of yarn spun from plastic. Today, it adds a new sneaker with a customizable fit to its offerings.

1h

South Africa uses new tech to fight vicious gun violence

As gunshots ring out in one of South Africa's most dangerous neighborhoods, a new technology detects the gun's location and immediately alerts police.

2h

High blood sugar in pregnancy ups child’s obesity risk

A pregnant woman’s high blood sugar level is linked to a significantly greater long-term risk of obesity in her child—even more than a decade later, a new study reports. The higher the woman’s blood sugar, the greater the risk of her child being obese. “The mother’s blood sugar level during pregnancy is an independent contributor to the child’s weight and risk of being obese later in childhood,”

2h

Forskere: Ny kommunal læge skal overtage patienter fra almen praksis

En ny lægefunktion – kaldet den tredje læge – skal følge op på behandlingen af ældre, multisyge patienter, når de bliver udskrevet hospitalerne. Det mener tre forskere.

2h

De skaldede hævnere rider igen

Anders Kühnau må kalde sine sheriffer til orden og hurtigt få skabt en holdbar hospitalsplan og et anstændigt klima for både chefer og menige.

2h

Nordjylland vælger samme EPJ-system som Midtjylland og Syddanmark

En ny budgetaftale for 2019 i Region Nordjylland er på plads. Forligspartierne er bl.a. blevet enige om at anskaffe det samme EPJ-system, som Region Midtjylland og Region Syddanmark allerede anvender.

2h

'Little improvement for UK gig economy workers' since major report highlighted their plight

Little has improved for gig economy workers in the UK since the release of a major European report into the platform economy a year ago, a conference on work and employment heard.

2h

Researchers develop interesting building blocks for quantum computers

Researchers at the MESA+ research institute of the University of Twente, working together with colleagues in Delft and Eindhoven, have successfully developed nanowires allowing individual electrons to be captured by a 'quantum dot' on which superconductivity can take place. This means such nanowires could play a role in the development of quantum computers. The results were published today in the

2h

Birds can learn to understand the meanings of other species’ calls

The superb fairy-wren takes advantage of the vigilance of others by teaching itself to recognise the alarm calls sent out by different species

2h

Kemikere skaber molekyle med ni knuder

Molekyler med knuder er både skønne og udfordrende at fremstille. Kemikerne har de senere år opnået store fremskridt.

2h

Climate change poses uncertain future for Indiana's aquatic habitats

Indiana's average air temperatures are expected to rise by as much as 6 degrees Fahrenheit by mid-century, warming and reducing wintertime ice cover on the state's lakes, streams, and rivers. At the same time, increases in winter and spring rainfall will likely wash more nutrients from farm fields into those water bodies, adding significant challenges to already fragile ecosystems.

2h

A way to detect likelihood of off-target cuts in CRISPR-Cas9

An international team of researchers has developed a way to detect the likelihood of making off-target cuts when using the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technique. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes the new technique and how well it worked when tested.

2h

New understanding of worm stem cells could lead to human therapies

Research from Oxford University published today in the journal Genome Research has found that a special combination of epigenetic modifications crucial to stem cell growth evolved in animals much earlier than previously appreciated. These findings imply that human stem cells, and those of simple animals such as planarian worms, have much more in common at the epigenetic level than previously thoug

2h

Sound Health: Shaping Our Children’s Lives Through Music Engagement

For the second year, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts spent a weekend exploring the connections between music, the brain, and humanity. A piece of their ongoing “Sound Health” partnership, the events at the Center this past weekend focused on how important the arts are to children’s development, both experiencing art and practicing and

2h

Bull ant venom could put the bite on pain

Venom from the giant red bull ant is helping University of Queensland scientists understand the evolution of animal toxins in work that could lead to better treatments for pain.

2h

35% of microplastics released into the world's oceans are from synthetic textiles

Each time an item of clothing is washed up to 700,000 microscopic fibres make their way into our oceans, where they are swallowed by sea life and become incorporated into the food chain, potentially ending up on our plates, according to a new report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.

2h

Researchers develop platform to help survive hurricanes, natural disasters

Just a few minutes of warning during a natural disaster can mean the difference between life and death.

2h

Modified arylomycin found to be effective against drug-resistant bacteria

A team of researchers working at Genentech with assistance from groups at RQx Pharmaceuticals and Wuxi AppTec has modified an arylomycin in a way that makes it effective against many drug-resistant bacteria. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their work and how well the new compound worked when tested under lab conditions.

2h

Emotionally stable people spend more during the holidays, according to new study

Comparing the spending habits and personality traits of over 2,100 people over the Christmas season, personality psychology researchers found significant relationships between spending amounts over the holiday season and specific personality traits.

2h

Did Usain Bolt win the space race?

Retired sprinter Usain Bolt took part in a zero gravity race as part of a champagne promotion.

2h

Ellen Trane Nørby: Klare fordele ved nationalt EPJ-system

Der vil være en række klare fordele ved at konsolidere til ét EPJ-system i Danmark, mener sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby.

2h

People living in areas of wealth disparity are more sympathetic to disability, says research

People living in areas where there is a large gap between rich and poor are more likely to be sympathetic to disability benefit claimants, research shows.

2h

Aeolus wows with first wind data

Just one week after ESA's Aeolus satellite shone a light on our atmosphere and returned a taster of what's in store, this ground-breaking mission has again exceeded all expectations by delivering its first data on wind – a truly remarkable feat so early in its life in space.

2h

Video: Staring down Hurricane Florence

"Ever stared down the gaping eye of a category 4 hurricane? It's chilling, even from space," says European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst (@Astro_Alex), who is currently living and working aboard the International Space Station as a member of the Expedition 56 crew.

2h

Scientists discover influenza protein behavior that could aid drug development

Influenza A viruses are highly adaptable, managing to infect and replicate rapidly and to spread efficiently from person to person. An outbreak has the potential to kill millions of people globally, and many scientists are racing to develop drugs that target the fundamental processes of the virus, such as its genetic replication or acid transport.

2h

The Diesel Brothers Pull Out All the Stops for Jose Cabellero

The Diesel Brothers have a long list of surprises awaiting Jose Cabellero – the subject of an angry tirade that went viral – and his family. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on

2h

Thousands of BRCA1 Genetic Variants Functionally Characterized

The researchers catalogued 3,893 variants of the gene implicated in cancer using CRISPR.

2h

An ultracompact laser has been made using nanoscale semiconductor columns

A tiny laser comprising an array of nanoscale semiconductor cylinders (see image) has been made by an all-A*STAR team. This is the first time that lasing has been achieved in non-metallic nanostructures, and it promises to lead to miniature lasers usable in a wide range of optoelectronic devices.

2h

Conservation takes one scientist to the extreme

Nexus Media News Because what happens in the most remote stretches of the planet can have a profound impact on life on Earth. For conservation scientist Joel Berger, going to the extreme is just part of a day's work.

3h

Image of the Day: Break Apart

Scientists can now view mitosis one protein (or more) at a time using a 4-D computer model.

3h

Lyft's Bid to Rule the Streets Now Includes Public Transit

Starting with Santa Monica, users can now check transit routes and times in the Lyft app—part of the ride-sharing company's strategy to move beyond cars.

3h

How to Ride a Bike at 168 MPH

Guts, legs of unobtanium, a friend with a drag racer, and a keen sense of aerodynamics are all key to Denise Mueller-Korenek's mission: setting the bike land speed record.

3h

How Can AI Help to Prepare for Floods in a Climate-Changed World?

Former FEMA chief Craig Fugate talks about sea level rise, big data, and bias — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Genetic Tweak Gave Early Humans Leg Up

A mutation in a key gene may have endowed humans with superior endurance—allowing them to compete better with other animals on the savanna. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

The physiology of impenetrable skin: Colossus of the X-men

One super-power that gains constant attention is that of impenetrability, a power possessed by superheroes like Luke Cage, Wonder Woman, Superman and Colossus. In a recent paper in Advances in Physiology Education, Barry W. Fitzgerald considers how Colossus' skin might work.

3h

Pile-ups in protein transport

Anyone who has ever tried to find a way through a crowded pedestrian zone has—literally—run into the problem: While some people choose to weave their way through the gaps, others stick to the straight and narrow, and collisions are only a matter of time. Something very similar can happen during active protein transport in cells when molecular motors with different modes of locomotion share the sam

3h

Morphological transitions of biological filaments under flow

The study of complex suspensions made of particles suspended in a simple fluid has been growing lately, with many opportunities for industry or lab-on-a-chip technology. The macroscopic flow properties of these suspensions depend on the nature of the suspended micro-particles, such as their size or flexibility, and remain poorly understood. These flow properties directly result from the microscopi

3h

Mathematicians propose first continuous self-organised criticality model

An international group of researchers (the first author is Nikita Kalinin, Higher School of Economics—Saint-Petersburg, the last author is Ernesto Lupercio, CINVESTAV, Mexico) has presented the first continuous model describing self-organised criticality. The proposed solution is simpler and more universal than the classical sandpile model. It integrates areas as remote from one another as economi

3h

Researchers uncover previously unstudied cancer enzyme

In a new study published in the scientific journal of repute Nature Communications researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered how an enzyme that plays a key role in cancer development functions. The researchers hope the new knowledge will lead to the design of more precise drugs.

3h

New ultrasonic wave phenomenon leads to improved safety for society

A research group led by Assistant Professor Yosuke Ishii at Toyohashi University of Technology has unraveled the phenomenon of a new "third ultrasonic wave" being generated when two ultrasonic waves intersect within a plate. This wave exhibits varying intensity in response to material damage and can therefore be used for nondestructively testing thin plate structures. This new technology surpasses

3h

Physicists revealed spontaneous T-symmetry breaking and exceptional points in cavity QED

Spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) is a physics phenomenon in which a symmetric system produces symmetry-violating states. Recently, extensive study shows that the parity-time symmetry breaking in open systems leads to exceptional points, promising for novel applications leasers and sensing.

3h

Climate change may drive 10 percent of amphibian species in the Atlantic rainforest to extinction

Global warming could lead to the extinction of up to 10 percent of frog and toad species endemic to Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest biome within about the next 50 years. The temperature and precipitation regimes predicted to occur between 2050 and 2070 will be lethal for species that are less well adapted to climate variation and inhabit certain areas of the Atlantic rainforest.

3h

Russian and German physicists developed a mathematical model of trapped atoms and ions

A team of physicists from RUDN, JINR (Dubna), and the University of Hamburg (Germany) developed a mathematical model for describing physical processes in hybrid systems that consists of atoms and ions cooled down to temperatures close to absolute zero. Such atom-ionic systems might serve as a basis for the elements of the quantum computer—a device operating on quantum phenomena and exceeding regul

3h

Nordkoreanske tvangsarbejdere: Forsvaret lod polsk værft bryde menneskerettigheder

Ny undersøgelse kritiserer Forsvarsministeriet for ikke at leve op til sit samfundsansvar. Kritikken bygger på, at ministeriet ikke krævede, at leverandører respekterede arbejdstager- og menneskerettigheder i forbindelse med byggeriet af inspektionsskibet Lauge Koch.

3h

Could cold water swimming help treat depression?

