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Nyheder2018september18

Cheat Sheet: What's the Deal With Location-Based VRFirefox Reality VR

A WIRED retro item from the 25th-anniversary issue.

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E.T. Hunters Join Forces to Probe the Heavens

SETI Institute cofounder Jill Tarter doesn’t want her former intern to forget about intelligent aliens.

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The Dawn of Twitter and the Age of Awareness

Status update: We are all now sci-fi telepaths, deafened by the blaring thoughts of humanity.

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An AI Pioneer, and the Researcher Bringing Humanity to AI

Technology’s potential is unbounded, says Fei-Fei Li. But only if you put people at the center.

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Why the Gene Editors of Tomorrow Need to Study Ethics Today

Jennifer Doudna says the next generation of biologists will be our first line of defense against Crispr gone wild.

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The Blockchain: Boon for Bankers—or Tool for Tyrants?

Boosters think crypto­currencies and the distributed ledgers they depend on will reinvent the financial system. That may or may not be a good thing.

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Sebastian Thrun on AI, Flying Cars, and Sam Altman

The tech luminary shares his lofty ideals.

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Most Dangerous Object in the Office: Segway Drift W1 E-Skates

A WIRED retro item, from the 25th anniversary issue.

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Palmer Luckey Is Just Getting StartedFirefox Reality VR

The Oculus founder on virtual reality, defense tech, biohacking an injured toe.

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Elon Musk to launch Japanese billionaire on Space X rocket to the moon

Fashion entrepreneur Yusaku Maezawa could be the first private passenger to make lunar trip Elon Musk plans to launch the Japanese billionaire Yusaku Maezawa on a rocket around the moon, the embattled SpaceX CEO has announced. Maezawa, a 42-year-old art collector and entrepreneur who founded Zozo, Japan’s largest online fashion retailer, could be the first private passenger to make the trip aroun

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Så kører brinttoget i Tyskland

Brændselscelleteknologi skal transportere nordtyskere rundt i verdens første kommercielle brinttog.

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With Moon as His Muse, Japanese Billionaire Signs Up for SpaceX VoyageSpaceX Yusaku Maezawa

Elon Musk shared a stage at a SpaceX factory on Monday night with Yusaku Maezawa, who will make a significant investment in the company’s next-generation rocket.

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Drugs that stop mosquitoes catching malaria could help eradicate the disease

Researchers have identified compounds that could prevent malaria parasites from being able to infect mosquitoes, halting the spread of disease.

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Searching for clues on extreme climate change

Nearly 13,000 years ago, pines in southern France experienced a cold snap, which scientists have now reconstructed. The study about the consequences of a drastic climate change event in past and its implications for our future will be published tomorrow in Scientific Reports. The authors are from GFZ Potsdam, Berlin, the UK, Switzerland, and France.

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Scientists use artificial neural networks to predict new stable materials

Artificial neural networks — algorithms inspired by connections in the brain — have 'learned' to perform a variety of tasks, from pedestrian detection in self-driving cars, to analyzing medical images, to translating languages. Now, researchers at the University of California San Diego are training artificial neural networks to predict new stable materials.

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Researchers Explore Gender Disparities In The Art World

Researchers studied nearly 2 million art auction sales and found paintings by women fetched less money than paintings by men. Disparities that plague parts of the economy also affect the art world. (Image credit: Lionel Derimais/Getty Images)

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This Rapper Tried To Use Neuroscience To Get Over Her Ex

Dessa is a singer and writer from Minneapolis who spent years trying to fall out of love and get over her ex. Nothing seemed to help — until she visited a research lab for a brain scan. (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear)

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DSB klar med løsning på forurening fra forældede ME-lokomotiver

Brændstofdyser og cylinderenheder skal fjerne kræftfremkaldende partikler.

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SpaceX: Japansk milliardær skal ud på månerejse

Rumselskabet SpaceX sender i 2023 en japansk milliardær på rumrejse til Månen.

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How Apple Makes the AI Chip Powering the iPhone's Fancy Tricks

In a rare interview, Tim Millet, Apple's leading chip architect, describes building artificial intelligence into the new A12 processor.

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Rapid-onset Gender Dysphoria and Squelching Controversial Evidence

A flawed study suggested that rapid onset gender dysphoria around the time of puberty might be a result of peer pressure and media influence. It raised some important questions, but Brown University succumbed to pressure from activists and removed it from its website

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Japanese Billionaire Books First Moonshot Aboard SpaceX's 'Big Falcon Rocket'SpaceX Yusaku Maezawa

Yusaku Maezawa would be the first person since 1972 to travel around the moon and the first-ever private citizen to do it. He was introduced at SpaceX headquarters near Los Angeles Monday night. (Image credit: Chris Carlson/AP)

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Precision Medicine Comes of Age

After years of research, therapies tailored to the genomes of individual patients are reaching maturity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Artificial genes show life does not have to be based on DNA

Two modified versions of DNA add different “letters” to life’s genetic code but still work just as well as the original

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Bedraggled, displaced Americans long to return home after hurricane

In a makeshift shelter on the campus of North Carolina State University, hundreds of people who fled Hurricane Florence dream of going home, but have little idea about when that will happen, or if their homes survived the deluge.

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Japanese billionaire businessman revealed as SpaceX's first Moon travelerSpaceX Yusaku Maezawa

A Japanese billionaire and online fashion tycoon, Yusaku Maezawa, will be the first man to fly on a monster SpaceX rocket around the Moon as early as 2023, and he plans to bring six to eight artists along.

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Anxiety surrounding mass shootings briefly closes ideological divides

People who feel anxious surrounding mass shootings tend to abandon their political ideology on typically divided issues, according to a study by two University of Kansas professors.

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Grad students will be future professors, but are they learning how to teach effectively?

A new Portland State University study found that graduate students are on board with wanting to adopt interactive teaching methods but often don't get the training or support they need from their institutions to do so.

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A green beer that looks like algae? It's all for clean water

There are spicy beers and even peanut butter beers, made to stand out on crowded shelves. Then there's a murky, green brew that looks a lot like algae. It's making a statement on the one ingredient brewers can't do without—clean water.

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E. coli's adaptation to extreme temperatures helps explain resistance to certain drugs

Long before bacteria had to contend with antibiotic drugs, they had to survive extreme temperatures as Earth warmed and cooled over millennia. Could the adaptations they evolved to temperature—especially heat—help explain why certain strains are resistant to certain drugs? A new study by a research team at the University of California-Los Angeles that includes Santa Fe Institute External Professor

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CRISPR screen identifies gene that helps cells resist West Nile, Zika viruses

UT Southwestern researchers today report the first use of CRISPR genome-wide screening to identify a gene that helps cells resist flavivirus infection. That nasty class of pathogens includes West Nile virus, dengue fever, Zika virus, and yellow fever.

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Warnings were up for Hong Kong for Typhoon Mangkhut after landfall

On Sunday, Sept. 16, Typhoon Mangkhut had made landfall in southern China and Hurricane signal #10 was still in force. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured an image that showed the storm after landfall.

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3-D electron microscopy uncovers the complex guts of desalination membranes

Careful sample preparation, electron tomography and quantitative analysis of 3-D models provides unique insights into the inner structure of reverse osmosis membranes widely used for salt water desalination wastewater recycling and home use, according to a team of chemical engineers.

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Elon Musk Says SpaceX Will Send Yusaku Maezawa (and Artists!) to the MoonSpaceX Yusaku Maezawa

Elon Musk introduced the Japanese billionaire as the mystery passenger who booked a trip to the moon aboard SpaceX's BFR rocket, along with a half-dozen artists he plans to invite.

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40,000 volunteers sought for largest ever UK study of depression

Researchers are asking people who have suffered from depression and anxiety to provide DNA samples so they can look for common genes Genetic links to anxiety and depression are to be explored in the largest ever study into the issue, experts have announced. Researchers are calling on people in England to sign up to the Genetic Links to Anxiety and Depression ( Glad) study . It is hoped that 40,00

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Nets har øget sikkerheden: Melder om kraftigt fald i forsøg på NemID-phishing

Indførelsen af DMARC på en række domæner relateret til NemID-kommunikation har ifølge Nets bevirket et heftigt fald i forsøg på phishing.

