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Nyheder2018september17

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Supreme Court Lets Stand a Decision Requiring ‘Dark Money’ Disclosure

Secret money in politics will soon be a lot less secret. The Supreme Court on Tuesday let stand a lower court ruling forcing politically active nonprofit groups to disclose the identities of any donor giving more than $200 when those groups advertise for or against political candidates. Until now, such nonprofit organizations—generally, those of the 501(c)(4) “social welfare” and 501(c)(6) “busin

7h

Sugar content of most supermarket yogurts well above recommended threshold

The sugar content of most types of yogurt is well above the recommended threshold, reveals an analysis of the nutrient content of available UK supermarket products. And organic varieties, often viewed as healthier options, contain some of the highest average sugar content, at 13.1 g/100 g, the findings indicate.

5h

Partikelforurening fundet i moderkager

Britisk forskning viser foruroligende nyt: Sodpartikler har fundet vej til moderkagen via blodbanen.

3h

Sponsored

LATEST

Searching for new bridge forms that can span further

Newly identified bridge forms could enable significantly longer bridge spans to be achieved in the future, potentially making a crossing over the Strait of Gibraltar, from the Iberian Peninsula to Morocco, feasible.

3min

Changes are needed to fund US water infrastructure

Water infrastructure in the western United States was funded in the early and mid-20th Century by federal financing through the Bureau of Reclamation, but such financing has declined in recent decades and there has been increased interest in alternative approaches to infrastructure funding. A new Journal of the American Water Resources Association article notes that two of these approaches—public-

3min

In a tiny worm, a close-up view of where genes are working

Scientists have long prized the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans as a model for studying the biology of multicellular organisms. The millimeter-long worms are easy to grow in the lab and manipulate genetically, and have only around 1,000 cells, making them a powerful system for probing intricacies of development, behavior and metabolism.

3min

RemoveDebris: UK satellite nets 'space junk'

A British satellite successfully deploys a net in orbit to demonstrate how to capture space debris.

33min

Regioner to år efter go-live: Hvordan kan data fra Sundhedsplatformen bruges?

Anvendelse af data var en af argumenterne for at købe Sundhedsplatformen. To år efter ibrugtagning af systemet, skal organisationen bag til at undersøge, hvordan man kan udnytte data på sigt.

36min

Children's yoghurts contain 'shocking' amounts of sugar, study finds

While they are still a healthier choice than a chocolate bar or a biscuit, flavoured yoghurts are packed with sugar Children’s yoghurts are packed with sugar, experts have found, warning that manufacturers and retailers need to do more to tackle the problem. Although yoghurt has long been considered a healthy food, experts warn that many of the products sold in supermarkets could contribute to ch

45min

Nu kan gravide også blive behandlet for hudlidelsen psoriasis

Tidligere har gravide måttet stoppe behandlingen for psoriasis på grund af risiko for abort og skader på fostret

1h

New fungus found to cause cankers and declines in pistachio trees in Sicily, Italy

Since 2010, pistachio farmers from Sicily have been reporting a disease on the trees, characterised by cankers and declines, sometimes leading to the collapse of entire plants. Having surveyed 15 pistachio orchards from three provinces, as well as potted plants, an international team of researchers identified a new disease caused by a previously unknown fungus. The aetiology of the disease and the

1h

Strength-based exercises could help child obesity fight, study finds

Encouraging young people to do strength-based exercises — such as squats, push ups and lunges — could play a key role in tackling child obesity, research suggests.

1h

Changes are needed to fund US water infrastructure

Water infrastructure in the western United States was funded in the early and mid-20th Century by federal financing through the Bureau of Reclamation, but such financing has declined in recent decades and there has been increased interest in alternative approaches to infrastructure funding. A new Journal of the American Water Resources Association article notes that two of these approaches — publ

1h

Study examines foraging of mountain gorillas for sodium-rich foods

A new Biotropica study examines mountain gorillas in Rwanda and their foraging for sodium-rich food in both national park areas and lands managed by local communities.

1h

Study examines how heartfelt guilt affects individuals

For thousands of years, people have closely associated moral cleanliness with acts of physical cleanliness. A recent study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology explored this association by eliciting guilt, a threat to one's moral purity.

1h

Chemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats

New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age. The findings are published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

1h

What treatable traits predict future asthma attacks?

Investigators have assessed the prevalence of treatable traits in severe asthma and have determined which specific traits are predictive of future asthma attacks. Their findings, which are published in Respirology, are the result of an extensive national collaborative study in Australia.

1h

Analysis finds HPV vaccine safe

Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause certain cancers in women and men, but HPV vaccines are highly effective in preventing infection with oncogenic HPV types. A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review of post-licensure data did not identify any new or unexpected safety concerns of the bivalent HPV vaccine.

1h

Overweight and obesity linked to higher risk of urinary incontinence for women

Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased risk of developing urinary incontinence for young to mid-aged women, according to an Obesity Reviews analysis of all relevant published studies.

1h

Research examines mechanisms behind cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes has been linked with an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia, but the underlying mechanisms are uncertain. In a new Diabetic Medicine study, imaging tests revealed that changes in white matter regions of the brain that are indicative of small vessel disease are associated with decreased processing speed (the the time it takes a person to do a mental task) in people

1h

Searching for new bridge forms that can span further

Newly identified bridge forms could enable significantly longer bridge spans to be achieved in the future, potentially making a crossing over the Strait of Gibraltar, from the Iberian Peninsula to Morocco, feasible. The new bridge forms — identified by a team of researchers from the University of Sheffield and Brunel University London, working with long span bridge expert Ian Firth of engineering

1h

Obesity and vitamin D deficiency may indicate greater risk for breast cancer

Vitamin D is already well known for its benefits in building healthy bones. A new study supports the idea that it also may reduce cancer risk as well as breast cancer mortality, especially in women with a lower body mass index. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS).

1h

Arthritis and depression often occur together in older adults

Arthritis is common in individuals with varying degrees of depression, according to a new International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry study.

1h

Creating 3D printed 'motion sculptures' from 2D videos

The new system uses an algorithm that can take D videos and turn them into 3D printed 'motion sculptures' that show how a human body moves through space. In addition to being an intriguing aesthetic visualization of shape and time, the team envisions that their 'MoSculp' system could enable a much more detailed study of motion for professional athletes, dancers, or anyone who wants to improve thei

1h

Midterm Time Capsule, 49 Days to Go: Intel Dump, Refugee Cap

Because these details tend to get lost in the froth, let’s pause to note two extraordinary steps Donald Trump took in the past 24 hours. One of them is literally unprecedented; the other is a sharp departure from modern norms. I’m not aware of any member of the governing GOP majority objecting to either of them. They are: (1) Declassifying FISA warrants and messages from FBI agents. Presumably be

2h

Sea Otters' Powerful Paw Prey Perception

The marine mammals have extraordinarily sensitive touch—which helps them nab prey in the absence of other sensory cues. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Trump Administration Eases Regulation Of Methane Leaks On Public Lands

The proposal to reduce limits on methane emissions from oil and gas operations on public land is the latest move to roll back Obama-era climate regulations.

5h

Social animals have tipping points, too

Quantitative tools developed in math and physics to understand bifurcations in dynamical systems could help ecologists and biologists better understand — and predict — tipping points in animal societies.

6h

Airbnb distribution may depend on who lives there, not just distance to city center

Distribution of Airbnbs may follow the same pattern across different cities, and several factors, including the number of residents who work in the creative industries, may determine their location, according to an article published in EPJ Data Science.

6h

Why do we hate wasps and love bees?

Both are as ecologically useful, say scientists, and the same effort must be made to protect them.

6h

Airbnb distribution may depend on who lives there, not just distance to city center

Distribution of Airbnbs may follow the same pattern across different cities, and several factors, including the number of residents who work in the creative industries, may determine their location, according to an article published in EPJ Data Science.

6h

Social animals have tipping points, too

In relatively cool temperatures, Anelosimus studiosus spiders lay their eggs and spin their webs and share their prey in cooperative colonies from Massachusetts to Argentina. Temperatures may vary, but the colonies continue to work together. That is, until 31 degrees C; then the spiders start to attack each other.

6h

Green space near home during childhood linked to fewer respiratory problems in adulthood

Children who have access to green spaces close to their homes have fewer respiratory problems, such as asthma and wheezing, in adulthood, according to new research. In contrast, children who are exposed to air pollution are more likely to experience respiratory problems as young adults.

6h

AI improves doctors' ability to correctly interpret tests and diagnose lung disease

Artificial intelligence (AI) can be an invaluable aid to help lung doctors interpret respiratory symptoms accurately and make a correct diagnosis, according to new research.

6h

Tweaking cells' gatekeepers could lead to new way to fight cancer

Researchers have devised a way to manipulate numbers of individual nuclear pores — a breakthrough that may one day stop cancerous cells from proliferating out of control.

6h

Why do we love bees but hate wasps?

A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to UCL-led research.

6h

The Atlantic Daily: ‘I Believe Her’

What We’re Following Uninspired Emmys: Critics have spoken: The 2018 Emmys gave viewers an uncomfortable pre-show and an uninspired, unnerving ceremony, save for much-needed respites such as an onstage marriage proposal during an acceptance speech. Self-referential jokes about the absence of diversity were as plentiful as the recognition of people of color’s work was scarce, Hannah Giorgis writes

6h

A DOJ Probe Into Elon's Tweets Could Spell Yet More Trouble for TeslaTesla DOJ Elon Musk

The reported criminal probe is likely in its early stages, but darkens an already gloomy sky gathering over Elon Musk's automaker.

7h

First particle tracks seen in prototype for international neutrino experiment

The largest liquid-argon neutrino detector in the world has just recorded its first particle tracks, signaling the start of a new chapter in the story of the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE).

7h

For-profit hospitals correlated with higher readmission rates

Patients who receive care in a for-profit hospital are more likely to be readmitted than those who receive care in nonprofit or public hospitals, according to a new study.

7h

In a tiny worm, a close-up view of where genes are working

Researchers have produced new resources for research involving the roundworm C. elegans: a comprehensive view of which genes are active in each of the four major tissues of adult worms, as well as a tool for predicting gene activity across 76 more specific cell types.

7h

Searching for errors in the quantum world

The theory of quantum mechanics is well supported by experiments. Now, however, a thought experiment by physicists yields unexpected contradictions. These findings raise some fundamental questions — and they're polarising experts.

7h

Dance flies attract males with their hairy legs and inflatable sacs

It’s usually males that go out of their way to attract a mate – but for dance flies it’s the females that dress to impress

7h

Mosquitoes are eating plastic and spreading it to new food chains

Aquatic mosquito larvae eat plastic in the water and retain it when they become flies – meaning the plastic ends up in the birds that eat mosquitoes

7h

Why do we love bees but hate wasps?

A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to UCL-led research.

7h

Sugar in yogurt leaves a sour taste

A comprehensive survey of ingredients in yogurts available in UK supermarkets highlights high sugar levels in many — particularly organic yogurts and those marketed towards children.

7h

Air pollution may be linked to heightened dementia risk

Air pollution may be linked to a heightened risk of developing dementia, finds a London-based observational study, published in the online journal BMJ Open.The associations found couldn't be explained by factors known to influence the risks of developing the condition, say the researchers.

7h

Sugar content of most supermarket yogurts well above recommended threshold

The sugar content of most types of yogurt is well above the recommended threshold, reveals an analysis of the nutrient content of available UK supermarket products. And organic varieties, often viewed as healthier options, contain some of the highest average sugar content, at 13.1 g/100 g, the findings indicate.

7h

Air pollution linked to much greater risk of dementia

Risk in over-50s increases by 40% where highest nitrogen oxide levels exist, study shows Air pollution may increase the chance of developing dementia, a study has suggested, in fresh evidence that the health of people of all ages is at risk from breathing dirty air. People over 50 in areas with the highest levels of nitrogen oxide in the air showed a 40% greater risk of developing dementia than t

7h

AI improves doctors' ability to correctly interpret tests and diagnose lung disease

Artificial intelligence (AI) can be an invaluable aid to help lung doctors interpret respiratory symptoms accurately and make a correct diagnosis, according to new research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

8h

Green space near home during childhood linked to fewer respiratory problems in adulthood

Children who have access to green spaces close to their homes have fewer respiratory problems, such as asthma and wheezing, in adulthood, according to new research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. In contrast, children who are exposed to air pollution are more likely to experience respiratory problems as young adults.

8h

Do household cleaners make kids obese? Here's why it's too soon to tell.

Health Don't go throwing the baby out with the bathtub cleaner. More and more research these days shows us we might have gone too far with our obsession to rid our homes of germs, and that kids could use a little dirt.

8h

Twitter's Chronological Timeline Will Save Us From Ourselves

Twitter announced it’s giving users more control over their timelines just in time for tweets about Toad.

8h

Why The Way Hurricanes Are Classified Can Be Deceptive

Meteorologists have been using a nearly 50-year-old scale to measure the wind speed and storm surge of a hurricane. But it's not a good measure for rain, which can often become the most dangerous aspect of a storm.

8h

Harvard Psychology Professor Discusses How Trauma Affects Memory

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with clinical psychologist Richard McNally about memory retention following traumatic events in light of the sexual assault accusations brought against Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

8h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump: ‘This Is Not a Man Who Deserves This’

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Senator Susan Collins asked the Senate Judiciary Committee to allow lawyers for Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, who has accused the Supreme Court nominee of sexual assault, time to question the opposing party at next week’s hearing. During a joint press conference with Poland’s Pr

8h

Here's how a photojournalist prepares to cover a hurricane

Environment A wire photographer gets ready to cover Florence. As everyday citizens evacuate or shelter in place, photojournalists move into the eye of the storm. Here’s how they plan for the assignment.

8h

To Reduce Criminal Sentences, Lawyers Are Filming Tear-Jerkers

Narrative is one of mankind’s sharpest tools. Many scholars argue that storytelling—our ability to invent fictions, and to collectively believe in them—is what ultimately distinguishes Homo sapiens from chimpanzees. You don’t have to look far to see the evidence; from politics to religion to capitalism to our own personal identity, the foundation of humanity is built upon stories. Doug Passon, a

8h

The TESS space telescope has spotted its first exoplanet

TESS’s first exoplanet is twice Earth’s size and may have lots of water.

8h

In a tiny worm, a close-up view of where genes are working

A team at Princeton's Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics has produced new resources for research involving the roundworm C. elegans: a comprehensive view of which genes are active in each of the four major tissues of adult worms, as well as a tool for predicting gene activity across 76 more specific cell types.

8h

China’s leaders are softening their stance on AI

A year after announcing an aggressive plan to dominate artificial intelligence, China’s vice premier has called for international collaboration.

9h

Climate Fwd:: Trump Administration Formally Rolls Back Rule Aimed at Limiting Methane Pollution

The Interior Department move, which benefits drilling companies, effectively reverses a major Obama-era effort to fight climate change.

9h

The Collateral Damage of Trump's Extreme Declassifications

Trump has the legal right to make public whatever documents he chooses. But he's going to cause untold damage in the process.

9h

For-profit hospitals correlated with higher readmission rates

Patients who receive care in a for-profit hospital are more likely to be readmitted than those who receive care in nonprofit or public hospitals, according to a new study published by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers.

9h

Synthetic Sandalwood Maintains Hair Growth in Human Tissue

The compound engages with a receptor in hair follicle cells and prevents skin cells from dying.

9h

'Captain Marvel' Trailer: The Next MCU Movie Will Pummel You with '90s Nostalgia

The MCU wants to take you back to the days of Blockbuster and beepers.

9h

Tweaking cells' gatekeepers could lead to new way to fight cancer

Salk Institute researchers have devised a way to manipulate numbers of individual nuclear pores — a breakthrough that may one day stop cancerous cells from proliferating out of control.