24-year-old who reduced her medication while swimming weekly in open water was drug-and symptom-free within four months A year ago, a 24-year-old woman with depression was given an unusual prescription by her doctor: a weekly swim in cold water. The patient, Sarah, was filmed as part of the BBC documentary series The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs , presented by Christoffer van Tulleken, a doctor and r

3h

The New ECG Apple Watch Could Do More Harm Than Good

For folks with atrial fibrillation, Apple’s new wearable could actually be useful. For everyone else, evidence suggests otherwise.

4h

'The Predator' Is One Huge Letdown

Director Shane Black's reboot is so unfun-dumb that its stupidity feels like a contagion.

4h

Hurricane Florence: Underwater Drones Help Track the Storm's Path

A new tool called a Slocum glider measures the ocean heat that fuels super-storms like Florence, filling in data gaps to help make forecasting more accurate.

4h

As Hurricane Florence Looms, Drone Pilots Prepare for Recovery

Forecasts are calling for a brutal storm, so pilots are getting ready to take to the skies—and give the recovery effort a head start.

4h

Are Science Communicators Chasing Public Attention at the Expense of Trust in Good Science?

We too often fall into the trap of relying on emotional rather than factual approaches — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

The World's Oldest Known Drawing Is a 73,000-Year-Old Hashtag

A small rock flake no larger than a house key is covered with a colossal surprise: the first known drawing ever made by a human.

4h

Photos: Oldest Known Drawing Was Made with a Red Crayon

This is what the world's oldest drawing — dated to 73,000 years ago — looks like.

4h

Boy Miraculously Survives Being Impaled with Meat Skewer Through His Head

A boy in Missouri who had a meat skewer piece his face and get stuck in his head miraculously survived the injury,.

4h

Nyt studie kortlægger effekten af almindelig diabetesmedicin

Ny forskning dokumenterer en hidtil ukendt effekt af metformin, der anvendes til behandling af type 2-diabetes. »Det er en milepæl,« siger Niels Jessen, der er forskningschef ved Steno Diabetes Center Aarhus og medforfatter på studiet.

4h

Efter cybersikkerheds-milliarder: CFCS kan blive flaskehals

EU vil styrke koordineringen mellem medlemslandenes cybersikkerhedseksperter hos myndigheder, private virksomheder og forskere. I Danmark risikerer Center for Cybersikkerhed under Forsvarets Eftertjeneste at blokere for danske bidrag til øget netværk og samarbejde. Sådan lyder det fra sikkerhedse…

4h

Brain's Dumped DNA May Lead to Stress, Depression

New research suggests genetic material from the mitochondria can trigger an immune response throughout the body — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Tiny Antarctic 'Kidnappers' Steal Sea Snails & Wear Them Like Backpacks

Shrimp-like crustaceans abduct sea snails and steal their poisonous defense.

4h

ANALYSE Pengene værd? 3 ting der skiller vandene ved de nye iPhones

Er det rimeligt, at en telefon koster op til 13.000 kroner? Er der overhovedet noget nyt under solen? Og kan det virkelig passe, at den nye ‘billige’ iPhone har en skærm som en iPhone 4?

4h

Robots ahoy! Mapping Earth's surface

Most of the planet hasn't yet been mapped properly. Autonomous vehicles are set to change all that.

4h

Dansk 3D-print skal producere F-35-dele på rekordtid

Terma og Force Technology er tæt på at kunne 3D-printe et råemne i rustfrit stål, der skal anvendes på et F-35-kampfly. Printprocessen reducerer produktionstiden fra 50 timer til ca. 5. Også besparelsen i materialer tegner lovende.

4h

EU-Kommissionen vil bruge 15 milliarder på cybersikkerhed

En stribe kompetencecentre skal samle viden og netværk om cybersikkerhed på tværs af EU's medlemslande.

4h

'Spøgelsesnet' bliver til plast-affald: Minister kræver kortlægning

Danmark ved ikke, hvor meget tabt fiskegrej der flyder rundt i dansk farvand. Det vil fiskeriminister Eva Kjer Hansen nu lave om på.

5h

Hurricane Florence Is Going to Slow Down. That’s Not Good.

The storm won’t be alone: Tropical cyclones have grown more sluggish since the mid-20th century. Here’s why that’s a bad thing.

5h

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

A record heat wave ruined crops across Europe this summer, but not all crops. Champagne growers are ecstatic over a bumper crop of grapes this year. Vintage 2018 is expected to be one of the best. (Image credit: Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images)

5h

Gov. Brown's Biggest Climate Foe Isn't Trump. It's Car-Loving Californians

Gov. Jerry Brown of California wants the state to radically cut carbon emissions. But to meet those goals, every new vehicle sold in California by 2040 will have to be a zero-emission model. (Image credit: David Zalubowski/AP)

5h

Study: Kidney stones have distinct geological histories

A geologist, a microscopist and a doctor walk into a lab and, with their colleagues, make a discovery that overturns centuries of thought about the nature and composition of kidney stones. The team's key insight, reported in the journal Scientific Reports, is that kidney stones are built up in calcium-rich layers that resemble other mineralizations in nature, such as those forming coral reefs or a

5h

One foot in the grave for pheasants that favor a side

Pheasants that more strongly favored one foot over the other die younger than those that don't, new research suggests.

5h

How bacteria play pass the parcel — and help each other evade antibiotics

Bacteria are very sneaky in their efforts to develop resistance to antibiotics. Some strains of bacteria package up the genetic instructions for how they defend themselves and cause disease, and pass this information on to neighbouring, naïve, bacteria — essentially gifting their colleagues with the defences they need to survive against our medical armoury of antibiotics. Scientists have now answ

5h

Diagnosing and treating resistant hypertension

Resistant blood pressure affects 12 percent to 15 percent of people currently being treated for high blood pressure.

5h

Video: »Vi er længst forbi de små hyggeanlæg med solceller«

Som leverandør af store solcelleparker til hele verden er European Energy nødt til at kunne teste nye teknologier og udvikle modeller til korrekt beregning af produktion og holdbarhed

5h

How bacteria play pass the parcel—and help each other evade antibiotics

Bacteria are very sneaky in their efforts to develop resistance to antibiotics. Some strains of bacteria package up the genetic instructions for how they defend themselves and cause disease, and pass this information on to neighbouring, naïve, bacteria—essentially gifting their colleagues with the defences they need to survive against our medical armoury of antibiotics.

6h

One foot in the grave for pheasants that favor a side

Pheasants that more strongly favoured one foot over the other die younger than those that don't, new research suggests.

6h

Kidney stones have distinct geological histories, study finds

A geologist, a microscopist and a doctor walk into a lab and, with their colleagues from across the nation, make a discovery that overturns centuries of thought about the nature and composition of kidney stones. The team's key insight, reported in the journal Scientific Reports, is that kidney stones are built up in calcium-rich layers that resemble other mineralizations in nature, such as those f

6h

MRI scans are horrible for kids – so I created a virtual reality app to help

From my office next door to the scanner, I heard how traumatic the procedure was. I found a solution in the latest technology As a physicist in the NHS, it’s not really my job to see patients. I am more the behind-the-scenes guy ensuring everything is safe and the machines are working. Related: 'The NHS is not just doctors and nurses': five hidden roles Continue reading…

6h

Towards a low carbon future

The world needs more energy but delivered with fewer carbon emissions. Embracing that dual challenge is the way BP thinks about every aspect of its business, says Kathrina Mannion

6h

Heat-related deaths likely to increase significantly as global temperatures rise, warn researchers

The world needs to keep global temperatures in check by meeting the goals set out in the Paris Agreement, or more people could die because of extreme temperatures, say authors of a new study in the letters section of Springer's journal Climatic Change.

6h

Gluten may be making you tired and depressed according to a new study

Gluten might not cause gut problems in people who don’t have coeliac disease, but a study of 14 people suggests it may occasionally cause fatigue or depression

6h

Mercury pollution threatens to impair the ability of birds to migrate

Migrating birds today must contend with numerous dangers and challenges that never existed before, from twirling wind turbines and shiny glass buildings in the sky to ever-shrinking amounts of stopover habitat and scores of outdoor cats lying in wait. A report from the Connecticut-based Great Hollow Nature Preserve & Ecological Research Center is now warning of a new, invisible threat to bird migr

6h

In first, US capital may employ levee against Hurricane Florence

It is an unremarkable wall a stone's throw from the White House, barely noticed by tourists and locals alike. Yet officials hope this updated but never-used levee system will protect downtown Washington from the wrath of Hurricane Florence.

7h

The Apple Watch is inching toward becoming a medical device

Apple is trying to turn its smartwatch from a niche gadget into a lifeline to better health by slowly evolving it into a medical device.

7h

Earliest known drawing found on rock in South African cave

Researchers believe the pattern on the fragment of rock is 73,000 years old, but are perplexed as to what it might represent It lacks the grace of Leonardo and has none of the warmth of Rubens, but the criss-crossed pattern on the chunk of rock is remarkable all the same. According to researchers who unearthed the piece, it is the earliest known drawing in the world. Archaeologists found the mark

7h

Cancer will kill 9.6m people this year, experts predict

International Agency for Research on Cancer says a third of new cases are likely to be caused by smoking and obesity One in five men and one in six women around the world develop cancer during their lifetime, according to the latest figures from the from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) . One in eight men and one in 11 women die from the disease. The rising toll of cancer is

7h

Freeze eggs before 35 for a better chance of IVF success, says report

Age at time of freezing is key to whether fertility treatment will succeed, says UK regulator For women intending to undergo IVF treatment using frozen eggs, the younger they are when they are frozen the greater the chance of a successful pregnancy, according to a report by the UK’s independent fertility regulator. Most IVF treatment cycles use fresh eggs, but a very small number use eggs that ha

7h

Junior investigators successfully compete for extra NIH grants

More than half of early-career scientists who received their first research project (R01) grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are successful in obtaining subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to a study published September 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Haggerty and Matthew Fenton of NIAID, an NIH in

7h

Nuns get hands dirty, and wet, to save Mexico salamander

Rolling up the sleeves of her immaculate white habit, Sister Ofelia Morales Francisco plunges her hands into an aquarium, grabs a large, slimy salamander and lifts it dripping into the air.

8h

Typhoon Mangkhut bears down on millions in Philippines

A super typhoon roared toward the Philippines on Thursday, packing fierce winds and heavy rains that are expected to strike the disaster-prone nation at the weekend before moving on to China.

8h

Whale meet nations in flare up over Brazil project

Supporters and opponents of whale hunting were at loggerheads late Wednesday at a meeting of the 89-nation International Whaling Commission (IWC) in Brazil.

8h

Another Tesla executive heads for exit

Tesla confirmed on Wednesday that finance executive Justin McAnear is leaving the electric car maker as it strives to become profitable by the end of the year.

8h

Storm to be 'exceptionally bad news' if it hovers offshore

Oddly, the closer Hurricane Florence gets to land the murkier its future gets.

8h

Elephant birds: Who killed the largest birds that ever lived?

Scientists are a step closer to explaining a 10,000-year-old crime mystery on the island of Madagascar.