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Watchdog calls for warnings on DNA testing sites

Sites should do more to inform users about potentially unwelcome results, says Hfea The fertility regulator has called for DNA testing websites to warn customers about the risks of uncovering traumatic family secrets and underlying health traits. Sites such as Ancestry.com, 23andMe and DNA.com offer customers the chance to discover long-lost relatives by having their DNA analysed, typically after

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Danskernes selvmedicinering med cannabis skal kortlægges

Der er meget lidt viden om brugen af cannabis som medicin, når lægen ikke er involveret. Derfor vil forsker nu undersøge hvordan vi bruger stoffet.

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Grad students will be future professors, but are they learning how to teach effectively?

A new Portland State University study found that graduate students are on board with wanting to adopt interactive teaching methods but often don't get the training or support they need from their institutions to do so.

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Long-term success of ACL reconstruction is connected to way you move post-surgery

Researchers from the University of North Carolina and Brigham Young University conducted a study to observe walking biomechanics of 130 subjects who have had ACL reconstruction surgery. They found people who report lingering symptoms post-surgery either underload their injured leg (6-12 months after surgery) or overload the injured leg (after the 24-month mark), as compared to those who have had t

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Anxiety surrounding mass shootings briefly closes ideological divides

People who feel anxious surrounding mass shootings tend to abandon their political ideology on typically divided issues, according to a study by two University of Kansas professors.

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Do we trust people who speak with an accent?

A recently published study shows that unless they speak in a confident tone of voice, you're less likely to believe someone who speaks with an accent. And, interestingly, as you make this decision different parts of your brain are activated, depending on whether you perceive the speaker to be from your own 'in-group' or from some type of 'out-group' (e.g., someone with a different linguistic or cu

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Small molecule plays big role in weaker bones as we age

With age, expression of a small molecule that can silence others goes way up while a key signaling molecule that helps stem cells make healthy bone goes down, scientists report.

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Research shows that busy people make healthier choices

A busy mindset can be leveraged to promote better self-control.

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Sleep deprived people more likely to have car crashes

A new study in SLEEP indicates that people who have slept for fewer than seven of the past 24 hours have higher odds of being involved in and responsible for car crashes. The risk is greatest for drivers who have slept fewer than four hours.

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Women who experienced higher levels of trauma gave birth to significantly smaller male babies

In the first study of its kind, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have found significantly lower birth weights in male infants — an average decrease of 38 grams, or approximately 1.3 ounces — born to women who had been exposed to trauma at some point in their lives and who secreted higher levels of cortisol, a hormone related to stress, in late pregnancy.

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Audi at Last Unveils the E-tron, Its First All-Electric SUV

Starting at $74,500 and offering 248(ish) miles of range, the E-tron is here to do battle with Tesla and every other automaker crowding into the luxury electric market.

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The Slow Death of the Red-Carpet Show

Early on in the E! Live From the Red Carpet show preceding this year’s Emmy Awards, the program’s longtime host, Giuliana Rancic, gamely engaged in an experiment intended to make the show more interesting. As she talked with celebrities on the red carpet—Milo Ventimiglia, Sterling K. Brown, and Ryan Michelle Bathe—Rancic motioned to a jar filled with pieces of paper. The strips contained question

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IKEA designs future autonomous cars that work as hotels, stores, and meeting rooms

The furniture store’s design agency has dreamed up seven ways we might use autonomous vehicles if we don’t actually have to focus on driving.

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Midterm Time Capsule, 50 Days to Go: The Kavanaugh Watch

At the moment, in mid-September—with no way of knowing how the midterm elections will go, or what legal entanglements lie ahead for Donald Trump—we do have one possible gauge of how far the politics of 2018 have actually deviated from previous norms. It involves the prospects for Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. Through post-World War II political history, there have been distin

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The Much-Needed Shock of That Emmys Marriage Proposal

Glenn Weiss was the director in the control booth during one of the most famous moments of live-televised chaos in history: when La La Land was mistakenly announced as Best Picture at the 2017 Academy Awards instead of the rightful winner, Moonlight . He’s since cracked that the mix-up had its upsides in making the show memorable. “Yeah, I’ve been joking about the fact that I’ve spent a whole car

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Forskere overvejer for første gang at slippe dommedagsgener ud i naturen

Ingen organismer med såkaldte gen-drivere er nogensinde blevet sat ud i det fri, men nu forbereder forskere i Vestafrika et unikt forsøg, der vil vende evolutionen på hovedet i håbet om at reducere dødeligheden af malaria.

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SpaceX Will Send a Japanese Billionaire to the Moon—And He’s Taking a Bunch of Artists With Him

SpaceX said Monday night that it would send Yusaku Maezawa, a billionaire entrepreneur from Japan, on a trip around the moon in 2023 aboard the company’s yet-to-be-built rocket. And Maezawa won’t be flying alone. Joining him will be six to eight artists, chosen from a pool of painters, photographers, musicians, film directors, fashion designers, and architects from around the world. “Ever since I

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Colin Jost and Michael Che’s Lackluster Emmys Monologue

For years, Michael Che and Colin Jost’s partnership on Saturday Night Live as the hosts of “Weekend Update” could best be described as competent and familiar. If they have a dynamic, it’s that Jost is the smarmy stiff and Che enjoys knocking him down a peg; but aside from that, they’re mostly just there to read one-liners, back and forth, with a seasoned air of disinterest. And that’s exactly how

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Elon Musk unveils first tourist for SpaceX 'Moon loop'SpaceX Yusaku Maezawa

The first private passenger to fly around the Moon with SpaceX will be a Japanese billionaire.

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Japanese Billionaire Will Be First Lunar Tourist. And He Plans to Invite Artists.

Yusaku Maezawa, founder of clothing company ZoZo, will be the first space tourist to travel around the moon, private spaceflight company SpaceX announced tonight (Sept. 17).

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I Believe Her

“Dear Caitlin,” an inscription in my 12th-grade yearbook begins. “I’m really very sorry that our friendship plummeted straight downhill after the first few months of school. Really, the blame rests totally on my shoulders. To tell you the truth, I’ve wanted to say this all year. I know you’ll succeed because you’re very smart and I regard you with the utmost respect … Take care—love always.” He w

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Solar Orbiter: Spacecraft to leave UK bound for the Sun

UK engineers finish building a satellite that will carry cameras closer to the Sun than ever before.

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Pancreas forms ducts like a river network

When rivers are formed and branch into smaller streams, the streams with the strongest current expand, while others run dry and eventually disappear. The same happens with the formation of some human organs, new research shows. To explore the idea further, researchers studied the pancreas in mouse embryos and looked at how the organ develops from embryo stage until the mouse is born. Enzyme produ

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The gene code of growing limbs

Scientists from EPFL and the University of Geneva have discovered a 'code' of architect genes that are expressed in specific combinations during the development of hands and fingers. The study decrypts developmental gene expression at the level of the single cell in developing limbs and expands our understanding of the genetics behind growing limbs.

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Michael Flynn Will Finally Be Sentenced

After more than 10 months of cooperating with Special Counsel Robert Mueller, former National-Security Adviser Michael Flynn—who led chants of “Lock her up!” about Hillary Clinton at Donald Trump’s campaign rallies—now has his own sentencing date in federal court. In a court document filed Monda y, Mueller and Flynn’s attorneys agreed on November 28—well after the midterm elections—for a sentenci

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People with COPD suffer fewer lung-related problems when treated with targeted lung denervation

First results from a clinical trial of a procedure to open obstructed airways in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have shown that it significantly reduces problems associated with the disease and is safe.

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A third of us would go one-way to Mars – but it may shrink your brain

New Scientist Asks the Public has revealed that 40 per cent of men want to go to Mars, but new evidence suggests the lengthy trip may be bad for your brain

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Only one in five UK adults would choose to live forever if they could

New Scientist Asks the Public has revealed that only 21 per cent of people would be keen to become immortal, should it ever become scientifically possible

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Why wouldn’t you want to live forever? New Scientist editors debate

More than half of UK adults would turn down an offer of immortality. Emily Wilson doesn’t understand why – but Richard Webb certainly does

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Revealed: What the UK public really thinks about the future of science

The 2018 New Scientist Asks the Public survey reveals that people are well-informed about science and technology, but politicians are ignoring their hopes and fears

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Data Firms Team up to Prevent the Next Cambridge Analytica Scandal

A new working group of Republican and Democratic firms is writing rules for their industry amid mounting scrutiny and consumer privacy concerns.

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Either too much or too little weight gain during pregnancy is associated with adverse outcomes in children aged 7 years

New research shows that if a woman gains either too much or too little weight during pregnancy, there are adverse effects in children at 7 years of age.

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Silicone breast implants linked to increased risk of some rare harms

Women receiving silicone breast implants may be at increased risk of several rare adverse outcomes compared to the general population.

