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Scientists reveal drumming helps schoolchildren diagnosed with autism

Children diagnosed with autism perform better in school if they participate in two 30-minute drumming sessions a week, according to a new scientific study.

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Gravitational waves provide dose of reality about extra dimensions

While last year's discovery of gravitational waves from colliding neutron stars was earth-shaking, it won't add extra dimensions to our understanding of the universe—not literal ones, at least.

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Paul Manafort's Cooperation With Mueller Is the Biggest Blow Yet to Trump

After more than four decades of lobbying on behalf of Republican politicians, foreign dictators, and oligarchs, Paul Manafort is flipping on his last client: President Donald Trump. The president’s former campaign chairman has agreed to cooperate with Special Counsel Robert Mueller in the investigation of a potential conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Moscow, prosecutors said in court on F

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Rolls Royce built a silent isolation chamber in its Phantom luxury car

Cars It will likely command a hefty price hike on a car that's already well over $400,000. It's really quiet inside the new Rolls Royce. Too quiet.

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As the Ice Melts, NASA Will Be Watching

The new ICESat-2, set to launch on Saturday, can measure changes in the planet’s ice that are less than the width of a pencil.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Manafort Destiny

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Paul Manafort, President Trump’s former campaign chairman, pleaded guilty to two criminal charges and agreed to cooperate with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Hurricane Florence made landfall on the North Carolina coast as a Cate

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Unexplained 'Security Issue' Keeps National Solar Observatory Facility Shuttered

It's been more than a week, and a National Solar Observatory (NSO) facility in New Mexico is still closed for an undisclosed "security issue."

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Facebook's AI Can Analyze Memes, but Can It Understand Them?

Facebook's Rosetta technology analyzes billions of images that contain text, but memes are more than the sum of their parts.

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'Shadow of the Tomb Raider' Tries to Be Epic, But It's Really Just Mean

In the new 'Tomb Raider', Lara Croft is born to suffer.

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About Half of Clinical Trials Go Unreported in EU

Pharma companies are more compliant in posting results compared to universities.

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Conservation Biologist and Placenta Expert Kurt Benirschke Dies

He established the San Diego Zoo’s cryopreserved Frozen Zoo.

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ORNL-developed technology streamlines computational science projects

An ORNL research team led by Jay Jay Billings has continuously updated a workflow management system they first developed in 2010 to help computational scientists develop software, visualize data, and solve problems, saving time and effort expended in support of modeling and simulation experiments. Recently, the team published an article inSoftwareX that both details the history of the system and p

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Manafort Takes Off His MAGA Hat

Today’s guilty plea by Paul Manafort brings to a close the criminal investigation of his conduct. But it is likely just the beginning of the next phase of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe into 2016 election interference. The plea is a significant success for the special counsel. It allows Mueller to avoid the uncertainty, time, and expense of a trial. And the criminal information filed by t

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Florence Will Drop an Inconceivable Amount of Water

On Friday, Hurricane Florence made landfall in North Carolina. It was also downgraded to a Category 1 storm: Its high winds, while still “extremely dangerous,” are no longer the storm’s scariest trait. But then again, they never were. Florence’s main threat has always been the water. In the coming days, Florence will besiege the Carolinas through two different mechanisms: First, it will inundate

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Humans are natural runners—and this ancient gene mutation might have helped

Health Your muscles are ready to run, whether you like it or not. Your cells are ready to run a marathon, even if you’re not. Every cell in the human body is carrying a mutation that might help optimize our muscles for running long…

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Taste preferences connected to success of long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery

Following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a type of bariatric surgery, many patients exhibit a reduction in taste preference for sweet and fatty foods, although this effect may only be temporary, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University at New York.

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Experience Infinity at the World’s Largest Mall

Upon entering China’s Yiwu Market, Jessica Kingdon experienced a sensory overload. She had intended to capture the cinematic experience of the world’s largest wholesale mall, but she couldn’t decide what to film. “I kept getting distracted because the number of stalls feels infinite,” Kingdon told The Atlantic . “It's like the ultimate FOMO experience.” Ultimately, Kingdon decided to focus on wha

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New soft coral species discovered in Panama

A study in the journal Bulletin of Marine Science describes a new, blood-red species of octocoral found in Panama. The species in the genus Thesea was discovered in the threatened low-light reef environment on Hannibal Bank, 60 kilometers off mainland Pacific Panama, by researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama (STRI) and the Centro de Investigación en Ciencias del Mar y

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Emmanuel Macron Tries—Slowly—To Reckon With France’s Past

France’s colonial rule in Algeria, as well as the war that brought it to an end, remains an open wound in French historical memory despite ending more than 50 years ago. For the French, it’s a dark era of its history that, like the country’s collaboration with Nazi Germany under Vichy rule , many seem anxious to forget. Few French leaders have been willing to acknowledge France’s colonization of

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How leaves tell each other about a bug attack

New research reveals how plant communication systems respond to threats from hungry critters. The results show that once wounded, plants use calcium signals to warn distant tissues of future attacks. In one video , you can see a hungry caterpillar, first working around a leaf’s edges, approaching the base of the leaf and, with one last bite, severing it from the rest of the plant. Within seconds,

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Three affordable soundbars worth bringing home

Gadgets In the last few months, I've played with several soundbars. Here are my picks. In the last few months, I've played with several soundbars. Here are my picks. Luckily, none of them will break the bank.

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X vs. Y vs. Z: The Winning Plane…

After a very hard fought battle, we have a victor of the VS! According to the very scientific leaderboard below, the most valued plane on Eyewire is the Y plane. Worth bearing in mind? Hmm… Artwork by Daniela Gamba

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Dozens of Massachusetts Homes Exploded. A Gas Expert Weighs In.

Late Thursday, dozens of explosions erupted in three towns in northern Massachusetts. As many as 70 fires, explosions, and suspected gas leaks were reported to state police, with at least 39 homes affected in Lawrence, Andover, and North Andover. One person was killed when a chimney collapsed on his car, and at least 25 more people were reportedly treated for injuries. In a statement , Columbia G

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New soft coral species discovered in Panama

Another new coral found in Panama's Coiba National Park, a UNESCO National Heritage Site, the location of the Smithsonian's newest research site.

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September Is Peak Hurricane Season. Why Is That?

September 10 is the day you're statistically most likely to find a tropical cyclone somewhere in the Atlantic basin. The reason has to do with both wind and water. (Image credit: NOAA/AP)

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Can the sleeping brain create unique people that the waking brain has never seen before?

Reader Ella asks: “I read a theory that while dreaming, the brain cannot invent new people out of nowhere. Instead, the brain shows people we've seen while awake, or combines a mix of previously-seen physical features to create a "new" person. How would you prove/disprove this theory? Why does the brain do this?” This is a really interesting question, but unfortunately, it’s an impossible questio

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Who Is SpaceX's Mystery Moon Passenger?

“The moon is essentially grey, no color. Looks like plaster of Paris or sort of a grayish beach sand.” This was how Jim Lovell described the lunar surface in 1968 from his perch about 60 miles above the moon. Lovell and his fellow NASA astronauts never touched down, but they returned to Earth with memories of what was, at the time, the closest view a human being had ever experienced of the planet

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Photos of the Week: Robotic Arms, Sheepdog Trials, Giant Carrot

Hurricane Florence reaches the Carolinas, Vostok 2018 military exercises in Siberia, multiple house fires in suburban Massachusetts, pedal-car racing in England, ballet in the streets of Mexico City, a dinosaur in North Korea, a pilgrimage to catch fish on Spain’s Gran Canaria, scenes from New York Fashion Week, and much more

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Repeat vaccination is safe for most kids with mild to moderate reactions

Children who experience some type of adverse event following initial immunization have a low rate of recurrent reactions to subsequent vaccinations, reports a study in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Russians Allegedly Targeted Lab Studying Chemical Weapons

Russian agents were allegedly planning to hack into a Swiss laboratory that was analyzing nerve agents used in March against a former Russian spy and his daughter. (Image credit: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images)

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Researchers develop method for video promo clips via facial expression tracking

Ever-expanding viewing options make it increasingly harder for a movie or television series to stand out in a saturated market. With trailers alone not drawing enough attention, marketers increasingly depend on shorter video snippets—video clips—to promote content across a variety of digital channels, including ones without sound.

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What Paul Manafort Knows

What kind of threat does Paul Manafort now pose to Donald Trump? Robert Mueller’s indictment of the fallen lobbyist is a masterful portrait of a craven man and his methods. But the chronology contained in the document filed this morning takes us right up to the eve of Manafort joining the Trump campaign, and then leaves the reader bursting with curiosity about what comes next. While Mueller has t

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Hurricane Florence Threatens to Spread Hog Poop Over North Carolina

Big pools of pig excrement, a byproduct of the state's many hog farms, sit in the path of Hurricane Florence.

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Researchers develop method for video promo clips via facial expression tracking

Researchers have developed a method to effectively compress the plot of a feature-length film in just a few, sometimes, silent seconds.

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Most kids with special healthcare needs still aren't receiving 'patient-centered medical home' care

The 'patient-centered medical home' (PCMH) approach is an important tool for providing coordinated care for the millions of American children with special healthcare needs. But most of these special-needs children don't have access to care consistent with the PCMH approach, reports a study in the October issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Breaking Down the iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, iPhone XR

This week Apple announced three new iPhones and a new Apple Watch. Are these a glimpse of the future, or more of the same?

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Bribery, Crowdfunding, and the Strange Case of Senator Susan Collins

Two progressive groups are gathering contributions – more than $1 million so far— pledged to a yet-to-be-named opponent to Maine Senator Susan Collins if she votes for the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. “Either Sen. Collins VOTES NO on Kavanaugh OR we fund her future opponent,” a crowdfunding page declares. The senator complained that this is “bribery,” a charge echoed by S

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Disagreeing About Abortion Can Be Respectful, After All

Three Children, Two Abortions In an essay last month, Deborah Copaken put her two abortions—one as a teenager, one in her 30s— in conversation with her motherhood. What a woman “chooses to do with her body if she finds herself accidentally pregnant,” she wrote, “should not be up for debate in 2018.” I appreciate Ms. Copaken’s courage in sharing her story. Truly, each of our unique stories defies

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FRESH program combines basic science with social benefits for women at risk of HIV

A program established by the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard is addressing the persistently elevated risk of HIV infection among young women in South Africa from two angles — first, investigating biological factors that modulate infection risk and the early immunologic events following viral exposure, and second, alleviating the socioeconomic factors that limit opportunities for young wom

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New photonic chip promises more robust quantum computers

Scientists have developed a topological photonic chip to process quantum information, promising a more robust option for scalable quantum computers. The research team, led by RMIT University's Dr Alberto Peruzzo, has for the first time demonstrated that quantum information can be encoded, processed and transferred at a distance with topological circuits on the chip. The research is published in Sc

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Google-Funded Study Finds Cash Beats Typical Development Aid

A study in Rwanda finds healthier children in families receiving large cash grants, rather than clean water, livestock, textbooks, or nutritional supplements.

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Port city hunkers down as Hurricane Florence whips through

In the port city of Wilmington, residents awoke to the sound of power transformers blowing up, plunging homes into darkness as Hurricane Florence's howling winds whipped through the streets sending metal signs, water and debris flying.

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The Predator Is a Manic, Messy Disaster

Over the course of four films (and a couple of spin-offs), the Predator has been a 7-foot-tall reptilian alien with giant snapping mandibles instead of a mouth, camouflage technology, and boundless interest in hunting and killing humans as trophies. But Shane Black’s smart-aleck script for the latest edition in the action franchise, The Predator, has a bone to pick with the name. “That’s not a pr

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Radio Atlantic: Is Democracy Dying?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play With authoritarianism and populism on the rise around the world, The Atlantic examines the fate of democracy in its October issue. Anne Applebaum writes that Poland shows how quickly things can fall apart and Jeffrey Rosen writes that the state of American politics is one Founder’s worst nightmare. They join Jeffrey Go

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Officials shed little light on closure of solar observatory

An observatory in the mountains of southern New Mexico that is dedicated unlocking the mysteries of the sun has found itself at the center of a mystery that is creating a buzz here on earth.

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Starving Orca Feared Dead. But NOAA Isn't Giving Up Just Yet.

Capturing Scarlet could be the only way to save her — if she's still alive.

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Hurricane Florence Drowned a Riverfront 30 Miles from the North Carolina Coast (Video)

Video shared from the town of Washington, North Carolina shows a riverfront drowned as far as the camera can see by Hurricane Florence's floodwaters.

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New photonic chip promises more robust quantum computers

Scientists have developed a topological photonic chip to process quantum information, promising a more robust option for scalable quantum computers.

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Florence could dump enough rain to fill the Chesapeake Bay

Florence's rain total will likely be staggeringly huge.

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Gold Rush—Returns Friday Oct 12 9p

When there is gold on the line, it’s every miner for themselves. An all-new season of Gold Rush gets underway Friday Oct 12 9p on Discovery! From: Discovery

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How Bots Ruined Clicktivism

As platforms struggle to detect and stop foreign interference in the midterm elections, there’s a thorny complication: Many of the tactics used by spammers and trolls are also leveraged by real activists.

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NASA sees wind shear bringing post-tropical Cyclone Olivia toward dissipation

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found that as Post-tropical cyclone Olivia was being strongly affected by wind shear in the Central Pacific Ocean. That shear was preventing the development of the thunderstorms that would revive the storm, so it weakened into a post-tropical system and is expected to dissipate over the weekend of Sept. 15.

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Researchers use environmental DNA to detect the presence of white sharks in local waters

A white shark's acute sense of smell is legendary, allowing it to detect a potential meal several miles away—and giving pause to those of us who work and play in the ocean.

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NASA sees dangerous Super Typhoon Mangkhut, eyeing the Philippines

Super Typhoon Mangkhut is a powerful tropical cyclone headed toward the northern Philippines. It is a Category 5 storm on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image as it passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and stared the storm in its eye.

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NASA sees dangerous Super Typhoon Mangkhut, eyeing the Philippines

Super Typhoon Mangkhut is a powerful tropical cyclone headed toward the northern Philippines. It is a Category 5 storm on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image as it passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and stared the storm in its eye.

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Sniffing out sharks

UCSB researchers use environmental DNA to detect the presence of white sharks in local waters.

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Research in yeast leads to serendipitous finding about a central nervous system disorder

Researchers from the Salk Institute found that an important quality control mechanism in baker's yeast is closely connected to hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, a debilitating disease found in children. The findings could indicate a therapeutic approach for this rare disease, as well as for multiple sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases.

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NASA sees wind shear bringing post-tropical Cyclone Olivia toward dissipation

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found that as Post-tropical cyclone Olivia was being strongly affected by wind shear in the Central Pacific Ocean. That shear was preventing the development of the thunderstorms that would revive the storm, so it weakened into a post-tropical system and is expected to dissipate over the weekend of Sept. 15.

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Watch Hurricane Florence Make Landfall in This Incredible Space Station Video

Hurricane Florence, the vast storm meteorologists and astronauts alike have been tracking, made landfall this morning (Sept. 14) near Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina.

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Mexico arrests 'hitman' for trafficking endangered fish

Mexico has arrested an alleged drug cartel hitman on charges of trafficking the critically endangered totoaba fish, a species whose swim bladder can fetch up to $20,000 on the black market in China.

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How cells handle a sticky, toxic, but absolutely essential molecule

Do you enjoy breathing air? You should spare a thought once in a while for heme, an iron-containing molecule essential to all organisms engaged in an air-breathing lifestyle. Heme molecules are most famously part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-transporting protein in blood, but they are also components of numerous other proteins involved in gas transport and fundamental chemistry in cells. On its own,

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Wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Joyce in NASA-NOAA satellite image

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and saw that Tropical Storm Joyce is battling wind shear. Winds are pushing thunderstorm development northeast of the center.

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NASA-NOAA satellite find wind shear affecting Helene, Azores warnings up

Tropical Storm Helene may be battling wind shear but it's caused a Tropical Storm Warning for all of the Azores Islands on Sept. 15. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and analyzed the storm.

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Trilobites: Water Droplets Don’t Just Hover on a Hot Pan. They Roll.

Physicists took a deeper look at the Leidenfrost effect, which you’ve likely experienced when you’ve dripped water into a pan to test its temperature.

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Prominent Cancer Researcher Resigns from Dartmouth Amid Plagiarism Charges

Dr. H. Gilbert Welch was seen as an authority on the risks of aggressive screening for breast cancer and over-diagnosis. He disputed the charges.

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With Rudy Giuliani, What You See Is What You Get

Rudy Giuliani marked this week’s 9/11 anniversary by reminiscing about that fateful day from the friendly confines of Fox & Friends . His hosts dutifully recycled the TV footage of Giuliani walking the streets of smoky Lower Manhattan, paper mask affixed to his face, imploring people to flee northward. He told his Fox couchmates that he walked for hours, and that there were times when he could ba

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How the Hollywood Redemption Machine Works, According to BoJack Horseman

This story contains spoilers for Season 5 of BoJack Horseman. T here’s an episode early in the new season of BoJack Horseman that condenses a famous actor’s ugly past with an efficiency so ruthless, the story line would seem cartoonish were it not so familiar. A few minutes of screen time chronicle a decade’s worth of vile behavior: A fictional celebrity named Vance Waggoner bounces from scandal

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Voodoo Dolls, Roller-Coasters for Kidney Stones Win at Ig Nobels

The awards for comical but practical scientific discovery also include cannibalism and self-colonoscopy.