8h

Her vil Google bygge 95.000 m2 ny datadrevet bydel

Google vil bygge en ny smart city-bydel i Toronto for 320 millioner kroner, hvor sensorer opsamler data overalt i byen

9h

Blog: Manglende fagkundskaber giver it-leverandører for frit spil i det offentlige

IT er kritisk for næsten alle dele af samfundet, men der stilles næsten ingen krav til indkøb, eller udvikling, af nye systemer, lyder det i blog.

9h

Ekstraordinær varme presser tropisk orkan længere nordpå end nogensinde før

Aldrig har en så kraftig orkan ramt så langt nordpå, siger klimaforsker om orkanen Florence, der fredag rammer det nordøstlige USA.

10h

Integrative Medicine finally admits it’s attracting bad apples

Integrative medicine proponents finally acknowledge their field is attracting bad apples but fail to identify the real source of their problem: It's rejection of science-based medicine, not lack of training in integrative medicine.

10h

Scientific publishing is a rip-off. We fund the research – it should be free | George Monbiot

Those who take on the global industry that traps research behind paywalls are heroes, not thieves Never underestimate the power of one determined person. What Carole Cadwalladr has done to Facebook and big data , and Edward Snowden has done to the state security complex , the young Kazakhstani scientist Alexandra Elbakyan has done to the multibillion-dollar industry that traps knowledge behind pa

10h

Scientists use bear saliva to rapidly test for antibiotics

If you're looking into the mouth of a brown bear, which is among the world's top predators, your chances of survival probably aren't good. But a team of Rutgers and other scientists has discovered a technology that rapidly assesses potentially lifesaving antibiotics by using bacteria in saliva from an East Siberian brown bear.

10h

Obesity alters airway muscle function, increases asthma risk

New research suggests that obesity changes how airway muscles function, increasing the risk of developing asthma. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology–Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

10h

Junior investigators successfully compete for extra NIH grants

More than half of early-career scientists who received their first research project (R01) grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are successful in obtaining subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to a study published September 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Haggerty and Matthew Fenton of NIAID, an NIH in

10h

A potential new way to treat some of the most common blinding diseases

Many eye diseases exhibit increased permeability of blood vessels in the macular portion of the retina leading to abnormal fluid accumulation and vision loss. Therapies targeting a specific cytokine, VEGF, have transformed clinical care; however, not all patients respond well. A new report in The American Journal of Pathology shows that inhibiting a specific signaling molecule, atypical protein ki

10h

The irresistible CCL17

The chemotactic protein CCL17 attracts immune cells to where they are currently needed. Doctors have long known: A high level of this substance in the body indicates an allergic reaction. A team of scientists led by the University of Bonn has now discovered a completely new function: CCL17 also influences signal transmission in the brain. There may even be a molecular link to autism. The results h

10h

ACA expansion did not improve access to complex surgeries for low-income/minority patients

Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act does not appear to have reduced disparities in the use of regionalized surgical care among vulnerable persons.

10h

Ingen kender effekten af intelligent trafikstyring for 162 millioner

Transportministeriet betegner trafiktavlerne som en dårlig forretning.

11h

Mental health tech start-up NeuroFlow raises $1.2M

NeuroFlow, the Philadelphia start-up trying to foster more engagement between therapists and their patients through technology, has raised another $1.2 million with expectations that total subscription will soon reach $1.5 million, the company announced recently.

12h

Hurricane Florence: Your Forecasting and Climate Questions Answered

How should we make sense of the different forecasting models? Why is the storm so unpredictable? And, how bad will it be?

13h

Nyt studie skaber tvivl om værdien af brystkræftscreening

Det er bedre behandling – ikke screening, som er skyld i, at færre dør af brystkræft, konkluderer forskere i et nyt studie.

13h

Holy Space Rocks! The Vatican Is Hosting Its First Meteorite Convention

Meteorites are key features of many natural history museum collections, but there's never been an international conference dedicated to taking care of these rocks that fall to Earth from space.

14h

A mere drop of blood makes skin cells line up

A team of researchers performed experiments on blood-deprived cells that were subsequently exposed to blood serum. Remarkably, all the cells started to move and grow in the same direction as soon as the blood serum was added.

14h

Climate change may drive 10 percent of amphibian species in the Atlantic Rainforest to extinction

Climate conditions forecast for 2050 and 2070 will be potentially lethal to species less adapted to climate variation, according to Brazilian researchers.

14h

New high-capacity sodium-ion could replace lithium in rechargeable batteries

Scientists are paving the way to swap the lithium in lithium-ion batteries with sodium, according to newly published research.

14h

Toward an 'ultra-personalized' therapy for melanoma

With new immunotherapy treatments for melanoma, recovery rates have risen dramatically, in some cases to around 50 percent. But they could be much higher: A new study shows, in lab dishes and animal studies, that a highly personalized approach could help the immune cells improve their abilities to recognize the cancer and kill it.

14h

New tool screens online health ads for deception

Experts have devised a simple screening tool to evaluate if the products popping up on your newsfeed are likely to be scams.

14h

Healthcare cuts 'strongly linked' to the resurgence of measles in Italy

Studies show that primary reason for the measles outbreak, affecting several European countries, is the decline in vaccination coverage, for which mainly the 'spread of anti-scientific theories' can be blamed. However, a new study shows that cuts in public health expenditure also play an important role, with measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccination coverage decreasing 0.5 percentage points for ea

14h

New ultrasonic wave phenomenon leads to improved safety for society

Researchers have unraveled the phenomenon of a new 'third ultrasonic wave' being generated when two ultrasonic waves intersect within a plate.

14h

'Football vision' as important as ball skills, experts reveal

Learning to read the game is as important to young footballers as kicking a ball. A new study, which highlighted Frank Lampard and Steven Gerrard as stars who incorporated the technique into their gameplay, calls on coaches to spend more time training young players to scan the field and less on ball skills.

14h

Bacteriophages can affect melioidosis disease acquisition

An international team has developed a mathematical model for monitoring and controlling the spread of melioidosis in Southeast Asia.

14h

Half of Facebook users say they don't understand how news feed works

Your relationship with Facebook could be, well, complicated.

15h

How designers cope with ever-changing iPhone screens

Technology Your digital life would fall apart without this grid. Responsive design allows apps and websites to render properly, no matter what size screen Apple or Android dream up next.

15h

Mini video cameras offer peek at hard-to-observe bird behavior

Scientists know little about fledging behavior — when and why baby birds leave the nest. Now researchers have deployed miniature video cameras to monitor over 200 grassland bird nests, and they found that fledglings' decision-making process is more complex than anyone guessed.

15h

Mitochondria come together to kill cancer cells

Targeting a pathway that controls the movement of mitochondria, the powerhouses of all cells, could reduce cancer invasiveness and resistance to radiotherapy, according to new research.

15h

Europe's renewable energy directive poised to harm global forests, experts argue

Europe's decision to promote the use of wood as a 'renewable fuel' will likely greatly increase Europe's greenhouse gas emissions and cause severe harm to the world's forests, according to a new paper.

15h

End of Colombia conflict may bring new threats to ecosystems

The end of a 52-year internal conflict could spell trouble for the second most biodiverse country in the world. A new study outlines a sustainable path forward.

15h

Caffeine consumption may extend life expectancy for people with kidney disease

A new study indicates that consuming more caffeine may help reduce the risk of death for people with chronic kidney disease.

15h

Elevated blood pressure is linked to increased risk of aortic valve disease

People who have long-term raised blood pressure have an increased risk of aortic valve disease. In a study of 5.4 million adults in the UK, published in the European Heart Journal, researchers found that above a systolic blood pressure of 115 mmHg, every additional 20 mmHg was associated with a 41 percent higher risk of aortic stenosis (AS) and a 38 percent higher risk of aortic regurgitation (AR)

15h

Recalled blood pressure drugs not linked to increased short term cancer risk

Products containing the withdrawn blood pressure drug valsartan are not associated with a markedly increased short term risk of cancer, finds an expedited analysis published by The BMJ today.

15h

High dose folic acid does not prevent pre-eclampsia in high risk women

Taking high dose folic acid supplements in later pregnancy (beyond the first trimester) does not prevent pre-eclampsia in women at high risk for this condition, finds a randomized controlled trial published by The BMJ today.

15h

Half of European clinical trials have not complied with EU rules on reporting results

Half of clinical trials on the EU register have not reported results, despite rules requiring results to be posted within 12 months of completion, finds a study published by The BMJ today.

15h

Is cancer fundraising fuelling quackery?

Figures published by The BMJ today show how crowdfunding for alternative therapies for patients with terminal cancer has soared in recent years. But there are fears that huge sums are being raised for treatments that are not backed by evidence and which, in some cases, may even do then harm.

15h

Apple's Fall Event: All the New Products

Well, really just phones and a watch—but upgrades and improvements abound.

15h

Horizon's experiments get supersized to bring in new audiences

BBC Two’s science show says in age of Netflix and Amazon it should not be taken for granted The BBC has “supersized the scale” of the experiments in its veteran science show Horizon to help attract new audiences to the programme, which is in danger of being “taken for granted”. Thought to be television’s longest-running strand, the 54-year-old Horizon is experiencing a new dawn with “the scaling

15h

A model to predict and quantify racism, sexism, and other unequal treatment

A new paper cuts to the heart of messy social interactions with a set of computational models to quantify and predict unequal treatment.

15h

New bacterial strain named after Cornish discovery

A new bacterial strain will be named after Cornwall following its identification from a skin infection.

15h

Industry-certified masks offer better protection from volcanic ash exposure

A new study finds that industry-certified particle masks are most effective at protecting people from volcanic ash, while commonly used surgical masks offer less protection.

15h

Unexpected link between immune cells and male-female differences

Researchers have made a surprising discovery: during fetal development, a particular immune cell seems to play a key role in determining the male or female characteristics of the brain.

15h

Magnetization in small components can now be filmed in the laboratory

Scientists have refined an electron microscope-based technique that makes it possible not only to capture static images of these components but also to film the high-speed switching processes.

15h

New genome editing method avoids cellular ‘trash disposal’

A new method of in-cell genome editing avoids the problems with current methods, including problems the cells themselves pose. “Human cells don’t like to take in stuff,” explains Norbert Reich, a professor in the chemistry and biochemistry department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The human cell has evolved a “trash disposal” mechanism that isolates and breaks down foreign protei

15h

Beetle adapts chemical mimicry to parasitize different bee species

A beetle that tricks bees into carrying it into their nests where it can live off their pollen, nectar and eggs adapts its deceptions to local hosts.

16h

Enzyme in milk production identified as target for novel breast cancer drugs

Researchers have identified a protein involved in milk production that stimulates the growth and spread of breast cancer and could ultimately serve as a target for novel therapies to treat breast cancer.

16h

Folding poisons: How toxins of the bacterium Clostridium difficile get into cells in the gut

Clostridium difficile can proliferate when the gut's normal microbiome is killed by antibiotics, leading to inflammation. New research shows how the microbes' poisonous proteins penetrate intestinal cells.

16h

How bad bacteria gain an edge in the gut

A new study finds that Clostridium difficile, which is responsible for the majority of antibiotic-associated diarrhea outbreaks worldwide, produces a unique compound called p-cresol to gain a competitive advantage over natural protective gut bacteria.