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X-rays uncover a hidden property that leads to failure in a lithium-ion battery material

X-ray experiments have revealed that the pathways lithium ions take through a common battery material are more complex than previously thought.

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New method more than doubles sugar production from plants

Chemists have developed a method that can significantly increase the yield of sugars from plants, improving the production of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials.

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Machine learning technique to predict human cell organization

Scientists have used machine learning to train computers to see parts of the cell the human eye cannot easily distinguish.

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Opioid users could benefit from meth-relapse prevention strategy, study finds

New research raises the possibility that a wider group of people battling substance use disorders may benefit from a relapse-prevention compound than previously thought.

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Undiagnosed STIs can increase negative PMS symptoms

Women that have undiagnosed sexually transmitted infections may be at greater risk of experiencing negative premenstrual symptoms (PMS), according to new research.

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The Atlantic Daily: Our Defenses Were Worn Down

What We’re Following “Boys Will Be Boys”: While sexual misconduct infects both political parties, responses by liberals and conservatives to each emergent allegation have often diverged. Now, key Senate Republicans seem to be wavering in light of Christine Blasey Ford’s sexual-assault allegation against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. When it comes to accusations of sexual assault, the

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Clinical gene discovery program solves 30 medical mysteries

A table in a recently published paper tells the story of 30 families who have, sometimes after years of searching, finally received an answer about the condition that has plagued one or more family members.

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CRISPR screen identifies gene that helps cells resist West Nile, Zika viruses

Researchers now report the first use of CRISPR genome-wide screening to identify a gene that helps cells resist flavivirus infection.

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3D electron microscopy uncovers the complex guts of desalination membranes

Careful sample preparation, electron tomography and quantitative analysis of 3D models provides unique insights into the inner structure of reverse osmosis membranes widely used for salt water desalination wastewater recycling and home use, according to chemical engineers.

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Current rates of diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes in American adults

A new study finds that type 2 diabetes remains overwhelmingly the most common type of diabetes diagnosed in American adults who have the disease. The study found that among Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes, 91.2 percent have type 2 diabetes and 5.6 percent have type 1 diabetes.

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E. coli's adaptation to extreme temperatures helps explain resistance to certain drugs

A new study suggests that defenses against extreme temperatures give E. coli bacteria an advantage in fending off certain drugs. The work could help doctors administer antibiotics in a more precise way.

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Micronizing ocean plastics threaten sea turtle populations, ocean life cycle

Ingestion of degrading ocean plastics likely poses a substantial risk to the survival of post-hatchling sea turtles because the particles can lead to blockages and nutritional deficiencies, according to new research.

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Sperm quality study updates advice for couples trying to conceive

New clinical and molecular evidence shows sperm quality and reproductive outcomes are improved when semen is provided after just 1-3 hours of abstinence.

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World's biggest study of blood pressure genetics

Over 500 new gene regions that influence people's blood pressure have been discovered in the largest global genetic study of blood pressure to date.

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Gene therapy via skin protects mice from lethal cocaine doses

A new study shows that skin stem cells, modified via CRISPR and transplanted back to donor mice, can protect addicted mice from cocaine-seeking and overdose.

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We are predisposed to forgive, new research suggests

New research finds that when assessing the moral character of others, people cling to good impressions but readily adjust their opinions about those who have behaved badly.

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Why some tuberculosis bacteria prove deadly

A new study has found that the same mutation that gives tuberculosis bacteria drug resistance also elicits a different — and potentially weaker — immune response.

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Large-scale shift causing lower-oxygen water to invade Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence

Rapid deoxygenation in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence is caused by shifts in two of the ocean's most powerful currents: the Gulf Stream and the Labrador Current. A detailed model shows that large-scale climate change is causing oxygen to drop in the deeper parts of this biologically rich waterway.

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The BFR in Images: SpaceX's Giant Spaceship for Mars Colony & Beyond

On Sept. 29, 2017, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk unveiled the company’s latest Mars-colonization architecture, which centers on a rocket-spaceship combo dubbed the BFR (Big F***ing Rocket). See how it works in images.

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Midwives call for pregnancy weight targets after study highlights health risks

Eating for two is a myth, say researchers, with weight gain linked to insulin resistance Midwives should be given guidelines on how to advise expectant mothers about managing their weight, their professional body has said, reacting to research that suggested the commonly held belief that pregnant women needed to eat for two was a myth. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy could put the future

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Four-year study: Pioneering contact lens approach slows myopia progression in children

New four-year study data shows the significant impact of a pioneering contact lens management approach to slowing the progression of myopia (nearsightedness) in children, including those whose treatment begins later. CooperVision is presenting the latest outcomes during the BCLA Asia conference in Singapore this week, at which the globally increasing prevalence of myopia is among the most widely d

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Characterizing pig hippocampus could improve translational neuroscience

A new study establishes the pig as promising preclinical research model for traumatic brain injury and epilepsy.

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Shifting focus from life extension to 'healthspan' extension

A new article addresses the need for researchers and clinicians to focus less on prolonging lifespan and more on prolonging 'healthspan.'

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Do rock climbers seek out high-risk climbs?

A new study finds a majority of rock climbers are more likely to visit sites with more routes and less risk.

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More than 4 billion birds stream overhead during fall migration

Using cloud computing and data from 143 weather radar stations across the continental United States, researchers can now estimate how many birds migrate through the US and the toll that winter and these nocturnal journeys take.

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Brain's lymphatic vessels as new avenue to treat multiple sclerosis

The brain's lymphatic vessels appear to carry previously unknown messages from the brain to the immune system that ultimately cause the disease symptoms. Blocking those messages may offer doctors a new way to treat a potentially devastating condition that affects more than 2 million people.

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Compact fiber laser may enable wearable tech and better endoscopes

A new photoacoustic imaging technology combines laser light and ultrasound to image biological tissue.

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New world record magnetic field

Researchers have recorded the highest magnetic field ever achieved indoors — a discovery that may open doors for materials science and fusion energy research.

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Linux's Creator Is Sorry. But Will He Change?

Linus Torvalds says he will take a break to learn more about "how to understand people’s emotions and respond appropriately."

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A blindfolded sea otter named Selka shows how the critters find food in murky water

Animals Proving the power of whiskers and paws. Newly published research from the University of California at Santa Cruz helps us peer into the murk and figure out how those snuggly-looking critters find food.

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Exposure to organochlorine pesticides in the womb linked to poorer lung function in childhood

Babies exposed to higher levels of organochlorine compounds in the womb go on to have worse lung function in childhood, according to new research presented today (Tuesday) at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. These compounds, which include the pesticide DDT, as well as electrical insulators and other industrial products, are now banned in most parts of the world. However, be

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COPD patients suffer fewer respiratory problems if treated with targeted lung denervation

First results from a clinical trial of a procedure to open obstructed airways in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have shown that it significantly reduces problems associated with the disease and is safe. Then findings on targeted lung denervation are presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

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Either too much or too little weight gain during pregnancy is associated with adverse outcomes in children aged 7 years

New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) shows that if a woman gains either too much or too little weight during pregnancy, there are adverse effects in children at 7 years of age.

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Another Blow Against Refugees

The Trump administration has reduced the maximum number of refugees it will accept in the next fiscal year from 45,000 to 30,000, the lowest level since the current refugee-resettlement program went into effect more than three decades ago. “The improved refugee policy of this administration serves the national interest of the United States, and helps those in need all around the world,” U.S. Secr

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘We Need to Hear From Her’

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) Today in 5 Lines Multiple Republican senators want to delay Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote until they hear testimony from Christine Blasey Ford, the California psychology professor who accused him of sexual assault. Ford’s attorney said she is willing to testify . The New York Times reported that Michael Bloomberg, the

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Decisive sea otters use paws and whiskers to distinguish objects by touch

When dinner is encased in a robust shell, brute force is often the only solution, but ingenious sea otters (Enhydra lutris) have been more ingenious. Some pound clams and snails on a rock balanced on their chests, while others skilfully crack open shells to satisfy their voracious appetites. Describing sea otters as eating machines, Sarah McKay Strobel from the University of California Santa Cruz

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Last week in tech: New iPhones, emergency text alerts, and the coming wave of gadget announcements

Technology Should you get a new iPhone? And why is the president texting us? Listen to the latest episode of the podcast and catch up on a week of tech news dominated by the new iPhone and Apple Watch.