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How cells handle a sticky, toxic, but absolutely essential molecule

A team of researchers at the Lerner Research Institute of the Cleveland Clinic has solved a long-standing puzzle by identifying the protein that 'chaperones' free heme in cells.

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Microbiome serves as sentinel for nerve gas exposure

Exposure to banned nerve agents remains a major public health concern globally, especially because of the recent air-release of these agents in Syria. One main problem is the difficulty of determining whether an exposure has occurred. Now, a new study demonstrates that the mammalian microbiome can act as a 'sentinel' due to its high responsiveness to exposure.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds winds tearing Tropical Depression Isaac apart

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over tropical cyclone Isaac in the eastern Caribbean Sea and it has weakened to a depression as a result of being hammered by vertical wind shear.

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Open insulin, 'DIY bio' and the future of pharma

A growing community of do-it-yourself 'biohackers' are disrupting business-as-usual for pharmaceutical discovery, development and distribution. A new article looks at how the pharmaceutical industry, and the U.S. regulatory environment, will need to change in response.

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Testosterone replacement therapy may slow the progression of COPD

Testosterone replacement therapy may slow disease progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to new research.

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New devices could reduce excess heat in computers

Antiferromagnets could make it possible to achieve computing speeds much faster than existing devices, new research suggests.

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The Gradual Disappearance of Jane Ashland Casts an Unlikely Spell

The title of this slim book sounds like a virtuosic magic act, and the Norwegian writer Nicolai Houm delivers. In the first of his three novels to appear in English, his legerdemain is remarkable. He builds suspense even as he splinters his plot into nonlinear fragments. He conjures up the emotional arc of a female life—from childhood loneliness through intense love to midlife derailment—in just

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ELFIN to study how electrons get lost

Three hundred and ten miles above our planet's surface, near-Earth space is abuzz with action. Here begin the Van Allen Belts, a pair of concentric rings of fast-moving particles and intense radiation that extends more than 30,000 miles farther into space. For the most part these particles are confined to this special region, spiraling along Earth's magnetic field lines. But sometimes they come to

4h

Gender Bias Dissected in eLife's Peer Review

The journal undertook a self-assessment, finding men have more success than women with all-male review panels.

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Spectacular ice age wolf pup and caribou dug up in Canada

Rare, mummified animals discovered by gold miners in Yukon territory The Klondike region of Canada is famous for its gold, but now other remarkable ancient treasures have been unearthed from the melting permafrost. Two mummified ice age mammals – a wolf pup and a caribou calf – were discovered by gold miners in the area in 2016 and unveiled on Thursday at a ceremony in Dawson in Yukon territory.

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Hurricane Florence’s slow creep across the Carolinas is bad news

Environment Wind speeds are not the problem. The storm will be slow to weaken as it moves away from the warm ocean waters, but even as the winds subside, the real story of the hurricane is just beginning.

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New means to fight 'un-killable' bacteria in healthcare settings

Scientists have identified new means of fighting drug-tolerant bacteria, a growing global threat as menacing as drug-resistant microbes. Little is known about the mechanisms leading to tolerance, a strategy that makes bacteria 'indifferent' to antibiotics and almost 'un-killable,' which results in chronic infections extremely difficult to treat and cure.

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Computer avatars play a part in dementia detection

Scientists have demonstrated the possibility of detecting dementia from conversations in human-agent interaction. Their research shows how a machine can learn characteristics of sounds of elderly people who answered easy questions from avatars on a computer.

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Typhoon Mangkhut Bears Down on the Philippines with 165-Mph Winds

A monster storm is poised to hit the Philippines.

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27 Major Cities Retreat from Peak Greenhouse Gas Emissions

New York City, London and Sydney are among the cities whose emissions are declining, a new report finds — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Happens When Gig-Economy Workers Become Employees

Ever since the emergence of companies like Uber and Lyft, businesses and labor advocates have engaged in an endless, largely theoretical debate about whether classifying workers as independent contractors—responsible for setting their own hours and paying for their own insurance, mileage, and other expenses—helps or hurts them. On one side are gig-economy employers, who say workers like the flexi

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The next phase: Using neural networks to identify gas-phase molecules

Scientists have developed a neural network that can identify the structure of molecules in the gas phase, offering a novel technique for national security and pharmaceutical applications.

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Why some people are at risk of gout

Researchers have helped characterize a genetic variant that enables new understanding of why some people are at risk of gout, a painful and debilitating arthritic disease.

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One in three college freshmen worldwide reports mental health disorder

A new study finds that more than one-third of first-year university students in eight industrialized countries around the globe report symptoms consistent with a diagnosable mental health disorder.

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NASA-NOAA satellite find wind shear affecting Helene, Azores warnings up

Tropical Storm Helene may be battling wind shear but it's caused a Tropical Storm Warning for all of the Azores Islands on Sept. 15. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and analyzed the storm.

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Wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Joyce in NASA-NOAA satellite image

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eastern Atlantic Ocean and saw that Tropical Storm Joyce is battling wind shear. Winds are pushing thunderstorm development northeast of the center.

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CHLA team identifies developmental stage for No. 1 eye tumor in children

Investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles have been able to pinpoint the exact stage of development of the human retina, when cells can grow out of control and form cancer-like masses. The finding could open the door for future interventions in retinoblastoma (RB), a tumor of the retina that affects children under five years of age.

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NASA-funded ELFIN to study how electrons get lost

The NASA-funded, UCLA built ELFIN Cubesat will launch on Sept 15, piggy-backing with NASA's ICESat-2, to study how electrons are lost from the Van Allen Belts.

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'Optical rocket' created with intense laser light

An experiment at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln demonstrated how the application of intense light boosts electrons to their highest attainable speeds.

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Glem alt om iPhone: Nye sundheds-sensorer var Apples største nyhed

Nye sensorer i Apples ur indvarsler en fremtid, hvor vi konstant overvåger vores krops sundhedstilstand. Men det er ikke uden problemer.

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Salford scientists show how cars could power your home

The electric cars with stored power that could be transferred to a dwelling.

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Quick learners remember info for longer

Quick learners have better long-term retention of the material they learn despite spending less time studying it, according to a new study. “Quicker learning appears to be more durable learning,” says Christopher L. Zerr, lead author and doctoral student in psychological & brain sciences at Washington University in St. Louis. “Even though people who learned the material in less time had less actu

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Study: Brain teasers in job interviews mainly reveal the sadistic traits of the interviewer

Riddle me this: what do brain teasers tell you during a job interview? A lot, but not about the applicant. Read More

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NASA to launch ICESat-2 into orbit this weekend. It will track ice changes in Antarctica and Greenland.

Using advanced laser technology, scientists at NASA will track global changes in ice with greater accuracy. Read More

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The Sex-Abuse Scandal Is Growing Faster Than the Church Can Contain It

This has been a dramatic week for Catholics around the world. As Pope Francis faces mounting pressure to address the spiraling clergy sex-abuse crisis, almost every day has brought some new revelation or declaration. Since Tuesday alone, a group of American Catholic leaders went to Rome to ask Francis some tough questions, while a women’s open letter demanding answers from him crossed the 45,000-

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Brief psychotherapy benefits women caring for children with severe health issues

Brief cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improved the mental health of women overwhelmed by caring for children with severe chronic health conditions, researchers at the University of Louisville have found.After five therapy sessions, study participants reported significantly decreased depressive symptoms, negative thinking and chronic stressors, and experienced improved sleep quality, acc

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Can a novel high-density EEG approach disentangle the differences of visual event related potential (N170), elicited by negative facial stimuli, in people with subjective cognitive impairment?

Thessaloniki- Macedonia, Greece — Sept. 14, 2018 — Greek researchers investigated whether specific brain regions, which have been found to be highly activated after negative facial stimulus, are also activated in different groups of people with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) compared to healthy controls (HC).

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RUDN scientists suggested a method to increase speed and reliability of wireless channels

A team from RUDN developed a mathematical model which simulates the operation of a computer communication system consisting of one common queue of customers and two heterogeneous servers with different speed and reliability attributes. The scientists proposed new methods for performance and reliability analysis of such systems. The article of the team was published in European Journal of Operation

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds winds tearing Tropical Depression Isaac apart

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over tropical cyclone Isaac in the eastern Caribbean Sea and it has weakened to a depression as a result of being hammered by vertical wind shear.

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Indigenous peoples, key to saving forests, catch a break

Proven masters at sustainably managing forests that protect against global warming, indigenous peoples got a place at the table, and some cash, at an international climate summit in San Francisco this week.

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Videogames: Design/Play/Disrupt review – a joyful peek under the hood

Even when we fail spectacularly at them, computer games are crafted to be a medium of delights, as an exhibition at London's Victoria & Albert Museum reveals

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Hydrogen can form ‘ghost bonds’ with something that isn’t even there

Chemists have worked out how to trick hydrogen into making a distant bond with nothing but thin air

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Fly me to the Moon? A look at the space-tourism race

SpaceX is among a handful of companies racing to propel tourists into space. Here are the top projects in the works, and what they involve.

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The New Old Age: For Elderly Women with Breast Cancer, Surgery May Not Be the Best Option

Nursing home patients may be frail or have other diseases, leading some doctors to advise hormone therapy rather than operations.

5h

Conservation dairy farming could help Pa. meet Chesapeake target

If the majority of dairy farms in Pennsylvania fully adopt conservation best-management practices, the state may be able to achieve its total maximum daily load water-quality target for the Chesapeake Bay, according to researchers.

5h

Enhanced 3-D imaging poised to advance treatments for brain diseases

Researchers have developed a combination of commercially available hardware and open-source software, named PySight, which improves rapid 2-D and 3-D imaging of the brain and other tissues.

5h

Caspase-2 enzyme inhibitor shows promise for ameliorating fatty liver disease

Researchers have discovered using mice and human clinical specimens that caspase-2, a protein-cleaving enzyme, is a critical driver of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a chronic and aggressive liver condition. By identifying caspase-2's critical role, they believe an inhibitor of this enzyme could provide an effective way to stop the pathogenic progression that leads to NASH — and possibly e

5h

Obesity alters airway muscle function, increases asthma risk

Obesity changes how airway muscles function, increasing the risk of developing asthma, a new study suggests.

5h

A/B Testing Foreign Aid

How can we innovate in the huge, $140 billion foreign aid sector? The same way we do in the private sector: routine evaluations of what’s working well and what isn’t. Yet donors rarely measure the effectiveness of individual programs, let alone weigh one intervention against another. The United States’ Agency for International Development (USAID), for example, conducted just one experimental eval

5h

ICESat: Space laser to get unprecedented view of Earth's ice

The US space agency is due to launch a laser to assess the impact of climate change on the poles.

5h

Intensive farming 'least bad option' for food and environment

Scientists say that high-yield farming may be the best way to meet demand for food while conserving biodiversity.

5h

NASA-NOAA satellite sees land-falling Hurricane Florence

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of Hurricane Florence the morning of landfall. Infrared imagery showed the power and the extent of this massive storm.

5h

Big data studies scrutinize links between fatty liver disease and how cells make energy

Three recent studies investigate changes in mitochondria, the cell's energy producers, as fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses to steatohepatosis (NASH). The first two studies illuminate how mitochondrial energy production stutters and fails; the third describes how changes to the liver during disease progression affect the organ's use of nutrients to produce energy.

5h

Religious upbringing linked to better health and well-being during early adulthood

Participating in spiritual practices during childhood and adolescence may be a protective factor for a range of health and well-being outcomes in early adulthood, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

5h

Undocumented immigrants least likely to see a doctor, but still healthier than other populations

Undocumented immigrants have the worst rates of health care utilization and access, numbers that are worse than 15 years ago and are likely to continue their downward trend. However, they have lower risk of chronic disease than other immigrants and U.S. citizens.

5h

RUDN chemists created a precise model of chemical bonds in diazone dyes

Chemists from RUDN carried out detailed analysis of the nature of intermolecular bonds between nitrogen and chlorine in the molecules of azo dyes and defined their photochromic properties. The scientists also clarified the importance of hydrogen and halogen intermolecular bonds in the stabilization of dyes structure. The research can be useful for all the types of azo dyes applications. The articl

5h

Sniffing out error in detection dog data

New research finds three alternative answers beyond errors in handler or dog training that can explain why dogs trained to identify scat for conservation purposes sometimes collect non-target scats.

6h

Viruses under the microscope

Human herpesviruses such as HHV-6 can remain dormant in cells for many years without being noticed. When reactivated, they can cause serious clinical conditions. Researchers have now found a way of differentiating between active and inactive viruses.

6h

Helping computers fill in the gaps between video frames

Researchers have developed an add-on module that helps artificial intelligence systems called convolutional neural networks, or CNNs, to fill in the gaps between video frames to greatly improve the network's activity recognition.

6h

Suspending young students risks future success in school

New research finds that young suspended students — especially boys — are likely to be suspended again later in elementary school.

6h

Mixed chemicals in beauty products may harm women's hormones

Researchers have discovered links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products and changes in reproductive hormones.

6h

Expedited partner therapy: With STDs at an all-time high, why aren't more people getting a proven treatment?

In a new paper, physicians describe the barriers that stand in the way of getting expedited partner therapy to more people.

6h

Appetite for shark fin soup serious risk to threatened sharks

Fishing pressure on threatened shark populations has increased dramatically in recent years and it is urgent that consumers reject shark fin products altogether, new study asserts.

6h

The art of storytelling: Researchers explore why we relate to characters

For thousands of years, humans have relied on storytelling to engage, to share emotions and to relate personal experiences. Now, psychologists are exploring the mechanisms deep within the brain to better understand just what happens when we communicate.

6h

VLBA measures asteroid's characteristics

Astronomers took advantage of a celestial alignment to make a novel and creative radio observation yielding information about the size, shape, and orbit of an asteroid.

6h

Video: How Elvis Introduced Paul McCartney to the Remote Control

The former Beatle talks about clickers, click tracks, and more in this video interview.

6h

Ontario women to get PET scans to help plan treatment in locally advanced cervix cancer

An Ontario clinical study that shows adding PET imaging to conventional CT imaging to stage locally advanced cervix cancer can change treatment means newly diagnosed women in this province may also receive PET imaging.

6h

China's energy policies must balance air quality, carbon emissions and water scarcity goals

The use of coal-based synthetic natural gas, known by the acronym 'SNG,' would increase carbon emissions and water demand, especially in regions in China that already have high per capita carbon emissions and water scarcity, according to a study in Nature Sustainability.

6h

Flu shot rates in clinics drop as day progresses, but nudges help give them a boost

Primary care clinics experienced a significant decline in influenza vaccinations as the day progressed, researchers from Penn Medicine report in a new study published in JAMA Open Network. However, 'nudging' clinical staff to order vaccines using a behavioral economics technique known as 'active choice' may help curb some of that drop off, the study suggests. The study is the first to show how cli

6h

Financial incentives for cholesterol control may be cost-effective

A program that offered financial incentives to both patients and their physicians to control low-density lipoproteins (LDL) cholesterol could be a cost-effective intervention for patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

6h

Overall well-being of a population associated with less per capita medicare spending

A new study in JAMA Network Open finds that the overall well-being of a population on a county level is associated with lower healthcare spending for each Medicare fee-for-service beneficiary.

6h

Study examines law enforcement-inflicted injuries using California hospital data

An analysis of hospital visits in California shows trends in injuries inflicted by law enforcement officers in the line of duty and how those injuries were associated with the race and ethnicity of individuals they encountered.

6h

Novel framework to address uncertainty in water management

IIASA researchers have developed a general decision-making framework to support policy decisions on the management of water resources, which, for the first time, explicitly takes into account the associated uncertainties.

6h

'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought — and could help spare habitats

New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the 'least bad' option for feeding the world while saving its species — provided use of such 'land-efficient' systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland.

6h

Pesticid-mareridt: Drikkevandsforurening femdoblet på et år

95 gange blev der sendt vand ud til forbrugerne med pesticidrester over grænseværdien sidste år, viser ny opgørelse. Et nyopdaget pesticid er hovedsynderen og det værste, som vandværkerne har oplevet.

6h

Hurricane category ratings can be misleading. Check out these deadly ‘minor’ storms.

Environment Water kills far more than wind. On its way to the North Carolina coast, Hurricane Florence weakened, yet simultaneously meteorologists warned that it was becoming more dangerous. That might seem…

6h

Trees reveal the evolution of environmental pollution

Chemical analysis of tipuana tree rings and bark by Brazilian researchers shows falling levels of heavy metal pollution in the air of São Paulo City, Southern Hemisphere's largest metropolis.

6h

Largest study of 'post-treatment controllers' reveals clues about HIV remission

Much remains unknown about a group of individuals known as HIV post-treatment controllers, including how rare this ability is. Two new studies explore the characteristics of this group as well as the biological mechanisms that may help explain this unique ability.

6h

Programmable materials: Hydrogels capable of complex movement created

Researchers have developed a process by which 2-D hydrogels can be programmed to expand and shrink in a space- and time-controlled way that applies force to their surfaces, enabling the formation of complex 3-D shapes and motions.