16h

Soon your doctor will be able to wirelessly track your health—even through walls

MIT professor Dina Katabi is building a gadget that can sit in one spot and track everything from breathing to walking, no wearables required.

16h

How machine learning and sensors are helping farmers boost yields

Software that optimizes seed selection, reduces fertilizer use, and detects early signs of disease is revolutionizing agriculture.

16h

The Lancet Neurology: Daily and weekly cycles of epileptic seizures more common than previously thought

Understanding the pattern of seizures, and how they are linked to circadian rhythms, could be important in improving management of epilepsy.

16h

Intense, recent physical activity linked to healthy metabolic profiles in adolescents

More time spent intensely active, to a greater extent than less time spent sedentary, correlates with a healthier metabolic profile in adolescence, according to a new study.

16h

Snapshots of the future: Tool learns to predict user's gaze in headcam footage

Researchers have developed a computational tool that can learn from headcam footage of complex tasks to predict where the user's future gaze will be focused. This tool combines 'visual saliency' mapping of frames of footage based on distinctive visual features with 'gaze prediction' mapping based on head movement and previous gaze direction. This tool could facilitate real-time guidance derived fr

16h

FDA Launches Crackdown on Juul, Other E-CigarettesFDA Juul Cigarettes

The agency cites risks of nicotine, particularly on young brains. “The FDA won’t tolerate a whole generation of young people becoming addicted to nicotine," Commissioner Scott Gottlieb says.

16h

The Atlantic Daily: Avowedly Enlightened

What We’re Following Democracy, Now: The America of today may not have been what the Founders envisioned or prepared for, with technology platforms inflaming online discourse and national politics stretching into unprecedented partisanship: “We are living, in short, in a Madisonian nightmare,” writes Jeffrey Rosen. Is American democracy itself in crisis ? Does Europe offer a glimpse into—and a wa

16h

If you want personalized medicine, we’ll need to know what time it is in your liver

Health This atlas maps what time it is in different parts of your body. The new atlas will help make the idea of personalized medicine built around the body clock more mainstream and improve patient outcomes.

16h

16h

Uptake is putting the world’s data to work

By applying AI to industrial data, the startup is minimizing machines’ downtime.

16h

Apple's Latest iPhones Are Packed With AI Smarts

Apple's new phones may look similar to last year's models, but they come with a powerful new A12 processor inside.

16h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Sign of the Times

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ), and Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines Forecasters expect Hurricane Florence to make landfall around the North and South Carolina border and then stall in the region , which could produce catastrophic flooding and widespread power outages. President Trump signed an executive order authorizing

16h

Childhood trauma linked to impaired social cognition later in life for patients with major psychiatric disorders

A new report has identified a significant association between childhood adversity and impaired social cognitive functioning among adults diagnosed with major psychiatric disorders.

16h

A reliable cryptocurrency needs good governance, say researchers

Participants in cryptocurrency networks like Bitcoin need to be better at preempting beneficial software changes. This will ensure the security and privacy of addresses and transactions, and help retain the value of cryptocurrencies, according to a new study.

16h

A trick of the light

Researchers are using nanoparticles to make photodetectors better able to handle the ultraviolet radiation produced in high-energy physics experiments.

16h

New tool to detect fatty liver disease before liver damage

A new test may soon be available to predict advanced fibrosis in people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the leading cause of chronic liver disease, affecting approximately one in four people, including children, worldwide.

16h

Apple's secretive self-driving car program suffers first reported crash

The first rule in Apple's self-driving car program called "Project Titan" is you don't talk about Project Titan. But thanks to California regulations, if a company's autonomous vehicle gets in a crash on a public road in this state, the company must talk about it in a report to the DMV.

17h

Trump Time Capsule Redux: Vichy Senate Edition

Back during the 2016 campaign, I put out 152 installments of the Trump Time Capsule series, chronicling what was known about this man at just time the Republican party was deciding to accept (and then embrace) him as its nominee, and as the states of Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania were delivering him an Electoral College win. I put it that way as a reminder that if a total of under 100,000

17h

A prehistoric thirst for craft beer

Evidence suggests that stone mortars from Raqefet Cave, Israel, were used in brewing cereal-based beer millennia before the establishment of sedentary villages and cereal agriculture.

17h

Heart attack: Substitute muscle thanks to stem cells

Scientists have for the first time succeeded in generating beating cardiac muscle cells from special stem cells. They may provide a new approach for the treatment of heart attacks.

17h

Cocaine addiction traced to increase in number of orexin neurons

A new study identifies a critical role of the orexin system in the expression of an addicted state in rats.

17h

Detecting hydrogen using the extraordinary Hall effect in cobalt-palladium thin films

Researchers have conducted the first systematic study of hydrogen detection through the extraordinary Hall effect in CoPd alloy thin films. The technique could improve hydrogen's safety and efficiency as a clean energy source.

17h

3-D virtual simulation gets to the 'heart' of irregular heartbeats

In a proof of concept study, scientists have successfully performed 3-D personalized virtual simulations of the heart to accurately identify where cardiac specialists should electrically destroy cardiac tissue to stop potentially fatal irregular and rapid heartbeats in patients with scarring in the heart.

17h

Researchers Discover Ancient 'Hashtag'

The world's oldest drawing was made 73,000 years ago in a South African Cave on a rock with an ocher "crayon." (Image credit: Craig Foster)

17h

Corruption is hard to hide if you're a politician whose face is wide

A new study shows that people can separate corrupt politicians from clean ones by simply looking at portraits of the politicians.

17h

Among body shapes, pears are healthier than apples

For women, fat usually accumulates around the hips, resulting in a pear-shaped look. In men, fat tends to build up around the abdomen, creating an apple shape. According to a new mouse study, it's healthier to be a pear than an apple.

17h

Biophysics: Pile-ups in protein transport

Motor proteins in cells can move along protein filaments in ways that interfere with each other's progress. A new model shows how this can lead to gridlock, even when there is still plenty of empty space.

17h

How key cancer-related enzyme functions

In a new study, researchers have discovered how an enzyme that plays a key role in cancer development functions. The researchers hope the new knowledge will lead to the design of more precise drugs.

17h

Trump's New Executive Order Slaps a Bandaid on Election Interference Problems

Trump’s order creates a framework to sanction foreign meddling in elections, but experts say it’s not enough.

17h

Henry Cavill Flying Away Is an Opportunity for DC to Start OverHenry Cavill Superman

Superman's reported step-down is a chance for Warner Bros. to move away from the mega-franchise format.

17h

Can Science Solve a Music Industry Mystery?

Can Science Solve a Music Industry Mystery? Legal experts call upon audio forensics experts to unravel a puzzling mystery that has rocked the music industry. audio editing_cropped.jpg Image credits: PrinceOfLove/ Shutterstock Culture Wednesday, September 12, 2018 – 13:00 Jennifer Leman, Contributor (Inside Science) — From its start, the case has been a thriller. For the past four years, an aural

17h

NEJM perspective: How state attorneys general can protect public health

To protect the public from harmful products, legal action can be used against industries, one example of which — a settlement with the tobacco industry — offers useful lessons for confronting several of today's public health epidemics.

17h

Genetic testing helps predict disease recurrence in myelodysplastic syndrome

A DNA-based analysis of blood cells soon after a stem cell transplant can predict likelihood of disease recurrence in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a group of cancerous disorders characterized by dysfunctional blood cells, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Such a practice could help doctors identify patients at high risk of disease

17h

Trump’s Dubious Revisionist History of Hurricane Maria

It’s every subpar student’s daydream: What if you could fill out your own report card? President Donald Trump enjoyed that fantasy Wednesday morning with regard to last year’s federal response to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico and elsewhere: We got A Pluses for our recent hurricane work in Texas and Florida (and did an unappreciated great job in Puerto Rico, even though an inaccessible island wit

17h

World Fungi Report

A new report from the Kew Gardens in London is billed as the first comprehensive report on the state of the world's fungi.

17h

Blood and brain fluid change first in Huntington's disease

A simple blood test can detect the earliest changes caused by Huntington's disease, even before scans can pick up any signs in the brain, a new study has found.

17h

Researchers optically trap, move and analyze living cells with laser/microscope combo

A new instrument lets researchers use multiple laser beams and a microscope to trap and move cells and then analyze them in real-time with a sensitive analysis technique known as Raman spectroscopy.

17h

People Across the Globe Feeling More Sad, Stressed and in Pain Than Ever

Worldwide, people's reports of negative emotions — including sadness, worry and stress — reached a record high in 2017, according to a new survey.

17h

Requiring physical activity classes help sedentary college students be more active

Requiring physical activity classes in college encourages sedentary students to become more active, while elective classes tend to draw those who are already motivated, new research from Oregon State University has found.

18h

Musical sensor shows bad medicine plays false note

A new sensor based on a 3,000 year old African musical instrument can be used to identify substances, including a poisonous chemical sometimes mistakenly added to medicines. The mbira sensor, which can be constructed from off-the-shelf or discarded materials, could offer pharmacists and consumers in the developing world inexpensive protection from counterfeit and adulterated drugs.

18h

Rare antibodies show scientists how to neutralize the many types of Ebola

Two new studies by scientists at Scripps Research are bringing Ebola virus's weaknesses into the spotlight, showing for the first time exactly how human and mouse antibodies can bind to the virus and stop infection–not only for Ebola virus, but for other closely related pathogens as well.

18h

'Oldest known drawing' found on tiny rock in South Africa

Etched with an "ochre crayon", the 73,000 year old drawing looks a little like a modern-day hashtag.

18h

Hurricane Florence Shifts Course, Will Make a 'Grand Tour' of Southeastern States

Hurricane Florence is changing course, according to new models released today.

18h

What if needle pokes didn't hurt? Hospital implements strategies to eliminate or reduce needle pain in kids

A major US children's hospital introduced a first-of-its-kind project to eliminate or reduce pain from elective needle procedures in all infants and children, reports a study in PAIN Reports®, part of a special issue on research innovations in pediatric pain. The official open-access journal of the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), PAIN Reports is published in the Lippincott

18h

Car makers are testing a way for humans to team up with dangerous robots

If Veo Robotics is successful, human factory workers will eventually work with robots the way farmers work with horses.

18h

Apple unveils 3 new iPhones and the Apple Watch Series 4

Apple unveiled the new Apple Watch Series 4 and three new iPhones during their keynote event on Wednesday, and they are chock-full of goodies. Read More

18h

'Nightmare' Hurricane Florence Poses Far-Reaching Dangers

Hurricane Florence is on track to blast the southeastern U.S. coast with ferocious winds and rain, but it may also swamp hog manure pits and coal ash dumps, spreading their toxins; as well as inundate nuclear reactors in the region.

18h

The Science Behind Composting

Banana peels, eggshells, coffee grounds, dead leaves and more naturally decompose into nutrient-rich soil, thanks to the action of microorganisms.

18h

Chicago sudden infant death cases never make the news

While news media reporting traffic crashes and fire-related deaths of infants and children is routine and often leads to preventative measures to reduce these deaths, there is little or no news coverage of sleep-related or sudden infants deaths, which contributes to the lack of efforts to prevent these deaths, according to a Rush physician.