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Where Brett Kavanaugh's Nomination Goes From Here

Updated on September 17 at 9:46 p.m. ET As of late last week, Brett Kavanaugh stood on the brink of confirmation to a lifetime appointment on the Supreme Court. The federal appellate judge nominated by President Donald Trump to replace the retiring Justice Anthony Kennedy had survived three days of confirmation hearings without alienating any of the 51 Senate Republicans whose votes he needs to s

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Science News Briefs from Around the World

A few very brief reports about science and technology from around the globe. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New school of thought: In-class physical exercise won't disrupt learning, teaching

As childhood obesity rates rise and physical education offerings dwindle, elementary schools keep searching for ways to incorporate the federally mandated half-hour of physical activity into the school day.

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New evidence of a preventative therapy for gout

Solomon and colleagues found a significant reduction in risk of gout attacks among patients who received the drug that targets a key inflammatory molecule, suggesting a new target for therapeutic strategies to prevent gout attacks. Their findings are published online today in Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Stress over fussy eating prompts parents to pressure or reward at mealtime

Mothers report higher level of concern about long-term health consequences for fussy eaters, according to a new study.

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Photosynthesis: Discovery of a photobase so strong, it merits moniker of 'super'

A new discovery of a light-induced super photobase is revealing some of photosynthesis' desirable traits. The interdisciplinary team of scientists was able to document the ultrafast dynamics of the super photobase that is 10 million times stronger than anything previously discovered.

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Nanoparticle therapeutic restores function of tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

Leveraging advances in mRNA and nanotechnology, researchers demonstrate that tumor suppressor PTEN can be restored in preclinical models of prostate cancer.

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Mapping vast unknown territory of long non-coding RNA

Scientists have developed a powerful method for exploring the properties of mysterious molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), some of which have big roles in cancer and other serious conditions.

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Researcher Fazlul Sarkar Has 12 More Papers Retracted

The ex-Wayne State University scientist has racked up 33 retractions to date.

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Meet SpaceX’s First Moon Voyage Customer, Yusaku Maezawa

Yusaku Maezawa, a Japanese fashion entrepreneur, and several artists would follow a looping path around the moon aboard a new rocket. When the flight might occur is uncertain.

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Merger of Cigna and Express Scripts Gets Approval From Justice Dept.

The takeover of one of the nation’s largest pharmacy benefit manager by a big health insurer is expected to close by the end of the year.

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Blood Moon vs. Supermoon: Which is Rarer?

What do all of these special-sounding moon terms really mean?

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E. coli's adaptation to extreme temperatures helps explain resistance to certain drugs

A new study suggests that defenses against extreme temperatures give E. coli bacteria an advantage in fending off certain drugs. The work could help doctors administer antibiotics in a more precise way.

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Modeling crystal behavior: Towards answers in self-organization

Researchers have created a model to explore the transition behavior of crystal lattices. Their system, based on spheroid particles with a permanent dipole, showed that the combination of anisotropic steric and dipole effects causes frustration that induces the coupling between polarization and strain, resulting in the self-organization. These findings are expected to contribute to the rational des

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Thinking beyond yourself can make you more open to healthy lifestyle choices

Many people feel threatened when reminded of their unhealthy behavior. However, a group of 220 sedentary adults became more receptive to health advice — and more active — after being primed to either think about their most important values or to make well-wishes for others.

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Targeting this key bacterial molecule could reduce the need for antibiotics

Scientists have shown that cellulose serves a mortar-like role to enhance the adhesion of bacteria to bladder cells, causing urinary tract infections.

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How dragonfly wings get their patterns

Researchers have developed a model that can recreate, with only a few parameters, the wing patterns of a large group of insects, shedding light on how these complex patterns form.

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Tonight: Watch SpaceX Announce Its First Passenger to the MoonElon Musk SpaceX Maezawa

Here's how to watch live as CEO Elon Musk reveals the first customer it will take to the moon aboard its BFR rocket, among other details.

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Study reveals the current rates of diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes in American adults

A new study from the University of Iowa finds that type 2 diabetes remains overwhelmingly the most common type of diabetes diagnosed in American adults who have the disease. The study found that among Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes, 91.2 percent have type 2 diabetes and 5.6 percent have type 1 diabetes.

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3D electron microscopy uncovers the complex guts of desalination membranes

Careful sample preparation, electron tomography and quantitative analysis of 3D models provides unique insights into the inner structure of reverse osmosis membranes widely used for salt water desalination wastewater recycling and home use, according to a team of chemical engineers.

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CRISPR screen identifies gene that helps cells resist West Nile, Zika viruses

UT Southwestern researchers today report the first use of CRISPR genome-wide screening to identify a gene that helps cells resist flavivirus infection.

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Warnings were up for Hong Kong for Typhoon Mangkhut after landfall

On Sunday, Sept. 16, 2018, Typhoon Mangkhut had made landfall in southern China and Hurricane signal #10 was still in force. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the storm and captured an image that showed the storm after landfall.

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Despite changes to US kidney allocation system, inequality persists

The new system did not minimize pre-transplant dialysis exposure for patients who were not waitlisted preemptively.

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We need better data to fight human trafficking

Researchers have created resources that cover data gathering for people working in the anti-human trafficking field, including best practices for getting responsible and reliable data when working with these hidden and vulnerable populations. When people want data on human trafficking, they might turn to widely cited statistics, such as a study showing there are 40.3 million victims of human traf

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More ships and more clouds mean cooling in the arctic

Researchers recently modeled the future of trans-Arctic shipping routes and found that the accompanying increase in emissions may offset some of the overall warming trend in that region. Though the researchers stress this is in no way an endorsement to trans-Arctic shipping or a means to mitigate climate change, the results illustrate the complexities in understanding how human activities impact t

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Circuit found for brain's statistical inference about motion

Neuroscientists have found the neural wiring underlying predictive eye-tracking of movements and watched in monkeys as the circuit is set to predict a given speed. They say the neurons of the brain's sensory and motor systems are guided by a combination of past experience and sensory inputs. When replicated in a neural network computer, these educated guesses made by motor neurons mimic Bayesian s

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Tropics are widening as predicted by climate models, research finds

Scientists have observed for years that Earth's tropics are widening in connection with complex changes in climate and weather patterns. But in recent years, it appeared the widening was outpacing what models predicted, suggesting other factors were at work. But a new paper finds that the most up-to-date models and the best data match up reasonably well.

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Newly discovered enzyme is 'firing pin' for plant immunity

Just like humans, plants have an immune system that helps them fight off infections. Researchers have now identified a key step in how plant cells respond to pathogens — a family of kinase enzymes that activate the enzymes that make reactive oxygen.

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New understanding of light allows researchers to see around corners

Researchers have demonstrated how to passively sense an object even when direct vision is impeded.

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Resynchronizing neurons to erase schizophrenia

By increasing the excitability of a subpopulation of 'defective' inhibitory neurons, researchers have demonstrated that it is possible to suppress certain behavioral symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

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After 150 years, a breakthrough in understanding the conversion of carbon dioxide to electrofuels

Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, engineers have observed how carbon dioxide is activated at the electrode-electrolyte interface. Their finding shifts the catalyst design from trial-and-error paradigm to a rational approach and could lead to alternative, cheaper, and safer renewable energy storage.

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Turmoil behind primate power struggles often overlooked by researchers

Social interactions can be intricate — and not just among humans. A new study suggests that researchers may be overlooking some of these same complexities in the social relations of our closest primate relatives, such as chimpanzees and macaques.

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Catastrophic construction: Storms can build reef islands in atoll regions

Many coral reef islands, or atolls, are created by water moving sand and gravel, piling it up into consecutive ridged layers. However, new research has uncovered a different type of island construction: storm-deposited boulders.

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NASA's TESS shares first science image in hunt to find new worlds

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which began science operations in July, has released its first full frame image using all four of its cameras.

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Email distractions make bosses worse leaders

Keeping up with email traffic places high demands on managers, preventing them from achieving goals and from being good leaders, according to a new study. The researchers believe the work is one of the first studies to examine how distractions from email affect managers, their productivity, and their role as leaders. Employees spend more than 90 minutes every day—or seven-and-a-half hours every w

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Turmoil behind primate power struggles often overlooked by researchers

Anyone who peruses relationship settings on social media knows that our interactions with other humans can be intricate, but a new study in Nature: Scientific Reports suggests that researchers may be overlooking some of these same complexities in the social relations of our closest primate relatives, such as chimpanzees and macaques.

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Trilobites: What 13,000 Patents Involving the DNA of Sea Life Tell Us About the Future

Whether a single private entity should be able to set the direction of how the genes of so many living things are used was a piece of a broader debate at the United Nations this month.