9h

Nipam Patel (MBL) 1: Patterning the Anterior-Posterior Axis: The Role of Homeotic (Hox) Genes

https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/homeotic-genes Nipam Patel explains the effects of Hox gene deletions and how these phenotypes help us understand the manner in which Hox genes act to control the insect body plan. Homeotic (Hox) genes are transcription factors that dictate the development and compartmentalization (regionalization) of body parts in animals along the anterior-pos

9h

Nipam Patel (MBL) 3: Homeotic (Hox) Genes and Evolution of Crustacean Body Plan

https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/homeotic-genes Nipam Patel explains the effects of Hox gene deletions and how these phenotypes help us understand the manner in which Hox genes act to control the insect body plan. Homeotic (Hox) genes are transcription factors that dictate the development and compartmentalization (regionalization) of body parts in animals along the anterior-pos

9h

Nipam Patel (MBL) 2: The Role of Ubx in the Development of Crustacean Body Plan

https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/homeotic-genes Nipam Patel explains the effects of Hox gene deletions and how these phenotypes help us understand the manner in which Hox genes act to control the insect body plan. Homeotic (Hox) genes are transcription factors that dictate the development and compartmentalization (regionalization) of body parts in animals along the anterior-pos

9h

Team care ups survival rates for people with lung cancer

A study of more than 4,000 lung cancer patients reveals that people who receive treatment under a multidisciplinary model of care have significantly higher survival rates at one, three, five, and 10 years after diagnosis than those who receive treatment with a traditional model of care. The study, which appears in Clinical Lung Cancer , represents the first large-scale published investigation in

9h

The Science Behind Feeding a Mission to Mars

The Science Behind Feeding a Mission to Mars Food scientists are developing food for astronauts that stays nutritious and fresh for at least three years. ISSThanksgiving.jpg NASA astronaut Michael Hopkins' Thanksgiving meal on November 28, 2013. Image from aboard the International Space Station. Image credits: NASA Space Tuesday, September 18, 2018 – 16:00 Rebecca Boyle, Contributor (Inside Scien

9h

International study suggest ancient globalization

Using energy consumption as a measure, a team of international scientists has found that ancient civilizations engaged in globalization more than previously believed, suggesting that an integrated global economy is nothing new and may have benefited societies for ages.

9h

Cash, carbon, crude: How to make oil fields bury emissions

A new analysis looks at what it would take for oil companies to start pumping millions of tons of carbon dioxide into their wells to boost crude production — and what it would mean for the climate.

9h

Kessler researchers show Speed of Processing Training effective in multiple sclerosis

'These results indicate that processing speed is fundamental to higher order cognitive function in individuals with MS,' said Dr. Chiaravalloti, the Foundation's director of Neuropsychology, Neuroscience, and Traumatic Brain Injury Research. 'Looking at the impact of cognitive interventions on neuropsychological measures isn't enough, however. The outcomes of our research studies need to include t

10h

Facebook is being sued for hiding job ads from womenACLU EEOC Facebook Ads

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10h

What patients think of companies selling their DNA

A new survey reveals public attitudes toward potential commercial use of their DNA, blood, and tissue samples. Recently, the almost 5 million people who paid to have 23andMe analyze their DNA found out that the company might have sold their genetic data and related health information to a major drug company. That’s because 23andMe made a $300 million deal with pharmaceutical giant Glaxo SmithKlin

10h

How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste

Study explains how radioactive radium transfers to wastewater in the widely-used method to extract oil and gas.

10h

New hurdle for developing immunotherapies

A new discovery tosses a new wrench into the process of building better molecules to develop immunotherapies.

10h

Making happiness last longer

The happiness derived from a purchase may last longer for those who set broader goals for the experience.

10h

Jararaca pit vipers: Giant' specimens proliferation linked to fewer predators

In São Paulo, Brazil, it is the lesser presence of predators, not large food supply, that can explain why an isolated green area concentrates more giant pit vipers than a wide forest reserve.

10h

Nuclear pasta, the hardest known substance in the universe

A team of scientists has calculated the strength of the material deep inside the crust of neutron stars and found it to be the strongest known material in the universe.

10h

Better chemo drug adsorption onto targeted delivery capsules

One of the challenges in cancer research is improving the delivery of chemo drugs to enhance their efficacy while decreasing the risk of side effects. Scientists now perform a theoretical prediction of adsorption of a well-known chemo drug onto active carbon with aluminium inclusions, to show its potential as an oral chemotherapy delivery capsule.

10h

Weird Infrared Signal Emanates Across Space, But What Created It?

The signal extends over a huge swath of space, an area that's 2.5 times bigger than the orbit of Pluto.

10h

10h

Colon cancer is caused by bacteria and cell stress

Scientists have made an unexpected discovery while investigating the triggering factors of colon cancer: Cell stress in combination with an altered microbiota in the colon drives tumor growth. Previously, it was assumed that this combination only contributes to inflammatory intestinal diseases.

10h

Silver nanoparticles are toxic for aquatic organisms

Silver nanoparticles are increasingly being used in consumer products, such as clothing and personal care products, in the medical and pharmaceutical industry, and in the food industry. That is why their presence is expected to increase in the environment where they can exert harmful effects on organisms.

10h

Global trade in exotic pets threatens endangered parrots through the spread of a virus

Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) in wild parrot populations has been detected in eight new countries, raising concerns for threatened species. This highlights the need for greater awareness of the risks of the spread of infectious disease associated with the international trade in live parrots.

10h

Intestinal bacteria produce electric current from sugar

Intestinal bacteria can create an electric current, according to a new study. The results are valuable for the development of drugs, but also for the production of bioenergy, for example.

10h

Natural climate oscillations in north Atlantic linked to Greenland ice sheet melt

Scientists have known for years that warming global climate is melting the Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest ice sheet in the world. A new study, however, shows that the rate of melting might be temporarily increased or decreased by two existing climate patterns: the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

10h

Chip-sized device can measure laser power in real time

Researchers have been developing a laser power sensor that could be built into manufacturing devices for real-time measurements in many manufacturing processes, from welding car parts to crafting engine components with 3D printers.

10h

Glyphosate resistance in junglerice confirmed

There has been a lot of publicity in recent years about growers battling glyphosate-resistant pigweed in soybean and cotton crops. But pigweed isn't the only weed resistant to glyphosate. New research shows certain populations of junglerice (Echinochloa colona) are now among a growing number of weeds resistant to the herbicide.

10h

The press trampled on my privacy. Here's how I took back my story | Kate Stone

After a horrific accident put her in the tabloid headlines, Kate Stone found a way to take control of her narrative — and help prevent others from losing their privacy, too. Learn how she reclaimed her story in this personal talk infused with humor and courage.

10h

What does math look like to mathematicians?

Science Excerpt: Math with Bad Drawings It’s very simple. Math looks like language. A funny language, I’ll admit. It’s dense, terse, and painstaking to read.

10h

The Problem Sunscreen Poses for Dark Skin

Americans as a whole don’t regularly wear sunscreen , but Americans of color especially don’t . This is striking given sunscreen’s wide-ranging benefits. It fades acne scars, which can last for weeks or even months. It staves off conditions that are caused or worsened by the sun, such as lupus, which is especially common among women of color. And it protects skin that becomes more photosensitive

10h

Cash, carbon, crude: How to make oil fields bury emissions

A new analysis looks at what it would take for oil companies to start pumping millions of tons of carbon dioxide into their wells to boost crude production — and what it would mean for the climate.

10h

QAnon Is Trying to Trick Facebook’s Meme-Reading AI

How should Facebook balance transparency about its automated systems with security?

10h

Great White Sharks Gather in Droves in the Middle of Nowhere, But Why?

The White Shark Café, a deserted area in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, is also a delightful buffet for the ocean's largest predatory fish.

10h

1 big change to math class may boost learning

‘Flipped’ teaching may increase student comprehension of math concepts and offer teachers a way to enhance their teaching skills, according to a new study. It could also help support parent participation in the learning process. Flipped instruction, a technique in which teachers send students home with information typically given in lectures and save class time for discussion, is becoming more po

10h

The nocturnal pollinators: Scientists reveal the secret life of moths

A new study suggests moths have an important but overlooked ecological role — dispensing pollen over large distances under the cover of darkness.

10h

Father's obesity in early puberty doubles asthma-risk for future offspring

Boys who have considerable weight gain between childhood and puberty, double the risk of having asthma as an adult, and for future offspring.

10h

New test kit for quick, accurate and low-cost screening of diseases

A multidisciplinary team of researchers has developed a portable, easy-to-use device for quick and accurate screening of diseases. This versatile technology platform called enVision (enzyme-assisted nanocomplexes for visual identification of nucleic acids) can be designed to detect a wide range of diseases – from emerging infectious diseases (e.g. Zika and Ebola) and high-prevalence infections (e.

10h

Extremely small and fast: Laser ignites hot plasma

When light pulses from an extremely powerful laser system are fired onto material samples, the electric field of the light rips the electrons off the atomic nuclei. A plasma is created. The electrons couple with the laser light in the process. When flying out of the target, they pull the atomic cores behind them. In order to experimentally investigate this complex acceleration process scientists h

10h

Jumping genes work together to control programmed deletion in the genome

Scientists have discovered a new family of molecules that work together to precisely remove unwanted DNA during reproduction in single-celled, freshwater organisms called ciliates.

10h

Florida Keys' corals are growing but have become more porous

Researchers have long questioned what impact climate change has on the rate at which corals are growing and building reef habitats in the Florida Keys. A new study explored this topic, finding both good and bad news. The rate of coral skeletal growth in the Florida Keys has remained relatively stable over time, but the skeletal density of the region's corals is declining, possibly due to ocean aci

10h

A key to climate stabilization could be buried deep in the mud

While scientists fear that rising temperatures could unleash a 'bomb' of carbon from Earth's soil carbon reservoirs, a new study suggests these reservoirs might actually be more stable than predicted.

10h

Surviving insects and plants are tougher than we think

Insect pollinators and plants that have survived the impacts of agricultural intensification may have a greater ability to resist future environmental changes than previously thought, a new study has found.

10h

How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste

Radioactivity in fracking wastewater comes from the interaction between a chemical slurry and ancient shale during the hydraulic fracturing process, according to Dartmouth College research.

10h

Study on jararaca pit vipers links 'giant' specimens proliferation to predators

In São Paulo, Brazil, it is the lesser presence of predators, not large food supply, that can explain why an isolated green area concentrates more giant pit vipers than a wide forest reserve.

10h

Making happiness last longer

The happiness derived from a purchase may last longer for those who set broader goals for the experience.

10h

How slick water and black shale in fracking combine to produce radioactive waste

Study explains how radioactive radium transfers to wastewater in the widely-used method to extract oil and gas.

10h

11h

Machine-learning system tackles speech and object recognition, all at once

Computer scientists have developed a system that learns to identify objects within an image, based on a spoken description of the image. Given an image and an audio caption, the model will highlight in real-time the relevant regions of the image being described.

11h

How cells repurpose their garbage disposal systems to promote inflammation

Researchers have unraveled new insights into the way cells leverage G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their cellular waste disposal systems to control inflammation. The findings suggest some existing cancer drugs that inhibit these cellular activities might be repurposed to treat vascular inflammation, which occurs when artery-blocking plaques form in atherosclerosis.

11h

Mathematicians calculate the safest way home for pedestrians

A mobile app that guides pedestrians along the safest instead of quickest route to their destination is being developed.

11h

Melting Arctic Permafrost Releases Acid that Dissolves Rocks, Releases CO2

As temperatures rise in the Arctic, icy permafrost isn't the only thing that's melting.

11h

Enabling Genomics-Guided Precision Medicine

Download this eBook from Qiagen to learn more about the promise of precision medicine and how QCITM Interpret can help deliver better care with better knowledge.

11h

Study uncovers new hurdle for developing immunotherapies

The body's immune system is a valiant weapon against disease, and harnessing its power through a technique called immunotherapy is at the forefront of current research to treat cancer and other diseases.

11h

European nations plan to use more hydrogen for energy needs

Dozens of European countries are backing a plan to increase the use of hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels to cut the continent's carbon emissions.

11h

Are These Four Personality Types for Real?

Researchers find that personality traits occur in clusters.

11h

11h

UTMB adapts Zika vaccine to fight brain cancer

Researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have successfully harnessed their Zika virus vaccine to target and kill brain cancer known as glioblastoma.

11h

The whiff of sandalwood makes the human head sprout more hair

Your scalp can "smell" things – and when it detects synthetic sandalwood, the rate of hair growth increases

11h

Quantum mechanics may contradict itself when applied to big objects

Standard quantum theory explains the behaviour of microscopic things like electrons and atoms. It should also, in principle apply to larger objects – but it might not

11h

Eating foods with low nutritional quality ratings linked to cancer risk in large European cohort

The consumption of foods with higher scores on the British Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system (FSAm-NPS), reflecting a lower nutritional quality, is associated with an increased risk of developing cancer.

11h

Use of electrical brain stimulation to foster creativity has sweeping implications

Researchers address neuro-ethical concerns associated with the increasing use of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES).

11h

Super-recognizers help fight crime, but their powers remain mysterious

Science And how AI could help them do it even better. Our ability to place faces exists on a spectrum. Some super-recognizers, whose abilities far exceed the average, have taken an outsize role in fighting crime.

11h

Early tests pave the way for a giant neutrino detector

A prototype detector demonstrates the technology needed for the DUNE experiment.

11h

International study suggests ancient globalization

Using energy consumption as a measure, a team of international scientists has found that ancient civilizations engaged in globalization more than previously believed, suggesting that an integrated global economy is nothing new and may have benefited societies for ages.

11h

Study uncovers new hurdle for developing immunotherapies

The discovery made by Notre Dame researchers and their collaborators tosses a new wrench into the process of building better molecules to develop immunotherapies.

11h

The GOP Response to the Kavanaugh Allegations Sends an Unmistakable Message to Women

To understand why women overwhelmingly support a Democratic takeover of Congress—a landslide majority of 65 percent, according to the latest ABC News/ Washington Post survey—it’s worth parsing some of the initial Republican responses to the sexual-assault allegations against Brett Kavanaugh. The remarks explain why, on the cusp of the first national elections of the #MeToo era, Republicans on the

11h

You Can Never Go Back to the Old Twitter

Twitter is bringing reverse-chronological timelines back. It won’t be the new default, but CEO Jack Dorsey announced that you’ll be able to go back to the simplest way to organize a timeline with a setting change. Uncheck “ show the best tweets first ,” and out will go the algorithmically shaped experience—tweets from 4h ago, lingering with tweets from 10s ago—and in will come the old rhythm, the

11h

Why some human genes are more popular with researchers than others

Historical bias is a key reason why biomedical researchers continue to study the same 10 percent of all human genes while ignoring many genes known to play roles in disease, according to a new study. This bias is bolstered by research funding mechanisms and social forces.

12h

Distance helps re-fuel the heart

Separated entry and exit doors for calcium keep energy production smooth in the powerhouses of heart cells.

12h

A new defender for your sense of smell

New research increases understanding of a mysterious sensory cell located in the olfactory epithelium, the patch of nasal tissue that contains odor-detecting olfactory receptor cells. The findings suggest that the so-called microvillous cells (MVCs) may protect the vulnerable olfactory epithelium by detecting and initiating defenses against viruses, bacteria, and other potentially harmful invaders

12h

Why some human genes are more popular with researchers than others

Historical bias is a key reason why biomedical researchers continue to study the same 10 percent of all human genes while ignoring many genes known to play roles in disease, according to a study publishing Sept. 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, led by Thomas Stoeger and Luís Amaral of Northwestern University, and colleagues. This bias is bolstered by research funding mechanisms and soci

12h

Study reveals best available science for predator-livestock coexistence

A new study published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Biology reveals certain nonlethal methods are effective for managing predators in agricultural landscapes. Twenty-one authors from 10 nations reviewed 114 peer-reviewed scientific studies measuring the effectiveness of lethal and non-lethal methods for reducing carnivore predation on livestock. Livestock guardian dogs, livestock enclosures an

12h

Study explains why some human genes are more popular with researchers than others

Historical bias is a key reason biomedical researchers continue to study the same 10 percent of all human genes whose sequences are known while ignoring many genes known to play roles in disease, according to a Northwestern University study. The bias is bolstered by research funding mechanisms and social forces. Well-meaning policy interventions to promote exploratory research result primarily in

12h

Eating foods with low nutritional quality ratings linked to cancer risk in large European cohort

The consumption of foods with higher scores on the British Food Standards Agency nutrient profiling system (FSAm-NPS), reflecting a lower nutritional quality, is associated with an increased risk of developing cancer, according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine.