18h

How AI could help solve some of society’s toughest problems

Machine learning and game theory help Carnegie Mellon assistant professor Fei Fang predict attacks and protect people.

18h

'Googley' does not mean 'young,' Google claims in age-bias lawsuit

Googlers are supposed to be Googley, but what exactly that means has become a key point of contention as the tech giant seeks to gut an age-discrimination lawsuit against the company.

18h

NASA-NOAA satellite stares down Super Typhoon Mangkhut's eye

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed directly over Super Typhoon Mangkhut from space and stared down its almost 30 nautical-mile-wide eye to the waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Mangkhut is threatening the northern Philippines where is known as Ompong.

18h

The Entrenched Effects of Misconduct in the Restaurant Industry

In December 2017, The New York Times reported allegations of sexual harassment against the prominent restaurateur Ken Friedman, the proprietor of the famed West Village outpost the Spotted Pig. The report outlined, in stunning detail, a series of abusive and predatory behaviors that multiple female restaurant employees said Friedman had subjected them to: physical assaults, public groping, and fo

18h

Armstrong out at Verizon's Oath after integrating AOL, Yahoo

Tim Armstrong, head of the Verizon unit that included faded internet stars AOL and Yahoo, is leaving the company at the end of the year, the telecom and media giant announced Wednesday.

19h

Updated Apple system takes on smartphone addiction

Apple's polished iPhone line-up comes with tools to help users dial back their smartphone obsessions, amid growing concerns over "addiction" and harmful effects on children.

19h

Curbing emissions isn’t enough—we need emergency solutions for climate change

Top energy scientist Daniel Schrag says we have to adapt and innovate, because we’re already signed up for centuries of higher global temperatures.

19h

‘Encyclopedia’ sheds light on how death boosts ecosystems

Researchers have developed a new way to understand how decomposing plants and animals contribute to ecosystems. Eric Benbow, a forensic entomologist and microbial ecologist at Michigan State University who led the new research, first defined the necrobiome, the collective organisms both big and small that help plants and animals decay, in 2013. Together with his collaborators, they established a

19h

Poorest Americans most likely to have used prescription opioids

Among older Americans, the poorest are the most likely to have used prescription opioids, according to a University at Buffalo study providing new insights into unexplored contours of the opioid crisis. The study also raises important questions about access to pain management options for the disadvantaged in the current climate of the opioid epidemic.

19h

US activists launch climate change initiatives in absence of federal leadership

US states, cities and businesses forge ahead with strategies to cut carbon emissions to 24% below 2005 levels by 2025 despite Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris accord America’s governors, mayors and CEOs are forging ahead with climate change initiatives despite the Trump administration’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement and commitment to reviving the coal industry. But a report published today

19h

Enabling 'internet of photonic things' with miniature sensors

Swapping electrons for photons, researchers have developed wireless sensors which are not subject to electromagnetic interference and are smaller and generally more flexible than the currently electronics-based technology.

19h

Scott Pruitt, Former E.P.A. Chief, Is in Talks for His Next Job: Coal Consultant

Mr. Pruitt has remained largely out of the public eye since departing the Trump administration in July under a cloud of ethics investigations.

19h

Apple iPhone Event 2018: Everything Apple Announced

Meet the iPhone Xs, iPhone Xs Max, and iPhone Xr.

19h

Climate change may drive 10 percent of amphibian species in the Atlantic Rainforest to extinction

Climate conditions forecast for 2050 and 2070 will be potentially lethal to species less adapted to climate variation, according to Brazilian researchers.

19h

NASA-NOAA satellite stares down Super Typhoon Mangkhut's eye

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed directly over Super Typhoon Mangkhut from space and stared down its almost 30 nautical-mile-wide eye to the waters of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Mangkhut is threatening the northern Philippines where is known as Ompong.

19h

We may have reached Madagascar 6000 years earlier than once thought

Cut marks on giant bird bones suggest humans reached Madagascar 10,000 years ago and may have coexisted with the island’s now extinct megafauna for millennia

19h

An antioxidant might lead to new therapies for bone arthritis

An antioxidant commonly sold as a food supplement has been found to limit joint damage in mice with osteoarthritis, and may lead to new treatments for people

19h

NASA sees Tropical Storm Barijat affecting Southern China

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found that as Tropical Storm Barijat was affecting Southern China, wind shear was affecting the storm.

19h

Canada May Soon Outpace the U.S. in Refugee Admissions

If current trends hold, the United States could resettle fewer refugees in fiscal year 2018 than Canada, which has about one-tenth the population. During the first year of the Trump administration, the U.S. relinquished its role as the world’s leader in resettling refugees, accepting fewer refugees in 2017 than all other nations combined for the first time since the passage of the Refugee Act in

19h

Teens Are Protesting In-Class Presentations

For many middle – and high-school students, giving an in-class presentation was a rite of passage. Teachers would call up students, one by one, to present their work in front of the class and, though it was often nerve-racking, many people claim it helped turn them into more confident public speakers. “Coming from somebody with severe anxiety, having somebody force me to do a public presentation

19h

Photos: Preparing for Hurricane Florence

While Hurricane Florence appears to have slowed somewhat on its approach toward the southern coast of North Carolina, forecasts are now predicting patterns that may cause the storm to stall along the shoreline, possibly spinning in place for days and dropping up to three feet of rain in some areas. More than a million people are under evacuation orders across a broad swath of the East Coast, and

19h

Ancient bird bones redate human activity in Madagascar by 6,000 years

Analysis of bones, from what was once the world's largest bird, has revealed that humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought.

19h

Wild animals were routinely captured and traded in ancient Mesoamerica

New evidence from the Maya city of Copan, in Honduras, reveals that ancient Mesoamericans routinely captured and traded wild animals for symbolic and ritual purposes, according to a new study.

19h

Turtle species in serious decline: Broad ecological impacts

About 61 percent of the world's 356 turtle species are threatened or already extinct, and the decline could have ecological consequences, according to a new study.

19h

WIRED25: Welcome to Our Robot Petting Zoo

The four-day WIRED Festival features art, science, and even a pun competition. And smart conversations with technological pioneers too.

19h

Trilobites: They’re Blue, Purple and Red, and No One Has Ever Seen Them Before

Deep in the Atacama Trench off the coast of Chile, researchers discovered three new species of snailfish.

19h

Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body

A new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision. In tests, the patch performed as well as some clinical methods to measure blood pressure. Applications include real-time, continuous monitoring of blood pressure changes in patients with heart or lung d

20h

A mere drop of blood makes skin cells line up

A team of researchers from Oslo University Hospital performed experiments on blood-deprived cells that were subsequently exposed to blood serum. Remarkably, all the cells started to move and grow in the same direction as soon as the blood serum was added. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology developed a matching simulation model, revealing new insights into the mechanisms of wound h

20h

Curbing emissions isn’t enough—we need emergency solutions for climate change

Top energy scientist Daniel Schrag says we have to adapt and innovate, because we’re already signed up for centuries of higher global temperatures.

20h

Apple iPhone Xr (2018): Specs, Features, Price

The new 6.1-inch iPhone Xr sacrifices top-end material quality for cost—which seems like more than a fair bargain.

20h

Europe's New Copyright Law Could Change the Web WorldwideEU European Parliament

Critics say the law, approved by the European Parliament Wednesday, will force site operators to filter content before posting it, diminishing the experience for users.

20h

New Tree Species Discovered–and Declared Extinct

Researchers have identified a new tree species in Cameroon, but it only grew in a landscape that has now been destroyed by agriculture — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

The weirdest things we learned this week: Lady Liberty's big secret, the ultimate exercise hack, and a penis in a bottle

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

20h

Apple iPhone Xs and Xs Max: Specs, Price, Release Date

The new iPhones have more advanced chips, better cameras, and improved battery life.

20h

We may hear others' footsteps, but how do we ignore our own?

A team of scientists has uncovered the neural processes mice use to ignore their own footsteps, a discovery that offers new insights into how we learn to speak and play music.

20h

NASA sees Hawaii facing Tropical Storm Olivia

While the U.S. East Coast prepares for Hurricane Florence, the U.S. state of Hawaii is feeling the effects of Tropical Storm Olivia. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Olivia that showed wind shear was affecting it before landfall.

20h

Apple sets recall of some defective iPhone 8 devices, but there could be a catch

If you have an iPhone 8, and have been having problems with your phone, you might be able to get it replaced for free by Apple.

20h

Among body shapes, pears are healthier than apples

For women, fat usually accumulates around the hips, resulting in a pear-shaped look. In men, fat tends to build up around the abdomen, creating an apple shape. As it turns out, it's healthier to be a pear than an apple. A UC Riverside research team has found that only male mice experienced neuroinflammation after being fed a high-fat diet. While females were unaffected, males showed low testostero

20h

NASA Sees Tropical Storm Barijat affecting Southern China

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found that as Tropical Storm Barijat was affecting Southern China, wind shear was affecting the storm.

20h

Enabling 'internet of photonic things' with miniature sensors

Swapping electrons for photons, researchers in the School of Engineering & Applied Science have developed wireless sensors which are not subject to electromagnetic interference and are smaller and generally more flexible than the currently electronics-based technology.

20h

Pilot study identifies strain of bacteria as chief risk factor for stomach cancer

Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have found a specific strain of Helicobacter pylori strongly correlated with stomach cancer.

20h

Quantum-level control of an exotic topological quantum magnet

Physicists have discovered a novel quantum state of matter whose symmetry can be manipulated at will by an external magnetic field. The methods demonstrated in a series of experiments could be useful for exploring materials for next-generation nano- or quantum technologies.

20h

Discovery of the earliest drawing

The oldest known abstract drawing has been found in South Africa's Blombos Cave — on the face of a flake of siliceous rock retrieved from archaeological strata dated to 73,000 years before the present. The work is at least 30,000 years older than the earliest previously known abstract and figurative drawings.

20h

Sugar pill just might control your chronic pain

Researchers have developed a way to reliably predict which chronic pain patients will respond to a sugar placebo pill based on brain anatomy and psychological characteristics. Doctors may one day prescribe placebos that work as effectively as any painkiller for certain patients, the researchers’ new study suggests. “Their brain is already tuned to respond,” says senior study author A. Vania Apkar

20h

Passions aren't fixed. You can develop them.

A Stanford new study delves into whether passions are fixed or developed. Read More

20h

Neil deGrasse Tyson's new book explores the symbiotic relationship between science and the military

In a new book co-authored with Avis Lang, Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the morally complicated, symbiotic relationship between science and the military. Read More

20h

MAX stor: Apple klar med største iPhone nogensinde

Apple går voldsomt op i størrelse med ny 6,5 tommer skærm. Det gør prisen desværre også.

20h

Cynthia Nixon’s Bagel Order Is Part of an Absurd, Inescapable Political Tradition

On Sunday, September 9, 2018, in New York City, the state’s Democratic gubernatorial candidate and the erstwhile Sex in the City star Cynthia Nixon went to Zabar’s. She ordered a cinnamon-raisin bagel with lox, red onions, capers, tomato, and cream cheese. For most people, the story ends right there. For some New Yorkers, it is the beginning of a major issue. In fact, it seems fair to say that th

20h

Celebrated Cardiologist Bongani Mayosi Dies

The 51-year-old University of Cape Town researcher had been suffering from depression, and his death has prompted reflection on being a black academic in South Africa.