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Meet SpaceX’s first moon tourist, Yusaku Maezawa

Space The Japanese billionaire isn't the only one headed for the moon. Here's where you can re-watch the SpaceX broadcast announcing Yusaku Maezawa's project with SpaceX.

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After Mysterious Closure, Solar Observatory In New Mexico Reopens

A telescope in Sunspot, N.M., will have additional security for now, after "an unusual number of visitors" showed up at the site. Conspiracy theories had proliferated about its sudden closing. (Image credit: NSO/AURA/NSF)

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SpaceX wants to send private citizens to the moon (again)Elon Musk SpaceX Maezawa

Space We all want to know who it is. Tonight at 9 pm eastern time, the world will gain a first glance at the latest private citizen to hand over a load of cash in exchange for a promised rare trip into…

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More women than men veterans with chronic pain use therapies like yoga and acupuncture

A major shift in practice by the VA means that therapies such as meditation and yoga are being offered to VA patients as non-drug approaches for pain management, says Elizabeth Evans of UMass Amherst, who studied their use by gender among veterans with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

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Clinical gene discovery program solves 30 medical mysteries

In a recent paper published in Genomic Medicine, the Brigham Genomic Medicine team describes its program, one the team hopes will serve as a model for other academic medical centers or institutions that are endeavoring to solve medical mysteries using genomic sequencing and the power of scientific crowdsourcing.

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Silicone breast implants linked to increased risk of some rare harms

Women receiving silicone breast implants may be at increased risk of several rare adverse outcomes compared to the general population, reports a study in Annals of Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Turmoil behind primate power struggles often overlooked by researchers

Anyone who peruses relationship settings on social media knows that our interactions with other humans can be intricate, but a new study in Nature: Scientific Reports suggests that researchers may be overlooking some of these same complexities in the social relations of our closest primate relatives, such as chimpanzees and macaques.

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Nonfiction: The Quest to Create and Perfect an Artificial Heart

Mimi Swartz’s “Ticker” tells the story of the doctors who, against all odds, struggled to make a device to replace one of our most vital organs.

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A Temporary Reprieve for Syria’s Last Rebel-Held Province

A disaster seemed imminent in Syria’s Idlib province. Bashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, had massed his forces on the borders of the province, the last major rebel stronghold in the country, while Syrian-government and Russian warplanes bombarded towns and villages along the front lines. It appeared to be a grim replay of the sequence of events that has brought other rebel-held areas under

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Grizzly's unusually aggressive behavior in Wyoming a puzzle

Wildlife officials are puzzled why a grizzly bear that killed a hunting guide and injured his client was behaving so aggressively.

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Newly discovered enzyme is 'firing pin' for plant immunity

Just like humans, plants have an immune system that helps them fight off infections. Plant immunity has some important differences: they don't make antibodies and can't fight off the same bug more quickly months or years later. However, plant cells can identify pathogens and react to them, often by producing a burst of reactive oxygen which is toxic to bacteria or fungi. Cells around an infected s

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New discovery of a photobase so strong, it merits moniker of 'super'

The power of the sun is so incredible that it could fulfill the world's energy needs in roughly 90 minutes. While plants have mastered photosynthesis, harnessing sunlight into chemical energy, scientists are still trying to decipher its secrets.

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Tropics are widening as predicted by climate models, research finds

Scientists have observed for years that the Earth's tropics are widening in connection with complex changes in climate and weather patterns. But in recent years, it appeared the widening was outpacing what models predicted, suggesting other factors were at work.

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iOS 12 just gave your iPhone new features—here's how to use them

DIY An AR measuring app, Memoji, easier photo sharing, and more. This month, you can finally download and install iOS 12 on your iPhone. Here are some of the coolest updates you should try first.

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Republicans face growing pressure to delay Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation vote

Kavanaugh is accused of drunkenly forcing himself on a young woman when he was a teenager Democrats need an objection from just one Republican senator on the Senate Judiciary Committee to get a delay A delay that lasts until after the midterms could squash Kavanaugh's confirmation if Democrats take control of the senate Allegations that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted a w

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Why Japan's hikikomori isolate themselves from others for years

A hikikomori is a type of person in Japan who locks themselves away in their bedrooms, sometimes for years. This is a relatively new phenomenon in Japan, likely due to rigid social customs and high expectations for academic and business success. Many believe hikikomori to be a result of how Japan interprets and handles mental health issues. None There's a particular type of person in Japan. They

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Newly discovered enzyme is 'firing pin' for plant immunity

Just like humans, plants have an immune system that helps them fight off infections. Gitta Coaker and colleagues at UC Davis have now identified a key step in how plant cells respond to pathogens — a family of kinase enzymes that activate the enzymes that make reactive oxygen.

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Tropics are widening as predicted by climate models, research finds

Scientists have observed for years that the Earth's tropics are widening in connection with complex changes in climate and weather patterns. But in recent years, it appeared the widening was outpacing what models predicted, suggesting other factors were at work. But a new paper finds that the most up-to-date models and the best data match up reasonably well.

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Circuit found for brain's statistical inference about motion

A team of Duke University neuroscientists has found the neural wiring underlying predictive eye-tracking of movements and watched in monkeys as the circuit is set to predict a given speed. They say the neurons of the brain's sensory and motor systems are guided by a combination of past experience and sensory inputs. When replicated in a neural network computer, these educated guesses made by motor

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NASA data shows Florence brings torrential rains and record flooding to the Carolinas

NASA estimated the precipitation generated by Hurricane Florence from Sept. 10 through 17 as it approached North Carolina and days after it made landfall. On Sept. 17, 2018, Florence's remnant rainfall was moving up the Appalachian Mountains into the Mid-Atlantic.

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How dragonfly wings get their patterns

Researchers from Harvard University have developed a model that can recreate, with only a few parameters, the wing patterns of a large group of insects, shedding light on how these complex patterns form.

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UCLA researchers develop mechanism for characterizing function of rare tumor cells

UCLA researchers have created a quick and effective mechanism to measure how these circulating tumor cells perform functions that drive cancer.

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Thinking beyond yourself can make you more open to healthy lifestyle choices

Many people feel threatened when reminded of their unhealthy behavior. However, a group of 220 sedentary adults became more receptive to health advice — and more active — after being primed to either think about their most important values or to make well-wishes for others.

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Modeling crystal behavior: Towards answers in self-organization

The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science researchers have created a model to explore the transition behavior of crystal lattices. Their system, based on spheroid particles with a permanent dipole, showed that the combination of anisotropic steric and dipole effects causes frustration that induces the coupling between polarization and strain, resulting in the self-organization. These

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After 150 years, a breakthrough in understanding the conversion of CO2 to electrofuels

Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, Columbia Engineers are first to observe how CO2 is activated at the electrode-electrolyte interface; their finding shifts the catalyst design from trial-and-error paradigm to a rational approach and could lead to alternative, cheaper, and safer renewable energy storage

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Targeting this key bacterial molecule could reduce the need for antibiotics

Stanford scientists have shown that cellulose serves a mortar-like role to enhance the adhesion of bacteria to bladder cells, causing urinary tract infections.

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NASA data shows Florence brings torrential rains and record flooding to the Carolinas

NASA estimated the precipitation generated by Hurricane Florence from Sept. 10 through 17 as it approached North Carolina and days after it made landfall. On Sept. 17, Florence's remnant rainfall was moving up the Appalachian Mountains into the Mid-Atlantic.

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Paris climate targets could be exceeded sooner than expected

A new study has for the first time comprehensively accounted for permafrost carbon release when estimating emission budgets for climate targets. The results show that the world might be closer to exceeding the budget for the long-term target of the Paris climate agreement than previously thought.

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Tiny fossils reveal how shrinking was essential for successful evolution

A new study shows that getting smaller was a key factor contributing to the exceptional evolution of mammals over the last 200 million years.

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New discovery of a photobase so strong, it merits moniker of 'super'

A new discovery of a light-induced super photobase at Michigan State University is revealing some of photosynthesis' desirable traits. The interdisciplinary team of scientists was able to document the ultrafast dynamics of the super photobase that is 10 million times stronger than anything previously discovered.

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RUDN University mathematicians proposed to improve cellular network coverage by using UAVs

RUDN University mathematicians simulated the work of a cellular network. In their model unmanned aerial vehicles are employed as additional transmitters. Most of the available communication systems give a flat coverage and do not take into account the difference in altitude, which results in the appearance of the so-called 'blind' zones. Flying drones will help in solving this issue. The work is p

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Stress over fussy eating prompts parents to pressure or reward at mealtime

Although fussy eating is developmentally normal and transient phase for most children, the behavior can be stressful for parents. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that concern over fussy eating prompts both mothers and fathers to use non-responsive feeding practices such as pressuring or rewarding for eating.