12h

Eying Uber, China's Didi launches in Mexico's second city

Chinese ride-hailing service Didi Chuxing said Tuesday it is launching service in Mexico's second-largest city, Guadalajara, expanding its presence in the country—and its challenge to market king Uber.

12h

Invasion risk of starry stonewort in upper Midwest

Researchers recently published a new article predicting the risk of starry stonewort invasion in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

12h

Matter: Why Your DNA Is Still Uncharted Territory

Scientists are focusing on a relatively small number of human genes and neglecting thousands of others. The reasons have more to do with professional survival than genetics.

12h

EU investigates German carmakers for possible collusion

European Union regulators have opened an in-depth investigation into whether automakers BMW, Daimler and Volkswagen colluded to limit the development and roll-out of car emission control systems.

12h

Renault-Nissan to use Android system in its dashboards

The Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi alliance, one of the world's top-selling automakers, has decided to go with Google's Android operating system to run its dashboard information and entertainment features.

12h

Letters: Standing Up for Truth

It’s Time for the Press to Stop Complaining—And to Start Fighting Back Earlier this month, Chuck Todd, an Atlantic contributing editor and the moderator of Meet the Press , described how a nearly 50-year campaign of vilification has left many Americans distrustful of the media. His essay urged journalists—and readers—to reach for facts instead of talking points. Alas, Chuck Todd’s lengthy view of

12h

The Genes That Never Go Out of Style

Back in 2000, a group of mildly inebriated geneticists set up a lighthearted sweepstakes to guess how many genes the human genome would turn out to contain once it was fully sequenced. More than 460 bets were placed, and the lowest guess of 25,947 eventually won when the Human Genome Project was completed in 2003. Fifteen years later, the exact number of human genes is still being debated , with

12h

Ireland recovers 14bn euros in Apple 'back taxes'

Apple has completed payment of 14.3 billion euros ($16.7 billion) in back taxes to the Irish government, Dublin said Tuesday, following a European Commission ruling that the tech giant had benefitted from illegal tax breaks in the country.

12h

How cells repurpose their garbage disposal systems to promote inflammation

G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are everywhere in our bodies. They are embedded in our cell membranes, where they act as signal transducers, allowing cells to respond to their external environments. GPCRs play a crucial role in most biological functions, including heart rate, blood pressure, vision, smell, taste and allergic responses. GPCR malfunction can lead to a number of diseases, and man

12h

NASA sees fading Florence's stretched-out strongest storms

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at fading Post-Tropical Cyclone Florence's clouds, revealing where the strongest thunderstorms were located. Those strong thunderstorms stretched from the Mid-Atlantic to New England.

12h

Geoscientists find unexpected 'deep creep' near San Andreas, San Jacinto faults

A new analysis of thousands of very small earthquakes that have occurred in the San Bernardino basin near the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults suggests that the unusual deformation of some—they move in a different way than expected—may be due to "deep creep" 10 km below the Earth's surface, say geoscientists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

12h

Software could lead to personalized leukemia treatments

Early findings from a new study could help in the development of immune-based treatments personalized to people with acute myeloid leukemia who are undergoing stem cell transplantation, researchers report. “If you could identify and activate the immune cells from the stem cell donor that only target leukemia cells, and not normal, healthy cells, that would be a big win,” says Ben Vincent, an assi

12h

NASA sees fading Florence's stretched-out strongest storms

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at fading Post-Tropical Cyclone Florence's clouds, revealing where the strongest thunderstorms were located. Those strong thunderstorms stretched from the Mid-Atlantic to New England.

12h

Geoscientists find unexpected 'deep creep' near San Andreas, San Jacinto faults

A new analysis of thousands of very small earthquakes in the San Bernardino basin suggests that the unusual deformation of some may be due to 'deep creep' 10 km below the Earth's surface, say geoscientists. They say scientists should not use the information recorded by these small earthquakes to predict loading of the nearby San Andreas and San Jacinto faults.

12h

Capitalizing on sleep-wake cycle can drastically increase digital ad profits from social media

New research shows digital content platforms can increase traffic to their websites from social media and boost digital ad profits by at least 8 percent, simply by aligning their posting schedules with target audiences' sleep-wake cycles.

12h

CRISPR screen reveals new targets in more than half of all squamous cell carcinomas

Researchers sheds light on p63 activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, providing an actionable path forward to drug development against this known cause of cancer.

12h

Tech In Times Of Trouble

Natural disaster? There's an app for that. (Image credit: NOAA via Getty Images)

12h

Defect engineering using crystal symmetry [Physics]

Defects in solids can be broadly classified based on their dimensionality (1). Zero-dimensional defects (point defects) arise as a consequence of entropy considerations (configurational entropy) and thus are thermodynamically required in any material. One-dimensional defects such as dislocations are not required by thermodynamics but arise anyway as a consequence of…

12h

Infrastructure to enable deployment of carbon capture, utilization, and storage in the United States [Sustainability Science]

In February 2018, the United States enacted significant financial incentives for carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) that will make capture from the lowest-capture-cost sources economically viable. The largest existing low-capture-cost opportunity is from ethanol fermentation at biorefineries in the Midwest. An impediment to deployment of carbon capture at ethanol…

12h

Gain control explains the effect of distraction in human perceptual, cognitive, and economic decision making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

When making decisions, humans are often distracted by irrelevant information. Distraction has a different impact on perceptual, cognitive, and value-guided choices, giving rise to well-described behavioral phenomena such as the tilt illusion, conflict adaptation, or economic decoy effects. However, a single, unified model that can account for all these phenomena…

12h

Infants distinguish between leaders and bullies [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

We examined whether 21-month-old infants could distinguish between two broad types of social power: respect-based power exerted by a leader (who might be an authority figure with legitimate power, a prestigious individual with merited power, or some combination thereof) and fear-based power exerted by a bully. Infants first saw three…

12h

Altered ER-mitochondria contact impacts mitochondria calcium homeostasis and contributes to neurodegeneration in vivo in disease models [Applied Biological Sciences]

Calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis is essential for neuronal function and survival. Altered Ca2+ homeostasis has been consistently observed in neurological diseases. How Ca2+ homeostasis is achieved in various cellular compartments of disease-relevant cell types is not well understood. Here we show in Drosophila Parkinson’s disease (PD) models that Ca2+ transport from…

12h

Structural elements required for coupling ion and substrate transport in the neurotransmitter transporter homolog LeuT [Biochemistry]

The coupled transport of ions and substrates allows transporters to accumulate substrates using the energy of transmembrane ion gradients and electrical potentials. During transport, conformational changes that switch accessibility of substrate and ion binding sites from one side of the membrane to the other must be controlled so as to…

12h

Photoaffinity-engineered protein scaffold for systematically exploring native phosphotyrosine signaling complexes in tumor samples [Biochemistry]

Phosphotyrosine (pTyr)-regulated protein complexes play critical roles in cancer signaling. The systematic characterization of these protein complexes in tumor samples remains a challenge due to their limited access and the transient nature of pTyr-mediated interactions. We developed a hybrid chemical proteomics approach, termed Photo-pTyr-scaffold, by engineering Src homology 2 (SH2)…

12h

14-3-3ϵa directs the pulsatile transport of basal factors toward the apical domain for lumen growth in tubulogenesis [Biochemistry]

The Ciona notochord has emerged as a simple and tractable in vivo model for tubulogenesis. Here, using a chemical genetics approach, we identified UTKO1 as a selective small molecule inhibitor of notochord tubulogenesis. We identified 14-3-3εa protein as a direct binding partner of UTKO1 and showed that 14-3-3εa knockdown leads…

12h

Fc{alpha}RI binding at the IgA1 CH2-CH3 interface induces long-range conformational changes that are transmitted to the hinge region [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

IgA effector functions include proinflammatory immune responses triggered upon clustering of the IgA-specific receptor, FcαRI, by IgA immune complexes. FcαRI binds to the IgA1–Fc domain (Fcα) at the CH2–CH3 junction and, except for CH2 L257 and L258, all side-chain contacts are contributed by the CH3 domain. In this study, we…

12h

Structure of the membrane proximal external region of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) bears epitopes of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) from infected individuals; it is thus a potential vaccine target. We report an NMR structure of the MPER and its adjacent transmembrane domain in bicelles that mimic a lipid-bilayer membrane. The MPER…

12h

A cancer-associated polymorphism in ESCRT-III disrupts the abscission checkpoint and promotes genome instability [Cell Biology]

Cytokinetic abscission facilitates the irreversible separation of daughter cells. This process requires the endosomal-sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery and is tightly regulated by charged multivesicular body protein 4C (CHMP4C), an ESCRT-III subunit that engages the abscission checkpoint (NoCut) in response to mitotic problems such as persisting chromatin bridges…

12h

Evolution of metazoan morphological disparity [Evolution]

The animal kingdom exhibits a great diversity of organismal form (i.e., disparity). Whether the extremes of disparity were achieved early in animal evolutionary history or clades continually explore the limits of possible morphospace is subject to continuing debate. Here we show, through analysis of the disparity of the animal kingdom,…

12h

Defective cortex glia plasma membrane structure underlies light-induced epilepsy in cpes mutants [Genetics]

Seizures induced by visual stimulation (photosensitive epilepsy; PSE) represent a common type of epilepsy in humans, but the molecular mechanisms and genetic drivers underlying PSE remain unknown, and no good genetic animal models have been identified as yet. Here, we show an animal model of PSE, in Drosophila, owing to…

12h

Chemokine receptors CCR2 and CX3CR1 regulate viral encephalitis-induced hippocampal damage but not seizures [Immunology and Inflammation]

Viral encephalitis is a major risk factor for the development of seizures, epilepsy, and hippocampal damage with associated cognitive impairment, markedly reducing quality of life in survivors. The mechanisms underlying seizures and hippocampal neurodegeneration developing during and after viral encephalitis are only incompletely understood, hampering the development of preventive treatments….

12h

Lack of Sprouty 1 and 2 enhances survival of effector CD8+ T cells and yields more protective memory cells [Immunology and Inflammation]

Identifying novel pathways that promote robust function and longevity of cytotoxic T cells has promising potential for immunotherapeutic strategies to combat cancer and chronic infections. We show that sprouty 1 and 2 (Spry1/2) molecules regulate the survival and function of memory CD8+ T cells. Spry1/2 double-knockout (DKO) ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CD8+…

12h

Expansion of cancer stem cell pool initiates lung cancer recurrence before angiogenesis [Medical Sciences]

Angiogenesis is essential in the early stage of solid tumor recurrence, but how a suspensive tumor is reactivated before angiogenesis is mostly unknown. Herein, we stumble across an interesting phenomenon that s.c. xenografting human lung cancer tissues can awaken the s.c. suspensive tumor in nude mice. We further found that…

12h

Phylogenetic approach to recover integration dates of latent HIV sequences within-host [Medical Sciences]

Given that HIV evolution and latent reservoir establishment occur continually within-host, and that latently infected cells can persist long-term, the HIV reservoir should comprise a genetically heterogeneous archive recapitulating within-host HIV evolution. However, this has yet to be conclusively demonstrated, in part due to the challenges of reconstructing within-host reservoir…

12h

Enterotoxigenic E. coli virulence gene regulation in human infections [Microbiology]

Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a global diarrheal pathogen that utilizes adhesins and secreted enterotoxins to cause disease in mammalian hosts. Decades of research on virulence factor regulation in ETEC has revealed a variety of environmental factors that influence gene expression, including bile, pH, bicarbonate, osmolarity, and glucose. However, other…

12h

Ehrlichia type IV secretion system effector Etf-2 binds to active RAB5 and delays endosome maturation [Microbiology]

Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an obligatory intracellular bacterium, infects monocytes/macrophages by sequestering a regulator of endosomal traffic, the small GTPase RAB5, on its membrane-bound inclusions to avoid routing to host-cell phagolysosomes. How RAB5 is sequestered on ehrlichial inclusions is poorly understood, however. We found that native Ehrlichia translocated factor-2 (Etf-2), a previously..

12h

Elimination of the error signal in the superior colliculus impairs saccade motor learning [Neuroscience]

When movements become dysmetric, the resultant motor error induces a plastic change in the cerebellum to correct the movement, i.e., motor adaptation. Current evidence suggests that the error signal to the cerebellum is delivered by complex spikes originating in the inferior olive (IO). To prove a causal link between the…

12h

PKCϵ contributes to lipid-induced insulin resistance through cross talk with p70S6K and through previously unknown regulators of insulin signaling [Physiology]

Insulin resistance drives the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). In liver, diacylglycerol (DAG) is a key mediator of lipid-induced insulin resistance. DAG activates protein kinase C ε (PKCε), which phosphorylates and inhibits the insulin receptor. In rats, a 3-day high-fat diet produces hepatic insulin resistance through this mechanism, and…

12h

Glutamate-activated BK channel complexes formed with NMDA receptors [Physiology]

The large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated K+ (BK) channel has a requirement of high intracellular free Ca2+ concentrations for its activation in neurons under physiological conditions. The Ca2+ sources for BK channel activation are not well understood. In this study, we showed by coimmunopurification and colocalization analyses that BK channels form…

12h

Mid-level visual features underlie the high-level categorical organization of the ventral stream [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Human object-selective cortex shows a large-scale organization characterized by the high-level properties of both animacy and object size. To what extent are these neural responses explained by primitive perceptual features that distinguish animals from objects and big objects from small objects? To address this question, we used a texture synthesis…

12h

Growing community of artificial molecular machinists [Introductions]

Over the past decades, chemists have been pursuing the creation of man-made molecular machines with either designed engineering-like operations or with higher performances compared with biological machines. The promise of creating an artificial molecular world traces its origins in the well-known lecture of Richard Feynman, There’s plenty of room at…

12h

Molecular machines with bio-inspired mechanisms [Physical Sciences]

The widespread use of molecular-level motion in key natural processes suggests that great rewards could come from bridging the gap between the present generation of synthetic molecular machines—which by and large function as switches—and the machines of the macroscopic world, which utilize the synchronized behavior of integrated components to perform…

12h

Stochastically pumped adaptation and directional motion of molecular machines [Physical Sciences]

Recent developments in synthetic molecular motors and pumps have sprung from a remarkable confluence of experiment and theory. Synthetic accomplishments have facilitated the ability to design and create molecules, many of them featuring mechanically bonded components, to carry out specific functions in their environment—walking along a polymeric track, unidirectional circling…

12h

New molecular switch architectures [Physical Sciences]

In this paper we elaborate on recently developed molecular switch architectures and how these new systems can help with the realization of new functions and advancement of artificial molecular machines. Progress in chemically and photoinduced switches and motors is summarized and contextualized such that the reader may gain an appreciation…

12h

Molecular rotary motors: Unidirectional motion around double bonds [Physical Sciences]

The field of synthetic molecular machines has quickly evolved in recent years, growing from a fundamental curiosity to a highly active field of chemistry. Many different applications are being explored in areas such as catalysis, self-assembled and nanostructured materials, and molecular electronics. Rotary molecular motors hold great promise for achieving…

12h

Morphological transitions of elastic filaments in shear flow [Applied Physical Sciences]

The morphological dynamics, instabilities, and transitions of elastic filaments in viscous flows underlie a wealth of biophysical processes from flagellar propulsion to intracellular streaming and are also key to deciphering the rheological behavior of many complex fluids and soft materials. Here, we combine experiments and computational modeling to elucidate the…

12h

Origin of the emergent fragile-to-strong transition in supercooled water [Applied Physical Sciences]

Liquids can be broadly classified into two categories, fragile and strong ones, depending on how their dynamical properties change with temperature. The dynamics of a strong liquid obey the Arrhenius law, whereas the fragile one displays a super-Arrhenius law, with a much steeper slowing down upon cooling. Recently, however, it…

12h

Nucleosomes inhibit target cleavage by CRISPR-Cas9 in vivo [Biochemistry]

Genome editing with CRISPR-Cas nucleases has been applied successfully to a wide range of cells and organisms. There is, however, considerable variation in the efficiency of cleavage and outcomes at different genomic targets, even within the same cell type. Some of this variability is likely due to the inherent quality…