6h

BPA replacements in plastics cause reproductive problems in lab mice

Twenty years ago, researchers made the accidental discovery that BPA had leached out of plastic cages used to house female mice in the lab, causing an increase in chromosomally abnormal eggs. Now, the same team is back to report that the array of alternative bisphenols now used to replace BPA in BPA-free bottles, cups, cages, and other items appear to come with similar problems for their mice.

6h

People show confirmation bias even about which way dots are moving

People have a tendency to interpret new information in a way that supports their pre-existing beliefs, a phenomenon known as confirmation bias. Now, researchers have shown that people will do the same thing even when the decision they've made pertains to a choice that is rather less consequential: which direction a series of dots is moving and whether the average of a series of numbers is greater

6h

Eyes have a natural version of night vision

To see under starlight and moonlight, the retina of the eye changes both the software and hardware of its light-sensing cells to create a kind of night vision. Retinal circuits that were thought to be unchanging and programmed for specific tasks actively adapt to different light conditions, say the scientists who made the discovery.

6h

BUFFALO charges towards the earliest galaxies

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has started a new mission to shed light on the evolution of the earliest galaxies in the Universe. The BUFFALO survey will observe six massive galaxy clusters and their surroundings. The first observations show the galaxy cluster Abell 370 and a host of magnified, gravitationally lensed galaxies around it.

6h

The walking dead: Fossils on the move can distort patterns of mass extinctions

Using the fossil record to accurately estimate the timing and pace of past mass extinctions is no easy task, and a new study highlights how fossil evidence can produce a misleading picture if not interpreted with care.

6h

World speed record for polymer simulations shattered by over a hundred-fold

By analogy to linear polymers, which reptate with a random walk embedded in a 3D network, we show that star polymers relax by a random walk in a 5D network.

6h

New method promises fewer side effects from cancer drugs

A recent achievement in the field of protein research allows for better tailored pharmaceuticals with fewer side effects.

6h

Calorie counts on restaurant menus have customers ordering less

Researchers conducted a randomized experiment and found that diners at full service restaurants whose menus listed calories ordered meals with 3 percent fewer calories — about 45 calories less — than those who had menus without calorie information. Customers ordered fewer calories in their appetizer and entree courses, but their dessert and drink orders remained the same.

6h

Leptospirosis strains identified in Uruguay cattle

Leptospirosis infections, caused by Leptospira bacteria, occur in people and animals around the world, but different strains of the bacteria may vary in their ability to cause disease and to jump between species. Now, researchers have for the first time described the characteristics of the Leptospira variants that infect cattle in Uruguay.

6h

Disrupting genetic processes reverses aging in human cells

Research has shed new light on genetic processes that may one day lead to the development of therapies that can slow, or even reverse, how our cells age.

6h

Anti-inflammatory diet linked to reduced risk of early death

A new study finds that adhering to an anti-inflammatory diet is associated with lower risks of dying from any cause, dying from cardiovascular causes, and dying from cancer.

6h

Poorest Americans most likely to have used prescription opioids

New research finds that among older Americans, the poorest are the most likely to have used prescription opioids. The study also raises important questions about access to pain management options for the disadvantaged in the current climate of the opioid epidemic.

6h

Carrier status matters in foot-and-mouth disease

Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is believed to be one of the most contagious pathogens of animals in its acute form; however, there is still controversy over whether it is transmissible from asymptomatic, long-term carriers. Despite the lack of evidence for transmission by direct contact with FMDV carrier cattle, there is demonstrable contagion associated with these animals, according to a new

6h

New plant species discovered in museum is probably extinct

A single non-photosynthetic plant specimen preserved in a Japanese natural history museum has been identified as a new species. However, it is highly possible that this species is already extinct.

6h

NASA-NOAA satellite sees land-falling Hurricane Florence

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of Hurricane Florence the morning of landfall. Infrared imagery showed the power and the extent of this massive storm.

6h

'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought—and could help spare habitats

Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

6h

China's energy policies must balance air quality, carbon emissions and water scarcity goals

Committed to addressing the country's severe air pollution, China is attempting a shift from coal to natural gas and is considering a variety of sources, including domestic and imported gas options as well as creating its own synthetic gas from coal.

6h

Novel framework to address uncertainty in water management

International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) researchers have developed a general decision-making framework to support policy decisions on the management of water resources, which, for the first time, explicitly takes into account the associated uncertainties.

6h

Europe's farmers on red alert as deadly African swine fever spreads to Belgium

Calls for a mass cull of wild boars to protect pork industry after disease is found in two animals in Gaume An outbreak of African swine fever terrorising pig farmers in Europe has dramatically escalated with the confirmation that the deadly infectious disease has spread to Belgium. The discovery of the highly contagious disease in two wild boars found dead near the town of Étalle, in Gaume, has

6h

Why a rake on the moon messed up our theories of life on Earth

We may have overestimated how many meteorites have hit the moon and Earth in the last 500 million years because Apollo astronauts didn’t dig deep enough

6h

Nuclear pasta in neutron stars may be the strongest material in the universe

Simulations suggest that the theoretical substance known as nuclear pasta is 10 billion times as strong as steel.

6h

Gut bacteria's shocking secret: They produce electricity

To date, most electricity-generating bacteria have come from weird environments, but researchers have found more than 100 in the human microbiome, both pathogenic and probiotic. They were unsuspected because they employ a different and simpler extracellular electron transfer system, which may prove useful in creating bacterial batteries. Their electrogenic ability may be important in infectivity,

7h

3 ways to make better decisions — by thinking like a computer | Tom Griffiths

If you ever struggle to make decisions, here's a talk for you. Cognitive scientist Tom Griffiths shows how we can apply the logic of computers to untangle tricky human problems, sharing three practical strategies for making better decisions — on everything from finding a home to choosing which restaurant to go to tonight.

7h

Conrad Shawcross review – beware of the toppling tetrahedrons

Victoria Miro Gallery, London Science smashes into art in this staggeringly ambitious attempt to map out reason itself I can’t remember the last time an artist explained a body of work to me by referring to Thomas Kuhn’s 1962 book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions . Come to think of it they never have before. According to Kuhn, the history of science progresses not through evolution but sud

7h

Image: Northeast Ethiopia

The Copernicus Sentinel-1B satellite takes us over Semera in northeast Ethiopia. Semera is a new town with a population of just over 2600 and serves as the capital of the Afar region. The region spans an estimated 270 000 sq km, from close to the border with Eritrea towards the capital of Addis Ababa.

7h

When 80 microns is enough

Physicists report in Nature magazine how they have sent and controlled a spin current across longer distances than ever before — and in a material that was previously considered unsuitable for the task.

7h

Best Practices for Sample Preparation and Lipid Extraction from Various Samples

Download this white paper from Bertin Technologies to learn how to extract and analyze lipid samples from various models!

7h

Why we're so self-critical of ourselves after meeting someone new

A new study discovers the “liking gap” — the difference between how we view others we’re meeting for the first time, and the way we think they’re seeing us. Read More

7h

Thousands of autistic girls and women 'going undiagnosed' due to gender bias

Number of girls and women with the condition in UK may be vastly underestimated, leading neuroscientist says Hundreds of thousands of girls and women with autism are going undiagnosed due to it being viewed as a “male condition”, according to one of the UK’s leading neuroscientists. Prof Francesca Happé, director of the Social, Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry Centre at King’s College London, w

7h

Could coal ash be a viable source of rare-earth metals?

Rare-earth elements, including neodymium and yttrium, are not actually rare – more common, in fact, in the Earth's crust than copper and tin. But, because they are scattered widely, and hard to separate from their surrounding ores, mining and refining them is difficult.

7h

Using lignin to replace fossil materials

Ball-like lignin particles developed by researchers open up completely new possibilities for the utilisation of lignin.

7h

Detectors for online hate speech can be easily duped by humans, study shows

Hateful text and comments are an ever-increasing problem in online environments, yet addressing the rampant issue relies on being able to identify toxic content. A new study by the Aalto University Secure Systems research group has discovered weaknesses in many machine learning detectors currently used to recognize and keep hate speech at bay.

7h

The walking dead: Fossils on the move can distort patterns of mass extinctions

Using the fossil record to accurately estimate the timing and pace of past mass extinctions is no easy task, and a new study highlights how fossil evidence can produce a misleading picture if not interpreted with care.

7h

Knowledge transfer creates sustainable Blue Growth

Marine and maritime research plays a vital role in developing our understanding of the seas and creating technology and management techniques for their sustainable use. However, key results are not always widely transferred or fully exploited despite being significantly useful to stakeholders in science, policy, industry and society.

7h

The Risky Business of Branding Black Pain

“It is both humiliating and humbling to discover that a single generation after the events that constructed me as a public personality, I am remembered as a hairdo.” These are words from the Black Power icon and lifelong activist Angela Davis’s 1994 essay, “ Afro Images: Politics, Fashion, and Nostalgia .” In the years following her emergence as a Communist, a revolutionary for black freedom, an

7h

Japan's commercial whaling bid rejected by IWC

Japan's determined bid to return to commercial whale hunting was rejected by the International Whaling Commission (IWC) Friday in a tense vote that exposed a deep split in the 72-year old organization.

7h

Aerial survey reveals great diversity and abundance in NE Canyons Marine National Monument

Airborne marine biologists were amazed by the sheer abundance and diversity of large marine wildlife in their recent aerial survey of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, the only marine national monument on the East Coast, about 150 southeast of Cape Cod. Scientists with the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium documented more than 600 animal s

7h

Social class determines how the unemployed talk about food insecurity

"Cherry Blossom," a 39-year-old woman worked as a hotel breakfast bar hostess around the start of the "Great Recession." She lost her job, and three years later she was being interviewed to assess her struggles with her unemployment. She talked about her empty refrigerator.

7h

Kindness: An unsung climate change tool

When you think of climate change and community resilience, visions of seawalls, renewable energy projects and other physical things may come to mind.

7h

'Optical rocket' created with intense laser light

In a recent experiment at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, plasma electrons in the paths of intense laser light pulses were almost instantly accelerated close to the speed of light.

7h

Organic farming methods favors pollinators

Pollinating insects are endangered globally, with a particularly steep decline over the last 40 years. An extensive 3-year study from Lund University in Sweden has found that organic farming methods can contribute to halting the pollinator decline. This beneficial effect is due to both the absence of insecticides and a higher provision of flower resources.

7h

The textile reactor takes its place on the recycling landscape

A multi-year collaboration between researchers within Resource Recovery at the University of Borås, Sweden, and a textile manufacturing company is now yielding results – a new type of reactor made of a textile material has found its way onto the market in different parts of the world. The reactor transforms different kinds of waste into new products, such as biofuel.

7h

Suspending little kids can do more harm than good

When schools suspend kindergartners and first-graders, some find it a challenge to turn things around in their academic life, a new study shows. Further, these young suspended students—especially boys—are likely to be suspended again later in elementary school, says Zibei Chen, a research fellow at the University of Michigan School of Social Work. Schools often use suspensions to discipline stude

7h

Lone Narwhal Caught Chilling with Gang of Beluga Whales in Canada

It's hard to find your place when you’re the new kid in town — especially when you're the only kid with a tusk the size of a baguette jutting out of center of your forehead.

7h

Decline in auto sales slows US retail spending in August

Falling auto sales in August slowed US retail spending, but a higher-than-originally reported figure for July meant the overall pace was well above 2017, the government said Friday.

7h

Research in yeast leads to finding about a central nervous system disorder

Studying the fundamental aspects of biology can sometimes lead to unexpected findings that directly relate to human disease. In one of the latest examples of scientific serendipity, researchers from the Salk Institute found that an important quality control mechanism in baker's yeast is closely connected to hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, a debilitating disease found in children.

7h

How a tetrahedral substance can be more symmetrical than a spherical atom: A new type of symmetry

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have theoretically demonstrated that special tetrahedron nanostructures composed of certain metals have a higher degree of symmetry than the geometrical symmetry of spherical atoms. Nanomaterials with unique and unprecedented electrical and magnetic properties arising from this symmetry will be developed and used for next-generation electronic devices.

7h

World speed record for polymer simulations shattered by over a hundred-fold

By analogy to linear polymers, which reptate with a random walk embedded in a 3D network, we show that star polymers relax by a random walk in a 5D network.

7h

The Closest Exoplanet to Earth Could Be "Highly Habitable"

A new study suggests Proxima Centauri could sustain liquid water on its surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

When is a sea wall a good idea?

Recent hurricanes like Maria and Sandy have brought crippling winds, torrential rains, and flooding to vulnerable coastal regions, in some cases killing thousands of people. Sea walls and other barriers are often suggested as a way of protecting these low-lying coastal communities, but how large should such a wall be, and where is the most effective place to build it? At Columbia's Earth Institute

8h

Scientists reveal drumming helps schoolchildren diagnosed with autism

Children diagnosed with autism perform better in school if they participate in two 30-minute drumming sessions a week, according to a new scientific study.

8h

Most fire in Florida goes undetected

A new study indicates that common satellite imaging technologies have vastly underestimated the number of fires in Florida, detecting only 25 percent of burned area.

8h

Viruses under the microscope

Human herpesviruses such as HHV-6 can remain dormant in cells for many years without being noticed. When reactivated, they can cause serious clinical conditions. Researchers from Würzburg have now found a way of differentiating between active and inactive viruses.

8h

An innovative procedure improves the control of liquid intake during haemodyalisis

The lecturer and researcher in the Department of Health Sciences of the Public University of Navarre (NUP/UPNA) Mark Beyebach has conducted a pilot study to demonstrate the positive impact of solution-focussed communication by nurses towards their patients on haemodyalisis, so that the patients manage to reduce their liquid intake and thus contribute towards the satisfactory course of their treatm

8h

Organic farming methods favors pollinators

Pollinating insects are endangered globally, with a particularly steep decline over the last 40 years. An extensive 3-year study from Lund University in Sweden has found that organic farming methods can contribute to halting the pollinator decline. This beneficial effect is due to both the absence of insecticides and a higher provision of flower resources.

8h

The walking dead: Fossils on the move can distort patterns of mass extinctions

Using the fossil record to accurately estimate the timing and pace of past mass extinctions is no easy task, and a new study highlights how fossil evidence can produce a misleading picture if not interpreted with care.

8h

‘Elephant bird’ bones rewrite history of humans on Madagascar

Humans arrived on the tropical island of Madagascar more than 6,000 years earlier than previously thought based on an analysis of bones from what was once the world’s largest bird, according to a new study. Researchers discovered that ancient bones from the extinct Madagascan elephant birds ( Aepyornis and Mullerornis ) show cut marks and depression fractures consistent with hunting and butchery

8h

Your phone screen is probably too bright—here's how to darken it beyond the built-in limit

DIY Save your eyes at night. When your bedroom is pitch black, you unlock your phone…and blazing light sears your eyes. Here's how to dim the screen beyond the lowest brightness setting.

8h

A Decade-Old Attack Can Break the Encryption of Most PCs

The computer industry thought cold boot hacks were solved 10 years ago. Researchers have proven that's not the case.

8h

Recognising tsunamis risks

Researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Bern are studying lakes in Switzerland to learn about tsunamis and their hazard, what triggers them, and how often they have occurred in the past.

8h

The Scent Of A Flower

The Scent Of A Flower Is pollution killing a flower’s scent? The Scent Of A Flower Video of The Scent Of A Flower Earth Friday, September 14, 2018 – 09:00 Emilie Lorditch, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Would a fresh bouquet of flowers lose its appeal if it didn’t smell? Or what if you could no longer buy your favorite perfume? Find out why scientists are studying how pollution is interfering w

8h

Obesity can boost your risk of asthma

Obesity changes how airway muscles function, which increases the risk of developing asthma, a new study suggests. The prevalence of asthma and obesity—as both separate and coexisting conditions—has grown considerably in the United States in recent years. Obesity is a major risk factor for asthma, in part, because of the systemic and localized inflammation of the airways that occurs in people with

8h

Ancient altar reveals Mayan 'Game of Thrones' dynasty

A 1,500 year old Mayan altar discovered in a small archeological site in northern Guatemala is drawing comparisons to popular fantasy drama television series "Game of Thrones" for its descriptions of the Kaanul dynasty's political strategies aimed at bringing entire cities under its control.

8h

Peer effects, personal characteristics and asset allocation

Both academic researchers and practitioners know that behavioural biases can drive household financial decisions away from standard finance models, and that people don't always follow the professional advice they receive. Peer effects have been found to influence financial decision making, but it can be hard to know the relative importance of different influences. For example, does an individual l

8h

Cities that never sleep: How the modern world blurs the boundaries between night and day

Night has always been a difficult realm for humans: we've had to learn to cope with the cold and the dark to thrive in it. Since the industrial revolution we've found ways to adapt our homes and cities to operate during the night. But as our conquest of the dark continues, the border between night and day is becoming increasingly blurry.

8h

Emergency mobile

Medical emergencies inevitably require an urgent response from doctors and other healthcare workers. Response time can mean the difference between life and death. As such, there are ongoing efforts in many areas of research to find technological approaches to reducing response times in order to improve medical outcomes. Writing in the International Journal of High Performance Computing and Network

8h

Searching through noise for pros and cons

Structured decision-making support: The research project "ArgumenText" in the field of Ubiquitous Knowledge Processing has found a way to filter concrete pro and con arguments on any topic from amongst the noise of the internet.