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Knowing your neighbor cares about the environment encourages people to use less energy

Giving people information about how much gas or electricity their neighbors use encourages them to use less energy, research shows.

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Counting (on) sheep? Promising gene therapy for visually impaired sheep now safe for human trials

A promising gene therapy for visually impaired sheep is now safe for human trials.

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How plants harness microbes to get nutrients

Scientists have discovered how plants harness microbes in soil to get nutrients, a process that could be exploited to boost crop growth, fight weeds and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides.

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Photos: The Aftermath of Super Typhoon Mangkhut

Typhoon Mangkhut, also known as Ompong in the Philippines, began forming in the Pacific Ocean 10 days ago and quickly intensified to a Category 5–equivalent super typhoon with sustained winds of 125 miles an hour by September 11. Its path took it westward, across the Philippines, then into Hong Kong and southeastern China, where it has now been downgraded to a tropical storm after tearing up vill

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After 150 years, a breakthrough in understanding the conversion of CO2 to electrofuels

Using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, Columbia Engineers are first to observe how CO2 is activated at the electrode-electrolyte interface; their finding shifts the catalyst design from trial-and-error paradigm to a rational approach and could lead to alternative, cheaper, and safer renewable energy storage

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Targeting this key bacterial molecule could reduce the need for antibiotics

Stanford researchers have shown that bacteria involved in urinary tract infections (UTI) rely on a novel chemical form of the molecule cellulose to stick to bladder cells.

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How dragonfly wings get their patterns

Harvard researchers have developed a computational model that can mimic, with only a few, simple parameters, the complex wing patterns of a large group of distantly-related insects, shedding light on how these patterns form.

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Modeling crystal behavior—toward answers in self-organization

The electrical and mechanical responses of crystal materials, and the control of their coupled effect, form one of the central themes in material science. They are vital to applications such as ultrasonic generators and non-volatile memory. However, despite knowledge of how to control such materials being widely demonstrated in practice, to date the physical principle behind the controllability th

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Klimatæsk: Vigtig havn får forsmag på ekstremt vejr

Modelforsøg i høj søgang tester dyrt byggeri, som skal beskytte Danmarks mest udsatte havn mod endnu værre bølger i fremtiden.

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Past NASA chiefs gather for space agency's 60th anniversary

NASA chiefs going back 30 years have come together to mark the space agency's 60th anniversary.

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More ships and more clouds mean cooling in the Arctic

With sea ice in the Arctic melting at an alarming rate, opportunities for trans-Arctic shipping are opening up, and by mid-century ships will be able to sail right over the North Pole—something not previously possible for humankind.

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Catastrophic construction: Storms can build reef islands in atoll regions

Tropical storms, with waves reaching up to 10-meters-high, can wallop coral reef islands. As global temperatures increase, some scientists suggest that such storms will become more frequent and intense over the next few decades. Additionally, potential sea level rise is perceived as a threat to the continued existence of these remote, low-lying communities.

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How studying chicken butts cracked the inner workings of our immune system

Health A Golden Goose award just recognized how poultry enhanced our understanding of B and T cells. Children were dying, and pediatrician Max Cooper couldn’t understand why. They had plenty of plasma cells, which he knew produced antibodies, but his patients who were…

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TESS shares first science image in hunt to find new worlds

NASA's newest planet hunter, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), is now providing valuable data to help scientists discover and study exciting new exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system. Part of the data from TESS' initial science orbit includes a detailed picture of the southern sky taken with all four of the spacecraft's wide-field cameras. This "first light" science image

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Anger as rhino trade kingpin released from S.African jail

Conservationists expressed shock Monday after a Thai kingpin of the illegal rhino horn trade was released from jail in South Africa after serving just six years of his 40-year sentence.

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NASA's TESS shares first science image in hunt to find new worlds

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, which began science operations in July, has released its first full frame image using all four of its cameras.

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More ships and more clouds mean cooling in the Arctic

UConn professor of geology Scott Stephenson and colleagues recently modeled the future of trans-Arctic shipping routes and found that increased emissions will spell a trend of slowed cooling in the region. Though the researchers stress this is in no way an endorsement to trans-Arctic shipping or a means to mitigate climate change, however the results illustrate the complexities in understanding ho

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Catastrophic construction: Storms can build reef islands in atoll regions

Tropical storms, with waves reaching up to 10-meters-high, can wallop coral reef islands. As global temperatures increase, some scientists suggest that such storms will become more frequent and intense over the next few decades. Additionally, potential sea level rise is perceived as a threat to the continued existence of these remote, low-lying communities.

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Warming Boosted Florence's Rainfall, One Expert Says

The hurricane was likely fueled by some of the warmer spots in the Atlantic Oceans this year — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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MoviePass rival offers unlimited movie-going at theaters

A Turkish startup is offering a movie a day in theaters for $30 a month.

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Neil deGrasse Tyson Reminds Us Why Smoking Weed in Space Is a Bad Idea

The famed astrophysicist would prefer if you didn't smoke weed in space, thanks.

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Epidural stimulation leads to recovery of cardiovascular function in spinal-cord-injured

Four research participants with chronic, complete cervical spinal cord injury, persistent low resting blood pressure and blood pressure decrease when sitting up experienced improvements in blood pressure and heart rate regulation during and after spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES).

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A protective shield for sensitive enzymes in biofuel cells

Researchers have developed a new mechanism to protect enzymes from oxygen as biocatalysts in fuel cells. The enzymes, known as hydrogenases, are just as efficient as precious metal catalysts, but unstable when they come into contact with oxygen. They are therefore not yet suitable for technological applications. The new protective mechanism is based on oxygen-consuming enzymes that draw their ener

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A novel approach of improving battery performance

A team of researchers has introduced a novel technology that promises to significantly boost the performance of lithium metal batteries.

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Understanding surface science to manufacture quality cosmetics

A team of researchers has identified variables that control the cavity-filling rates, required for liquids to penetrate into the cavities.

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New light on the controversial question of species abundance and population density

Inspired by the negative results in the recently published largest-scale analysis of the relation between population density and positions in geographic ranges and environmental niches, a team of US and Mexican scientists identified several issues in the methodology used, able to turn the tables in the ongoing debate.

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Organic ferromagnetism: Trapping spins in glassy state

A team of researchers presents alternative approaches for versatile future applications of plastic magnets.

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Micronizing ocean plastics threaten sea turtle populations, ocean life cycle

Ingestion of degrading ocean plastics likely poses a substantial risk to the survival of post-hatchling sea turtles because the particles can lead to blockages and nutritional deficiencies, according to new research from Loggerhead Marinelife Center and the University of Georgia. This puts the survival of all sea turtle populations at risk, because sea turtles may take decades to become sexually m

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Decades of Atlantic Readers Debating Abortion

Abortion-rights advocates express their opposite views during a demonstration outside the Supreme Court on December 8, 1993. (Joe Marquette / AP) Letters From the Archives is a series in which we highlight past Atlantic stories and reactions from readers at the time. In personal essays, reported features, and constitutional arguments, The Atlantic has been covering the American abortion debate fo

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Social class sways how unemployed people talk about food

People who are unemployed may talk about food—or the lack of it—in different ways based on their social class, a new study reports. What started as a survey of unemployment following the recession led researchers to discover that people often use food to describe their circumstances. For example, “Cherry Blossom,” a 39-year-old woman worked as a hotel breakfast bar hostess around the start of the

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Particles surf their own waves, reveal how microbes and cells move through human body

Surf's up for microbes swimming beside red blood cells.

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New understanding of light allows researchers to see around corners

Covert sensing of objects around a corner may soon become a reality.

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New world record magnetic field

A group of scientists at the University of Tokyo has recorded the largest magnetic field ever generated indoors—a whopping 1,200 tesla, as measured in the standard units of magnetic field strength.

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Compact fiber laser may enable wearable tech and better endoscopes

By creating a new twist on fiber optic sensors, researchers in China have developed a smart, flexible photoacoustic imaging technique that may have potential applications in wearable devices, instrumentation and medical diagnostics.