20h

Why Americans are eating less meat

Two of every three US consumers surveyed report eating less of at least one type of meat, according to new research. “Many Americans continue to have strong preferences for meat,” says Roni Neff, an assistant professor of environmental health and engineering at Johns Hopkins University. “But this survey adds to a growing body of evidence that a significant portion of the population may be purpose

20h

IWC vote backs new quotas for aboriginal whale hunts

In a rare moment Wednesday, the International Whaling Commission voted overwhelmingly to back whale hunting, but strictly for small subsistence hunts undertaken by some communities, mostly in the Arctic.

20h

Bose launches sleepbuds based on tech from EvoNexus startup

In June, Bose launched a new line of noise-canceling smart earbuds based on technology it discovered at the EvoNexus startup incubator in San Diego.

20h

Why Some People Catch a Cold and Others Don't

Whether you catch a cold this winter or make it through the season scot-free may depend in part on how many "stressors" your nose and airway passages encounter.

20h

Nano-sandwiching improves heat transfer, prevents overheating in nanoelectronics

Sandwiching two-dimensional materials used in nanoelectronic devices between their three-dimensional silicon bases and an ultrathin layer of aluminum oxide can significantly reduce the risk of component failure due to overheating, according to a new study published in the journal of Advanced Materials led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering.

20h

Researchers optically trap, move and analyze living cells with laser/microscope combo

A new instrument lets researchers use multiple laser beams and a microscope to trap and move cells and then analyze them in real-time with a sensitive analysis technique known as Raman spectroscopy. The instrument could allow scientists to learn more about how infections take hold or the formation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial biofilms.

20h

North Carolina Chose to Ignore Its Dangerous Sea Levels Years Before Hurricane Florence Hit

Six years ago, North Carolina's politicians shot down a report on its rising sea levels. Now it prepares for disaster.

20h

Where have all the turtles gone, and why does it matter?

About 61 percent of the world's 356 turtle species are threatened or already extinct, and the decline could have ecological consequences.

20h

Corruption is hard to hide if you're a politician whose face is wide

A new study shows that people can separate corrupt politicians from clean ones by simply looking at portraits of the politicians.

20h

Nano-sandwiching improves heat transfer, prevents overheating in nanoelectronics

Sandwiching two-dimensional materials used in nanoelectronic devices between their three-dimensional silicon bases and an ultrathin layer of aluminum oxide can significantly reduce the risk of component failure due to overheating, according to a new study published in the journal of Advanced Materials led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering.

20h

Keep them guessing, keep them gaming

While conventional wisdom says that people don't like uncertain gains or rewards, a study from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that uncertainty can play an important role in motivating repeat behaviors.

20h

Researchers optically trap, move and analyze living cells with laser/microscope combo

A new instrument lets researchers use multiple laser beams and a microscope to trap and move cells and then analyze them in real-time with a sensitive analysis technique known as Raman spectroscopy.

20h

Ancient bird bones redate human activity in Madagascar by 6,000 years

Analysis of bones, from what was once the world's largest bird, has revealed that humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought — according to a study published today, Sept. 12, 2018, in the journal Science Advances.

20h

An old drug finds new purpose against retinal neovascularization

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have found that the anti-malaria drug amodiaquine inhibits the apelin receptor protein, which helps drive the vascularization behind diabetic retinopathy, wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and other conditions. Because the drug has been approved to treat malaria for decades, it could move relatively quickly through th

20h

Blood and brain fluid change first in Huntington's disease

A simple blood test can detect the earliest changes caused by Huntington's disease, even before scans can pick up any signs in the brain, a new UCL-led study has found.

20h

Discovery of a cancer promoter offers pathway to overcome drug resistance

Geneticists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have discovered a previously unknown cell growth mechanism that makes a wide range of cancers resistant to rapamycin and related drugs. The finding offers the promise of new drug therapies that can overcome that resistance to treat cancers including leukemia and tumors in the brain and other organs.

20h

An effective adjuvanted intradermal flu vaccine for humans

An intradermal vaccine equipped with an immune response-boosting adjuvant protected ferrets and humans against one of the more lethal strains of pandemic flu, researchers report. Their approach represents the first adjuvanted vaccine designed for intradermal delivery, which, because it does not require immunization expertise could one day be sent through the mail for self-administration.

20h

Antioxidant defender protects against osteoarthritis

A protein involved in multiple cellular processes called ANP32A protects cartilage in the joints against degradation by damaging oxidation, preventing the development and progression of osteoarthritis, according to a new study by Frederique Cornelis and colleagues.

20h

Timing may be everything when taking meds

Using new bioinformatics tools to analyze thousands of human tissue samples, researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center created a new database of daily rhythms in human gene activity — including many genes that regulate how drugs work. Reporting in Science Translational Medicine, researchers say their results could have significant implications for a growing field of study calle

20h

Spring is advancing unevenly across North America

Spring is arriving earlier in many parts of North America, but this advance is not happening uniformly across the migration routes of many birds, according to a study by Eric Waller at the US Geological Survey in California and colleagues, publishing Sept. 12, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

20h

Wild animals were routinely captured and traded in ancient Mesoamerica

New evidence from the Maya city of Copan, in Honduras, reveals that ancient Mesoamericans routinely captured and traded wild animals for symbolic and ritual purposes, according to a study published Sept. 12, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nawa Sugiyama from George Mason University, Va., USA, and colleagues.

20h

Incognito mode: the battle for privacy in a world of face recognition

Face recognition technology has rapidly found its way into modern society, from policing to shopping. Is it too late to hold back the tide?

20h

New breast cancer gene tests will mean hard choices for many women

We are starting to learn more about how gene variants influence the risk of getting breast cancer, but deciding how to use the results raises ethical dilemmas

20h

Governor of California orders state to go carbon neutral by 2045

The governor of California has signed an executive order calling for state-wide carbon neutrality by 2045, followed by net negative emissions after that

20h

World’s first drawing is a red crayon doodle made 73,000 years ago

Early humans made red ochre crayon to draw lines on small rock 73,000 years ago. It was probably part of a larger artwork

20h

Is the rise of populism over or only just beginning?

Ten years after the financial crisis, a leading theory says the political upheavals that followed should now fade away. Is populism's bubble about to burst, asks Simon Oxenham

20h

Global warming is amplifying Hurricane Florence’s destructive power

Hurricane Florence won’t make landfall until Thursday, but we can already be sure that its destruction will be greater because of climate change

20h

It’s an outrage that Turkey is ditching Darwin from science textbooks

Evolution is being dropped from school biology texts in Turkey. In Hungary, academic freedoms are increasingly threatened. Time to worry, says Rachael Jolley

20h

Bigger, pricier iPhone shown at Apple event Wednesday

Apple unveiled three new iPhones on Wednesday, including its biggest and most expensive model yet, as the company seeks to widen the product's appeal amid slowing sales.

20h

After elephant killings, Botswana mulls lifting hunting ban

Botswana launched a review Wednesday of a 2014 hunting ban imposed to reverse a decline in elephants and other wildlife.

20h

World faces uphill climate fight as US efforts fall short

The United States will fall short on its Paris commitment to cut greenhouse gases, making the uphill battle to avoid runaway global warming that much harder, according to a report released hours ahead of a major, solutions-oriented climate summit in San Francisco.

20h

Keep them guessing, keep them gaming

Marketers everywhere are looking for what will entice consumers to make a purchase—not just once but repeatedly—and new research points to a rather surprising result.

20h

Ancient bird bones redate human activity in Madagascar by 6,000 years

Analysis of bones, from what was once the world's largest bird, has revealed that humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought—according to a study published today, 12 September 2018, in the journal Science Advances.

20h

NASA sees Paul become a remnant low pressure area

Former Tropical Storm Paul lost its strength and appeared as a swirl of clouds on infrared imagery from NASA.

20h

New research can identify extremists online, even before they post dangerous content

New research has found a way to identify extremists, such as those associated with the terrorist group ISIS, by monitoring their social media accounts, and can identify them even before they post threatening content.

20h

France to run driverless mainline trains within five years

French railway operator SNCF said Wednesday it was planning to introduce prototypes of driverless mainline trains for passengers and freight by 2023, and include them in scheduled services in subsequent years.

20h

Sea level rise doesn’t necessarily spell doom for coastal wetlands

Wetlands can survive and even thrive despite rising sea levels — if humans give them room to grow.

20h

Cross-Legged Woman's Tomb Reveals Ancient Maya Kept Jaguars in Cages

Jaguars, pumas, deer, and even crocodile bones turn up in the old Maya city of Copán. And a new paper shows they were kept captive and traded.

21h

Earlier Springs May Mean Mistimed Bird Migrations

Springtime's arriving earlier across North America. But the degree of change isn't the same everywhere, which could spell trouble for migratory birds. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

Global coastal wetlands need to move inland in fight against climate change

Up to 30 per cent of coastal wetlands could be lost globally by the year 2100 with a dramatic effect on global warming and coastal flooding, if action is not taken to protect them, new research warns.

21h

Sugar pills relieve pain for chronic pain patients

Someday doctors may prescribe sugar pills for certain chronic pain patients based on their brain anatomy and psychology. And the pills will reduce their pain as effectively as any powerful drug on the market, according to new research. Scientists have shown they can reliably predict which chronic pain patients will respond to a sugar placebo pill based on the patients' brain anatomy and psychologi

21h

Breast cancer screening does not reduce mortality

Fewer and fewer women die from breast cancer in recent years but, surprisingly, the decline is just as large in the age groups that are not screened. The decline is therefore due to better treatment and not screening for breast cancer.

21h

Butchered bird bones put humans in Madagascar 10,500 years ago

Humans reached the island near Africa 6,000 years earlier than thought, raising questions about how its megafauna went extinct.

21h

Don’t Fear the Russian Military

The headline figures for Russia’s Vostok (or “East”) military exercises, which began yesterday , are dramatic: 300,000 soldiers, 36,000 tanks and other vehicles, 80 ships, and 1,000 aircraft operating across more than half the country. That’s double the size of the British armed forces. It’s also twice the size of the last Vostok war games, held back in 2014. As if that weren’t enough, some 3,200

21h

Trump’s Latest Warning to Iran Didn’t Come Out of Nowhere

Shia militants in Baghdad are always prepared to attack U.S. facilities: They have encased pipes, which are aimed in the direction of the U.S. Embassy, in the ground near east Baghdad’s soccer pitches, Michael Knights, an expert on Iraq at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, told me. “So any time you want to rocket the U.S. Embassy, you can just go find one of these holes in the ground

21h

How Our Biological Clock Could Dictate Medical Treatments

Two new studies bring us closer to finding the optimal time, according to our internal clocks, to pop a pill—or maybe even schedule surgery.

21h

You Can Drink Champagne in Space—Yes, Really

Champagne maker Mumm is testing a piston-activated bottle on zero-G flights.