8h

Sniffing out poop error in detection dog data

A new study in the journal Scientific Reports gets to the bottom of it: Why do dogs that are trained to locate poop sometimes find the wrong kind of poop?

8h

Hurricane Florence Is Dumping a Huge Amount of Rain on the Carolinas

The storm's winds are no longer as strong as they once were, but the rainfall is already approaching 'catastrophic.'

8h

Kühnau har holdt hastemøde efter protest fra medarbejdere

Medarbejdernes udvandring fra et møde i regionens samarbejdsudvalg i går har gjort, at Kühnau i dag har indkaldt til hastemøde.

8h

Sniffing out error in detection dog data

New research finds three alternative answers beyond errors in handler or dog training that can explain why dogs trained to identify scat for conservation purposes sometimes collect non-target scats.

8h

Hate speech-detecting AIs are fools for 'love'

Hateful text and comments are an ever-increasing problem in online environments, yet addressing the rampant issue relies on being able to identify toxic content. A new study by the Aalto University Secure Systems research group has discovered weaknesses in many machine learning detectors currently used to recognize and keep hate speech at bay.

8h

Aerial survey reveals great diversity & abundance in NE Canyons Marine National Monument

Airborne marine biologists were amazed by the sheer abundance and diversity of large marine wildlife in their recent aerial survey of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, the only marine national monument on the East Coast, about 150 southeast of Cape Cod.

8h

Social class determines how the unemployed talk about food insecurity

'Cherry Blossom,' a 39-year-old woman worked as a hotel breakfast bar hostess around the start of the 'Great Recession.' She lost her job, and three years later she was being interviewed to assess her struggles with her unemployment. She talked about her empty refrigerator.A study by University of Missouri researchers that began as a survey of unemployment following the recession, led researchers

8h

Advanced biomaterials with silk fibroin-bioactive glass to engineer patient-specific 3-D bone grafts

The complex architecture of bone is challenging to recreate in the lab. Therefore, advances in bone tissue engineering (BTE) aim to build patient-specific grafts that assist bone repair and trigger specific cell-signaling pathways. Materials scientists in regenerative medicine and BTE progressively develop new materials for active biological repair at a site of defect post-implantation to accelera

8h

Vital for life, heat and power – what you never knew about salt water

Your tongue is a salt detector – it dissolves the solid salt crystals sprinkled on your chips to create an intense flavour sensation.

8h

'Sleeping Beauties' and the importance of storytelling in science

I'm a regular biomedical scientist, although in one sense I'm perhaps a bit different, in that I really like the process of writing.

8h

Was this huge river delta on Mars the place where its oceans finally disappeared?

For some time, scientists have known that Mars was once a much warmer and wetter environment than it is today. However, between 4.2 and 3.7 billion years ago, its atmosphere was slowly stripped away, which turned the surface into the cold and desiccated place we know today. Even after multiple missions have confirmed the presence of ancient lake beds and rivers, there are still unanswered question

8h

Tiny protein has big impact in times of stress

Ribosomes churn out proteins that carry out all of life's functions, but when missing a key and previously overlooked factor, they can break down in times of stress, Yale University scientists have discovered.

8h

Dietary fiber reduces brain inflammation during aging

As mammals age, immune cells in the brain known as microglia become chronically inflamed. In this state, they produce chemicals known to impair cognitive and motor function. That's one explanation for why memory fades and other brain functions decline during old age. But, according to a new study, there may be a remedy to delay the inevitable: dietary fiber.

8h

How skin begins: New research could improve skin grafts, and more

Researchers have discovered a key mechanism by which skin begins to develop in embryos.

8h

Gut microbes' role in mammals' evolution starts to become clearer

Scientists have made a key advance toward understanding which of the trillions of gut microbes may play important roles in how humans and other mammals evolve.

8h

We have more than enough calories, but what about other nutrients?

A new study is the first to quantitatively map the flow of energy, protein, fat, essential amino acids and micronutrients from 'field-to-fork' at a global level and identify hotspots where nutrients are lost. The study shows that while we produce far more nutrients than is required for the global population, inefficiencies in the supply chain leave many people nutrient deficient.

8h

Probiotic use may reduce antibiotic prescriptions

The use of probiotics is linked to reduced need for antibiotic treatment in infants and children, according to a review of studies that probed the benefits of probiotics, co-led by a Georgetown investigator.

8h

Geologists reveal ancient connection between England and France

The British mainland was formed from the collision of not two, but three ancient continental land masses, according to new research.

8h

Efficacy of pre-event planning will be key as Florence hits, urban planner says

A University of Kansas urban planning researcher who has researched long-term risks and natural disasters in the North Carolina region is available to discuss the potential effects of Hurricane Florence, which is expected to hit the East Coast in coming days.

8h

Telescope captures ‘wind’ from distant star-forming galaxy

Scientists have for the first time observed a powerful galactic “wind” of molecules in a galaxy seen when the universe was only one billion years old. The discovery, made using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, or ALMA, offers insights into how certain galaxies in the early universe were able to self-regulate their growth so they could continue forming stars across cosmic time. So

8h

Heart-tugging tales of crowdfunded cancer ‘cures’ fuel quack medicine

Media stories about people with cancer seeking controversial cures are unwittingly bolstering unscientific and potentially harmful treatments, says Michael Marshall

8h

BPA exposure in US-approved levels may alter insulin response in non-diabetic adults

In a first study of its kind study, researchers have found that a common chemical consumers are exposed to several times a day may be altering insulin release. Results of the study, led by scientists at the University of Missouri, indicate that the Food and Drug Administration-approved 'safe' daily exposure amount of BPA may be enough to have implications for the development of Type 2 diabetes and

8h

Give Sandra Oh the Emmy, but 'Killing Eve' Deserved More Nominations

The BBC America show was easily the most revolutionary of 2018—and it deserves more recognition.

8h

Why Big Tech and the Government Need to Work Together

Opinion: Former Secretary of Defense Ash Carter argues for cooperation between tech workers and the DoD

8h

Halving greenhouse gas emissions by 2030: Roadmap shows what's needed in each sector

A new report shows the potential for all sectors of global economy—energy, food and agriculture, industry, buildings and transport—to halve greenhouse gas emissions by around 2030. Stronger policies, the digital revolution and greater climate leadership are necessary to accelerate the economic transformation, say the authors.

8h

Burning Man's Mathematical Underbelly

It’s mostly an art festival, but attendees are impressively fascinated with science and math — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Journey of Gold (360 Video)

Every day you may hold a piece of the Congo in the palm of your hand. Not just used in banking and jewelry, gold can be found in many consumer and industrial products, including cell phones, health care equipment and even airplanes. But have you ever stopped to ask where it comes from? How it's bought and sold? Or who are the people behind the product? Join us in “The Journey of Gold”, an experie

8h

Jes Søgaard stopper i Kræftens Bekæmpelse

Sundhedsøkonom Jes Søgaard, der de seneste år har været ansat som først afdelingsleder og siden cheføkonom i Kræftens Bekæmpelse, stopper efter gensidig aftale.

8h

Rusland spreder nye teorier i sagen om hullet rumfartøj

I sagen om det hullede rumfartøj Soyuz oplyser russiske kilder, at man arbejder på en ny teori om amerikansk indblanding. Nasa-astronaut afviser blankt.

9h

Rooting out the errors in climate models to better predict hurricanes

On the eve of every hurricane season, climatologists around the world offer their studied prognostications: Will we see high activity? Low activity? How will ocean temperature affect storm development? What are the chances of a powerful storm making landfall?

9h

The 'new social work' is performance-based practice, researcher suggests

Rather than social work practice being based solely on a therapist's intuition and assumptions, social workers should consider a system of evaluation and measurement based on hard data, suggests a professor of social work at Washington University in St. Louis.

9h

Trees reveal the evolution of environmental pollution

In an article published in the journal Environmental Pollution, Brazilian researchers have showed that tree species Tipuana tipu have been successfully employed as a marker of atmospheric pollution by heavy metal and other chemical compounds in Sao Paulo, Brazil's biggest metropolis.

9h

Watch: Hurricane Florence Preparations

The Scientist speaks with a researcher who is also the mayor of a coastal town in the path of the storm.

9h

Study confirms adopting truth commissions and justice measures in post-authoritarian regimes lowers homicide rates

Nations that adopt transitional justice measures, such as truth commissions and judicial prosecutions for past human rights violations, experience lower homicide rates and lower levels of criminal violence, according to new research led by University of Notre Dame Associate Professor Guillermo Trejo and published in the Journal of Peace Research.

9h

A call to protect much more land and sea from human encroachment

A noted figure in the science world has paired with a colleague to pen an editorial for the journal Science. Jonathan Baillie, executive VP and chief scientist at the National Geographic Society and Ya-Ping Zhang with the Chinese Academy of Sciences have published a paper strongly supporting the idea of establishing many more land and sea areas as protected sites. Failure to do so, they warn, coul

9h

People Don't Know When They're Being Jerks

Compared to other self-knowledge, people are bad at knowing when they're being rude.

9h

Få alle nyheder fra den store lungekongres i Paris

Dagens Medicin har to videnskabsjournalister klar til rapportere om ny forskning, når ERS-kongressen i morgen åbner i Paris.

9h

John Legend’s EGOT and the Seduction of Symbolic Racial Progress

The announcement earlier this week that John Legend has achieved EGOT status—that is, the entertainment industry’s Emmy/Grammy/Oscar/Tony quadruple crown—affirmed him as a man for all stages. The past decade and a half since Legend broke into mainstream popular music with 2004’s piano solo “Ordinary People” has been marked with successes for the nimble entertainer. On top of his 10 Grammys , incl

9h

The Brilliant, Playful, Bloodthirsty Raven

Lucille Clerc I can make a passable imitation of a raven’s low, guttural croak, and whenever I see a wild one flying overhead I have an irresistible urge to call up to it in the hope that it will answer back. Sometimes I do, and sometimes it does; it’s a moment of cross-species communication that never fails to thrill. Ravens are strangely magical birds. Partly that magic is made by us. They have

9h

When to evacuate residents during a wildfire

When a wildfire breaks out and approaches a community, how do emergency managers decide when residents should evacuate?

9h

Giant iceberg escapes

In July 2017, one of the largest icebergs on record calved from the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica. However, sea ice to the east and shallow waters to the north kept this giant berg, named A68, hemmed in. So for more than a year it wafted to and fro, but never left its parent ice shelf's side. Strong winds blowing from Larsen C have finally given it the push it was waiting for. In early Septembe

9h

New method promises fewer side effects from cancer drugs

Protein research is one of the hottest areas in medical research because proteins make it possible to develop far more effective pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diabetes, cancer and other illnesses.

9h

Cannibal Nutrition and Self-Colonoscopies Win Accolades at the 2018 Ig Nobels

Who went home with the top prizes at the 2018 Ig Nobels?

9h

Could A Ban On Fishing In International Waters Become A Reality?

As the United Nations meets to discuss high-seas biodiversity, scientists and activists say that while a fishing ban could profoundly help protect sea life, it may also be impossible to enforce. (Image credit: Christopher Costello/NPR)

9h

*Spider-Man* Story: There Are Two Sides to Every Memetic Breakup

Just ask the people who got all excited about the marriage proposal hidden in Insomniac's new PS4 game.

9h

Hurricane Florence: Evacuating Cities Struggle to Help Those Who Can't Drive

As storms like Hurricane Florence get more serious and the US population ages, a tricky logistical problem will only become more important.

9h

New NASA Satellite's Lasers Will Track Tiny Changes in Polar Ice

NASA's ICESat-2 will watch over the planet's polar ice to improve forecasts of sea level rise.

9h

Image of the Day: The Imitation Game

A bioinspired robot helps researchers study insect flight.

9h

Fatal gas explosions rock Massachusetts towns—and the cause is still unclear

Science Here's everything we know. Dozens of gas explosions rocked the Massachusetts towns of Lawrence, North Andover and Andover on Thursday evening, killing at least one person.

9h

Why Hurricane Florence is unusual and dangerous

Hurricane Florence is expected to bring heavy rains and dangerous storm surge to the Carolinas between Thursday and Saturday. Image: NOAA

9h

A very special protein synthesis machinery

Sleeping sickness-causing parasites contain an unusual protein synthesis mechanism. A team of researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Bern have resolved its very special structure for the first time. Ribosomes are among the most important molecular machines within the cell, and have hardly changed in the course of evolution. Their function is to read copies of our genes, or building plan

9h

Men enjoy their jobs less than they do housework on average, research says

Men enjoy their jobs less than they do housework, and feeling rushed is one of the reasons, research says.

9h

Ryanair announces preliminary deal with Italian staff

Budget airline Ryanair announced on Friday that it has reached an agreement with flight crew unions in Italy to provide employment contracts under Italian law.

9h

South Africa Pushes Science to Improve Daily Life

Sweeping policy changes aim to refocus research efforts on poverty, unemployment, drought and other national problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Hurricane Florence Makes Landfall in North Carolina, Slams US Southeast Coast with Raging Winds and Rain

The brunt of Hurricane Florence slammed North Carolina this morning with winds raging an astonishing 90 mph (150 km/h), according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

9h

Groundwork for playing with the architecture of plants

Growing tomatoes at the same height so that they can be easily picked by a harvesting robot. Growing deeper roots where the soil is dry. These types of changes to plant architecture may well be enabled in the future thanks to scientists from Wageningen University & Research who have shown how to stimulate stem cells in a specific spot. "We have proven a simple model for organising stem cells at a

10h

Half-billion-year-old fossils offer new clues to how life exploded on the sea floor

Stephen Pates, a researcher from Oxford University's Department of Zoology, has uncovered secrets from the ancient oceans.

10h

Lego-style solar panels to smash energy bills

Ready-made snap-together solar panels that turn waste heat into hot water are being developed at Brunel University London in a £10 million sustainable energy scheme starting next month.

10h

Gravity theory saved from death

An international group of astronomers, including physicists at the University of St Andrews, has revived a previously debunked theory of gravity, arguing that motions within dwarf galaxies would be slower if close to a massive galaxy.

10h

MarCO makes space for small explorers

Twenty years ago, CubeSats—a class of boxy satellites small enough to fit in a backpack—were used by universities as a teaching aid. Simpler, smaller and cheaper than traditional satellites, they've made space more accessible to private companies and science agencies.

10h

Hurricanes Are Especially Hard on Children

In 2005, Hurricane Katrina displaced hundreds of thousands of people, possibly more , and in the following two years, Shannon Self-Brown kept up with more than 400 of them. Self-Brown, now the chair of the health-policy-and-behavioral-sciences department at Georgia State University’s School of Public Health, and her fellow researchers wanted to better understand how parents and children coped wit

10h

How Will Police Solve Murders on Mars?

I f humans ever go to Mars, the worst of our impulses will accompany us there. The Red Planet will not rid us of murder, violence, and blackmail. There will be kidnapping, extortion, and burglary. Given time, we will even see bank heists. For generations, people have imagined life on the Martian surface in extraordinary detail, from how drinking water will be purified to how fresh food will be gr

10h

Iran’s Pompeii: Astounding story of a massacre buried for millennia

The ancient town of Hasanlu was under savage attack when a chance event meant every detail was frozen in time. Finally the story can be told, and the assailants unmasked

10h

Governors And Mayors Pledge More Emissions Cuts To Fight Climate Change

Governors and mayors from around the world are making new pledges to cut carbon emissions. They're in San Francisco this week, trying to counter the Trump administration's rollbacks on climate change.

10h

Cities lead the way on curbing carbon emissions

Twenty-seven leading cities see their greenhouse gas emissions peak and decline over the past five years.

10h

‘Poached’ offers a deep, disturbing look into the illegal wildlife trade

In ‘Poached,’ a journalist reports from the front lines of the illegal wildlife trade and shows how conservationists are fighting back.

10h

To Solve Flying Cars' Battery Problem, Tie Them to Power Lines

To get around concerns of battery capacity and weight, Karman Electric wants flying cars to draw juice from the ground, like an inverted streetcar system.

10h

Enter the Age of Borderless Memes

South Korean teens scarfing down massive piles of food for an internet audience of millions have inspired imitators worldwide, including American YouTube celebrities—making the "mukbang" trend an early success story of the global internet.

10h

An Equator Full of Hurricanes Shows a Preview of End Times

The climate has changed, and our planet is growing less habitable.

10h

Searching for Life on Mars through the Lens of Greenland

Mini-ecosystems on the island's huge ice sheet could help us look for life on the Red Planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Applying metamaterials to quantum optics paves the way for new interdisciplinary studies

Two teams of scientists from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have collaborated to conduct groundbreaking research leading to the development of a new and innovative scientific field: Quantum Metamaterials. The findings are presented in a new joint paper published in the journal Science.

10h

Race to rescue people stranded in US hurricane

Emergency crews in North Carolina scrambled Friday to rescue hundreds of people stranded in their homes by flood waters unleashed by Hurricane Florence.