12h

Ragulator and SLC38A9 activate the Rag GTPases through noncanonical GEF mechanisms [Biochemistry]

The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) growth pathway detects nutrients through a variety of sensors and regulators that converge on the Rag GTPases, which form heterodimers consisting of RagA or RagB tightly bound to RagC or RagD and control the subcellular localization of mTORC1. The Rag heterodimer uses…

12h

Ultrahigh-throughput functional profiling of microbiota communities [Biochemistry]

Microbiome spectra serve as critical clues to elucidate the evolutionary biology pathways, potential pathologies, and even behavioral patterns of the host organisms. Furthermore, exotic sources of microbiota represent an unexplored niche to discover microbial secondary metabolites. However, establishing the bacterial functionality is complicated by an intricate web of interactions inside…

12h

Mammalian STT3A/B oligosaccharyltransferases segregate N-glycosylation at the translocon from lipid-linked oligosaccharide hydrolysis [Biochemistry]

Oligosaccharyltransferases (OSTs) N-glycosylate proteins by transferring oligosaccharides from lipid-linked oligosaccharides (LLOs) to asparaginyl residues of Asn-Xaa-Ser/Thr acceptor sequons. Mammals have OST isoforms with STT3A or STT3B catalytic subunits for cotranslational or posttranslational N-glycosylation, respectively. OSTs also hydrolyze LLOs, forming free oligosaccharides (fOSs). It has

12h

GEF mechanism revealed by the structure of SmgGDS-558 and farnesylated RhoA complex and its implication for a chaperone mechanism [Biochemistry]

SmgGDS has dual functions in cells and regulates small GTPases as both a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho family and a molecular chaperone for small GTPases possessing a C-terminal polybasic region followed by four C-terminal residues called the CaaX motif, which is posttranslationally prenylated at its cysteine…

12h

Franck-Condon picture of incoherent neutron scattering [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

A spectroscopic interpretation of incoherent neutron scattering experiments is presented which is based on Franck–Condon-type probabilities for scattering-induced transitions between quantum states of the target. The resulting expressions for the scattering functions enable an energy landscape-oriented analysis of neutron scattering spectra as well as a physical interpretation of Van Hove’s…

12h

Simultaneous polymerization and adhesion under hypoxia in sickle cell disease [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Polymerization and adhesion, dynamic processes that are hallmarks of sickle cell disease (SCD), have thus far been studied in vitro only separately. Here, we present quantitative results of the simultaneous and synergistic effects of adhesion and polymerization of deoxygenated sickle hemoglobin (HbS) in the human red blood cell (RBC) on…

12h

Machining protein microcrystals for structure determination by electron diffraction [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

We demonstrate that ion-beam milling of frozen, hydrated protein crystals to thin lamella preserves the crystal lattice to near-atomic resolution. This provides a vehicle for protein structure determination, bridging the crystal size gap between the nanometer scale of conventional electron diffraction and micron scale of synchrotron microfocus beamlines. The demonstration…

12h

Mechanics of diseased red blood cells in human spleen and consequences for hereditary blood disorders [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

In red blood cell (RBC) diseases, the spleen contributes to anemia by clearing the damaged RBCs, but its unique ability to mechanically challenge RBCs also poses the risk of inducing other pathogenic effects. We have analyzed RBCs in hereditary spherocytosis (HS) and hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), two typical examples of blood…

12h

Chemical control over membrane-initiated steroid signaling with a DNA nanocapsule [Physical Sciences]

Membrane-initiated steroid signaling (MISS) is a recently discovered aspect of steroidal control over cell function that has proved highly challenging to study due to its rapidity and ultrasensitivity to the steroid trigger [Chow RWY, Handelsman DJ, Ng MKC (2010) Endocrinology 151:2411–2422]. Fundamental aspects underlying MISS, such as receptor binding, kinetics…

12h

The chaperonin TRiC/CCT is essential for the action of bacterial glycosylating protein toxins like Clostridium difficile toxins A and B [Cell Biology]

Various bacterial protein toxins, including Clostridium difficile toxins A (TcdA) and B (TcdB), attack intracellular target proteins of host cells by glucosylation. After receptor binding and endocytosis, the toxins are translocated into the cytosol, where they modify target proteins (e.g., Rho proteins). Here we report that the activity of translocated…

12h

Genetic screen identifies adaptive aneuploidy as a key mediator of ER stress resistance in yeast [Cell Biology]

The yeast genome becomes unstable during stress, which often results in adaptive aneuploidy, allowing rapid activation of protective mechanisms that restore cellular homeostasis. In this study, we performed a genetic screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genome adaptations that confer resistance to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Whole-genome sequencing of…

12h

Dynamic force spectroscopy of synthetic oligorotaxane foldamers [Physical Sciences]

Wholly synthetic molecules involving both mechanical bonds and a folded secondary structure are one of the most promising architectures for the design of functional molecular machines with unprecedented properties. Here, we report dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments that explore the energetic details of donor–acceptor oligorotaxane foldamers, a class of molecular…

12h

Triangular cyclic rotaxanes: Size, fluctuations, and switching properties [Physical Sciences]

We examine one of the simplest cyclic rotaxanes—a molecule made from three rods with variable length between 0 and L. This [3]rotaxane, unlike a traditional molecule, shows significant size and shape fluctuations. We quantify these using a number of different measures. In particular, we show that the average angles are…

12h

Structure of a monolayer of molecular rotors on aqueous subphase from grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction [Physical Sciences]

In situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering shows that a monolayer of artificial rod-shaped dipolar molecular rotors produced on the surface of an aqueous subphase in a Langmuir trough has a structure conducive to a 2D ferroelectric phase. The axes of the rotors stand an average of 0.83 nm apart in a…

12h

Reversible photoswitching of encapsulated azobenzenes in water [Physical Sciences]

Efficient molecular switching in confined spaces is critical for the successful development of artificial molecular machines. However, molecular switching events often entail large structural changes and therefore require conformational freedom, which is typically limited under confinement conditions. Here, we investigated the behavior of azobenzene—the key building block of light-controlled molec

12h

Remote electrochemical modulation of pKa in a rotaxane by co-conformational allostery [Physical Sciences]

Allosteric control, one of Nature’s most effective ways to regulate functions in biomolecular machinery, involves the transfer of information between distant sites. The mechanistic details of such a transfer are still an object of intensive investigation and debate, and the idea that intramolecular communication could be enabled by dynamic processes…

12h

Inchworm movement of two rings switching onto a thread by biased Brownian diffusion represent a three-body problem [Physical Sciences]

The coordinated motion of many individual components underpins the operation of all machines. However, despite generations of experience in engineering, understanding the motion of three or more coupled components remains a challenge, known since the time of Newton as the “three-body problem.” Here, we describe, quantify, and simulate a molecular…

12h

Decreased water activity in nanoconfinement contributes to the folding of G-quadruplex and i-motif structures [Chemistry]

Due to the small size of a nanoconfinement, the property of water contained inside is rather challenging to probe. Herein, we measured the amount of water molecules released during the folding of individual G-quadruplex and i-motif structures, from which water activities are estimated in the DNA nanocages prepared by 5…

12h

Toward the first quantum simulation with quantum speedup [Computer Sciences]

With quantum computers of significant size now on the horizon, we should understand how to best exploit their initially limited abilities. To this end, we aim to identify a practical problem that is beyond the reach of current classical computers, but that requires the fewest resources for a quantum computer….

12h

Striking stationarity of large-scale climate model bias patterns under strong climate change [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Because all climate models exhibit biases, their use for assessing future climate change requires implicitly assuming or explicitly postulating that the biases are stationary or vary predictably. This hypothesis, however, has not been, and cannot be, tested directly. This work shows that under very large climate change the bias patterns…

12h

Dynamic amplification of extreme precipitation sensitivity [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

A useful starting hypothesis for predictions of changes in precipitation extremes with climate is that those extremes increase at the same rate as atmospheric moisture does, which is ∼7% K−1 following the Clausius–Clapeyron (CC) relation. This hypothesis, however, neglects potential changes in the strengths of atmospheric circulations associated with precipitation…

12h

Wetting controls of droplet formation in step emulsification [Engineering]

The formation of droplets is ubiquitous in many natural and industrial processes and has reached an unprecedented level of control with the emergence of milli- and microfluidics. Although important insight into the mechanisms of droplet formation has been gained over the past decades, a sound understanding of the physics underlying…

12h

Global estimates of mortality associated with long-term exposure to outdoor fine particulate matter [Environmental Sciences]

Exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is a major global health concern. Quantitative estimates of attributable mortality are based on disease-specific hazard ratio models that incorporate risk information from multiple PM2.5 sources (outdoor and indoor air pollution from use of solid fuels and secondhand and active smoking), requiring assumptions…

12h

Cancer-driving H3G34V/R/D mutations block H3K36 methylation and H3K36me3-MutS{alpha} interaction [Genetics]

Somatic mutations on glycine 34 of histone H3 (H3G34) cause pediatric cancers, but the underlying oncogenic mechanism remains unknown. We demonstrate that substituting H3G34 with arginine, valine, or aspartate (H3G34R/V/D), which converts the non-side chain glycine to a large side chain-containing residue, blocks H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) dimethylation and trimethylation…

12h

High-resolution repertoire analysis reveals a major bystander activation of Tfh and Tfr cells [Immunology and Inflammation]

T follicular helper (Tfh) and regulatory (Tfr) cells are terminally differentiated cells found in germinal centers (GCs), specialized secondary lymphoid organ structures dedicated to antibody production. As such, follicular T (Tfol) cells are supposed to be specific for immunizing antigens, which has been reported for Tfh cells but is debated…

12h

Distinct antiviral signatures revealed by the magnitude and round of influenza virus replication in vivo [Microbiology]

Influenza virus has a broad cellular tropism in the respiratory tract. Infected epithelial cells sense the infection and initiate an antiviral response. To define the antiviral response at the earliest stages of infection we used a series of single-cycle reporter viruses. These viral probes demonstrated cells in vivo harbor a…

12h

Clinical and veterinary trypanocidal benzoxaboroles target CPSF3 [Microbiology]

African trypanosomes cause lethal and neglected tropical diseases, known as sleeping sickness in humans and nagana in animals. Current therapies are limited, but fortunately, promising therapies are in advanced clinical and veterinary development, including acoziborole (AN5568 or SCYX-7158) and AN11736, respectively. These benzoxaboroles will likely be key to the World…

12h

A pan-mammalian map of interhemispheric brain connections predates the evolution of the corpus callosum [Neuroscience]

The brain of mammals differs from that of all other vertebrates, in having a six-layered neocortex that is extensively interconnected within and between hemispheres. Interhemispheric connections are conveyed through the anterior commissure in egg-laying monotremes and marsupials, whereas eutherians evolved a separate commissural tract, the corpus callosum. Although the pattern…

12h

ASCT1 (Slc1a4) transporter is a physiologic regulator of brain d-serine and neurodevelopment [Neuroscience]

d-serine is a physiologic coagonist of NMDA receptors, but little is known about the regulation of its synthesis and synaptic turnover. The amino acid exchangers ASCT1 (Slc1a4) and ASCT2 (Slc1a5) are candidates for regulating d-serine levels. Using ASCT1 and ASCT2 KO mice, we report that ASCT1, rather than ASCT2, is…

12h

Designing antiphase boundaries by atomic control of heterointerfaces [Physics]

Extended defects are known to have critical influences in achieving desired material performance. However, the nature of extended defect generation is highly elusive due to the presence of multiple nucleation mechanisms with close energetics. A strategy to design extended defects in a simple and clean way is thus highly desirable…

12h

Floquet quantum criticality [Physics]

We study transitions between distinct phases of one-dimensional periodically driven (Floquet) systems. We argue that these are generically controlled by infinite-randomness fixed points of a strong-disorder renormalization group procedure. Working in the fermionic representation of the prototypical Floquet Ising chain, we leverage infinite randomness physics to provide a simple description…

12h

Universal quantum Hamiltonians [Physics]

Quantum many-body systems exhibit an extremely diverse range of phases and physical phenomena. However, we prove that the entire physics of any quantum many-body system can be replicated by certain simple, “universal” spin-lattice models. We first characterize precisely what it means for one quantum system to simulate the entire physics…

12h

Nontrivial superconductivity in topological MoTe2-xSx crystals [Physics]

Topological Weyl semimetals (TWSs) with pairs of Weyl points and topologically protected Fermi arc states have broadened the classification of topological phases and provide superior platform for study of topological superconductivity. Here we report the nontrivial superconductivity and topological features of sulfur-doped Td-phase MoTe2 with enhanced Tc compared with type-II…

12h

Structural fluctuations cause spin-split states in tetragonal (CH3NH3)PbI3 as evidenced by the circular photogalvanic effect [Physics]

Lead halide perovskites are used in thin-film solar cells, which owe their high efficiency to the long lifetimes of photocarriers. Various calculations find that a dynamical Rashba effect could significantly contribute to these long lifetimes. This effect is predicted to cause a spin splitting of the electronic bands of inversion-symmetric…

12h

Metal-insulator-transition engineering by modulation tilt-control in perovskite nickelates for room temperature optical switching [Physics]

In transition metal perovskites ABO3, the physical properties are largely driven by the rotations of the BO6 octahedra, which can be tuned in thin films through strain and dimensionality control. However, both approaches have fundamental and practical limitations due to discrete and indirect variations in bond angles, bond lengths, and…

12h

Plastid terminal oxidase requires translocation to the grana stacks to act as a sink for electron transport [Plant Biology]

The plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) has been shown to be an important sink for photosynthetic electron transport in stress-tolerant plants. However, overexpression studies in stress-sensitive species have previously failed to induce significant activity of this protein. Here we show that overexpression of PTOX from the salt-tolerant brassica species Eutrema salsugineum…

12h

Perspective taking can promote short-term inclusionary behavior toward Syrian refugees [Political Sciences]

Social scientists have shown how easily individuals are moved to exclude outgroup members. Can we foster inclusion instead? This study leverages one of the most significant humanitarian crises of our time to test whether, and under what conditions, American citizens adopt more inclusionary behavior toward Syrian refugees. We conduct a…

12h

Americans’ occupational status reflects the status of both of their parents [Social Sciences]

American workers’ occupational status strongly reflects the status of their parents. Men and women who grew up in a two-earner or father-breadwinner family achieved occupations that rose 0.5 point for every one-point increase in their parents’ statuses (less if their father was absent). Gender differences were small in two-earner families…

12h

Linking economic growth pathways and environmental sustainability by understanding development as alternate social-ecological regimes [Sustainability Science]

Scientists understand how global ecological degradation is occurring but not why it seems to be so difficult to reverse. We used national-level data and a mathematical model to provide an empirical test of the hypothesis that national economies display two distinct economic regimes that are maintained by self-reinforcing feedbacks between…

12h

Correction for Chen et al., Diverse AR-V7 cistromes in castration-resistant prostate cancer are governed by HoxB13 [Corrections]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Diverse AR-V7 cistromes in castration-resistant prostate cancer are governed by HoxB13,” by Zhong Chen, Dayong Wu, Jennifer M. Thomas-Ahner, Changxue Lu, Pei Zhao, Qingfu Zhang, Connor Geraghty, Pearlly S. Yan, William Hankey, Benjamin Sunkel, Xiaolong Cheng, Emmanuel S. Antonarakis, Qi-En Wang, Zhihua Liu, Tim H.-M. Huang,…

12h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

DNA architecture influences genome-editing efficiency Illustration of Cas9 binding to DNA. Hypothetical PAM sites for Cas9 targets are shown in red; DNA backbones are blue; RNA backbone is teal; DNA and RNA bases are white, except for PAM; histones are green; and Cas9 is purple. Image courtesy of Janet Iwasa…

12h

Profile of Dana Carroll [Profiles]

University of Utah biochemist Dana Carroll was among the first scientists to develop reagents for genome editing. These tools can make site-specific double-strand DNA breaks to stimulate desired recombination and repair. The technology that Carroll spearheaded, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), laid the groundwork for other genome-editing platforms, such as transcription activator-like…

12h

Dark deactivation of chloroplast enzymes finally comes to light [Plant Biology]

From the pioneering work that the Buchanan group started in the late 1960s, we know that the division of photosynthesis into light and dark reactions is inadequate because the activity of a number of chloroplast enzymes, many involved in the Calvin–Benson cycle, is strictly controlled by light; that is, they…

12h

Single-molecule study reveals the frenetic lives of proteins in gradients [Developmental Biology]

Protein concentration gradients are a common strategy to compartmentalize activities within cells and tissues. Gradients position the division plane of bacterial cells, regulate the size of yeast cells, and pattern embryos (1–3). Among the most studied gradients is the Bicoid gradient of Drosophila. Bicoid protein is synthesized from a localized…

12h

Sprouty branches out to control T cell memory [Immunology and Inflammation]

CD8+ T cells provide critical immune protection against infections and cancer. Upon T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of a cognate antigen–MHC I complex and costimulatory signals presented by dendritic cells, quiescent CD8+ T cells undergo activation, leading to proliferation and effector responses that mediate clearance of pathogen-infected cells or cancer….