21h

Top VW shareholder faces investor fury in own 'dieselgate' suit

A German court on Wednesday began hearing a lawsuit pitting Porsche SE, the majority shareholder in Volkswagen, against angry investors who say they were told too late about the diesel emissions cheating scandal.

21h

Amazon's business-to-business unit turns into a $10 billion business

Amazon.com is having some luck getting buyers of corporate office supplies to shop like teenagers armed with their parents' credit card.

21h

Spring is advancing unevenly across North America

Spring is arriving earlier in many parts of North America, but this advance is not happening uniformly across the migration routes of many birds, according to a study by Eric Waller at the US Geological Survey in California and colleagues, publishing September 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE.

21h

Wild animals were routinely captured and traded in ancient Mesoamerica

New evidence from the Maya city of Copan, in Honduras, reveals that ancient Mesoamericans routinely captured and traded wild animals for symbolic and ritual purposes, according to a study published September 12, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nawa Sugiyama from George Mason University, Virginia, USA, and colleagues.

21h

NASA sees Hawaii facing Tropical Storm Olivia

While the US East Coast prepares for Hurricane Florence, the US state of Hawaii is feeling the effects of Tropical Storm Olivia. NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Olivia that showed wind shear was affecting it before landfall.

21h

New research can identify extremists online, even before they post dangerous content

New research in the INFORMS journal Operations Research has found a way to identify extremists, such as those associated with the terrorist group ISIS, by monitoring their social media accounts, and can identify them even before they post threatening content.

21h

NASA sees Paul become a remnant low pressure area

Former Tropical Storm Paul lost its strength and appeared as a swirl of clouds on infrared imagery from NASA.

21h

Apple Watch 4 Adds ECG, EKG, and More Heart-Monitoring CapabilitiesApple Watch Series

The Apple Watch 4 arrives this month, and it's now solidly a health device.

21h

Does Your Brain Let You Hear Your Own Footsteps?

Your brain might serve as noise-canceling headphones

21h

Airbnb hits back at Paris ban threat

Rent-a-room giant Airbnb on Wednesday accused the Paris official seeking to ban the service in the city of electioneering and insisted it enjoys widespread support in the French capital.

21h

NASA/JAXA satellite finds heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Isaac

Tropical Cyclones generate a lot of rainfall and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite and constellation of satellites gather that data and share it with forecasters. GPM recently passed over Tropical Storm Isaac and analyzed its rainfall.

21h

NASA/JAXA satellite finds heavy rainfall in Tropical Storm Isaac

Tropical Cyclones generate a lot of rainfall and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite and constellation of satellites gather that data and share it with forecasters. GPM recently passed over Tropical Storm Isaac and analyzed its rainfall.

21h

New combination treatment targets pre-leukemia stem cells

Omacetaxine (to block protein synthesis) with venetoclax (to block oxidative phosphorylation), was highly effective against CD123+ leukemia stem cells.

21h

Experts weigh next steps, possible capture to save ill orca

A young, sick whale is skinnier than ever and in poor condition nearly two months after an international team of experts began taking extraordinary measures to save her.

21h

Planned Parenthood Names Leana Wen, a Doctor, Its New President

Leana Wen, who replaces Cecile Richards, won praise for her steadying hand as Baltimore’s health commissioner during the city’s convulsive protests in 2015.

21h

Oldest Known Drawing by Human Hands Discovered in South African Cave

The artifact, which scientists think is about 73,000 years old, predates the oldest previously known human drawings from Europe by about 30,000 years.

21h

Apple unveils premium iPhone XS, health features for watch (Update)

Apple unveiled three new iPhones on Wednesday in a bid to bolster its spot in the premium smartphone market, along with an upgraded smartwatch that takes electrocardiograms and detects falls.

21h

Georgia governor declares emergency ahead of hurricane

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal declared a state of emergency in the southern US state on Wednesday ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Florence.

21h

Help make a better world land map with NASA app

Starting this month, you can be part of a project to create more detailed satellite-based global maps of land cover by sharing photos of the world around you in a new NASA citizen science project.

21h

Global coastal wetlands need to move inland in fight against climate change

Up to 30 per cent of coastal wetlands could be lost globally by the year 2100 with a dramatic effect on global warming and coastal flooding, if action is not taken to protect them, new research warns.

21h

NASA looks at Hurricane Helene's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 12 it analyzed water vapor within Hurricane Helene.

21h

Forest Service science improving fire weather prediction

The weather plays a significant role in how a wildfire grows, how fast it spreads, and how dangerous it can become for firefighters, but few tools exist to help fire managers anticipate days when weather conditions will have the greatest potential to make wildfire erratic or especially dangerous. The USDA Forest Service is expanding the options with the Hot-Dry-Windy Index (HDW), a new fire-weathe

21h

Big data is synergized by team and open science

For some time, "big data" has loomed large as a source of challenges and opportunities for science, but as yet, guidance on how to manage the data deluge has been wanting.

21h

The world needs death and decomposition

What if roadkill piled beside the road and never decomposed? What if massive fish kills washed up on beaches and remained for eternity?

21h

Princeton scientists discover a 'tuneable' novel quantum state of matter

An international team of researchers led by Princeton physicist Zahid Hasan has discovered a novel quantum state of matter whose symmetry can be manipulated at will by an external magnetic field. The methods demonstrated in a series of experiments could be useful for exploring materials for next-generation nano- or quantum technologies.

21h

Global coastal wetlands need to move inland in fight against climate change

Up to 30 per cent of coastal wetlands could be lost globally by the year 2100 with a dramatic effect on global warming and coastal flooding, if action is not taken to protect them, new research warns.

21h

Minding the brain to curb pain hypersensitivity

A study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the National Institute of Mental Health may open new opportunities for treating neuropathic pain, a difficult-to-treat type of chronic pain caused by nerve damage that can make the lightest touch intensely painful. Reporting in Nature, scientists demonstrate that neurons that originate in the brain's cortex influence sensitivity to touch. The circuit t

21h

Findings could improve treatment for challenging acute leukemia in children

Researchers from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have made important discoveries that could lead to better treatment for a rare blood cancer in children that has features of both leukemia and lymphoma.

21h

Gut bacteria's shocking secret: They produce electricity

To date, most electricity-generating bacteria have come from weird environments, but UC Berkeley researchers have found more than 100 in the human microbiome, both pathogenic and probiotic. They were unsuspected because they employ a different and simpler extracellular electron transfer system, which may prove useful in creating bacterial batteries. Their electrogenic ability may be important in i

21h

Multimedia graphic design — 73,000 years ago

The earliest evidence of a drawing made by humans has been found in Blombos Cave in the southern Cape in South Africa.The drawing, which consists of three red lines cross-hatched with six separate lines, was intentionally drawn on a smooth silcrete flake about 73,000 years ago. This predates previous drawing from Africa, Europe and Southeast Asia by at least 30,000 years.

21h

Fluorescence-activating beta-barrel protein made from scratch for first time

For the first time, scientists have created, entirely from scratch, a protein capable of binding to a small target molecule. They designed a cylindrical protein called a beta barrel, which has a cavity to bind the target. The designed protein was able to bind and activate a compound similar to that housed inside green fluorescent protein.

21h

Brain has natural noise-cancelling circuit

There's a noise-cancelling circuit in your brain that filters out the thump-thump-thump of your footsteps while you walk so that you can hear other things. We know this because of an experiment that involved auditory virtual reality for mice.

21h

Thousands of breast cancer gene variants engineered and analyzed

A scientific analysis of nearly 4,000 mutations deliberately engineered into the BRCA1 gene will immediately benefit people undergoing genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk. Many people obtaining genetic screenings previoulsy have learned that their BRCA1 gene contains a variant of uncertain significance. Data from this study now categorizes thousands of variants as behaving like disea

21h

St. Jude researchers solve a central mystery of a baffling high-risk leukemia

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators have unraveled the origins and identified mutations associated with a perplexing form of acute leukemia. The landmark study appears today as an advance online publication in the journal Nature and lays the foundation for more effective treatment of patients with the high-risk cancer.Their treatment is complicated because MPAL does not fit cleanly

21h

We may hear others' footsteps, but how do we ignore our own?

A team of scientists has uncovered the neural processes mice use to ignore their own footsteps, a discovery that offers new insights into how we learn to speak and play music.

21h

Carrier status matters in foot-and-mouth disease

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is believed to be one of the most contagious pathogens of animals in its acute form; however, there is still controversy over whether it is transmissible from asymptomatic, long-term carriers. Despite the lack of evidence for transmission by direct contact with FMDV carrier cattle, there is demonstrable contagion associated with these animals, according to a new

21h

Reducing oil ‘flaring’ could cut emissions in a big way

The burning of unwanted gas associated with oil production—called “flaring”—remains the most carbon-intensive part of producing oil, according to a new analysis. Until renewable sources of energy like wind or solar become more reliable and less expensive, people worldwide remain reliant on fossil fuels for transportation and energy. This means that if people want to reduce greenhouse gas emission

21h

Turtle species decline may impact environments worldwide

Approximately 61 percent of the world's 356 turtle species are threatened or already extinct, and the decline could have ecological consequences.

21h

Future impacts of El Nino, La Nina likely to intensify

When an El Niño or its opposite, La Niña, forms in the future, it's likely to cause more intense impacts over many land regions—amplifying changes to temperature, precipitation and wildfire risk.

21h

An Ancient Crosshatch May Be the Earliest Drawing Ever Found

Around 73,000 years ago, in a cave now known as Blombos, someone took a pointed lump of iron-rich rock—ochre—and dragged its tip across another rock, leaving behind a pattern of red, crosshatched strokes. The identity of the marks’ creator is unknown. Their intentions are unclear. But the red marks still persist on a 1.5-inch-long piece of stone , discovered by a team of researchers led by Christ

21h

With CRISPR, Scientists Engineered Nearly 4,000 Mutations of a Breast-Cancer Gene

BRCA1 is one of the best-studied cancer genes in the world. Still, on occasion, doctors will test a patient and find a BRCA1 mutation no one has ever seen before. This creates a dilemma. The newly discovered “ variant of unknown significance ,” or VUS, could be harmful, making a woman’s risk of developing breast cancer as high as 72 percent . Or it could be nothing to worry about at all. “You hea

21h

A new antibiotic uses sneaky tactics to kill drug-resistant superbugs

Scientists have developed a molecule that kills off bacteria that are resistant to existing antibiotics.

21h

This South African cave stone may bear the world’s oldest drawing

The Stone Age line design could have held special meaning for its makers, a new study finds.

21h

World’s Simplest Animal Reveals Hidden Diversity

The world’s simplest known animal is so poorly understood that it doesn’t even have a common name. Formally called Trichoplax adhaerens for the way it adheres to glassware, the amorphous blob isn’t much to look at. At just a few millimeters across, the creature resembles a squashed sandwich in which the top layer protects, the bottom layer crawls, and the slimy stuffing sticks it all together. Wi

21h

Navigating the path to a PhD

For many college students with chemistry-related majors, the next step in their career path is not always clear. Should they go to graduate school? If so, how does one choose a research program and advisor? What if something unexpected happens? These and many other questions about the chemistry graduate school experience are tackled in this week's cover story for Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN)

21h

Astronomers probe 'outstanding mystery' of how galaxies stop building stars

Galaxies like our own Milky Way are factories that use gravity to fashion new stars out of molecular hydrogen gas.