11h

The Environment's New Clothes: Biodegradable Textiles Grown from Live Organisms

To combat the ill effects of “fast fashion,” designers look for more sustainable methods — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

We’ve found a pulsar spinning so slowly that it shouldn’t exist

Radio pulsars sweep beams of radiation across space like interstellar lighthouses as they spin, and now we’ve found one that breaks all the rules

11h

AI tries bad improv comedy to trick people into thinking it is human

Artificial intelligence has joined forces with a group of actors to create spontaneous comedy sketches on stage. The result is a new variant of the Turing test

11h

British Airways risikerer milliardbøde efter datatyveri

Tyveriet af 380.000 kunders kreditkortoplysninger kan blive ekstremt dyr for British Airways, hvis det britiske datatilsyn vurderer, at luftfartsselskabet ikke havde implementeret nødvendige sikkerhedsforanstaltninger.

11h

Første pornografiske computerspil klar på Steam

I dag udkommer det første 100 procent ucensorerede computerspil på Steam.

11h

Kunstgræsbaner eller legetøj: Grænser for giftstoffer skal være ens, mener EU

Der er strengere krav til forbrugerprodukter end til gummigranulat i kunstgræs, selv om anvendelsen ligner hinanden.

11h

The Fatal Flaw That Doomed the Oslo Accords

It hardly seems possible that it’s been 25 years since the signing of the Oslo Accords, that hopeful moment when peace between Palestinians and Israelis seemed at hand. In retrospect, the Accords seem less a triumph than an abject failure. Most observers, trying to understand what went wrong, fight over who to blame. The more constructive question is not who, but rather what, to blame. What doome

11h

Who’s Left Covering Brooklyn With the Big Newspapers in Retreat?

L iena Zagare had always seen them around the neighborhood. They were at the bus stop, at the corner food mart, and all around Coney Island Avenue in Brooklyn’s Ditmas Park. In one way or another, they were part of the community. But then last April, Zagare received a distressed message from a neighbor, alerting her that something seemed terribly wrong: “Where have all the crazy people gone?” Zag

11h

Roma Is Netflix’s Most Compelling Big-Screen Argument Yet

In the middle of Roma , Alfonso Cuarón’s intimate and epic account of his childhood in early-1970s Mexico City, the film journeys outside of the capital and visits a local strongman in the countryside who’s training a group of young men in martial arts. As Cuarón’s camera takes in the stunning vista of dozens of bodies moving in unison, the strongman announces that he will perform his most impres

11h

Dealing With an Out-of-Control President, in 1973

In August 1974 Richard Nixon would resign from the presidency after the Watergate scandal eroded his public support and Congress initiated impeachment proceedings against him. But in November 1973, the fate of his presidency was still uncertain; the full story behind Watergate was just coming to light, illuminating a historic “expansion and abuse of presidential power,” in the words of the histor

11h

The Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2018

Understanding the latest innovations—and their challenges—will help society determine how to maximize their benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2018

Disruptive solutions that are poised to change the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Hør ugens podcast: Skræddersyede produkter fra fabrikken

I masseproduktionens tidsalder skulle vi bare have de samme mærkevarer, som alle andre. Men nu går tendensen mod, at vi kan bestille personaliserede produkter, der opfylder vores særlige behov og udtrykker vores personlighed.

12h

Se handsken, der rørte Månen som den sidste

‘Cape Louisiana’ udstiller månesten, kærlig­hedsdigte, rumskrot og Eugene Cernans handske fra sidste besøg på månen.

12h

Nyt hybridt nanomateriale kan moduleres som Lego-klodser

DTU Kemi har udviklet et nyt nanomateriale, hvis egenskaber kan designes langt mere nøjagtigt, end man kender fra andre 2D-materialer. Grundforskningen skal bruges til endnu hurtigere kvantecomputere og fremtidens superledere.

12h

Geologists reveal ancient connection between England and France

The British mainland was formed from the collision of not two, but three ancient continental land masses, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

12h

TAVR associated with shorter hospital stay, compared to SAVR

Patients who underwent TAVR had a significantly shorter length of stay and were significantly less likely to be transferred to a skilling nursing facility compared to patients who underwent SAVR, a new study finds.

12h

Probiotic use may reduce antibiotic prescriptions, researchers say

The use of probiotics is linked to reduced need for antibiotic treatment in infants and children, according to a review of studies that probed the benefits of probiotics, co-led by a Georgetown investigator.

12h

We have more than enough calories, but what about other nutrients?

A new study is the first to quantitatively map the flow of energy, protein, fat, essential amino acids and micronutrients from 'field-to-fork' at a global level and identify hotspots where nutrients are lost. The study shows that while we produce far more nutrients than is required for the global population, inefficiencies in the supply chain leave many people nutrient deficient.

12h

It's Not Too Late to Prevent a Russia-China Axis

Chinese tanks splashed through the mud, while a few dozen helicopters flew in formation overhead in eastern Russia, and a young Chinese military recruit explained , “I have never experienced an overseas deployment of this scale.” The scene neatly summed up the much-written-about, enormous Russian military exercises that took place this week. Participants included 300,000 Russian and 3,200 Chinese

12h

Cornwall and south Devon 'originally part of mainland Europe'

Study reveals Britain acquired regions when struck by land bearing what is now France With what can only be described as unfortunate timing, researchers have discovered that there is a corner of Britain that will forever belong to mainland Europe. Analysis of rock from deep beneath the ground reveals that the UK only acquired Cornwall and parts of south Devon when it was struck by the landmass be

12h

We have more than enough calories, but what about other nutrients?

The United Nation's second Sustainable Development Goal targets the end of malnutrition in all forms by 2030. But new research shows that to meet this target, we need a different approach to assessing the nutrient sufficiency of the global food system. Published in Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems, this is the first study to quantitatively map the flow of energy, protein, fat, essential amino

12h

Geologists reveal ancient connection between England and France

The British mainland was formed from the collision of not two, but three ancient continental land masses, according to new research.

12h

Acid is dribbling out of the melting permafrost in the Arctic

As climate change thaws the Arctic permafrost, some of it is releasing sulphuric acid – which destroys limestone and releases even more climate-warming carbon dioxide

14h

In US beach resort, residents seek shelter from the storm

With Hurricane Florence downgraded on Thursday from a Category Four to a Category Two storm, and then once again, around fifty people left the evacuation shelter in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

14h

Urgent preparations as super typhoon closes in on Philippines

Preparations were in high gear in the Philippines on Friday with Super Typhoon Mangkhut set to make a direct hit in less than 24 hours, packing winds up to 255 kilometres per hour and drenching rains.

14h

Bezos unfazed by antitrust concerns on Amazon

Amazon founder and chief executive Jeff Bezos said Thursday he was not worried about the potential for anti-trust scrutiny of the company as it becomes an important economic force.

14h

Belugas adopt toothy whale lost in Canadian waters

A lonely narwhal that strayed far from its Arctic habitat has apparently found a new family in a pod of belugas in Canada's Saint Lawrence River, a marine conservation group said Thursday.

14h

Colombian zoo celebrates birth of endangered spider monkey

A zoo in Colombia is celebrating the birth of a baby spider monkey, a rare species in danger of extinction.

14h

Slaughtered rhino embodies S.Africa's poaching crisis

The mutilated carcass of a female white rhino, who had given birth just months ago, lay rotting on a hill beside a road that meanders through South Africa's Kruger National Park.

14h

The Chiropractic Technique Parade

Failure of the chiropractic establishment to renounce the scientifically indefensible vertebral subluxation theory assures an unending parade of questionable chiropractic diagnostic and treatment methods for correction of putative vertebral subluxations.

14h

Lawsuit renews focus on privacy policies for mobile apps

Researchers have warned that many popular free mobile apps aimed at children are potentially violating a U.S. law designed to protect the privacy of young users.

14h

SpaceX announces new plan to send tourist around MoonElon Musk SpaceX BFR Moon

SpaceX on Thursday announced a new plan to launch a tourist around the Moon using its Big Falcon Rocket (BFR), a massive launch vehicle that is being designed to carry people into deep space.

15h

Gut microbes' role in mammals' evolution starts to become clearer

An international collaboration led by Oregon State University scientists has made a key advance toward understanding which of the trillions of gut microbes may play important roles in how humans and other mammals evolve.

15h

First sequencing of Canada lynx genome

Scientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, in collaboration with the Vertebrate Genome Laboratory (VGL), New York, this week are publishing the first-ever whole genome for the Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). It is one of 14 being released to the public data repository for use by researchers studying evolution, disease, genetics and conservation, says lynx team coordinator Tanya Lama, a

15h

Team reports sighting rare wild goat species in Afghanistan

Based on field surveys in northern Afghanistan, Zalmai Moheb, an ecologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society's Afghanistan Program and a doctoral candidate in environmental conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others, report this week that they have for the first time documented by direct observation the presence of two rare Asian wild goat species in the country.

15h

Lovgivning bremser forskning i klinisk kvalitet

Læger advarer om, at vigtig viden og erfaring går tabt, fordi sundhedsloven forhindrer forskere i at få adgang til data i patientjournaler og derved gør det umuligt at følge op på kvaliteten af behandlingen.

16h

Forsker må opgive at få data fra 80 patientjournaler

Læge Rasmus Richelsen ønskede i forbindelse med stort registerstudie at validere data for 80 patienter. At gøre det lovligt ville kræve tilladelse fra 20-30 ledende overlæger og velvillig medvirken fra 20-30 andre medarbejdere.

16h

Overlæge får kritik efter opslag i journaler

I seks sager har overlæge Thue Bisgaard fået kritik af Sundhedsvæsenets Disciplinærnævn, fordi han har overtrådt Sundhedsloven ved at indhente elektroniske patientoplysninger til et forskningsprojekt. Thue Bisgaard kalder regler for »uigennemskuelige« og »kafkaske«.

16h

16h

Are fungi the secret to a sweet sounding violin? – Science Weekly podcast

From making violins sound beautiful, to beer and bread, to creating life-saving medicine, fungi have an array of very useful attributes. This week, a report demonstrates just how little we know about this kingdom of life and what we are set to gain if we tap into fungi as a resource. Hannah Devlin investigates. Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter The more mycologists study fungi, the more

16h

Are fungi the secret to a sweet sounding violin? – Science Weekly podcast

From making violins sound beautiful, to beer and bread, to creating life-saving medicine, fungi have an array of very useful attributes. This week, a report demonstrates just how little we know about this kingdom of life and what we are set to gain if we tap into fungi as a resource. Hannah Devlin investigates.

16h

Forfatter: Singularity er dårlig science fiction uden science

En taxa-tur med teknologi-kommentatoren og forfatteren Bruce Sterling fører til døden for en elsket teknologi-lov. En død med konsekvenser for Singularity og Danmark.

17h

Test dine fordomme: Er du mindre tiltrukket af folk med dialekt?

Gamle, grimme og dårligt uddannede. Lyt til fire dialekter og få testet om du har de samme fordomme, som andre har.

17h

New method promises fewer side effects from cancer drugs

A recent achievement in the field of protein research allows for better tailored pharmaceuticals with fewer side effects. The method was developed by two University of Copenhagen researchers.

17h

Inhaled steroids may increase risk of nontuberculous mycobacteria lung infections

Patients using inhaled steroids to control asthma and other breathing problems may be at greater risk for developing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) lung infections, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

17h

Children who develop ALL may have dysregulated immune function at birth

Neonatal concentrations of eight detectable inflammatory markers were significantly different in children later diagnosed with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) compared with controls.

17h

New study shows eczema in African-Americans is more difficult to treat

A new study suggests that African-Americans may face a greater struggle to find effective therapies for atopic dermatitis than European-Americans. The study used molecular profiling to study the skin of both groups.

17h

Hjertestop uden for hospital slår oftere psykiatriske patienter ihjel

Rammes psykiatriske patienter af hjertestop i byen eller hjemmet, har de større risiko for at dø af det end alle andre, viser nyt dansk studie. Psykiatriske patienter får efter alt at dømme ikke den nødvendige akutte hjælp og behandling, vurderer forskerne.

17h

Dansk kardiolog får liv i armensk hjerteafdeling

I syv år er Sam Riahi i sine ferier rejst til Armenien for at få en trængt hjerteafdeling på fode. Den nordjyske hjertelæges hjælp har gjort en verden til forskel. Fra at være en nedslidt afdeling uden varmt vand i hanerne er den i dag hospitalets stolthed.

17h

Quick fixes for praksis ønskes!

PLO og regionerne må være meget kreative for at finde utraditionelle løsninger til den enkelte læge.

17h

Sådan kan vi stoppe rekrutteringskrisen på sygehusene

Hvis regionerne ønsker stærk ledelse på sygehusene, skal de i langt højere gradarbejde for en åben og lydhør kultur, hvor der ikke udelukkende stilles krav nedad i systemet.

17h

Andrew Cuomo Sealed His Victory With One Last Power Move

NEW YORK —The progressive insurgency that has toppled Democratic Party favorites in New York City’s outer boroughs, Boston, and Florida could not lay a finger on Andrew Cuomo. The two-term New York governor easily dispatched an energetic challenge from the actress and activist Cynthia Nixon on Thursday night to win renomination to a third term. With more than three-quarters of the ballots counted

17h

Research on aid tackling modern slavery, forced labor, human trafficking, child labor

A new report released today offers detailed and robust analysis about countries' development spending commitments to achieve target 8.7 of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (end forced labour, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labour). The report, which analyses and visualises how official development assistance was committed, on what, and by whom, is a product of Delta 8.7, a project

17h

Panum vil være mester i revy

I næste uge bliver kitler og studiebøger for en stund udskiftet med kostumer og rekvisitter for en gruppe lægestuderende fra København. Studenterrevyen fra medicinstudiet på KU skal deltage ved DM i Revy og vise en mere ukendt, men vigtig side af medicinstudiet frem.

18h

Nu skal virksomhederne masseproducere skræddersyede produkter

BAGGRUND: Forbrugere efterspørger produkter, som de selv kan designe. Virksomheder vil have udstyr, der er specialiseret og individuelt. Det er nye behov, som producenterne må omfavne uden at miste evnen til at masseproducere.

18h

Midterm Time Capsule, 54 Days to Go: ‘Making Me Look Bad’

As I write, the national news is dominated by the arrival of Hurricane Florence, and the political news has emphasized Donald Trump’s reaction to this event and last year’s Hurricane Maria. Other Atlantic pieces lay out some of the problems with Trump’s response: for instance, one by David Graham here and others by Vann Newkirk here and here . My purpose this evening is to contrast the way this p

18h

Top Sloan Kettering Cancer Doctor Resigns After Failing to Disclose Industry Ties

Dr. José Baselga, the cancer center’s chief medical officer, stepped down days after a report that he had not reported millions of dollars as potential conflicts in dozens of research articles.

20h

New genetics tool helps answer evolutionary questions

Developing cutting-edge statistical tools that can handle these massive new datasets is a piece of the research puzzle, and new research has just added a new tool for the modern genomic toolbox.

20h

Scientists map interactions between head and neck cancer and HPV virus

Scientists mapped the interactions between all HPV proteins and human proteins for the first time.

20h

Cancer drug and antidepressants provide clues for treating brain-eating amoeba infections

Researchers have now identified three new molecular drug targets in Naegleria fowleri and a number of drugs that are able to inhibit the amoeba's growth in a laboratory dish. Several of these drugs are already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for other uses, such as antifungal agents, the breast cancer drug tamoxifen and antidepressant Prozac.

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Trump's Disregard of Puerto Rico's Death Toll Is Putting Lives at Risk

President Trump's tweet about the death toll in Puerto Rico is worse than a lie. It means we'll never learn from past disasters, repeating devastating mistakes.

21h

Ig Nobel win for kidney stone removing roller-coaster

It's a scream: Riding on some types of roller-coaster is an effective way of removing kidney stones.

21h

How the Weather Channel Made That Insane Hurricane Florence Storm Surge AnimationWeather Channel HF

A combination of Unreal Engine and a specially outfitted studio brought Hurricane Florence to life.

21h

Newspaper reporting of NHS Cancer Drugs Fund misleading

An analysis of UK newspaper reporting of the NHS Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) between 2010 and 2015 shows that despite some critical analysis, the mostly positive stories are likely to have contributed to the CDF's continuation, despite mounting evidence of its ineffectiveness. Close to £1.4 billion in total has been spent through the CDF which has subsequently been reconfigured and is now under the co

22h

Medicinsk cannabis

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Bibliotek for læger

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22h

Det syge væsen

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22h

High-resolution genomic map gives scientists unprecedented view of brain development

Researchers have created a massive database of the changes in gene activity of individual cells in the cerebellum during embryonic development and immediately after birth. The analysis of thousands of brain cells isolated from mice offers researchers a high-resolution map that enables scientists to view the detailed genomic changes cells undergo as the cerebellum wires its neural circuitry.

22h

How the immune system protects against Zika-induced neurological symptoms

A type of immune cell that produces a protein called CD4 plays an important role in protecting mice infected with the Zika virus against severe neurological disease, according to a new study.

22h

Don’t just ditch Facebook—start your own social-media site instead

There might be a better way of making social media a healthier place, from creating more user-friendly settings to setting up our own sites from scratch.

22h

Voodoo doll and cannibalism studies triumph at Ig Nobels

Self-colonoscopies, useless instruction manuals, and kidney stones on rollercoasters also among subjects awarded Never mind the protests from health and safety. A research paper that describes how employees can overcome workplace injustice by torturing a voodoo doll that resembles their boss has landed one of the most coveted awards in academia: an Ig Nobel prize. The study, which sought to under

22h

Artificial intelligence is often overhyped—and here’s why that’s dangerous

AI has huge potential to transform our lives, but the term itself is being abused in very worrying ways, says Zachary Lipton, an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University.