12h

Pathogens’ adaptation to the human host [Microbiology]

Diarrheal diseases are still one of the biggest global health burdens. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), diarrhea ranks as the ninth cause of death worldwide, being the fourth among children. One of the most prevalent diarrheagenic pathogens is enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (1). ETEC’s classic virulence mechanisms include…

12h

News Feature: What’s the best way to build a molecular machine? [Chemistry]

Chemists are tinkering with a variety of different designs and means of propulsion, though practical uses for these mini-motors have yet to be realized. Some of the smallest, most useful machines known to science are the biological molecules that keep living things living. The protein myosin drives the contraction and…

12h

American Weirdness: Observations From an Expat

Sometimes it begins with the toothpaste. Whenever I go back to the United States from Europe, where I’ve lived for more than half my adult life, I’ll often find myself in a jet-lagged fog at a huge American drugstore staring at the toothpaste aisle. Why? I ask myself, or anyone who’s around. Why are there so many kinds of toothpaste? Whitening, baking soda, clean mint, fresh mint, gel, paste, swi

12h

Photos: Pet Rescues in the Wake of Hurricane Florence

As Hurricane Florence passes out of the area, the floodwaters from the record rainfall continue to threaten some parts of North and South Carolina, with major rivers expected to reach their peak flood levels in the next few hours or days. For much of the past week, residents have been evacuating or fleeing from Florence, many of them carrying their beloved furry companions. Dogs, cats, and other

12h

How cells repurpose their garbage disposal systems to promote inflammation

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have unraveled new insights into the way cells leverage G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and their cellular waste disposal systems to control inflammation. The findings, published Sept. 18, 2018 in Cell Reports, suggest some existing cancer drugs that inhibit these cellular activities might be repurposed to treat vascular infl

12h

Machine-learning system tackles speech and object recognition, all at once

MIT computer scientists have developed a system that learns to identify objects within an image, based on a spoken description of the image. Given an image and an audio caption, the model will highlight in real-time the relevant regions of the image being described.

12h

Use of electrical brain stimulation to foster creativity has sweeping implications

In an article published in Creativity Research Journal, Georgetown researchers address neuro-ethical concerns associated with the increasing use of transcranial electrical stimulation (tES).

12h

Scientists catch Higgs boson particle’s most common decay

CERN researchers have observed the Higgs boson particle transforming into bottom quarks as it decays. Scientists predict this is the most common way for Higgs bosons to decay, yet it was a difficult signal to isolate because background processes closely mimic the subtle signal. This new discovery is a big step forward in the quest to understand how the Higgs enables fundamental particles to acqui

12h

Geoscientists find unexpected 'deep creep' near San Andreas, San Jacinto faults

A new analysis of thousands of very small earthquakes in the San Bernardino basin suggests that the unusual deformation of some may be due to 'deep creep' 10 km below the Earth's surface, say geoscientists at UMass Amherst. They say scientists should not use the information recorded by these small earthquakes to predict loading of the nearby San Andreas and San Jacinto faults.

13h

SunTrust's online banking difficulties enters third day

Customers of the large regional bank SunTrust are experiencing a third day of outages and difficulties from its online banking services, a particular problem for its customers in North and South Carolina who are currently dealing with Hurricane Florence.

13h

Tesla confirms criminal probe into Musk talk of going private

Tesla confirmed Tuesday that US Justice Department officials were looking into possible criminal aspects of a seemingly spontaneous, and later aborted, announcement by chief executive Elon Musk on taking the electric automaker private.

13h

NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shearing Tropical Depression Joyce

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Depression Joyce and found wind shear was pushing the bulk of clouds and showers to the east of the center.

13h

Review explores how birds can stay slim, even when they overeat

Noticing that songbirds, such as finches, never seem to get fat despite overeating at bird feeders, London environmental biologist Lewis Halsey wondered whether the amount of energy birds put into singing, fidgeting, or exercising could be adjusted in ways that regulate weight. In a literature review published September 18 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, he explores whether songbirds

13h

The Mirai Botnet Architects Are Now Fighting Crime With the FBI

In 2016, three friends created a botnet that nearly broke the internet. Now, they're helping the feds catch cybercriminals of all stripes.

13h

‘Varm tobak’ er den nye kampplads mellem læger og tobaksindustri

Professor Charlotta Pisinger er stærkt bekymret for ‘heated tobacco’ som er tobaksindustriens seneste tiltag for at fastholde rygere, og tiltrække nye generationer af rygere. Europæiske lungelægers organisation advarer mod produkterne.

13h

Ny metode hjælper lungemedicinere med at undersøge bivirkninger

Danske undersøgelser præsenteret på ERS-kongressen afkræfter tidligere formodninger om bivirkninger til hyppigt anvendte astmamidler. Forskerne har benyttet ny farmakoepidemiologisk metode til at screene for bivirkninger.

13h

SpaceX Plans to Fly Humans Around the Moon in 2023

Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa and a hand-picked coterie of artists could embark on a lunar mission within five years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

13h

Researchers predict invasion risk of starry stonewort in upper Midwest

Researchers from the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center recently published a new paper predicting the invasion risk of starry stonewort (Nitellopsis obtusa) in Minnesota and Wisconsin lakes. Starry stonewort is a macroagla invasive in North America that has been found in fourteen lakes in Minnesota to date.

13h

Before the fire: Large-scale study aims to improve burning management of Flint Hills

Kansas State University researchers are part of a large collaborative project that is using unmanned aircraft to improve the Kansas Flint Hills Smoke Management Plan.

13h

First particle tracks seen in prototype for international neutrino experiment

The largest liquid-argon neutrino detector in the world has just recorded its first particle tracks, signaling the start of a new chapter in the story of the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE).

13h

A new defender for your sense of smell

New research from the Monell Center increases understanding of a mysterious sensory cell located in the olfactory epithelium, the patch of nasal tissue that contains odor-detecting olfactory receptor cells. The findings suggest that the so-called microvillous cells (MVCs) may protect the vulnerable olfactory epithelium by detecting and initiating defenses against viruses, bacteria, and other poten

13h

Researchers investigate correlation between blood flow and body position

For the first time ever, an international research group detected alterations in capillary blood flow around the face caused by body position change. This became possible through the use of imaging photoplethysmography. Using this method, scientists can examine blood vessels located in the carotid system in order to, for example, investigate the cerebral blood flow response to various stimuli in h

13h

This Experiment Will Shoot Ghostly Particles Through Earth, Answer Why We Exist

An international group of physicists has announced that they have seen the first signals in a cube-shaped detector called ProtoDUNE.

13h

Mannitolinhalation er en effektiv test til astmadiagnostik

Brug af mannitol til at diagnosticere astma er en enkel og hurtig test, som med stor præcision kan finde frem til både dem, der har astma, og udelukke dem, der ikke har. Dansk forsker mener, at testen bør bruges i almen praksis.

13h

Rygning giver systemisk inflammation

Data fra Herlev-Østerbroundersøgelsen viser, at personer med genvarianter, der får folk til at ryge mere, får et højere niveau af systemisk inflammation.

13h

The Unknowable Enigma of Babies’ Dreams

Infants spend most of their time sleeping, waking up for just a few hours total every day. A lot of growth happens during those spans of shut-eye, though. Research shows that sleep is just as formative for babies’ development as are the scattered bouts of consciousness when their eyes are open and their ears are perked up. As with adults, sleeping likely helps infants retain or protect memory and

13h

Colorado’s Charismatic Governor Is Pondering a Run for President

DENVER —John Hickenlooper sits in the backseat of his official SUV, poring over a speech he’s about to deliver before the One Colorado Education Fund. He’s slated to receive an award from the group for his leadership on LGBTQ issues. It’s a busy Saturday night in the life of Colorado’s popular Democratic governor, who is dressed in a royal-blue, pin-striped zoot suit, having just left the annual

13h

Russia’s Tangled Syria Policy May Prove Unsustainable

A Russian military plane was shot down over the Mediterranean on Monday—an incident that, despite being the direct result of antiaircraft fire from its Syrian ally, Moscow blamed on Israel, another of its de facto allies. The incident shows not only the clashing tangle of competing interests in Syria as the civil war nears its end, but also how easily that dynamic can rupture carefully cultivated

13h

CRISPR screen reveals new targets in more than half of all squamous cell carcinomas

Team of University of Colorado Cancer Center researchers sheds light on p63 activity in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung, providing an actionable path forward to drug development against this known cause of cancer.

13h

New AI Strategy Mimics How Brains Learn to Smell

Today’s artificial intelligence systems, including the artificial neural networks broadly inspired by the neurons and connections of the nervous system, perform wonderfully at tasks with known constraints. They also tend to require a lot of computational power and vast quantities of training data. That all serves to make them great at playing chess or Go, at detecting if there’s a car in an image

14h

Målrettet lungedenervation hjælper patienter med KOL

Første forsøg med at åbne tillukkede luftveje hos patienter med KOL viser, at ny teknik signifikant kan reducere problemer associeret med sygdommen.

14h

Pesticider giver dårligere lungefunktion i barndommen

Babyer, som har været udsat for organoklorin-pesticider, mens de var i mors mave, udvikler dårligere lungefunktion i barndommen. Det viser ny forskning.

14h

Florence's Floods Reveal Exposure of Rural Areas to Climate Change

For cash-strapped communities, planning for a warmer future is a luxury — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Distance helps re-fuel the heart

Separated entry and exit doors for calcium keep energy production smooth in the powerhouses of heart cells.

14h

Capitalizing on sleep-wake cycle can drastically increase digital ad profits from social media

New Notre Dame research shows digital content platforms can increase traffic to their websites from social media and boost digital ad profits by at least 8 percent, simply by aligning their posting schedules with target audiences' sleep-wake cycles.

14h

NASA infrared imagery reveals wind shearing Tropical Depression Joyce

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Depression Joyce and found wind shear was pushing the bulk of clouds and showers to the east of the center.

14h

Researchers predict invasion risk of starry stonewort in upper Midwest

Researchers from the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center recently published a new paper predicting the risk of starry stonewort invasion in Minnesota and Wisconsin.

14h

Is email evil? Bosses are getting boxed in by their inbox

Want to be a better boss? Check your email less often. Research from Michigan State University shows that keeping up with email traffic places high demands on managers, which prevents them from achieving their goals and from being good leaders.

14h

Why Sex and Gender Matter in Migraine

Men and women experience the attacks differently due to both physiology and sociology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

First gut bacteria may have lasting effect on ability to fight chronic diseases

New research showing that the first bacteria introduced into the gut have a lasting impact, may one day allow science to adjust microbiomes — the one-of-a-kind microbial communities that live in our gastrointestinal tracts — to help ward off serious chronic diseases.

14h

Transparent loudspeakers and MICs that let your skin play music

An international team of researchers has presented an innovative wearable technology that will turn your skin into a loudspeaker.

14h

Neuroscience of envy: Activated brain region when others are rewarded revealed

Researchers showed that part of the macaque brain alters the sense of value felt upon receiving a reward in a manner dependent on the receipt of rewards by one's peers. This finding on the neuroscience of envy provides insight into how all primates, including humans, compare their material wellbeing with that of others and are potentially motivated to compete for limited resources.

14h

Cosmetically smoothing over visible facial scars

A novel cosmetic product, designed to fill small to moderate facial scars, has shown promise in covering such deformities in a small group of patients. Participants were generally more satisfied with their appearance after the treatment was applied and the researchers believe it could help improve psychological wellbeing for patients whose self-esteem is affected by their scars.

14h

Is email evil? Bosses are getting boxed in by their inbox

New research shows that bosses struggle, like the rest of us, to keep up with email demands. What makes managers unique is that email traffic prevents them from being effective leaders and threatens employee performance.

14h

Hardwired for laziness? Tests show the human brain must work hard to avoid sloth

Society has encouraged people to be more physically active, yet we are actually becoming less active. This new study offers a possible explanation: Our brains may be innately attracted to sedentary behavior. Electroencephalograms showed that test subjects had to summon extra brain resources when trying to avoid physical inactivity.

14h

Engineered E. coli using formic acid and CO2 as a C1-refinery platform strain

A research group has developed an engineered E. coli strain that converts formic acid and CO2 to pyruvate and produces cellular energy from formic acid through reconstructed one-carbon pathways. The strategy described in this study provides a new platform for producing value-added chemicals from one-carbon sources.

14h

Researchers confirm glyphosate resistance in junglerice

There has been a lot of publicity in recent years about growers battling glyphosate-resistant pigweed in soybean and cotton crops. But pigweed isn't the only weed resistant to glyphosate. New research published in the journal Weed Science shows certain populations of junglerice (Echinochloa colona) are now among a growing number of weeds resistant to the herbicide.

14h

I fremtiden vil hjemmets belysning have sensorer

Signify, der udvikler dioder til Philips vil forbinde alle hjemmets lyskilder til sikkerhed og underholdning.

14h

Searching for errors in the quantum world

The theory of quantum mechanics is well supported by experiments. Now, however, a thought experiment by ETH physicists yields unexpected contradictions. These findings raise some fundamental questions — and they're polarising experts.

14h

Nappy change: Dutch to turn diapers into furniture

Fed-up with a growing mountain of stinking disposable nappies, a Dutch firm Tuesday started building the country's first recycling plant to turn poo into profit.

14h

Electrochemistry: Greater than the sum of its parts

Scientists have developed a new model that merges basic electrochemical theory with theories used in different contexts, such as the study of photoelectrochemistry and semiconductor physics, to describe phenomena that occur in any electrode.

14h

Eelgrass wasting disease has new enemies: Drones and artificial intelligence

Every year, the world loses an estimated 7 percent of its seagrasses. While the reasons are manifold, one culprit has long confounded scientists: eelgrass wasting disease. This September a team of biologists is zeroing in on the problem, in the first study of the disease to stretch along the Pacific Coast from southern California to Alaska.

14h

Nearly half of resident physicians report burnout

Resident physician burnout in the US is widespread, with the highest rates concentrated in certain specialties, according to research from Mayo Clinic, OHSU and collaborators.

14h

How birds can stay slim, even when they overeat

Noticing that songbirds never seem to get fat despite overeating at bird feeders, environmental biologists wondered whether the amount of energy birds put into singing, fidgeting, or exercising could be adjusted in ways that regulate weight. Researchers now explore whether songbirds needn't worry about their calorie counts because they can control the way their bodies use energy.

14h

Solving the gut inflammation puzzle

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an umbrella term for a number of gut disorders — including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease — remains a clinical challenge. Now, researchers have identified a protein that drives intestinal inflammation. This finding highlights new opportunities for creating targeted therapeutics.

14h

Class of neurological disorders share 3D genome folding pattern

Researchers have found a new common thread linking nearly all of the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases, which include ALS, Huntington's Disease and Fragile X Syndrome, involving the complicated 3D patterns that the DNA is folded into in order to fit in the nucleus of the cell. Nearly all of the short tandem repeats known to grow unstable in disease are located at the boundaries that separate

14h

Chemists create circular fluorescent dyes for biological imaging

Chemists have created a new class of fluorescent dyes that function in water and emit colors based solely on the diameter of circular nanotubes made of carbon and hydrogen.