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Individual, societal changes needed to combat obesity

Fighting the obesity epidemic in the US will require changes at both the individual and societal level, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. This paper is part of an eight-part health promotion series where each paper will focus on a different risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

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Pre-activating cath labs prior to STEMI arrival speeds treatment, reduces risk

ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients have a higher chance of survival if emergency medical service (EMS) teams notify the cardiac catherization lab at the hospital where the patient will be transported in advance of the patient's arrival, according to a study published today in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions. However, hospital cardiac catherization labs in the US are only being

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You can't tell whether an online restaurant review is fake — but this AI can

Researchers find AI-generated reviews and comments pose a significant threat to consumers, but machine learning can help detect the fakes.

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Ceres takes life an ice volcano at a time

Every year throughout its 4.5-billion-year life, ice volcanoes on the dwarf planet Ceres generate enough material on average to fill a movie theater, according to a new study led by the University of Arizona.

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The surprising environment of an enigmatic neutron star

An unusual infrared emission detected by the Hubble Space Telescope from a nearby neutron star could indicate that the pulsar has features never before seen. The observation, by a team of researchers at Penn State, Sabanci University in Turkey, and the University of Arizona, could help astronomers better understand the evolution of neutron stars—the incredibly dense remnants of massive stars after

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More than 4 billion birds stream overhead during fall migration

Using cloud computing and data from 143 weather radar stations across the continental United States, Cornell Lab of Ornithology researchers can now estimate how many birds migrate through the U.S. and the toll that winter and these nocturnal journeys take. Their findings are published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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NASA finds Tropical Depression Joyce continues to lose it

Visible and infrared satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Tropical Storm Joyce continues to become more disorganized.

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NASA sees Post-Tropical Cyclone Helene affecting Ireland, United Kingdom

Post-tropical cyclone Helene developed off the west coast of Africa and moved north then northeast where it is now raining on parts of Ireland and the United Kingdom. Clouds and rainfall connected to Helene are already affecting those countries.

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NASA catches Tropical Cyclone 01s's last breath in southern Indian Ocean

The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season, 01S, formed on Sept. 15 and was already fizzling two days later. Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed recently developed tropical cyclone 01S was already fading.

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Jennifer Lawrence's Russian Accent in 'Red Sparrow' Wasn't Great

Margot Robbie's in *I, Tonya* was spot-on, though.

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To Combat Climate Change, We Gotta Get a Better Battery. But How?

Energy storage is hard at scale. What would we do if batteries can’t support the clean energy of the future?

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Tusindvis har spillet computer for at hjælpe forskerne – du kan også være med

Flere af DRs værter har også prøvet spillet Skill Lab, der hjælper forskere fra Aarhus Universitet med at kortlægge menneskets hjerne.

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These trans teens have higher risk of suicide

New research examines which teens within the transgender community are most at risk for suicide. Transmasculine teens—those who were born female but identify as male—and teens who don’t identify as exclusively male or female are at the greatest risk for attempting suicide, says Russell Toomey, associate professor in the Norton School for Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona.

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Angsten hæmmer kræftpatienters evne til at modtage information

Frygten for en lungekræftdiagnose får de fleste patienter til at gå i en choktilstand, som blokerer for informationer og for patienternes tidligere evner. Derfor skal der mere fokus på patienternes angst, involvering af patienternes netværk, og at bruge forskellige former for information, peger kvalitativ undersøgelse på.

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Saltmarsh Sparrows Fight to Keep Their Heads Above Water

Rising sea levels are bringing more nest-flooding tides that threaten to push the birds that breed in coastal marshes along the Atlantic Coast to extinction.

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Q&A: Lapses in Turning the Lights On

When you flip the switch, there seems to be a wait before the bulb glows brightly.

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Neil DeGrasse Tyson Examines The 'Unspoken Alliance' Between Science And War

In his new book, Accessory to War, the astrophysicist argues that people who work in his field are often complicit to military development — despite being overwhelmingly liberal and anti-war.

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Characterizing pig hippocampus could improve translational neuroscience

Researchers have taken further steps toward developing a superior animal model of neurological conditions such as traumatic brain injury and epilepsy, according to a study of miniature pigs published in eNeuro. The results establish the pig as a promising preclinical research model for hippocampal-dependent human memory disorders.

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Japan's hikkomori isolate themselves from others for years

A hikkomori is a type of person in Japan who locks themselves away in their bedrooms, sometimes for years. This is a relatively new phenomenon in Japan, likely due to rigid social customs and high expectations for academic and business success. Many believe hikkomori to be a result of how Japan interprets and handles mental health issues. None There's a particular type of person in Japan. They ar

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The secret cities that built the atomic bomb

Highly secretive, closed cities were used during the Cold War to develop nuclear-grade plutonium and uranium. Oak Ridge and City 40 — two such cities — highlight the world-altering impact of nuclear weapons. Vacationing in the East Ural Mountains? Bring a Geiger counter. None In 1942, the U.S. Government bought 60,000 acres of land in rural Tennessee. On it, they began to build thousands of small

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Here's the Data behind Apple's New Heart-Monitoring App

The FDA is reviewing evidence from hundreds of people that used the company’s watch — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tværsektorielt lungeteam har effekt på KOL-patienters indlæggelser

Forebyggende pleje og tilbud om hjemmebehandling af KOL-patienter ser ud til at have effekt på både antallet af hospitalsindlæggelser og længden af indlæggelserne, viser undersøgelse fra Aarhus.

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Micronizing ocean plastics threaten sea turtle populations, ocean life cycle

Ingestion of degrading ocean plastics likely poses a substantial risk to the survival of post-hatchling sea turtles because the particles can lead to blockages and nutritional deficiencies, according to new research.

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New world record magnetic field

Scientists at the University of Tokyo have recorded the largest magnetic field ever generated indoors — a whopping 1,200 tesla, as measured in the standard units of magnetic field strength. The high magnetic field also has implications for nuclear fusion reactors, a tantalizing if unrealized potential future source of abundant clean energy. The experiments that set the new world record are descri

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The Movie Myths That Shaped Steve Bannon’s View of America

One of Steve Bannon’s favorite movies, as he repeatedly reminds viewers during the documentary American Dharma , is Twelve O’Clock High , Henry King’s searing 1949 World War II film about a down-on-their-luck group of bomber pilots who are whipped into fighting shape by the stern General Frank Savage (Gregory Peck). Bannon is entranced by Savage’s bluntness in the face of danger. On taking comman

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Nyt styresystem til iPhone: Her er de 4 vigtigste nye funktioner

Nyeste styresystem til iPhone og iPad er nu klar til at blive downloadet. Se frem til blandt andet at kunne styre din egen – og børnenes – tid med skærmen.

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Why did we evolve to feel shame?

Evolution built shame into human nature because it served an important function for our foraging ancestors, a new paper argues. Living in small, highly interdependent bands, the researchers explain, our ancestors faced frequent life-threatening reversals, and counted on fellow band members to value them enough during bad times to pull them through. So having others devalue our ancestors—deeming t

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Ice volcano activity on dwarf planet Ceres

Ice volcanoes on the dwarf planet Ceres generate enough material to fill one movie theater each year, new calculations show.

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Social anxiety: How to rewire your confidence

60% of us are shy or socially anxious. But one mental exercise can change that statistic, says Andrew Horn. Learn the metamorphic two-step: It's a hypnosis mental technique that can help you name and tame your social anxiety. Awareness of your conversation dynamics can stop small talk from reaching an awkward dead end. Don't switch topics when the flow stalls; instead, go deeper and learn to "tur

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Number of New Heroin Users Drops, but Overdose Deaths Continue to Climb

Government data provides fresh snapshot of annual drug-use behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA sees Post-Tropical Cyclone Helene affecting Ireland, United Kingdom

Post-tropical cyclone Helene developed off the west coast of Africa and moved north then northeast where it is now raining on parts of Ireland and the United Kingdom. Clouds and rainfall connected to Helene are already affecting those countries.

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Compact fiber laser may enable wearable tech and better endoscopes

By creating a new twist on fiber optic sensors, researchers in China have developed a smart, flexible photoacoustic imaging technique that may have potential applications in wearable devices, instrumentation and medical diagnostics.