22h

Here’s how climate change is fueling Hurricane Florence

Scientists take a stab at predicting climate change’s influence on Hurricane Florence.

22h

Boss revenge, self-colonoscopy studies win 2018 Ig Nobels

Anyone who's ever been so furious with their boss that they feel like exacting revenge really needs to listen to Lindie Liang.

22h

New study finds HIV outbreak in Indiana could have been prevented

An HIV outbreak among people who inject drugs in Indiana from 2011 to 2015 could have been avoided if the state's top health and elected officials had acted sooner on warnings, a new study by the Yale School of Public Health finds.

23h

The Lancet Psychiatry: ADHD medication use is increasing but some patients in some countries are still not receiving the treatment they need

Despite increases in medication use for ADHD between 2001 and 2015, prescription rates are still far below diagnosis rates in most countries, suggesting some patients may not be receiving the treatment they need. Children and adults are far more likely to be prescribed drug treatment for ADHD in the USA than the UK. Renewed efforts are needed to improve the consistent identification and treatment

23h

Scientists design new metabolic technology to open scientific data for everyone

XCMS-MRM and METLIN-MRM represent a cloud-based analysis platform that allows scientists to quantify molecules from biological samples and make their results publicly available.

23h

Study shows toxic effects of oil dispersant on oysters following deepwater horizon spill

A new study finds that oysters likely suffered toxic effects from the oil dispersant Corexit® 9500 when it was used to clean up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Researchers determined this by comparing the low levels of toxicity of oil, the dispersant and a mixture of the two on Eastern oysters.

23h

Our seasons are out of whack, which is really bad for migratory birds

Animals Spring is advancing much faster in northern areas than it is in southern areas throughout three migration routes. In North America, spring is arriving earlier and earlier. But this shift isn't uniform across the continent. That unevenness, according to a new study, has unfortunate…

23h

Diabetes-professor modtager ærespris for banebrydende forskning

Professor og overlæge på Hvidovre Hospital Sten Madsbad har modtaget Bagger-Sørensen Fondens pris for sin mangeårige, betydningsfulde indsats på diabetesområdet.

23h

Bacteria passed on in the womb is linked to premature birth and breathing difficulties

Babies born very prematurely are more likely to harbor Ureaplasma bacteria, according to new research to be presented on Sunday at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

23h

The Atlantic Daily: Ripe for Reevaluation

What We’re Following Hurricane Watch: It’s no longer a Category 4 storm, but as Florence looms against the Carolina coast, to evaluate the danger it poses wholly by the 1 to 5 scale would be a mistake. Most of the Houston victims of Hurricane Harvey last summer died by drowning , as unprecedented rainfall and subsequent flooding swallowed the region. The grisly and complicated business of getting

23h

Stunning Weather Channel Video Shows Why Storm Surges Are So Dangerous

Hurricane Florence is packing the potential for some dangerous flooding, and a new Weather Channel video highlights why it's important to avoid.

23h

Scientists discover what caused the worst mass extinction in world history

How a cataclysm worse than what killed the dinosaurs destroyed 90 percent of all life on Earth. Read More

23h

Wider-faced politicians are seen as more corrupt

New research offers a tip for politicians who don’t want to be seen as corrupt: don’t get a big head. Read More

23h

“Hundreds” of crimes will soon be solved using DNA databases, genealogist predicts

CeCe Moore’s company has been helping police departments solve cold cases by uploading crime-scene DNA to public genealogy databases.

1d

U.S., Russia Respond to Space Station Leak Rumors

After speaking for the first time, Jim Bridenstine of NASA and his Russian counterpart, Dmitry Rogozin, set out to reaffirm cooperation on orbital matters.

1d

What Hurricane Florence Tells Us About Climate Change

Florence is wetter, wider — and maybe slower, due to climate change, according to new research. And flood insurance isn't keeping up with how climate change is altering hurricanes.

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘We Cannot Allow the Devastation of Our Citizens to be Questioned’

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump drew widespread condemnation for falsely claiming that 3,000 people “did not die” in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria, and that Democrats inflated the death toll to smear him. “We cannot allow the devastation of our citizens to be questioned and we cannot allow response effor

1d

The Apple Watch is evolving into a legitimate medical device

Technology The smartwatch's new ECG function brings fitness trackers into real medical care. This week, Apple took a big step in bringing its Apple Watch Series 4 beyond the scope of a typical fitness or wellness trackers into the sphere of clinical medical…

1d

UMass Amherst ecologists, team report sighting rare wild goat species in Afghanistan

Based on field surveys in northern Afghanistan, Zalmai Moheb, an ecologist with the Wildlife Conservation Society's Afghanistan Program and a doctoral candidate in environmental conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others, report this week that they have for the first time documented by direct observation the presence of two rare Asian wild goat species in the country.

1d

Certain environmental pollutants may contribute to poor kidney health

In an analysis of all relevant studies, exposure to environmental toxins called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances was linked to worse kidney function and other signs of kidney damage.

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Watch Hurricane Florence Batter a Lighthouse 34 Miles Offshore

A lighthouse just off the coast of North Carolina is livestreaming the approach of Hurricane Florence.

1d

BPA and Its Replacements Have Same Effects on Mice

The plastic ingredients BPS and diphenyl sulfone cause chromosomal abnormalities, and the effects can last for generations.

1d

Hurricane Florence 2018: How to Use Social Media Responsibly During the Storm

During a natural disaster, social media is a vital tool for rescuers and victims. Don't get in their way.

1d

New Stephen Hawking Graphic Biography to Reveal the Scientist — and the Man

A new graphic biography details the life and science of the late Stephen Hawking.

1d

Gut microbes' role in mammals' evolution starts to become clearer

An international collaboration led by scientists has made a key advance toward understanding which of the trillions of gut microbes may play important roles in how humans and other mammals evolve.

1d

Lesbian, gay or bisexual youth are at increased risk of using multiple substances

Young people who identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual are at increased risk of using substances such as alcohol, nicotine and marijuana, a new study from Oregon State University has found.

1d

A new map reveals the causes of forest loss worldwide

A new study shows where global forest loss is due to permanent deforestation versus short-term shifts in land use.

1d

How skin begins: New research could improve skin grafts, and more

University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered a key mechanism by which skin begins to develop in embryos.

1d

Remember the Bees That Swarmed Times Square? We Tried to Find Out Where They Came From

Where the 20,000 insects ended up is known, thanks to Twitter, but where they originated from before invading a hot dog cart in Manhattan remains a mystery, and a blame game.

1d

Government Study Of BPA Backs Its Safety, But Doesn't Settle Debate

The plastic additive BPA got a clean bill of health in a two-year government study involving thousands of rats. But scientists worried about BPA's risks say the study has flaws. (Image credit: T-pool/STOCK4B/Getty Images)

1d

There Are Too Many Federal Disasters

The federal government is mobilizing its resources as Hurricane Florence bears down on the Southeast. Cleanup and recovery are likely to be enormously expensive, and if the president formally declares it a disaster, the federal government will foot most of the bill. In recent decades, though, such disaster declarations have proliferated, leaving the Federal Emergency Management Agency spread thin

1d

Your Virtual Self: Psychology in the Age of Virtual Reality

“Look!” My nephew kept eating from a box of infinite donuts in his new cubicle office. He had just been promoted by a floating computer monitor, his boss. A concerned look slowly printed onto his boss’ flat face as it saw him continuously push donuts down his gullet. The game was “Job Simulator”, and while […]

1d

Virtual 3D hearts may help doctors zap diseased tissue

Personalized 3D heart simulations can accurately identify tissue doctors should electrically destroy to stop potentially fatal irregular, rapid heartbeats. A retrospective analysis of 21 patients with ventricular tachycardia and a prospective study of five establishes that 3D simulation-guided procedures are worthy of expanded clinical trials, researchers say. “Cardiac ablation, or the destructio

1d

17 Bipartisan Governors Vow to Fight Climate Change—and President Trump

In his 20 months in office, President Trump has stripped out huge swaths of federal climate policy. He has canceled or incapacitated Obama-era programs meant to encourage a cleaner electricity system and more efficient cars , and he has left the Paris Agreement on climate change . Now, climate-concerned governors are doing what they can to fight back. On Thursday, a bipartisan alliance of 17 gove

1d

Dietary fiber reduces brain inflammation during aging

As mammals age, immune cells in the brain known as microglia become chronically inflamed. In this state, they produce chemicals known to impair cognitive and motor function. That's one explanation for why memory fades and other brain functions decline during old age. But, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, there may be a remedy to delay the inevitable: dietary fiber.

1d

London is a shallow Christian sea dotted with islands of other faiths

Although London is predominantly Christian, this map shows an archipelago of different faiths throughout the city. Read More

1d

Five foods that increase your psychological well-being

These five main food groups are important for your brain's health and likely to boost the production of feel-good chemicals. Read More

1d

Mental health crisis in teens is being magnified by demise of creative subjects in school

The arts can help schools tackle the current mental health crisis among teenagers. Read More

1d

Fighting for open access: Why academic publishers are making a killing

Academic publishers have some of the highest profit margins in the world. In the digital age, researchers are starting to wonder whether publishers actually deserve this much money. Read More

1d

For the 99%, the lines are getting blurry

Infographics show the classes and anxieties in the supposedly classless U.S. economy. Read More

1d

Thyroid hormone shows promise for fighting liver disease

A thyroid hormone shows promise in fighting non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with diabetes, according to new research. The disease, a major global health problem characterized by accumulation of fat in the liver, develops in patients with obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidaemia, and insulin resistance. The presence of excess fat in the liver can be a long silent process. As the disea

1d

Hurricanes are getting more intense—but should we add a Category 6?

Science Wind speed isn't everything. First of all, there is currently no Category 6 for hurricanes. But some people are looking into it.

1d

Blazes of light reveal how plants signal danger long distances

Botoniest reveal reveal how glutamate, an abundant neurotransmitter in animals, activates a wave of calcium when a plant is wounded — the best look yet at the communication systems within plants that are normally hidden from view.

1d

How to create a world where no one dies waiting for a transplant | Luhan Yang

For nearly half a century, scientists have been trying to create a process for transplanting animal organs into humans, a theoretical dream that could help the hundreds of thousands of people in need of a lifesaving transplant. But the risks, specifically of transmitting the PERV virus from pigs to humans, have always been too great, stalling research — until now. In a mind-blowing talk, genetici

1d

Massive Animal Sequencing Effort Releases First Set of Genomes

The Vertebrate Genomes Project has released data on 14 vertebrate species, but the goal is to sequence all 66,000.

1d

Volkswagen to end iconic 'Beetle' cars in 2019

Volkswagen announced Thursday it would end production of its iconic "Beetle" cars in 2019 after adding a pair of final editions of the insect-inspired vehicles.

1d

Thousands of Pacific walruses again herd up on Alaska coast

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is monitoring Pacific walruses resting on Alaska's northwest coast.

1d

New York's Worst-in-the-Country Voting System

Clumsily designed ballots. An antiquated registration process. Confusing deadlines and outdated laws. Long lines and no early voting. New York State—caricatured as a bastion of progressive politics—has some of the most retrograde voting laws and practices in the nation. Reports of dysfunction from Thursday’s primary only add to the evidence: New York is disenfranchising its citizens. How dire is

1d

US takes first step toward a quantum computing workforce

The pioneer behind a new national plan says it could help the US compete—and address a looming shortage of quantum engineers.

1d

Immune response mechanism described for fate determination of T cells

Researchers have detailed a mechanism that sets the stage for the fate decision that gives rise to two major subsets of effector cells: T follicular helper cells and non-T follicular helper cells, known as Tfh and non-Tfh cells.

1d

Malicious brain cell identified

Astrocytes' important role in brain function suggests they are also involved in disease. Now, scientists have identified an astrocyte subpopulation as the dominant cell type to spring into action in vivo in a neuroinflammatory disease setting.

1d

Weather forecasting sheds light on where and when birds will fly

September is the peak of autumn bird migration, and billions of birds are winging their way south. Using a combination of artificial intelligence and weather forecasting can help scientists to predict the movements of millions of birds and support their conservation goals, according to new research.

1d

How a virus destabilizes the genome

New insights into how Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus induces genome instability and promotes cell proliferation could lead to the development of novel antiviral therapies for KSHV-associated cancers.

1d

Climate-induced soil changes may cause more erosion and flash flooding

A new study predicts a climate-induced reduction in large soil pores, which may intensify the water cycle and contribute to more flash flooding and soil erosion by the end of the 21st century.

1d

6 reasons to upgrade your iPhone right now

Technology And 3 reasons not to. Looking for reasons to shell out money for a shiny new phone—or just keep using the one you have? We've got you covered.

1d

Calorie counts on restaurant menus have customers ordering less

In a new study, Cornell University researchers conducted a randomized experiment and found that diners at full service restaurants whose menus listed calories ordered meals with 3 percent fewer calories – about 45 calories less – than those who had menus without calorie information. Customers ordered fewer calories in their appetizer and entree courses, but their dessert and drink orders remained

1d

Study shows toxic effects of oil dispersant on oysters following Deepwater Horizon spill

Oysters likely suffered toxic effects from the oil dispersant Corexit® 9500 when it was used to clean up the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, said Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Connecticut. The team determined this by comparing the low levels of toxicity of oil, the dispersant and a mixture of the two on Eastern oysters. The team published their findings in the

1d

The Best Cheap iPhones You Can Buy (Fall 2018)

Resist the temptation of Apple’s enticing new iPhone Xs and Xr. Your wallet will thank you.

1d

‘America Has Always Been a Tribal Society’

“Human beings are tribal,” says Amy Chua, Professor of Law at Yale Law School. “We're hardwired that way. We need to belong to groups.” The problem, Chua says, is when tribalism takes over a political system—and that’s just what is happening in America. In a new video filmed at the 2018 Aspen Ideas Festival in June, Chua explains that, in an unprecedented fashion for America, whites are on the ve

1d

Watch this robotic fruit fly swoop, dive and perform impressive flips

DelFly is a robot that flies through a room with as much agility as a real fly using its flappy wings. It is also helping researchers understand how insects move

1d

Half the planet should be set aside for wildlife – to save ourselves

If we want to avoid extinctions and preserve the ecosystems all life depends on, half of the Earth’s land and oceans should be protected by 2050, say biologists

1d

New Apple Watch heart monitor sounds great – here’s why it may not be

At its latest product launch, Apple announced its smartwatches would get an upgrade letting people take an ECG of their own heart, but this could do more harm than good

1d

Bandages laser-bonded to your skin may fix wounds better than stitches

Most flesh wounds are repaired with sutures, but they cause extra damage to the skin. A bandage made of silk and gold, sealed with laser light, could solve that

1d

BPA-free plastics seem to disrupt sperm and egg development in mice

We are starting to replace harmful BPA in plastic bottles and food containers, but alternative chemicals might be just as bad

1d

Artificial intelligence is about to revolutionise warfare. Be afraid

Sci-fi loves to depict military AIs as malign killer minds or robots. But the truth is more subtle and more terrifying – and it's happening right now

1d

The big slosh: Florence begins days of rain, wind on coast

The big slosh has begun, and the consequences could be disastrous.

1d

Endangered Lemur Newborn Is So Ugly It's Cute

Tonks is the newest baby aye-aye in the United States.

1d

Immune response mechanism described for fate determination of T cells

In a paper published in the journal Science, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues at four other United States institutions have detailed a mechanism that sets the stage for the fate decision that gives rise to two major subsets of effector cells: T follicular helper cells and non-T follicular helper cells, known as Tfh and non-Tfh cells.

1d

Flawed Crystals are Beautiful in the Eyes of Scientists

Flawed Crystals are Beautiful in the Eyes of Scientists Defects in crystals may be useful for designing spintronic devices, which use the magnetic properties of electrons for processing information. Crystal.png Rights information: CC0 Public Domain Physics Thursday, September 13, 2018 – 13:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — Jewelers may disagree, but flaws in a crystal can be a good th

1d

Cassini's final view of Titan's northern lakes and seas

During NASA's Cassini mission's final distant encounter with Saturn's giant moon Titan, the spacecraft captured the enigmatic moon's north polar landscape of lakes and seas, which are filled with liquid methane and ethane.

1d

Perfect storms: hurricanes and typhoons

As Hurricane Florence looms off the eastern United States and Typhoon Mangkhut threatens the Philippines, here are some facts about monster storms and what to expect as climate change supercharges our weather.

1d

US judge delays grizzly bear hunts in Rockies two more weeks

A U.S. judge on Thursday delayed for two more weeks the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades, saying he needed more time to consider if federal protections for the animals should be restored.

1d

Many populations fear big job loss from automation: survey

The public is broadly fearful that automation will lead to significant job losses, with many populations skeptical the technologies will boost economic efficiency, according to a survey of 10 countries released Thursday.

1d

Don't Condemn People Who Don't Evacuate for Hurricane Florence

Many simply can't; packing up and leaving assumes a level of privilege many people probably don't think about — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Famous theory of the living Earth upgraded to 'Gaia 2.0'

A new twist has been given to the 'Gaia' theory that aims to explain why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years.