14h

How the Law Treats Kids Who Didn't Grow Up Like Kavanaugh

The scene is familiar: loud music, no parents, and beer. Christine Blasey Ford alleges that, in a Bethesda home in 1982, when she was in high school, then 17-year-old Brett Kavanaugh tried to rape her. Kavanaugh categorically denies the accusation. His staunchest defenders say that, even if the accusation is true, his behavior as a young man should not derail his path to the Supreme Court. Yet th

14h

Apple escapes China tariff hit for now, but threats loom

The latest round of tariffs imposed on China imposed by President Donald Trump appeared to largely spare Apple and other consumer electronics makers but they face increasing threats from the deepening trade war between the two economic giants.

14h

Oldest animal is bizarre, but a lot like modern critters

Scientists are learning a lot more about Earth’s first visible animal: the 570-540-million-year-old, enigmatic Ediacara biota. Ediacaran fossils have a slightly bizarre appearance no modern animal groups share. For decades, researchers thought the fossils were ecologically simple. However, borrowing a method from modern ecology—fitting species to relative abundance distributions—researchers have

14h

Hardwired for laziness? Tests show the human brain must work hard to avoid sloth

Society has encouraged people to be more physically active, yet we are actually becoming less active. This new study offers a possible explanation: Our brains may be innately attracted to sedentary behavior. Electroencephalograms showed that test subjects had to summon extra brain resources when trying to avoid physical inactivity.

14h

Women who experienced higher levels of trauma gave birth to significantly smaller male babies

Researchers have found significantly lower birth weights in male infants — an average decrease of 38 grams, or approximately 1.3 ounces — born to women who had been exposed to trauma at some point in their lives and who secreted higher levels of cortisol, a hormone related to stress, in late pregnancy.

14h

First gut bacteria may have lasting effect on ability to fight chronic diseases

New research showing that the first bacteria introduced into the gut have a lasting impact, may one day allow science to adjust microbiomes — the one-of-a-kind microbial communities that live in our gastrointestinal tracts — to help ward off serious chronic diseases.

15h

Penn researchers: Class of neurological disorders share 3D genome folding pattern

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a new common thread linking nearly all of the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases, which include ALS, Huntington's Disease and Fragile X Syndrome, involving the complicated 3D patterns that the DNA is folded into in order to fit in the nucleus of the cell. Nearly all of the short tandem repeats known to grow unstable in disease are locat

15h

Mannose's unexpected effects on the microbiome and weight gain

Scientists continue to unravel links between body weight and the gut microbiome. Now, researchers from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) report an unexpected finding: mice fed a fatty diet and mannose, a sugar, were protected from weight gain — and this effect tracked with changes in the gut microbiome. The study published today in Cell Reports.

15h

Medical schools lag behind in veterans' tuition aid

Veterans Affairs-supported tuition aid for military veterans enrolling in medical school covers a smaller proportion of tuition compared to aid for other graduate programs — just 45 percent of medical school tuition is covered by aid compared to 85 percent for law and 100 percent for MBA programs — according to a new study.

15h

recommendation statement on behavioral weight loss interventions to prevent obesity-related health problems, death in adults

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians offer or refer adults with a body mass index of 30 or higher to intensive behavioral interventions that focus on dietary changes and increased physical activity and that provide a variety of components to support weight loss and to maintain it.

15h

Do rates of burnout, career-choice regret vary by specialty among resident physicians?

Burnout is common among physicians. But do rates of burnout symptoms and career-choice regret vary among physicians in training by clinical specialty? In a study of nearly 3,600 second-year residents who were followed-up with questionnaires since medical school, 45 percent reported burnout symptoms and 14 percent reported regret over their career choice. The frequency of burnout symptoms and caree

15h

Nearly half of resident physicians report burnout

Resident physician burnout in the US is widespread, with the highest rates concentrated in certain specialties, according to research from Mayo Clinic, OHSU and collaborators.

15h

Review explores how birds can stay slim, even when they overeat

Noticing that songbirds never seem to get fat despite overeating at bird feeders, London environmental biologist Lewis Halsey wondered whether the amount of energy birds put into singing, fidgeting, or exercising could be adjusted in ways that regulate weight. In a literature review published Sept. 18 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution, he explores whether songbirds don't need to worry a

15h

Solving the gut inflammation puzzle

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), an umbrella term for a number of gut disorders — including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease — remains a clinical challenge. Now, researchers from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), in collaboration with scientists at Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, have identified a protein that drives intestinal inflammation. This finding

15h

Hurricanes are no longer just a coastal problem

Environment Rivers flood regularly during hurricanes, but get less attention than coastlines Some of the worst damage from Eastern Seaboard hurricanes in the past several decades has come from inland flooding along rivers after storms move ashore.

15h

Study links natural climate oscillations in north Atlantic to Greenland ice sheet melt

Scientists have known for years that warming global climate is melting the Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest ice sheet in the world. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, shows that the rate of melting might be temporarily increased or decreased by two existing climate patterns: the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillati

15h

Greater than the sum of its parts

When it comes to designing and optimizing mechanical systems, scientists understand the physical laws surrounding them well enough to create computer models that can predict their properties and behavior. However, scientists who are working to design better electrochemical systems, such as batteries or supercapacitors, don't yet have a comprehensive model of the driving forces that govern complex

15h

Eucalyptus 2018: Plantation managers and researchers are working to deal with climate change

Did you know that in addition to producing paper pulp and firewood, eucalyptus is used by scientists to study how trees function in tropical climates, just as poplar is used for temperate climates? Eucalyptus originated in Australia (it is the sole food source for koalas), and is also a prime source of low-cost woody biomass. This explains its popularity for both industrial firms and smallholders

15h

A sensor inspired by an African thumb piano could root out bogus medicines

An inexpensive, user-friendly device that’s based on an mbira could help identify counterfeit and contaminated medications.

15h

Google kigger væk mens svindlere malker virksomheders reklamebudgetter

Intet tyder på, at ­Google sætter effektivt ind mod svindelannoncer, og reklamegiganten får da også mellem 30 og 50 procent af hver eneste lille transaktion.

15h

BMW to pause UK output of Minis after Brexit

BMW will stop production at its Mini factory in Oxford for several weeks to avoid supply disruption in case of a no-deal Brexit, the German auto giant said Tuesday.

15h

15h

Bill Gates calls for more global education assessments data

Bill Gates is rallying behind school quality in developing nations with a push for more assessment data, a new initiative that links the Microsoft co-founder's signature U.S. education priorities with his more prominent global philanthropy work.

15h

Most prior research on discrimination looked at adults, study says

Racial and ethnic discrimination takes a toll on adolescents and is linked to their depression, poor self-esteem, lower academic achievement, substance use and risky sexual behavior, according to a meta-analysis published in the American Psychological Association's flagship journal, American Psychologist.

15h

Better chemo drug adsorption onto targeted delivery capsules

The efficacy of chemotherapy treatment depends on how effectively it reaches cancerous cells. Increasing targeted delivery could mean decreasing side effects. Scientists are enhancing methods of selectively transmitting active chemotherapy agents and reducing their toxicity by encapsulating chemo drugs into active carbon used as the targeted delivery device. In a new study published in EPJ E, Gabr

15h

Surviving insects and plants are tougher than we think

Insect pollinators that have survived the impacts of agricultural intensification may have a greater ability to resist future environmental changes than previously thought, a new study has found.

15h

Greater than the sum of its parts

Argonne scientists and their collaborators have developed a new model that merges basic electrochemical theory with theories used in different contexts, such as the study of photoelectrochemistry and semiconductor physics, to describe phenomena that occur in any electrode.

15h

Eucalyptus 2018: Plantation managers and researchers are working to deal with climate change

Commercial eucalyptus plantations cover some 20 million hectares in a hundred or so countries, and primarily serve to produce paper, while smallholder plantings produce firewood*. However, they are now suffering the effects of climate change. Some 225 scientists and managers from around thirty countries are meeting in Montpellier from 17 to 21 September to discuss ways of adapting plantations.

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Better chemo drug adsorption onto targeted delivery capsules

One of the challenges in cancer research is improving the delivery of chemo drugs to enhance their efficacy while decreasing the risk of side effects. In a new study published in EPJ E, Scientists from Argentina perform a theoretical prediction of adsorption of a well-known chemo drug onto active carbon with aluminium inclusions, to show its potential as an oral chemotherapy delivery capsule.

15h

Is email evil? Bosses are getting boxed in by their inbox

New Michigan State University research shows that bosses struggle, like the rest of us, to keep up with email demands. What makes managers unique is that email traffic prevents them from being effective leaders and threatens employee performance.

15h

Researchers confirm glyphosate resistance in junglerice

There has been a lot of publicity in recent years about growers battling glyphosate-resistant pigweed in soybean and cotton crops. But pigweed isn't the only weed resistant to glyphosate. New research published in the journal Weed Science shows certain populations of junglerice (Echinochloa colona) are now among a growing number of weeds resistant to the herbicide.

15h

It's the Emmy Awards That Need a 'Popular' Category, Not the Oscars

A lot of great shows came up empty-handed last night; others weren't nominated at all. Here's an idea: Let's celebrate TV we *talk* about.

15h

Why we choke under pressure — and how to avoid it | Sian Leah Beilock

When the pressure is on, why do we sometimes fail to live up to our potential? Cognitive scientist and Barnard College president Sian Leah Beilock reveals what happens in your brain and body when you choke in stressful situations, sharing psychological tools that can help you perform at your best when it matters most.

15h

The U.S. Sends an Unwelcoming Signal to Refugees

More than 25 million refugees around the world have had to flee their origin country due to war, famine, or persecution. Many will spend years in refugee camps, while others—those who can never return home—are placed elsewhere. For millions of refugees, their ultimate destination has been the United States, which has historically been committed to the resettlement of the world’s most vulnerable p

15h

Too much screen time? New phone controls for you and kids

Apple and Google want to help you spend less time on their phones—really. Like that time you checked Facebook at 3 a.m. Stats don't lie.

15h

Global trade in exotic pets threatens endangered parrots through the spread of a virus

Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) in wild parrot populations has been detected in eight new countries, raising concerns for threatened species.

15h

Introducing the 'smart mirror'

researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have been developing a laser power sensor that could be built into manufacturing devices for real-time measurements in many manufacturing processes, from welding car parts to crafting engine components with 3D printers.

15h

Racial/ethnic discrimination associated with lower well-being among adolescents

Racial and ethnic discrimination takes a toll on adolescents and is linked to their depression, poor self-esteem, lower academic achievement, substance use and risky sexual behavior, according to a meta-analysis published in the American Psychological Association's flagship journal, American Psychologist.

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Nuclear pasta, the hardest known substance in the universe

A team of scientists has calculated the strength of the material deep inside the crust of neutron stars and found it to be the strongest known material in the universe.

15h

Study links natural climate oscillations in north Atlantic to Greenland ice sheet melt

Scientists have known for years that warming global climate is melting the Greenland Ice Sheet, the second largest ice sheet in the world. A new study from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, shows that the rate of melting might be temporarily increased or decreased by two existing climate patterns: the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillati

15h

Digital games show potential to improve cardiovascular disease-related exercise outcomes

A scoping review of studies on game interventions for cardiovascular disease (CVD) self-management found that the use of digital games improved exercise capacity and energy expenditure significantly.

15h

A key to climate stabilization could be buried deep in the mud, FSU researchers suggest

While scientists fear that rising temperatures could unleash a 'bomb' of carbon from Earth's soil carbon reservoirs, a new FSU study suggests these reservoirs might actually be more stable than predicted.

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RUDN agriculturists suggested an optimal strategy for growing wheat in northern Eurasia

RUDN and the Italian Euromediterranean Center for Climate Change (CMCC) scientists studied how climate changes may affect wheat harvest in high latitudes of the Eastern hemisphere on the example of Russia. In the upcoming decades the most yielding agricultural areas in the south of the country will be hit by droughts. The optimal territory for wheat and other grain crops cultivation would move nor

15h

New study shows Florida Keys' corals are growing but have become more porous

Researchers have long questioned what impact climate change has on the rate at which corals are growing and building reef habitats in the Florida Keys. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explored this topic, finding both good and bad news. The rate of coral skeletal growth in the Florida Keys has remained relatively stable over time, but the skeletal density of the re

15h

Ferrari says most of its cars will be hybrid by 2022

Most of the cars made by Ferrari will be hybrid petrol-electric by 2022, the Italian sports car manufacturer said on Tuesday, including its first SUV.

15h

Environmental DNA sniffs out sharks

A white shark’s acute sense of smell allows it to detect a potential meal several miles away. Now, using environmental DNA (eDNA), scientists—and someday, perhaps, any curious person—can sniff them out as well, according to new research. “One of the goals of this research is for a lifeguard to be able to walk down to the shore, scoop up some water, shake it, and see if white sharks are around,” s

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Twitter to offer users option to go back to 'chronological' feed

Twitter is preparing an option for users to go back to its original chronological news feed, responding to complaints about its algorithmic system implemented two years ago.

15h

Jumping genes work together to control programmed deletion in the genome

Scientists have discovered a new family of molecules that work together to precisely remove unwanted DNA during reproduction in single-celled, freshwater organisms called ciliates.

15h

Chemists create circular fluorescent dyes for biological imaging

Chemists have created a new class of fluorescent dyes that function in water and emit colors based solely on the diameter of circular nanotubes made of carbon and hydrogen.

15h

New insights into DNA polymerases in interaction with modified substrates

New findings at the molecular level of polymerases can be used for genome sequencing and other areas of molecular biology-based diagnostics.

15h

Zika vaccine shows promise for treating deadly brain cancer

Researchers have successfully deployed a Zika virus vaccine to target and kill human glioblastoma brain cancer stem cells, which had been transplanted into mice. In a new study, the team shows that a live, attenuated version of the Zika virus could form the basis of a new treatment option for this fatal brain cancer.

15h

Surviving insects and plants are tougher than we think

Insect pollinators and plants that have survived the impacts of agricultural intensification may have a greater ability to resist future environmental changes than previously thought, a new study led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology has found.

15h

Increased the performance and lifetime of lithium batteries in renewable energy facilities

Variations in power generation using renewable sources lead to control problems in the electricity grid. The technology of lithium batteries is a candidate offering great potential in solving these problems. An industrial engineer at the Public University of Navarre (NUP/UPNA) has developed a new management system that allows good performance of these batteries to be achieved and their lifetime to

15h

New study shows Florida Keys' corals are growing but have become more porous

Researchers have long questioned what impact climate change has on the rate at which corals are growing and building reef habitats in the Florida Keys. A new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explored this topic, finding both good and bad news. The rate of coral skeletal growth in the Florida Keys has remained relatively stable over time, but the skeletal density of the re

15h

Colon cancer is caused by bacteria and cell stress

The team of Professor Dirk Haller at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) made an unexpected discovery while investigating the triggering factors of colon cancer: Cell stress in combination with an altered microbiota in the colon drives tumour growth. Previously, it was assumed that this combination only contributes to inflammatory intestinal diseases.

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Silver nanoparticles are toxic for aquatic organisms

Silver nanoparticles are increasingly being used in consumer products, such as clothing and personal care products, in the medical and pharmaceutical industry, and in the food industry. That is why their presence is expected to increase in the environment where they can exert harmful effects on organisms. The UPV/EHU's 'Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology' research group has analysed adult ze

15h

Jumping genes work together to control programmed deletion in the genome

Scientists have discovered a new family of molecules that work together to precisely remove unwanted DNA during reproduction in single-celled, freshwater organisms called ciliates.

15h

Thermal ablation effectively treats early-stage lung cancer

Thermal ablation is a safe, effective treatment for early-stage lung cancer, according to a new study. The results show that ablation may be an effective alternative for patients who cannot undergo lung cancer surgery because of age or health status.

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Cybersecurity firm: More Iran hacks as US sanctions loomed

An Iranian government-aligned group of hackers launched a major campaign targeting Mideast energy firms and others ahead of U.S. sanctions on Iran, a cybersecurity firm said Tuesday, warning further attacks remain possible as America re-imposes others on Tehran.