21h

New reports will enable UK to make the most of its natural assets

Four new reports on Natural Capital published today will enable governments and businesses to take an evidence-based approach to valuing the UK's natural assets.

21h

A wearable device for regrowing hair

Although some people embrace the saying "bald is beautiful," for others, alopecia, or excessive hair loss, can cause stress and anxiety. Some studies have shown that stimulating the skin with lasers can help regrow hair, but the equipment is often large, consumes lots of energy and is difficult to use in daily life. Now, researchers have developed a flexible, wearable photostimulator that speeds u

21h

NASA looks at Hurricane Helene's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 12 it analyzed water vapor within Hurricane Helene.

22h

Study first to report sexual behavior norms for US adults with dementia living at home

The majority of partnered, home-dwelling people in the U.S. with dementia are sexually active, according to a University of Chicago Medicine study out this week in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

22h

Ants surrender their venomous secrets

Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part because each bug contains such a tiny amount. Researchers recently responded to this challenge by conducting one of the first intensive studies of ant venom. They have now publ

22h

Scientists discover a 'tuneable' novel quantum state of matter

Quantum particles can be difficult to characterize, and almost impossible to control if they strongly interact with each other—until now.

22h

Hundreds of electricity-generating bacteria found, including pathogenic, probiotic and fermenting bacteria

While bacteria that produce electricity have been found in exotic environments like mines and the bottoms of lakes, scientists have missed a source closer to home: the human gut.

22h

Drawing on a piece of silcrete found in Blombos Cave predates previous human-made drawings by at least 30,000 years

The earliest evidence of a drawing made by humans has been found in Blombos Cave in the southern Cape in South Africa.

22h

Fluorescence-activating beta-barrel protein made from scratch for first time

For the first time, scientists have created, entirely from scratch, a protein capable of binding to a small target molecule. Researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine report the advance in the Sept. 12 issue of the journal Nature.

22h

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes rainmaker Hurricane Florence

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of powerful Category 4 Hurricane Florence and found the storm over 400 miles in diameter and the capability to generate very heavy rainfall.

22h

New Technique Limits CRISPR-Cas9 Off-Target Mutations

A mouse study details a method called VIVO that predicts the accuracy of any guide RNA.

22h

Getting the Upper Hand on Superbugs

We need an entirely new class of antibiotic, which scientists have been unable to create for more than 50 years. Until now, that is. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Why Some Parents Turn Boys’ Names Into Girls’ Names

In 2017, there were 205 Ezras, 237 Lincolns, 137 Austins, and 107 Wyatts born in the U.S. who shared something unexpected in common: They’re girls. These babies’ parents made a decision that thousands of their peers did in giving their newborn daughters a name that is generally considered male. According to Pamela Redmond Satran, who co-runs the baby-name website Nameberry, the past 10 years of g

22h

Hurricane Florence is coming. Here's what you need to know.

Environment This is not a storm to take lightly. Florence is a serious storm that warrants the attention of everyone near its path.

22h

Breast cancer screening does not reduce mortality

Fewer and fewer women die from breast cancer in recent years but, surprisingly, the decline is just as large in the age groups that are not screened. The decline is therefore due to better treatment and not screening for breast cancer. This is shown by a major Danish-Norwegian study, which has just been published in the scientific journal International Journal of Cancer.

22h

Forest Service science improving fire weather prediction

Scientists with the USDA Forest Service and St. Cloud State University have created a new fire-weather prediction tool that works with the same weather models that are used every day in fire weather forecasts, and thus can be applied anywhere in the world, regardless of fuel conditions or topography.

22h

Scientists map interactions between head and neck cancer and HPV virus

A team of scientists led by Nevan J. Krogan, PhD, senior investigator at the Gladstone Institutes, mapped the interactions between all HPV proteins and human proteins for the first time. Their findings are published today in the journal Cancer Discovery.

22h

Category 6 hurricanes? Future storms will be increasingly violent

A new computer model suggests that the 21st century will have more frequent hurricanes of staggering force. Read More

22h

22h

Treadmill desks can hamstring your memory

Working memory isn’t as efficient when using a treadmill workstation as when sitting or standing, according to a small study. Other types of thinking, such as switching tasks and checking immediate impulses (also called inhibition), however, are the same whether sitting or standing. Researchers assessed response time and accuracy of three components of executive function during sitting, standing,

22h

Turtle species decline may impact environments worldwide

About 61 percent of the world's 356 turtle species are threatened or already extinct, and the decline could have ecological consequences, according to a study in the journal BioScience.

22h

Big data is synergized by team and open science

The synergy of data-intensive, open, and team science can help scientists answer broad environmental questions.

22h

NYU Physicists develop new techniques to enhance data analysis for large hadron collider

NYU physicists have created new techniques that deploy machine learning as a means to significantly improve data analysis for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's most powerful particle accelerator.

22h

Are Hurricanes Getting Worse?

Whenever a hurricane is on the way, the same questions tend to resurface. Are storms really becoming stronger and more frequent? And is climate change playing a role? NPR's Rebecca Hersher explains. (Image credit: NOAA/GOES/Getty Images)

22h

X vs. Y vs. Z Planes

This seems straightforward. But you might also say you can come at it from three different directions. Eh? Eh? We’re getting a bit meta on Eyewire this week: what’s your favorite plane to play in? Let’s see which one prevails. The competition starts at 11 AM EDT on 9/13 and goes for 24 hours! All info about points bonuses is available through your competition notification on eyewire.org. For scie

22h

Medie: Tocifret milliontab venter Amager Bakke efter driftsstop

Fejl på kompensatorer har lukket ned for energiproduktionen på forbrændingsanlægget Amager Bakke. Leverandør opdagede fejlen uden at sige det videre.

22h

The Silent Victims of the Media Baron

Sex or power. Biology or culture. Inevitable or changeable. These are the dichotomies embedded in the debate around the #MeToo movement. On one side are those who tend to say that power is the issue: Harvey Weinstein abused his status in ways that lay bare larger structural inequalities that should be rectified. Others ask whether the problem isn’t just that Weinstein was a special kind of creep

22h

Smarty pants: Robot trousers could keep the elderly mobile

Artificial muscles could assist mobility as people age.

22h

Sugar pills relieve pain for chronic pain patients

Someday doctors may prescribe sugar pills for certain chronic pain patients based on their brain anatomy and psychology. And the pills will reduce their pain as effectively as any powerful drug on the market, according to new research. Scientists have shown they can reliably predict which chronic pain patients will respond to a sugar placebo pill based on the patients' brain anatomy and psychologi

23h

In drought and heavy rains, ecosystems function like information communication networks

How is a telecommunications network like an ecosystem? Tree canopies and the running streams below, or coral reefs and the ocean waters that flow around them, are interconnected components of a larger whole: an ecosystem. These ecosystem parts are in communication with one another, scientists have learned, via signals transmitted among earth, air and water.

23h

A wearable device for regrowing hair

Although some people embrace the saying 'bald is beautiful,' for others, alopecia, or excessive hair loss, can cause stress and anxiety. Some studies have shown that stimulating the skin with lasers can help regrow hair, but the equipment is often large, consumes lots of energy and is difficult to use in daily life. Now, researchers have developed a flexible, wearable photostimulator that speeds u

23h

Waiting to have a baby can lead to having many at once

Assisted reproductive technologies are not the only cause of multiple births, a new study reports. Women choosing to have children later in life is a reason, too. Starting in the 1980s, the number of multiple births—twins, triplets, quadruplets, and quintuplets—steadily increased from about 20 sets per 1,000 live births to almost 35 sets per 1,000 live births in the 2010s. That trend presents som

23h

WeWork Is About To Start Selling Software

The coworking company just paid $100 million to buy the enterprise software startup Teem—an important milestone in WeWork's quest to be more than a real estate company.

23h

Physicists develop new techniques to enhance data analysis for Large Hadron Collider

New York University physicists have created new techniques that deploy machine learning as a means to significantly improve data analysis for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's most powerful particle accelerator.

23h

Sensors that are literally 'music to one's ears'

Researchers have found a new use for a 3,000-year-old African musical instrument: detecting toxic substances and counterfeit medications. The sensor, based on the mbira (pronounced 'em-bir'-uh') is inexpensive and easy to operate, allowing its use in developing regions, the researchers say.

23h

Zimbabwe's Medical Marijuana Future Uncertain

The country is the second in Africa to permit cannabis cultivation, but months after approval there's been little uptake by farmers and no scientific proposals.

23h

Gå på opdagelse i forunderlig forskning til kulturnat hos SUND

Lyt til musikalske hjerterytmer, bliv kirurg for en aften, opklar et dødsfald, mød forvirrede…

23h

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes rainmaker Hurricane Florence

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of powerful Category 4 Hurricane Florence and found the storm over 400 miles in diameter and the capability to generate very heavy rainfall.

23h

Sleep apnea could favor tumor growth at young ages

A scientific study, conducted with animal models, states that sleep apnea can favor lung cancer growth in young individuals. Thus, aging would be a protecting factor against the fast tumor development, induced by this sleep alteration.

23h

Rural and urban communities need different policies to boost economic mobility

The farther away from a city a person is raised, the more likely they are to climb the economic ladder, according to economists, who also found that community characteristics associated with upward mobility actually have different effects in rural and urban locations.

23h

Bræmme af brint kan udgøre væggen i vores solsystem

New Horizons er den første rumsonde, som i knap tre årtier har indsamlet spor efter det, der kan være en ophobning af brintatomer nær kanten af den teoretiske grænse for vores solsystem.

23h

Here's How to Make the Sahara Desert Green Again

The Sahara is the world's largest hot desert, but parts of it could be made green if massive solar and wind farms set up shop there, a new study finds.

23h

The spark that created life

Evolution by natural selection is immensely powerful — both in nature and within laboratories. Researchers have identified 'Structural Capacitance Elements' within proteins, which retain the potential to evolve into micro-structures following the introduction of a mutation. These mutated proteins are associated with many different types of human diseases, such as cancer. Understanding if and how

23h

Bismuth shows novel conducting properties

Scientists have discovered a new class of materials: higher-order topological insulators. Theoretical physicists first predicted the existence of these insulators with conducting properties on the edges of crystals rather than on their surface and their characteristic ability to conduct electricity without dissipation. Now, these novel properties are demonstrated experimentally in bismuth.

23h

What the Polls Keep Missing in the Midterm Elections

The summer of 2018 has been full of progressive-insurgent wins—wins that have been pretty shocking for anyone relying exclusively on poll numbers to make predictions. No poll showed Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley ahead in her primary challenge to Representative Mike Capuano of Massachusetts until she won last Tuesday by 18 points. The Florida gubernatorial candidate Andrew Gillum was polli

23h

New Scientist Live: the death of the universe may not be inevitable

The universe will end bleakly, in cold darkness. Or will it? At New Scientist Live next week, Geraint Lewis will explain how the cosmos might have a chance

23h

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