1d

A very special protein synthesis machinery

Sleeping sickness-causing parasites contain an unusual protein synthesis machinery. A team of researchers has resolved its very special structure for the first time.

1d

Designer enzyme conquers sulfite reduction, a bottleneck in environmental cleanup

Researchers have cleared one hurdle toward environmental cleanup of certain contaminants with a newly designed synthetic enzyme that reduces the compound sulfite to sulfide — a notoriously complex multistep chemical reaction that has eluded chemists for years.

1d

Scientific institutions continue to lag behind the #TimesUp movement

Scientific and medical institutions must fundamentally reconsider how they address sexual harassment in the workplace, experts argue in a new article.

1d

Scientists design new metabolic technology to open scientific data for everyone

Patients want to see their medical information. Researchers want to share their data.

1d

NASA satellite analyzes powerful super Typhoon Mangkhut

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at powerful Super Typhoon Mangkhut early on Sept. 13 that revealed a large eye surrounded by a large area of powerful storms. Mangkhut is a Category 5 storm.

1d

NASA sees Tropical Depression Olivia's strength waning

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at a weakening and now tropical depression Olivia in the Central Pacific Ocean. Olivia soaked the Hawaiian Islands on its east to west track through them.

1d

New genetics tool helps answer evolutionary questions

The age of big data is here. Thanks to innovations in genetic sequencing technology, scientists can now generate massive datasets describing the genomes of Earth's diverse set of species. This ever-growing genomic encyclopedia has the capacity to reveal the forces shaping complex patterns of genetic variation between individuals, populations and species—if scientists can only unlock its secrets.

1d

How to hack an election—and what states should do to prevent fake votes

Two speakers at this year’s EmTech MIT conference addressed voting vulnerabilities.

1d

Suspending young students risks future success in school

Some kindergartners and first-graders suspended from school can find it challenging to reverse the negative trajectory in their academic life, says a University of Michigan researcher.

1d

NASA satellite analyzes powerful super Typhoon Mangkhut

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at powerful Super Typhoon Mangkhut early on Sept. 13 that revealed a large eye surrounded by a large area of powerful storms. Mangkhut is a Category 5 storm.

1d

Scientists design new metabolic technology to open scientific data for everyone

XCMS-MRM and METLIN-MRM represent a cloud-based analysis platform that allows scientists to quantify molecules from biological samples and make their results publicly available.

1d

New genetics tool helps answer evolutionary questions

Developing cutting-edge statistical tools that can handle these massive new datasets is a piece of the research puzzle, and new research from Michigan State University has just added a new tool for the modern genomic toolbox.

1d

NASA-NOAA satellite finds Barijat crossing Gulf of Tonkin

Tropical Cyclone Barijat appeared disorganized on satellite imagery as it moved across the Gulf of Tonkin, South China Sea. Barijat is being torn apart and had weakened from wind shear. After a landfall on Sept. 13, it is expected to dissipate quickly.

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Space Station Commander: It's "Absolutely a Shame" to Suggest Astronauts Caused Leak

The lead astronaut on the station defends the integrity of his team — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Who Gets Their News From Which Social Media Sites?

A Pew study finds that nonwhites rely more on social media for news that whites, and consider it more accurate.

1d

Trilobites: Watch Plants Light Up When They Get Attacked

Scientists showed that plants are much less passive than they seem by revealing the secret workings of their threat communication systems.

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Tiny camera lens may help link quantum computers to network

Scientists have invented a tiny camera lens, which may lead to a device that links quantum computers to an optical fiber network.

1d

Novel flying robot mimics rapid insect flight

A novel insect-inspired flying robot, developed by TU Delft researchers from the Micro Air Vehicle Laboratory (MAVLab), is presented in Science. Experiments with this first autonomous, free-flying and agile flapping-wing robot — carried out in collaboration with Wageningen University & Research – improved our understanding of how fruit flies control aggressive escape maneuvers. Apart from its fur

1d

Analysis of breast cancer gene variations will boost testing

Researchers have analyzed nearly 4,000 mutations deliberately engineered into the BRCA1 gene, a process which will immediately benefit people undergoing genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk. The BRCA1 gene suppresses tumors, but scientists haven’t fully understood exactly how it does this, though certain mutations in the gene predispose women to breast and ovarian cancers. If a healt

1d

Hurricane Florence Is 50 Miles Larger, with 50% More Rain, Thanks to Climate Change

For the first time, researchers have calculated the impact of climate change on a hurricane before it actually hits land.

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You should not drink human blood. It will not keep you young.

Health No, just…no. Yes, headlines and tweets are designed to make you click. But an unscrupulous headline can go too far by… uh… promoting vampirism.

1d

What Kids' Backpacks Say About Them

When Eric Ushiroda moved to a tiny Japanese village in the mid-1990s to work as a teacher, there was one thing he learned almost immediately: His middle-school students in this chilly, forested town were obsessed with L.L. Bean backpacks. A recent graduate of the University of Hawaii who’d applied for the teaching job as part of an exchange program, Ushiroda didn’t own winter clothing. Mail-order

1d

North Carolina's Natural Hurricane Defenses Are Disappearing

Development and sea level rise are chipping away at the barrier islands that help shield the mainland — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

NASA gets inside look at large and powerful Hurricane Florence

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the large and powerful Hurricane Florence early on Sept. 13, 2018 that indicated wind shear was temporarily affecting the southern side of the storm.

1d

Rare antibodies show scientists how to neutralize the many types of Ebola

Two new studies are bringing Ebola virus's weaknesses into the spotlight, showing for the first time exactly how human and mouse antibodies can bind to the virus and stop infection — not only for Ebola virus, but for other closely related pathogens as well.

1d

Requiring physical activity classes help sedentary college students be more active

Requiring physical activity classes in college encourages sedentary students to become more active, while elective classes tend to draw those who are already motivated, new research from Oregon State University has found.

1d

Nano-sandwiching improves heat transfer, prevents overheating in nanoelectronics

Sandwiching two-dimensional materials used in nanoelectronic devices between their three-dimensional silicon bases and an ultrathin layer of aluminum oxide can significantly reduce the risk of component failure due to overheating, according to a new study published in the journal of Advanced Materials led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering.

1d

Pilot study identifies strain of bacteria as chief risk factor for stomach cancer

Researchers have found a specific strain of Helicobacter pylori strongly correlated with stomach cancer.

1d

Thousands of breast cancer gene variants engineered and analyzed

A scientific analysis of nearly 4,000 mutations deliberately engineered into the BRCA1 gene will immediately benefit people undergoing genetic testing for breast or ovarian cancer risk. Many people obtaining genetic screenings previoulsy have learned that their BRCA1 gene contains a variant of uncertain significance. Data from this study now categorizes thousands of variants as behaving like disea

1d

In Turkey, Darwin is being removed from textbooks

Some parts of the world are going backward right now. Where will it leave us? Read More

1d

Elon Musk’s Boring Company wants to connect your garage to its hyperloop

The Boring Company plans to build a new tunnel system that would connect residential garages to an underground hyperloop via elevator, potentially enabling people to someday enter the futuristic public transit system by simply stepping into their parked cars. Read More

1d

A very special protein synthesis machinery

Sleeping sickness-causing parasites contain an unusual protein synthesis machinery. A team of researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Berne resolved its very special structure for the first time.

1d

Famous theory of the living Earth upgraded to 'Gaia 2.0'

A time-honored theory into why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years has been given a new, innovative twist.

1d

Tiny camera lens may help link quantum computers to network

An international team of researchers led by The Australian National University (ANU) has invented a tiny camera lens, which may lead to a device that links quantum computers to an optical fibre network.

1d

Cancer drug and antidepressants provide clues for treating brain-eating amoeba infections

Researchers at Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at University of California San Diego have now identified three new molecular drug targets in Naegleria fowleri and a number of drugs that are able to inhibit the amoeba's growth in a laboratory dish. Several of these drugs are already approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for other uses, such as antifungal agents, the

1d

When a tree lost is, or isn't, permanent deforestation: Mapping global forest loss

Despite numerous efforts by international governments, corporations and conservationists to reduce it, the overall rate of a permanent type of forest loss known as commodity-driven forest loss has not changed since 2001, a new map-based study reports.

1d

Warm with a chance of birds: Forecasting avian migrations

During peak passage, when air temperatures warm in early May, more than 500 million migratory birds take flight each night, a new study finds.

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Bright and quick: Paper-based method for detecting medically relevant metabolites

Measuring concentrations of medically relevant metabolites in the blood may have just gotten easier — requiring mere minutes and just microliters of blood — thanks to an approach involving a bioengineered protein that lights up, and a digital camera.

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Flappy robot mimics the aerial acrobatics of agile flying insects

An agile flapping-wing robot designed to better illuminate the full range of movement associated with free flight reveals new insights into how flying insects like the fruit fly perform rapid banked turns, often used for escaping predators.

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Designer enzyme conquers sulfite reduction, a bottleneck in environmental cleanup

Researchers have cleared one hurdle toward environmental cleanup of certain contaminants with a newly designed synthetic enzyme that reduces the compound sulfite to sulfide — a notoriously complex multistep chemical reaction that has eluded chemists for years.

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Blazes of light reveal how plants signal danger long distances

In more than a dozen videos, University of Wisconsin-Madison Professor of Botany Simon Gilroy and his lab reveal how glutamate, an abundant neurotransmitter in animals, activates a wave of calcium when a plant is wounded — the best look yet at the communication systems within plants that are normally hidden from view.

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Novel flying robot mimics rapid insect flight

A novel insect-inspired flying robot, developed by TU Delft researchers from the Micro Air Vehicle Laboratory (MAVLab), is presented in Science. Experiments with this first autonomous, free-flying and agile flapping-wing robot — carried out in collaboration with Wageningen University & Research – improved our understanding of how fruit flies control aggressive escape maneuvers. Apart from its fur

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Creating a continental bird migration forecast

September is the peak of autumn bird migration, and billions of birds are winging their way south in dramatic pulses. A new study published in the journal Science reports that scientists can now reliably predict these waves of bird migration up to seven days in advance. The study details the underlying methods that power migration forecasts, which can be used as a bird conservation tool.

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How the immune system protects against Zika-induced neurological symptoms

A type of immune cell that produces a protein called CD4 plays an important role in protecting mice infected with the Zika virus against severe neurological disease, according to a study published Sept. 6 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Amelia Kahler Pinto of Saint Louis University, and colleagues. Based on the findings, vaccines that induce strong responses from these immune cells, k

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How a virus destabilizes the genome

New insights into how Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) induces genome instability and promotes cell proliferation could lead to the development of novel antiviral therapies for KSHV-associated cancers, according to a study published Sept. 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Erle Robertson of the University of Pennsylvania, and colleagues.

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Leptospirosis strains identified in Uruguay cattle

Leptospirosis infections, caused by Leptospira bacteria, occur in people and animals around the world, but different strains of the bacteria may vary in their ability to cause disease and to jump between species. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have for the first time described the characteristics of the Leptospira variants that infect cattle in Uruguay.

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A Nuclear Plant Braces for Impact With Hurricane Florence

In North Carolina, a nuclear power plant sits right in the hurricane's path, creating a high-stakes test of its post-Fukushima safety measures.

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WATCH: Flapping Robot Sheds Light On How Fruit Flies Move

The scientists were inspired by the super-agile fruit fly. And by designing this robot, they've figured out some of the mysteries of one of the fly's fanciest maneuvers. (Image credit: Henri Werij/TU Delft )

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Migrating Birds Avoid Bad Weather — Which Makes Their Paths Predictable

Scientists have developed a forecast model for predicting mass bird migrations, based in part on weather patterns. (Image credit: R. Tsubin/Getty Images)

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How mice block out the sound of their own feet

A mouse’s brain has a built-in noise-cancelling circuit to ensure that the mouse hears the sounds of an approaching cat better than it hears the sounds of its own footsteps, according to new research. It’s a direct connection from the motor cortex of the brain to the auditory cortex that says essentially, “we’re running now, pay no attention to the sound of my footsteps.” “What’s special about th

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Space for nature

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News at a glance

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Piercing the haze

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Windfall

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Gaia 2.0

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Looking ahead

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Bird forecast

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Flying fast and free

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The entropy of a few

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A tailless aerial robotic flapper reveals that flies use torque coupling in rapid banked turns

Insects are among the most agile natural flyers. Hypotheses on their flight control cannot always be validated by experiments with animals or tethered robots. To this end, we developed a programmable and agile autonomous free-flying robot controlled through bio-inspired motion changes of its flapping wings. Despite being 55 times the size of a fruit fly, the robot can accurately mimic the rapid e

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Organic and solution-processed tandem solar cells with 17.3% efficiency

Although organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells have many advantages, their performance still lags far behind that of other photovoltaic platforms. A fundamental reason for their low performance is the low charge mobility of organic materials, leading to a limit on the active-layer thickness and efficient light absorption. In this work, guided by a semi-empirical model analysis and using the tandem cel

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A designed heme-[4Fe-4S] metalloenzyme catalyzes sulfite reduction like the native enzyme

Multielectron redox reactions often require multicofactor metalloenzymes to facilitate coupled electron and proton movement, but it is challenging to design artificial enzymes to catalyze these important reactions, owing to their structural and functional complexity. We report a designed heteronuclear heme-[4Fe-4S] cofactor in cytochrome c peroxidase as a structural and functional model of the en

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Quantum entanglement of the spin and orbital angular momentum of photons using metamaterials

Metamaterials constructed from deep subwavelength building blocks have been used to demonstrate phenomena ranging from negative refractive index and -near-zero to cloaking, emulations of general relativity, and superresolution imaging. More recently, metamaterials have been suggested as a new platform for quantum optics. We present the use of a dielectric metasurface to generate entanglement betw

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Quantum metasurface for multiphoton interference and state reconstruction

Metasurfaces based on resonant nanophotonic structures have enabled innovative types of flat-optics devices that often outperform the capabilities of bulk components, yet these advances remain largely unexplored for quantum applications. We show that nonclassical multiphoton interferences can be achieved at the subwavelength scale in all-dielectric metasurfaces. We simultaneously image multiple p

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Classifying drivers of global forest loss

Global maps of forest loss depict the scale and magnitude of forest disturbance, yet companies, governments, and nongovernmental organizations need to distinguish permanent conversion (i.e., deforestation) from temporary loss from forestry or wildfire. Using satellite imagery, we developed a forest loss classification model to determine a spatial attribution of forest disturbance to the dominant

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Glutamate triggers long-distance, calcium-based plant defense signaling

Animals require rapid, long-range molecular signaling networks to integrate sensing and response throughout their bodies. The amino acid glutamate acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter in the vertebrate central nervous system, facilitating long-range information exchange via activation of glutamate receptor channels. Similarly, plants sense local signals, such as herbivore attack, and transmit t

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A continental system for forecasting bird migration

Billions of animals cross the globe each year during seasonal migrations, but efforts to monitor them are hampered by the unpredictability of their movements. We developed a bird migration forecast system at a continental scale by leveraging 23 years of spring observations to identify associations between atmospheric conditions and bird migration intensity. Our models explained up to 81% of varia

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An ER surface retrieval pathway safeguards the import of mitochondrial membrane proteins in yeast

The majority of organellar proteins are translated on cytosolic ribosomes and must be sorted correctly to function. Targeting routes have been identified for organelles such as peroxisomes and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, little is known about the initial steps of targeting of mitochondrial proteins. In this study, we used a genome-wide screen in yeast and identified factors critical

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Semisynthetic sensor proteins enable metabolic assays at the point of care

Monitoring metabolites at the point of care could improve the diagnosis and management of numerous diseases. Yet for most metabolites, such assays are not available. We introduce semisynthetic, light-emitting sensor proteins for use in paper-based metabolic assays. The metabolite is oxidized by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, and the sensor changes color in the presence of the reduce

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Ribonucleotide incorporation enables repair of chromosome breaks by nonhomologous end joining

The nonhomologous end–joining (NHEJ) pathway preserves genome stability by ligating the ends of broken chromosomes together. It employs end-processing enzymes, including polymerases, to prepare ends for ligation. We show that two such polymerases incorporate primarily ribonucleotides during NHEJ—an exception to the central dogma of molecular biology—both during repair of chromosome breaks made by

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New Products

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Learning to lead

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Differential IL-2 expression defines developmental fates of follicular versus nonfollicular helper T cells

In response to infection, naïve CD4 + T cells differentiate into two subpopulations: T follicular helper (T FH ) cells, which support B cell antibody production, and non-T FH cells, which enhance innate immune cell functions. Interleukin-2 (IL-2), the major cytokine produced by naïve T cells, plays an important role in the developmental divergence of these populations. However, the relationship

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Recurrent cortical circuits implement concentration-invariant odor coding

Animals rely on olfaction to find food, attract mates, and avoid predators. To support these behaviors, they must be able to identify odors across different odorant concentrations. The neural circuit operations that implement this concentration invariance remain unclear. We found that despite concentration-dependence in the olfactory bulb (OB), representations of odor identity were preserved down

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Asymmetric phosphoric acid-catalyzed four-component Ugi reaction

The Ugi reaction constructs α-acylaminoamide compounds by combining an aldehyde or ketone, an amine, a carboxylic acid, and an isocyanide in a single flask. Its appealing features include inherent atom and step economy together with the potential to generate products of broad structural diversity. However, control of the stereochemistry in this reaction has proven to be a formidable challenge. We

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Response to Comment on "Unexpected reversal of C3 versus C4 grass response to elevated CO2 during a 20-year field experiment"

Nie and colleagues suggest a key role for interannual climate variation as an explanation for the temporal dynamics of an unexpected 20-year reversal of biomass responses of C 3 -C 4 grasses to elevated CO 2 . However, we had already identified some climate-dependent differences in C 3 and C 4 responses to eCO 2 and shown that these could not fully explain the temporal dynamics we observed.