16h

Researchers find hints of Israeli spyware around globe

Researchers say an increasingly notorious brand of Israeli surveillance software is being used further afield than previously known, with possible infections detected around the globe.

16h

Facebook allows gender-biased job ads on its platforACLU EEOC Facebook Ads

The ACLU accused Facebook of discrimination, saying the company violated federal and state laws prohibiting businesses from excluding women from job ads.

16h

Region Sjælland afsætter penge til at gøre Sundhedsplatformen mere brugervenlig

Ny politisk aftale skaffer fem til ti mio. kr til at gøre Sundhedsplatformen nemmere at bruge for Region Sjællands medarbejdere på sygehusene.

16h

To protect pollinators, go easy on the fall garden cleanup

Time to rake up the yard, deadhead the perennials and till the vegetable garden? Not so fast.

16h

Hurricane rating system fails to account for deadly rain

When meteorologists downgraded Hurricane Florence from a powerful Category 4 storm to a Category 2 and then a Category 1, Wayne Mills figured he could stick it out.

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Chemists create circular fluorescent dyes for biological imaging

Sept. 18, 2018—University of Oregon chemists have created a new class of fluorescent dyes that function in water and emit colors based solely on the diameter of circular nanotubes made of carbon and hydrogen.

16h

The nocturnal pollinators: Scientists reveal the secret life of moths

Scientists have discovered that moths may play a much broader role as plant pollinators than previously suspected.

16h

New insights into DNA phase separation

A recent study has presented the notion of 'DNA Phase Separation', which suggests that the DNA within the nucleus may trigger phase separation, like oil in water.

16h

Magellanic Clouds duo may have been a trio

Two of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way — the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds — may have had a third companion, astronomers believe. New research describes how another 'luminous' galaxy was likely engulfed by the Large Magellanic Cloud some three to five billion years ago.

16h

Enlarged genotype-phenotype correlation for a deletion in neurofibromatosis type 1

New research shows that while a three-base pair, in-frame deletion called p.Met992del in the NF1 gene has a mild phenotype for people with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1, or NF1, the mutation does cause complications. These include non-optic brain tumors, mostly low-grade and asymptomatic, as well as cognitive impairment and/or learning disabilities.

16h

Failure rate in some surgical mesh treatments unacceptably high – Biomedical review

Failure rates in some surgical mesh products used to treat prolapse injury are unacceptably high according to a new biomedical review conducted by a medical materials expert, who also believes patients should have received more information around the risk before being treated for urinary incontinence with surgical mesh products.

16h

Intestinal bacteria produce electric current from sugar

Intestinal bacteria can create an electric current, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The results are valuable for the development of drugs, but also for the production of bioenergy, for example.

16h

Global trade in exotic pets threatens endangered parrots through the spread of a virus

Beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) in wild parrot populations has been detected in eight new countries, raising concerns for threatened species. This highlights the need for greater awareness of the risks of the spread of infectious disease associated with the international trade in live parrots.

16h

Understanding group relationships in gorillas

A study by researchers from The University of Western Australia has found that the behaviour between groups of African mountain gorillas is very much influenced by the strong, life-long bonds they form with members of their group.

16h

Renault-Nissan alliance takes Google Android for a drive

Renault's alliance with Nissan and Mitsubishi said Tuesday it would start equipping its cars with the Android operating system to make dashboards smart.

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EU targets BMW, Daimler, VW in pollution cartel probe

The EU opened an in-depth probe into alleged collusion by major German carmakers over anti-pollution technology Tuesday, a fresh blow to the scandal-hit industry three years after the notorious "dieselgate."

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1st private moon flight passenger to invite creative guestsSpaceX Yusaku Maezawa

After announcing that he'll take the first-ever commercial rocket trip around the moon, Yusaku Maezawa said he wants company for the weeklong journey. The Japanese billionaire said he plans to invite six to eight artists, architects, designers and other creative people to join him on board the SpaceX rocket "to inspire the dreamer in all of us."

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Twitter will let you see your feed in chronological order again—here's how and why

Technology The algorithm's grip on your social stream may be loosening.

16h

Silver nanoparticles toxic for aquatic organisms

Silver nanoparticles are increasingly being used in consumer products, such as clothing and personal care products, in the medical and pharmaceutical industry, and in the food industry. That is why their presence is expected to increase in the environment where they can exert harmful effects on organisms. The UPV/EHU's Cell Biology in Environmental Toxicology research group has analysed adult zebr

16h

Drought affected about 90% of German territory in 2018

The four-month period from April to July 2018 was the warmest in Germany since the beginning of weather recording. Many places reached new all-time as well as monthly records. In addition, the situation was aggravated by a drought since February. In August, about 90 percent of the German territory suffered under drought. Heat and drought led to severe forest fires in several regions of Europe and

16h

The Challenges of Bringing Service Dogs into the Lab

Joey Ramp went back to college to study post-traumatic stress disorder. But the dogs that help her manage her own PTSD complicate her research career.

16h

A control system to improve the efficiency of wave energy converters

Interest in wave energy has been growing in recent years, and electric generators specially designed to generate electricity from this renewable energy source are being developed. The UPV/EHU's Advanced Control Group (GCA) has come up with a robust control system for these generators which, during the tests conducted, has been shown to substantially improve their efficiency.

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Closed-loop systems that keep astronauts alive in space could inform circular economy strategies

Dr. Christophe Lasseur, coordinator of the European Space Agency's Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELISSA), studies how to keep astronauts alive in space by recycling their waste products into water, oxygen, food and other materials. Using this expertise is helping the NextGen project design circular economy solutions for water on Earth.

16h

Intestinal bacteria produce electric current from sugar

Intestinal bacteria can create an electric current, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The results are valuable for the development of drugs, but also for the production of bioenergy, for example.

16h

NUS researchers invent new test kit for quick, accurate and low-cost screening of diseases

A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a portable, easy-to-use device for quick and accurate screening of diseases. This versatile technology platform called enVision (enzyme-assisted nanocomplexes for visual identification of nucleic acids) can be designed to detect a wide range of diseases – from emerging infectious diseases (e.g. Zika

16h

Extremely small and fast: Laser ignites hot plasma

When light pulses from an extremely powerful laser system are fired onto material samples, the electric field of the light rips the electrons off the atomic nuclei. A plasma is created. The electrons couple with the laser light in the process. When flying out of the target, they pull the atomic cores behind them. In order to experimentally investigate this complex acceleration process, researchers

16h

Father's obesity in early puberty doubles asthma-risk for future offspring

Boys who have considerable weight gain between childhood and puberty, double the risk of having asthma as an adult, and for future offspring.

16h

Why the brain struggles to get off the sofa

Researchers at UNIGE have studied the neuronal activity of people faced with making the choice between physical activity and doing nothing. They noted that the brain requires far greater resources to escape a general attraction to minimising effort. A struggle then breaks out between the desire to do nothing and the physical activity. The results are consistent with the idea that our ancestors had

16h

The nocturnal pollinators: Scientists reveal the secret life of moths

A new study suggests moths have an important but overlooked ecological role — dispensing pollen over large distances under the cover of darkness.

16h

Monitoring serum Albumin can help patients recover from gastrectomy

Our result suggests preoperative albumin level as an independent risk factor for PPCs in elderly gastric cancer (GC) patients after elective laparoscopic gastrectomy. We also suggest that those elderly hypoalbuminemic GC patients may benefit from more intensive perioperative care including perioperative nutritional status improvement.

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Exposure to organochlorine pesticides in the womb linked to poorer lung function in childhood

Babies exposed to higher levels of organochlorine compounds in the womb go on to have worse lung function in childhood, according to new research. These compounds, which include the pesticide DDT, as well as electrical insulators and other industrial products, are now banned in most parts of the world. However, because they degrade very slowly, they are still present in the environment and in food

16h

First images of mist dispersing around young galaxy

Galaxies in the early universe are shrouded in a kind of mist: a cloud of hydrogen. With galaxies in the later universe this mist has disappeared. Astronomer Jorryt Matthee has made the first images of this dissipating mist. Ph.D. defence 19 September.

16h

The Danger of Judging Scientists by What They Discover

Researchers follow the truth where it leads them, but study shows the personal costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

16h

Hair-sized wireless sensor uses light to gather heat data

Researchers have developed a tiny wireless photonic sensor that can record environmental data. The photonic sensors recorded data during the spring of 2017 under two scenarios: a real-time measurement of air temperature over 12 hours, and an aerial mapping of temperature distribution with a sensor mounted on a drone in a St. Louis city park. Researchers paired the sensor with a commercial thermom

17h

Scientists use artificial neural networks to predict new stable materials

Artificial neural networks — algorithms inspired by connections in the brain — have 'learned' to perform a variety of tasks, from pedestrian detection in self-driving cars, to analyzing medical images, to translating languages. Now, researchers are training artificial neural networks to predict new stable materials.

17h

Drugs that stop mosquitoes catching malaria could help eradicate the disease

Researchers have identified compounds that could prevent malaria parasites from being able to infect mosquitoes, halting the spread of disease.

17h

Mathematicians calculate the safest way home

A mobile app that guides pedestrians along the safest instead of quickest route to their destination is being developed by researchers at Cardiff University.

17h

Engineered E. coli using formic acid and CO2 as a C1-refinery platform strain

A research group at KAIST has developed an engineered E. coli strain that converts formic acid and CO2 to pyruvate and produces cellular energy from formic acid through reconstructed one-carbon pathways. The strategy described in this study provides a new platform for producing value-added chemicals from one-carbon sources.

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Productive interaction

'ChemLife' research initiative at the University of Konstanz makes an quintessential contribution to study of DNA polymerases.

17h

Transparent loudspeakers and MICs that let your skin play music

An international team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has presented an innovative wearable technology that will turn your skin into a loudspeaker.

17h

Neuroscience of envy: Activated brain region when others are rewarded revealed

National Institute for Physiological Sciences researchers showed that part of the macaque brain alters the sense of value felt upon receiving a reward in a manner dependent on the receipt of rewards by one's peers. This finding on the neuroscience of envy provides insight into how all primates, including humans, compare their material wellbeing with that of others and are potentially motivated to

17h

Oregon chemists create circular fluorescent dyes for biological imaging

University of Oregon chemists have created a new class of fluorescent dyes that function in water and emit colors based solely on the diameter of circular nanotubes made of carbon and hydrogen.

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The migration of same-sex couples to the suburbs is shaping the fight for LGBT equality

This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in the most important case involving same-sex marriage since it became legal in all 50 states.

17h

SpaceX’s billionaire moon trip is all about building a luxury brand

The first passengers to fly to the moon on SpaceX’s BFR rocket will be artists, in an effort to widen the company's appeal beyond governments and satellite firms

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Inside the stargazer’s paradise where all outside lights are banned

The Arizona Sky village is a purpose-built community for star lovers. Most residents own telescopes and other stargazing gadgets

17h

How a remote island bounced back after rats ran amok

A new study shows how removing invasive rats from Palmyra Atoll allowed its native vegetation to make a grand comeback. When Hillary Young, a community ecologist at University of California, Santa Barbara, spent time at the Palmyra Atoll in 2006 to study the effects of seabirds on resident plant communities, she got a bit more than she bargained for: rats. “Rats would literally run over your feet

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Budget på plads i Region Syddanmark

Budgetforliget i Syddanmark sikrer ekstra penge til psykiatrien og kompetenceudvikling af medarbejdere på sygehusenes fælles akutmodtagelser, medicinske afdelinger og i psykiatrien.

17h

Cash, carbon, crude—how to make oil fields bury emissions

In February 2018, Donald Trump signed into law new tax credits that reward oil companies for capturing carbon dioxide and preventing it from entering the atmosphere – either by burying the gas underground or by pumping it into wells to boost production. These tax credits, which have bipartisan support, are encouraging for those who believe that trapping CO2 from the fossil fuel industry – though n

17h

Low cost navigation system for unmanned aerial systems

An EU-funded initiative has developed a low-cost positioning and navigation system for unmanned aerial systems (UASs). Utilising multiple-antenna, the device is based on off-the-shelf components and advanced data fusion algorithms.

17h

Searching for clues on extreme climate change

Nearly 13,000 years ago, pines in southern France experienced a cold snap, which scientists have now reconstructed. The study about the consequences of a drastic climate change event in past and its implications for our future.

17h

Small molecule plays big role in weaker bones as we age

With age, expression of a small molecule that can silence others goes way up while a key signaling molecule that helps stem cells make healthy bone goes down, scientists report.

17h

Grad students will be future professors, but are they learning how to teach effectively?

A new study found that graduate students are on board with wanting to adopt interactive teaching methods but often don't get the training or support they need from their institutions to do so.

17h

ACLU Says Facebook Ads Let Employers Favor Men Over Women

Charge filed with the EEOC says employers can discriminate by targeting ads at men and excluding women.

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Our Truest Companions

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

The Challenges of Bringing Service Dogs into the Lab

Joey Ramp went back to college to study post-traumatic stress disorder. But the dogs that help her manage her own PTSD complicate her research career.

17h

A strategic research agenda to make better use of land and soils in Europe

Soil and land use research is fragmented in Europe. Now, researchers and practitioners have developed a comprehensive agenda on key knowledge gaps that research needs to address for benefit of society now and in the future.

17h

Simulation shows nuclear pasta 10 billion times harder to break than steel

A trio of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. and Canada has found evidence that suggests nuclear material beneath the surface of neutron stars may be the strongest material in the universe. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, M. E. Caplan, A. S. Schneider, and C. J. Horowitz describe their neutron star simulation and what it showed.

17h

Hardwired for laziness? Tests show the human brain must work hard to avoid sloth

Society has encouraged people to be more physically active, yet we are actually becoming less active. This new study offers a possible explanation: Our brains may be innately attracted to sedentary behavior. Electroencephalograms showed that test subjects had to summon extra brain resources when trying to avoid physical inactivity.

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Cosmetically smoothing over visible facial scars

A novel cosmetic product, designed to fill small to moderate facial scars, has shown promise in covering such deformities in a small group of patients. Participants were generally more satisfied with their appearance after the treatment was applied and the researchers believe it could help improve psychological wellbeing for patients whose self-esteem is affected by their scars.

17h

Enlarged genotype-phenotype correlation for a deletion in neurofibromatosis type 1

International collaborative research led by Ludwine Messiaen, Ph.D., shows that while a three-base pair, in-frame deletion called p.Met992del in the NF1 gene has a mild phenotype for people with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1, or NF1, the mutation does cause complications. These include non-optic brain tumors, mostly low-grade and asymptomatic, as well as cognitive impairment and/or

17h

Magellanic Clouds duo may have been a trio

Two of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way–the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds–may have had a third companion, astronomers believe.Research published today describes how another 'luminous' galaxy was likely engulfed by the Large Magellanic Cloud some three to five billion years ago.

17h

New insights into DNA phase separation

A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has presented the notion of 'DNA Phase Separation', which suggests that the DNA within the nucleus may trigger phase separation, like oil in water.

17h

The path to reducing plastic pollution

Shuddering and unable to breathe, he vomited up five plastic bags. The small pilot whale, found in a Thai canal this past June, is another symptom of a crisis in the world's oceans. Plastic waste, mostly broken down into tiny particles, floats in huge blobs that together cover as much as 40 percent of Earth's ocean surface. Growing public concern has inspired movements to ban single-use plastics,

17h

Marriage Takes a Drastic Turn in Forever

This article contains spoilers through all eight episodes of Forever. The opening sequence of Forever , the new eight-part Amazon series from the creators Alan Yang and Matt Hubbard, is one of the more flawless introductions to a series in recent memory. It plays out to Miles Davis’s recording of Rodgers and Hart’s “It Never Entered My Mind,” a honeyed, wistful ode to melancholia, as Oscar (Fred

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Danmark og Norge indgår aftale om fælles indkøb af medicin

Første skridt til et fælles nordisk udbud af lægemidler blev taget i dag, da den danske og norske sundhedsminister underskrev en fælles medicinaftale. Det skal føre til billigere medicin.

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Giving environmental water to drought-stricken farmers sounds straightforward, but it's a bad idea

Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack last week suggested the government would look at changing the law to allow water to be taken from the environment and given to farmers struggling with the drought.

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New chip-sized device could help manufacturers measure laser power in real time

Lasers play roles in many manufacturing processes, from welding car parts to crafting engine components with 3D printers. To control these tasks, manufacturers must ensure that their lasers fire at the correct power.

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ANALYSE: Dieselskandalens 3-års jubilæum – hvad har vi lært?

Fronterne mellem de europæiske bilproducenter og miljøorganisationer er stadig trukket skarpt op, når det gælder NOx-emission. Så hvad er der egentlig sket her tre år efter, at dieselskandalen rullede?

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Do we trust people who speak with an accent?

A recently published study shows that unless they speak in a confident tone of voice, you're less likely to believe someone who speaks with an accent. And, interestingly, as you make this decision different parts of your brain are activated, depending on whether you perceive the speaker to be from your own 'in-group' or from some type of 'out-group' (e.g., someone with a different linguistic or cu

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Long-term success of ACL reconstruction is connected to way you move post-surgery

Researchers conducted a study to observe walking biomechanics of 130 subjects who have had ACL reconstruction surgery. They found people who report lingering symptoms post-surgery either underload their injured leg (6-12 months after surgery) or overload the injured leg (after the 24-month mark), as compared to those who have had the surgery but no longer report symptoms.

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Sleep deprived people more likely to have car crashes

A new study indicates that people who have slept for fewer than seven of the past 24 hours have higher odds of being involved in and responsible for car crashes. The risk is greatest for drivers who have slept fewer than four hours.

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Sticker Design Contest for Brain Awareness Week 2019

Fall is in the air, and that means it’s time to start thinking about Brain Awareness Week (BAW) 2019. The March campaign will take place from the 11-17 and unite the efforts of partner organizations worldwide in celebration of the brain. There is no better way to gear up for BAW 2019 than to enter our annual Brain Awareness Week Sticker Design Contest, which is now officially open! In this compet

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AI That Can Argue and Instruct

New algorithms will enable personal devices to learn any topic well enough to debate it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Modified superconductor synapse reveals exotic electron behavior

Electrons tend to avoid one another as they go about their business carrying current. But certain devices, cooled to near zero temperature, can coax these loner particles out of their shells. In extreme cases, electrons will interact in unusual ways, causing strange quantum entities to emerge.

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Designing smarter cities using computer game thinking

Dr. Willem-Jan Renger, head of the Innovation Studio at HKU University of the Arts Utrecht, is driving citizen engagement in smart city planning using methods generally seen in computer game creation, as part of an international consortium of cities, IRIS.

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Magellanic clouds duo may have been a trio

Two of the closest galaxies to the Milky Way—the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds—may have had a third companion, astronomers believe.

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Scientists closing in on source of Shetland tsunamis

Shetland has been hit by at least two more tsunamis in the past 10,000 years than previously thought, and scientists are working to identify where the giant waves originated.

18h

Cochrane Collaboration Expels Cofounder, Prompts Resignations

Physician Peter Gotzsche, a board member of the organization, has been an outspoken critic of certain vaccines and of the pharma industry in general.

18h

Baby walkers have never been safe. Why are companies still selling them?

Health Pediatricians just published data on related injuries—but this isn't new information. Plenty of people aren’t aware of just how dangerous these baby walkers can be—but doctors have known for years.

18h

Capitalizing on sleep-wake cycle can drastically increase digital ad profits from social media, study shows

Firms increasingly are investing their marketing dollars in social media—market research firms predict spending will reach $37 billion by 2020.

18h

How Audi's Electric E-tron SUV Stacks Up to Its Competitors

From kilowatt-hours to horsepower to acceleration times, see how the E-tron SUV compares to similar offerings from Tesla, Mercedes-Benz, Jaguar, and others.

18h

Image of the Day: Viral Vision

Modified cryogenic electron microscopy can analyze viral structures better than ever before.

18h

How a Professor Was Punished for an Act of Citizenship

Michael Fischler is an award-winning professor emeritus of education at Plymouth State University, a public institution in Plymouth, New Hampshire. He founded its Counseling and Human Relations Center, led it for four decades, and ultimately saw it officially renamed in his honor. But that honor has now been stripped, his attorneys say, and he is being asked to complete Title IX training before h

18h

GOLD instrument captures its first image of the Earth

NASA's Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) instrument powered on and opened its cover to scan the Earth for the first time, resulting in a "first light" image of the Western Hemisphere in the ultraviolet. GOLD will provide unprecedented global-scale imaging of the temperature and composition at the dynamic boundary between Earth's atmosphere and space. The instrument was launched

18h

How honeybees maintain protective clumps under stressful conditions

A team of researchers at Harvard University has discovered the means by which honeybees keep their temporary clumps intact during adverse weather conditions. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes their study of honeybee behavior in their lab and what the found.

18h

AI for Molecular Design

Machine-learning algorithms are speeding up the search for novel drugs and materials — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Condensation enhancement: Toward practical energy and water applications

Condensation heat transfer plays an essential role in the efficiency of energy-intensive industrial technologies including power generation, energy utilization, water desalination and harvesting, air-conditioning, and thermal management of electronics. It is well known that dropwise condensation on the hydrophobic surface (Fig. 1A), where the frequent roll-off of condensed droplets, e.g. on vertic

18h

Scientists locate parent lightning strokes of sprites

Thunderstorms can generate various forms of transient luminous events, such as red sprites, gigantic jets, and blue jets through the charge transfer involved in the lightning forged inside thunderclouds.

18h

Take-up of MMR vaccine falls for fourth year in a row in England

Proportion of children being immunised down to 91.2% as experts warn of measles risk The proportion of children in England getting immunised for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) has fallen for the fourth year in a row, as uptake for a further nine out of the 12 routine vaccinations has dropped, figures show. Related: Resurgence of deadly measles blamed on low MMR vaccination rates Continue readin

18h

A novel approach of improving battery performance

New technological developments by UNIST researchers promise to significantly boost the performance of lithium metal batteries in promising research for the next-generation of rechargeable batteries. The study also validates the principle of enhanced battery performance via the real-time in situ observation of charge-discharge cycling.

18h

Understanding surface science to manufacture quality cosmetics

A research team affiliated with UNIST has examined the rates of liquid penetration on rough or patterned surfaces, especially those with pores or cavities. Their findings provide important insights into the development of everyday products, including cosmetics and paints, and industrial applications like enhanced oil recovery.

18h

Organic ferromagnetism: Trapping spins in the glassy state of an organic network structure

An international team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has introduced an exciting new organic network structure that shows pure organic ferromagnetism from pure p-TCNQ without any metal contamination at room temperature. The results have been published in Chem.

18h

Detangling DNA replication

DNA is a lengthy molecule—approximately 1,000-fold longer than the cell in which it resides—so it can't be jammed in haphazardly. Rather, it must be neatly organized so proteins involved in critical processes can access the information contained in its nucleotide bases. Think of the double helix like a pair of shoe laces twisted together, coiled upon themselves again and again to make the molecule

18h

10 Reasons Why Humans Are So Gross

Have you ever wondered why humans are so … gross? We burp, we smell, we sneeze — humans do disgusting things all day long.

19h

Is That 'Midlife Crisis' Really Alzheimer's Disease?

Here's what young-onset Alzheimer's looks like.

19h

Why Does OJ Taste Bad After You Brush Your Teeth?

There's nothing like a fresh, tangy glass of orange juice to go with your morning oatmeal. But if you've just brushed your teeth, you may find that the beverage tastes … less than delicious.

19h

Amazingly Preserved Wolf Pup Mummy Discovered in Yukon Gold Mine

Frozen for more than 50,000 years, the pup still has its tail and paws.

19h

Research shows that busy people make healthier choices

Busyness is often thought of as a modern day affliction, but it can also help you delay gratification and make decisions that provide benefits over the long term, according to new research from the global business school INSEAD.

19h

Patented nanostructure for solar cells: Rough optics, smooth surface

Thin-film solar cells made of crystalline silicon are inexpensive and achieve efficiencies of around 14 percent. However, they could do even better if their shiny surfaces reflected less light. A team led by Prof. Christiane Becker from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has now patented a sophisticated new solution to this problem

19h

Study shows synchronous human energy consumption over the past 10,000 years

University of Wyoming researchers contributed to a study that begins to fill in the knowledge gap of whether human societies grow and decline at the same rate and at the same time.

19h

Image: Frosty crater on Mars

This image shows the south-facing rim of a pit crater at 68°S in the Sisyphi Planum region of Mars. It is a colour composite made from images acquired on 2 September 2018 by the Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System, CaSSIS, onboard the joint ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, when the southern hemisphere of Mars was in late spring.

19h

Still Smarting From Uber, Cities Wise up About Scooter Data

Most cities felt powerless to extract concessions from Uber and Lyft. Now that scooters are here, they've learned their lesson—and toughened up.

19h

Future robo-taxis could charge themselves and help balance the electric grid

Wireless startup WiTricity wants cars to power up without human help and feed utilities energy during peak demand.

19h

Does Anybody at the Emmys Know What the Word Diversity Means?

The 70th annual Emmy Awards subjected viewers to an almost unending barrage of secondhand embarrassment. Full of stilted banter, dubious jokes, and painful comedic mismatches, the ceremony dragged on with all the excitement of an extended commercial break. Still, even within the parade of uncomfortable drudgery, one moment felt particularly unnerving. The comedian James Corden, who hosted the 201

19h

The Coddling of the American Mind ‘Is Speeding Up’

Greg Lukianoff was preoccupied with political polarization—not just the divisiveness he observed, but the fallout—and specifically the effects of tribalism on college campuses. The year was 2015. “It is a very serious problem for any democracy,” he and his co-author Jonathan Haidt wrote in a cover story for The Atlantic that year. “As each side increasingly demonizes the other, compromise becomes

19h

Yes, Female Inventors Actually Exist

They don’t fit the stereotype, but fortunately, that image is headed for extinction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Smart plants can teach us a thing or two

‘The Revolutionary Genius of Plants’ challenges the brain-centered view of intelligence.

19h

Big Data Gives the "Big 5" Personality Traits a Makeover

An analysis of 1.5 million people tries to more accurately categorize people’s character traits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

19h

Hovedstaden ser bort fra fødselslægers advarsler mod nyt fødeafsnit

Region Hovedstaden holder fast i sin plan om at etablere et nyt fødested på Bispebjerg Hospital, selv om flere sundhedsfaglige råd har protesteret imod planerne.

19h

Amerikansk stat sagsøger Google og Twitter for ulovlig dataindsamling om børn

I USA er det ulovligt at indsamle data om børn på internettet, hvis deres forældre ikke har givet tilladelse til det, men det er der tilsyneladende rigtig mange apps, der ikke lever op til. Google frasiger sig ansvaret.

19h

Google indrømmer: Har ændret Android-brugeres indstillinger i det skjulte

Android-brugere har brokket sig over, at Google tilsyneladende har pillet ved deres indstillinger uden at spørge om lov. Nu indrømmer og undskylder Google.

19h

Danmark er mere sårbart: Flere byer i risiko for oversvømmelse

En ny risikovurdering fra Kystdirektoratet føjer fire byer til listen over oversvømmelsestruede områder.

19h

Gillette's Heated Razor Warms Your Face While You Shave

Costing $150 and launching on Indiegogo, the Heated Razor isn't anything like what you're used to.

19h

Klima-beregner: Så meget skader din flyferie

Se hvor meget CO2 din flytur udleder. Og hvor langt du kan komme, hvis du i stedet tager toget eller bilen.

19h

The gene code of growing limbs

When a fetus develops, cell division and differentiation, gene expression, cell-to-cell signaling, and morphogenesis must be carefully coordinated to occur in the correct sequence and for the proper amount of time. Failures in timing can result in congenital deformities, disabilities, and even death. For a long time, developmental biologists have sought to determine what sets the pace and directs

19h

Zika vaccine shows promise for treating deadly brain cancer

An international team of researchers has successfully deployed a Zika virus vaccine to target and kill human glioblastoma brain cancer stem cells, which had been transplanted into mice. In a study published this week in mBio®, the team shows that a live, attenuated version of the Zika virus could form the basis of a new treatment option for this fatal brain cancer.

20h

Q&A: Tech visionary Geordie Rose is wired to build robots

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

20h

The Machinery of Death Is Back on the Docket

"From this day forward,” Justice Harry Blackmun announced in 1994, “I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.” Blackmun had voted to restore the death penalty and even to approve mandatory death sentences. But after 25 years, he said, “I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed … the problems that were pursued down one ho

20h

Housegirl Complicates the Diaspora Narrative

The Ghanaian British author Michael Donkor’s U.S. debut, Housegirl , is full of movement. The novel follows a 17-year-old domestic laborer named Belinda as she travels from Ghana to London. Before the start of the novel, Belinda has already journeyed from her home village to Kumasi, one of the largest cities in Ghana. The voyage to London marks her second sojourn. It is not her last. Like many im

20h

ISIS Is Poised to Make a Comeback in Syria

On the surface, the Syrian civil war appears to be nearing its final stage. Bashar al-Assad's regime and its Russian and Iranian backers won the battle that mattered the most for them in July, when they drove the moderate rebels out of their last bastion in the southern Syrian city of Deraa. With that military victory, any hopes of a moderate takeover must be laid to rest. But while the rebels ha

20h

What Would You Nominate as the Eighth Wonder of the World?

Vanessa Hua, author, A River of Stars Angkor Wat is where my husband proposed to me at dawn, the sky rosy and golden over the spires reflected in the moat. With its stunning bas-reliefs and crumbling temples in eternal battle with banyan trees, the temple complex inspires awe and contemplation of the sweep of history and the atrocities of war. Lydia Kallipoliti, author, The Architecture of Closed

20h

Half-Life

After Hölderlin Yellow pears wild roses the lake your swans and kisses your head in water. But where, when winter, is sunshine and shadow? The walls, silent and cold, clatter.

20h

The Conversation

The Dangers of Distracted Parenting In the July/August issue, Erika Christakis argued that we should worry less about children’s screen time—and more about our own. We have three sons and three grandsons. All, including the 17-month-old, are screen zombies. We just experienced the power of the addiction/distraction during a two-week vacation with our two oldest grandchildren (13 and 11). In the p

20h

Data vs. knowledge: Why only the wise understand the difference

It's naive to think that data automatically produces knowledge, says Yale historian Timothy Snyder. Data scientists should study the humanities to see the world more clearly, and gain the wisdom to wield data. Perhaps the next basic civil right in the U.S. should be controlling your own data, and having basic access to easily understood facts. According to Yale University professor Timothy Synder

20h

Mr. Know-It-All on Honesty and Social Media

A Wired retro item, from the 25th anniversary issue

20h

Edward Snowden on Protecting Activists Against Surveillance

“Turnkey tyranny” has never been closer. For some communities, it feels like it’s already here.

20h

Things Break and Decay on the Internet—That's a Good Thing

The Wayback Machine reveals that the internet is frail and unsteady, like all human endeavors. And when things fail, they are replaced.

20h

6 Terrific Books for Getting Girls Into Tech

Room to Read CEO Geetha Murali on her favorite page-­turners for future scientists and engineers.

20h

Jack Dorsey on ProPublica's Experimental Journalism

The way they use Twitter is a paradigm that could point to the future of media.

20h

Jeff Bezos and the Clock That Will Outlast Civilization

This past winter, inside a mountain on the Amazon founder's West Texas ranch, the Long Now Foundation began assembling its 10,000-year clock.

20h

Just Outta Beta: 8-Bit Astronomy, Solar Yacht, and More

A WIRED retro item, from the 25th anniversary issue.

20h

Why DNA Is the Most Exciting Programming Language Today

Napster cofounder Sean Parker and biologist Alex Marson on the coming power of Crispr.

20h

WIRED 25th Anniversary: Who's Shaping Tech's Next 25 Years?

Special Issue: For 25 years, technology has turned the world upside down and inside out. Now the icons of the digital revolution tell us who will shake up the next 25.

20h

How Zipline Helps Remote Regions Get Blood From a Drone

The sky delivery service scales up.

20h

Real or Fake: YouTube Sensations

A WIRED retro item, from the 25th anniversary issue.

20h

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