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A sense of belonging: the best aged care lifts the spirits

Cultural touchstones and being treated with dignity can make all the difference when choosing an aged care facility This is part of a series about aged care in Australia In the 2007 film The Savages, actors Philip Seymour Hoffman and Laura Linney play conflicted siblings faced with choosing an aged care facility for their elderly, irascible father as he declines into dementia. In one scene, they

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'Robbed of precious time': chemical restraints and aged care | Sarah Russell

Nearly two-thirds of aged care residents are prescribed psychotropic drugs regularly. Questions that must be urgently asked This is part of a series about aged care in Australia Mary’s 85-year-old husband had been in an aged care home for just over a week. He had been getting frailer but was still sharp mentally. However, Mary* became extremely worried when her husband started sleeping all day. A

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A New Robotic Fly Dips and Dives Like the Real Thing

Inspired by a fruit fly, this tiny robot insect manages to twist and bank with astonishing speed.

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This flying robot could reveal secrets of the aerial world of insects

A new winged robot with the exceptional agility of a fruit fly could lend insight into animal flight.

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Apple's Newest iPhones Signal the End of Small Phones

RIP, iPhone SE. The iPhone Xs, Xs Max, and Xr show that it’s all mega phones from now on.

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Tiny camera lens may help link quantum computers to network

An international team of researchers led by The Australian National University (ANU) has invented a tiny camera lens, which may lead to a device that links quantum computers to an optical fibre network.

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Famous theory of the living Earth upgraded to 'Gaia 2.0'

A time-honoured theory into why conditions on Earth have remained stable enough for life to evolve over billions of years has been given a new, innovative twist.

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Creating a continental bird migration forecast

September is the peak of autumn bird migration, and billions of birds are winging their way south in dramatic pulses. A new study published in the journal Science reports that scientists can now reliably predict these waves of bird migration up to seven days in advance. The study details the underlying methods that power migration forecasts, which can be used as a bird conservation tool.

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Blazes of light reveal how plants signal danger long distances

In one video, you can see a hungry caterpillar, first working around a leaf's edges, approaching the base of the leaf and, with one last bite, severing it from the rest of the plant. Within seconds, a blaze of fluorescent light washes over the other leaves, a signal that they should prepare for future attacks by the caterpillar or its kin.

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Designer enzyme conquers sulfite reduction, a bottleneck in environmental cleanup

Researchers have cleared one hurdle toward environmental cleanup of certain contaminants with a newly designed synthetic enzyme that reduces the compound sulfite to sulfide—a notoriously complex multistep chemical reaction that has eluded chemists for years.

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Wearable ultrasound patch monitors blood pressure deep inside body

A new wearable ultrasound patch that non-invasively monitors blood pressure in arteries deep beneath the skin could help people detect cardiovascular problems earlier on and with greater precision. In tests, the patch performed as well as some clinical methods to measure blood pressure. Applications include real-time, continuous monitoring of blood pressure changes in patients with heart or lung d

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Trees reveal the evolution of environmental pollution

Chemical analysis of tipuana tree rings and bark by Brazilian researchers shows falling levels of heavy metal pollution in the air of São Paulo City, Southern Hemisphere's largest metropolis.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds Barijat crossing Gulf of Tonkin

Tropical Cyclone Barijat appeared disorganized on satellite imagery as it moved across the Gulf of Tonkin, South China Sea. Barijat is being torn apart and had weakened from wind shear. After a landfall on Sept. 13, it is expected to dissipate quickly.

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The World Bank is a verified blockchain booster

Its efforts are still just experiments, but the global development bank is serious about using blockchains to help it reduce poverty.

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Donald Trump Doesn’t Care About Puerto Rico

I’ve talked to people in Puerto Rico who lost loved ones during Hurricane Maria. I’ve interviewed whole extended families struggling to locate one another and fearing for the worst, clinging to sporadic WhatsApp updates and making daily pilgrimages across the island to tiny archipelagos of cellphone service. I’ve heard stories of cousins who disappeared and people in nursing homes or on dialysis

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The Day Israeli-Palestinian Peace Seemed Within Reach

In the annals of the Arab-Israeli conflict, it was a historic turning point. At least that’s the way it seemed at the time. On this day, 25 years ago, the Oslo Accords—a framework for an interim agreement between Israelis and Palestinians—were signed on the South Lawn of the White House. President Bill Clinton, the host of the ceremony, was unable to sleep the night before. He told his peace team

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Largest study of 'post-treatment controllers' reveals clues about HIV remission

Most HIV patients need to take daily anti-retroviral therapy — if they suspend treatment, HIV will rebound within 3-4 weeks. But clinical trials have revealed that a small fraction of patients can stop taking medications yet keep the virus suppressed for 24 weeks or longer, maintaining viral control without the assistance of medication.

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Mixed chemicals in beauty products may harm women's hormones

A new study published in Environment International by George Mason University Assistant Professor of Global and Community Health Dr. Anna Pollack and colleagues discovered links between chemicals that are widely used in cosmetic and personal care products and changes in reproductive hormones.

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Trilobites: Just a Few Pieces of Plastic Can Kill Sea Turtles

A new study shows that especially for young turtles, ingesting just a little more than a dozen pieces of plastic in the ocean can be lethal.

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How Trump and Manafort Are Helping Each Other in the Russia Investigation

President Donald Trump has tried to distance himself from his former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, insisting that Manafort only worked for him for a very short time and that his recent convictions on tax- and bank-fraud charges have nothing to do with the campaign. But Trump’s and Manafort’s legal interests may be more aligned than either of them have let on. According to Rudy Giuliani, the pr

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7 Ways to Let Go of Guilt

Guilt makes us feel lower than a worm’s belly but it is also a sign of empathy and a signal that we care about not hurting others — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Emissions Have Already Peaked in 27 Cities—And Keep Falling

At the Global Climate Action Summit, a coalition of cities says it's made big progress in combating climate change.

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Cancer Cells Fuse with Immune Cells in Human Patients

The hybrid cells promote tumor heterogeneity and possible metastasis, a new study in mice and humans shows.

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NASA sees Tropical Depression Olivia's strength waning

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at a weakening and now tropical depression Olivia in the Central Pacific Ocean. Olivia soaked the Hawaiian Islands on its east to west track through them.

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Malicious brain cell identified

Astrocytes important role in brain function suggests they are also involved in disease. Now, scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have identified an astrocyte subpopulation as the dominant cell type to spring into action in vivo (in a living organism) in a neuroinflammatory disease setting. Their early activation inspired their new name: ieAstrocytes (immediate ea

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Hjernen fungerer bedst om efteråret

Sæsonvariationer kendes både inden for biologi og fysik. Men gode forklaringer savnes.

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Weird Science Stars in Ig Nobel Awards: Watch Live Tonight

Who will take home this year's Ig Nobels, the world's most unusual science prizes?

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Norm Macdonald’s Protective View of Comedy

One of Norm Macdonald’s most famous comedy performances came at the Comedy Central Roast of Bob Saget in 2008. Macdonald, probably best known for his dry, prickly demeanor as the host of Saturday Night Live ’s “Weekend Update” for three years, took the stage at an event known for cruel ribaldry and read a list of charmingly innocuous lines from an old book called Jokes for Retirement Parties . “B

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Hørte du også målene, før du så dem: Måske snart slut med forsinkelse på stream-tv

Britiske BBC har opfundet en løsning, der giver dig målene på tv, før du hører dem fra din nabo.

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Suspending young students risks future success in school

Some kindergartners and first-graders suspended from school can find it challenging to reverse the negative trajectory in their academic life, says a University of Michigan researcher.

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Brain features may reveal if placebo pills could treat chronic pain

Researchers narrow in on how to identify people who find placebos effective for treating persistent pain.

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Health Officials Rush to Protect Seniors, the Most Vulnerable Group, from Hurricane Florence

Evacuations may prove particularly challenging for nursing homes and people who receive care at home — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ryanair cabin crew in five countries to strike Sept 28

Ryanair cabin crew from five European countries will go on strike on September 28, threatening hundreds of flights in the latest round of a bitter tussle between unions and the budget airline's management.

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'I have a sense that it's probably quite bad … but because I don't see it, I don't know'

Lad culture in English universities is often perceived by university staff as involving 'extreme' behaviour and as being carried out by only a handful of 'bad apples' rather than as a widespread culture that fosters gender-based harassment and violence.But new research, led by Lancaster University, says this perception stems from various factors, including many staff having limited understandings

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Helping computers fill in the gaps between video frames

In a paper being presented at this week's European Conference on Computer Vision, MIT researchers describe an add-on module that helps artificial intelligence systems called convolutional neural networks, or CNNs, to fill in the gaps between video frames to greatly improve the network's activity recognition.

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Test checks bear spit for new antibiotics

Researchers have discovered a technology that rapidly assesses potentially lifesaving antibiotics by using bacteria in saliva from an East Siberian brown bear. The technology involves placing a bacterium from a wild animal’s mouth—or other complex source of microbes with potential antibiotic properties—in an oil droplet to see if it inhibits harmful bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus , accor

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The Bacteria in Your Gut Produce Electricity

These microbes lurking in your gut, produce their own electricity

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"I have a sense that it's probably quite bad… but because I don't see it, I don't know"

Lad culture in English universities is often perceived by university staff as involving 'extreme' behaviour and as being carried out by only a handful of 'bad apples' rather than as a widespread culture that fosters gender-based harassment and violence.

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White commuters favored anti-immigration policies after just being exposed to Spanish speakers

Although initial contact with outsiders is stressful, over time we figure out how to fit them into our lives. Read More

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Poorer people eat more meat to feel affluent, new study finds

A new study shows that the worse off you think you are, the more likely you are to choose the steak over the garden salad. Read More

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Hurricane Florence is so huge, astronauts had to use a super wide-angle lens

Images revealing the power of Hurricane Florence enthrall us and terrify us at the same time. Read More

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American Horror Story Is at the End of Its Wits

This article contains spoilers through Episode 1 of FX’s American Horror Story: Apocalypse. Stupidity is an ingredient in most horror-movie experiences. Every “Don’t go in there!” screamed at the screen recognizes that what’s bent about the world depicted isn’t just that vampires exist or that serial killers wear ski masks. It’s that the people in the movie act unlike real people do. This is, of

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On Waste Plastics at Sea, She Finds Unique Microbial Multitudes

In the middle of the Pacific Ocean, several hundred miles from Hawaii, is a swirling cauldron of waste plastic that’s been growing steadily since the mid-1980s. Dubbed the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, it’s an ugly testament to the scale of disposable culture — but it’s also an active breeding ground for new varieties of single-celled life. Along with colleagues on board the research schooner Tara

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Study Cracks Open the Secrets of Genetic Mutations That Boost Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

Scientists scoured variants of BRCA1 to determine which are pathogenic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Conservation dairy farming could help Pa. meet Chesapeake target

If the majority of dairy farms in Pennsylvania fully adopt conservation best-management practices, the state may be able to achieve its total maximum daily load water-quality target for the Chesapeake Bay, according to researchers.

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Indigenous Peoples Are Vital to Curtailing the Climate Crisis

Keeping global temperatures within safe limits requires empowering the inhabitants of forests around the world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Conservation dairy farming could help Pennsylvania meet Chesapeake target

If the majority of dairy farms in Pennsylvania fully adopt conservation best-management practices, the state may be able to achieve its total maximum daily load water-quality target for the Chesapeake Bay, according to researchers.

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NASA finds subtropical storm Joyce disorganized, wandering

Subtropical Storm Joyce seemed dazed by its own formation, wandering in the north central Atlantic Ocean and disorganized. NASA satellite imagery confirmed the lack of organization and patchy development of thunderstorms within the system.

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'A single piece of plastic' can kill sea turtles, says study

New study: Ingesting even a single piece of plastic exposes sea turtles to a 20% chance of death.

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Hen harrier disappears after satellite tag stops working

Hen harrier Heulwen had flown across Snowdonia when her satellite tag stopped transmitting.

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Wind and rain from Florence's leading edge lash Carolinas

The outer bands of wind and rain from a weakened but still lethal Hurricane Florence began lashing North Carolina on Thursday as the monster storm moved in for a prolonged and potentially catastrophic drenching along the Southeast coast.

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NASA finds subtropical storm Joyce disorganized, wandering

Subtropical Storm Joyce seemed dazed by its own formation, wandering in the north central Atlantic Ocean and disorganized. NASA satellite imagery confirmed the lack of organization and patchy development of thunderstorms within the system.

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New map of daily light integrals generated from updated data

The most recent solar radiation data have been converted into a new map of Daily Light Integrals for the United States by a team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture and Clemson University. Joanne Logan, associate professor in Biosystems Engineering and Soil Science, along with Clemson University associate professor James Faust, was recently awarded first place

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Researcher creates hydrogels capable of complex movement

Living organisms expand and contract soft tissues to achieve complex, 3-D movements and functions, but replicating those movements with man-made materials has proven challenging.

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Most fire in Florida goes undetected, researchers say

A new study from Florida State University researchers indicates that common satellite imaging technologies have vastly underestimated the number of fires in Florida.

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UTA researcher creates hydrogels capable of complex movement

Kyungsuk Yum, an assistant professor in UTA's Materials Science and Engineering Department, and his doctoral student, Amirali Nojoomi, have developed a process by which 2-D hydrogels can be programmed to expand and shrink in a space- and time-controlled way that applies force to their surfaces, enabling the formation of complex 3-D shapes and motions.

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FSU researchers: Most fire in Florida goes undetected

A new study indicates that common satellite imaging technologies have vastly underestimated the number of fires in Florida, detecting only 25 percent of burned area.

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Prostate cancer care for older men estimated to cost Medicare $1.2 billion

Researchers examined the costs associated with screening for prostate cancer, including treatment, for three years after diagnosis. They estimated that for men diagnosed in each of 2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007, the total cost for treating and screening for each group would be $1.2 billion for three years after diagnosis.

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Accelerating electrocatalyst discovery with machine learning

Researchers are paving the way to total reliance on renewable energy as they study both large- and small-scale ways to replace fossil fuels. One promising avenue is converting simple chemicals into valuable ones using renewable electricity, including processes such as carbon dioxide reduction or water splitting. But to scale these processes up for widespread use, we need to discover new electrocat

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Yes, Climate Action Is a Moral Issue

But the actions of individuals are not where our outrage should be focused — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Plate tectonics observatory to create seismic shift in earthquake research

We may never be able to entirely predict earthquakes such as those that hit central Italy in 2016, but we could better assess how they're going to play out by joining up data from different scientific fields in a new Europe-wide observatory, say scientists.

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Flooding, storm surge can be as destructive as a hurricane's winds

When hurricanes and powerful storms threaten land, people typically focus on wind speed. That could be a mistake.

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NASA gets inside look at large and powerful Hurricane Florence

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at the large and powerful Hurricane Florence early on Sept. 13 that indicated wind shear was temporarily affecting the southern side of the storm.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds wind shear pushing on Tropical Storm Isaac's center

Wind shear seems to be affecting several storms in the Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 13, 2018. Wind shear is affecting Hurricane Helene in the Eastern Atlantic and in the Western Atlantic, Hurricane Florence and even Tropical Storm Isaac are feeling its effects.

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Facebook 'better prepared' for election meddling, Zuckerberg says

Facebook is better prepared to defend against efforts to manipulate the platform to influence elections and has recently thwarted foreign influence campaigns targeting several countries, chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said Thursday.

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Our taste for beer may go back 13,000 years

Researchers have discovered evidence of the earliest brewmasters to date, a finding that might stir an old debate: What came first, beer or bread? In a cave in what is now Israel, scientists found beer-brewing innovations that they believe predate the early appearance of cultivated cereals in the Near East by several millennia. Their findings support a hypothesis proposed by archaeologists more t

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Amazon's Jeff Bezos unveils $2 bn philanthropic fund

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced Thursday he was creating a philanthropic fund with a $2 billion initial commitment to help homeless families and launch preschools in low-income communities.

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Video: What are eye crusties made of?

The substance that builds up in the corners of your eyes as you sleep has a variety of colloquial names: eye crusties, sleep, eye dust.

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VLBA measures asteroid's characteristics

In an unusual observation, astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) to study the effects on radio waves coming from a distant radio galaxy when an asteroid in our Solar System passed in front of the galaxy. The observation allowed them to measure the size of the asteroid, gain new information about its shape, and greatly improve the accuracy with which its

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Scientists use bear saliva to rapidly test for antibiotics

A team of scientists has discovered a technology that rapidly assesses potentially lifesaving antibiotics by using bacteria in saliva from an East Siberian brown bear.

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NASA-NOAA satellite finds wind shear pushing on Tropical Storm Isaac's center

Wind shear seems to be affecting several storms in the Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 13, 2018. Wind shear is affecting Hurric