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Why Mathematicians Can’t Find the Hay in a Haystack

The first time I heard a mathematician use the phrase, I was sure he’d misspoken. We were on the phone, talking about the search for shapes with certain properties, and he said, “It’s like looking for hay in a haystack.” “Don’t you mean a needle?” I almost interjected. Then he said it again. In mathematics, it turns out, conventional modes of thought sometimes get turned on their head. The mathem

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Spelling Bees Are Trendier Than Science Fairs

To be nerdy these days is to be cool . Pop culture’s adoration of nerds is ubiquitous in this era of high-tech gadgets . You can see it everywhere from The Big Bang Theory to The Bachelorette to the Scripps National Spelling Bee , the latter of which is broadcast on ESPN. Which is why it’s curious that competitions like the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF)—whose contestants each

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Childhood Trauma And Its Lifelong Health Effects More Prevalent Among Minorities

The largest study of its kind shows a high prevalence of adverse childhood experiences — or ACEs — across the population, but especially among some vulnerable groups. (Image credit: Elva Etienne/Getty Images)

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Significant disparities in college student mental health treatment across race/ethnicity

The first nationally representative study since the 1990s to examine mental health among college students of color, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, shows significant disparities in treatment across race/ethnicity.

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NASA catches Tropical Cyclone 01s's last breath in southern Indian Ocean

The first tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season, 01S, formed on Sept. 15 and was already fizzling two days later. Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed recently developed tropical cyclone 01S was already fading.

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UVA identifies brain's lymphatic vessels as new avenue to treat multiple sclerosis

The vessels appear to carry previously unknown messages from the brain to the immune system that ultimately cause the disease symptoms. Blocking those messages may offer doctors a new way to treat a potentially devastating condition that affects more than 2 million people.

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More than 4 billion birds stream overhead during fall migration

Using cloud computing and data from 143 weather radar stations across the continental United States, Cornell Lab of Ornithology researchers can now estimate how many birds migrate through the US and the toll that winter and these nocturnal journeys take. Their findings are published in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Do rock climbers seek out high-risk climbs?

The sport of rock climbing is gaining international attention, having been approved for inclusion in the 2020 Olympic Games. But news headlines about the sport are still dominated by reports of gruesome injuries and near-death falls. Are rock climbers going out of their way to seek these risks? A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal reveals that decreasing the level of in

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What Your Genes Mean For Your Education

A study from the U.K. is arguing that they've determined which genes have an impact on your education. Pay attention to the terms "twin studies" and "heritability." Even after you've had a look at those two terms, there's still some stuff here worth looking at and thinking about. Zip codes have an impact on educational outcomes . Having a teacher that looks like you has an impact on educational o

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Træning af vejrtrækning giver patienter med svær astma bedre sygdomskontrol

Dysfunktionel vejrtrækning hos patienter med svær astma kan bedres signifikant med fysioterapi og hjemmeøvelser, viser undersøgelse fra Bispebjerg Hospital præsenteret på ERS-kongressen.

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Lungelæger har behov for systematisk oplæring i brug af ultralyd

Analyse af den videnskabelige litteratur peger på stærkt uensartede krav til lægers teoretiske og praktiske kundskaber som forudsætning for at kunne lave lungeundersøgelser med ultralyd.

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The secret cities that built the atomic bomb

During WWII and the Cold War, the U.S. and the Soviet Union scrambled to develop nuclear-grade plutonium and uranium in highly secretive, closed cities The history behind Oak Ridge and City 40 highlight the world-altering impact of nuclear weapons If you're going on vacation in the East Ural Mountains, bring a Geiger counter None In 1942, the U.S. Government bought 60,000 acres of land in rural T

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Never-before-seen features found around a neutron star

An unusual infrared light emission from a nearby neutron star detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope could indicate new features never before seen.

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Artificial intelligence can determine lung cancer type

A new computer program can analyze images of patients' lung tumors, specify cancer types, and even identify altered genes driving abnormal cell growth, a new study shows.

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Soil holds the secret to mitigating climate change

New research suggests that crop yields and the global food supply chain can be preserved by harnessing the critical, and often overlooked, partner in food supply — soil.

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Roadmap for measuring animal, plant traits to meet biodiversity goals

An international team of researchers has outlined a plan for how to measure changes in key traits of animals and plants and provide these data to policymakers to improve natural resource management and keep nations on track to meet global biodiversity and sustainability goals.

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Anesthesia drugs: Muscle relaxants increase risk of respiratory complications

Muscle relaxants are a necessary part of anesthesia during certain major operations. Studies have, however, hinted at respiratory risks connected with these drugs. A major new study has confirmed the association between use of muscle relaxants and respiratory complications and assessed the chances of the current avoidance strategies.

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Developmental stage for No. 1 eye tumor in children

Investigators have been able to pinpoint the exact stage of development of the human retina, when cells can grow out of control and form cancer-like masses. The finding could open the door for future interventions in retinoblastoma (RB), a tumor of the retina that affects children under five years of age.

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Brain recovery: Activity, not rest, may speed recovery after brain injury

When recovering from a brain injury, getting back in the swing of things may be more effective than a prolonged period of rest, according to a new study in mice. These findings offer a compelling example of the brain's remarkable capacity to adapt in response to trauma. They also point to new, activity-centered treatment strategies that could one day result in faster and more complete recovery tim

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Scientists determine four personality types based on new data

Researchers have sifted through data from more than 1.5 million questionnaire respondents and found at least four distinct clusters of personality types exist: average, reserved, self-centered and role model. They are based on the five widely accepted basic personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The findings challenge existing paradigms in psy

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Earth's oldest animals formed complex ecological communities

Ediacara biota were forming complex communities tens of millions of years before the Cambrian explosion.

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Shifting focus from life extension to 'healthspan' extension

The Journal of the American Medical Association published an article by University of Illinois at Chicago epidemiologist S. Jay Olshansky on the need for researchers and clinicians to focus less on prolonging lifespan and more on prolonging 'healthspan.'

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NASA finds Tropical Depression Joyce continues to lose it

Visible and infrared satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Tropical Storm Joyce continues to become more disorganized.

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Number of New Heroin Users Drops, But Overdose Deaths Continue to Climb

Government data provides fresh snapshot of annual drug use behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To End Poverty, Increase Access to Energy

Concern about climate change has unintended consequences for the most impoverished countries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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It’s Healthy Aging Month!

Image: Shutterstock Every September is Healthy Aging Month , and there is no better time than the present to start living a healthier life for your brain. Whether you are 80 or 18, it’s never too late or too early to follow some basic principles. The Dana Foundation ’s Successful Aging & Your Brain booklet discusses what older adults can do to keep their brains sharp as they age. Although it is t

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Particles surf their own waves, reveal how microbes and cells move through human body

Surf's up for microbes swimming beside red blood cells. New calculations and experiments model for the first time how spherical particles submerged in gooey liquid travel along a flexible rubber sheet; comparable conditions are common in the human body, such as blood cells flowing through a capillary or the journeys of self-propelled microbes. All these particles, it turns out, catch a wave.

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Playing sound through the skin improves hearing in noisy places

submitted by /u/Pezz89 [link] [comments]

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The surprising environment of an enigmatic neutron star

An unusual infrared emission detected by the Hubble Space Telescope from a nearby neutron star could indicate that the pulsar has features never before seen. The observation could help astronomers better understand the evolution of neutron stars.

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Problematiske bakterier i livmoderen kan behandles sikkert med antibiotika

Bakterier, som enten kan smitte børn i løbet af graviditeten eller under fødslen og lede til for tidlige fødsler og vejrtrækningsproblemer, kan behandles sikkert med antibiotika.

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Nem undersøgelse reducerer indlæggelser og brug af antibiotika

Ny test for virusinfektioner kan sikre, at patienter ikke får unødvendig behandling med antibiotika. Testen kan også spare hospitaler for mange penge.

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Key Senate Republicans Express Support for Mueller Probe

As President Trump continues to rail against Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s partisan “witch hunt,” he’s undoubtedly assessing how that’s playing with a key constituency: Senate Republicans. When the president first started publicly toying with the idea of firing Mueller, Lindsey Graham was among the loudest of those saying, in so many words, don’t even think about it. A year ago, Graham was 100

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New school of thought: In-class physical exercise won't disrupt learning, teaching

As childhood obesity rates rise and physical education offerings dwindle, elementary schools keep searching for ways to incorporate the federally mandated half-hour of physical activity into the school day.

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Hubble uncovers never-before-seen features around a neutron star

An unusual infrared light emission from a nearby neutron star detected by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope could indicate new features never before seen.

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New understanding of light allows researchers to see around corners

Covert sensing of objects around a corner may soon become a reality.Aristide Dogariu, a University of Central Florida Pegasus Professor of Optics and Photonics, and his colleagues published a paper in Nature Communications this month demonstrating how to passively sense an object even when direct vision is impeded.

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UA study: Sleep apnea, congenital heart disease may be deadly mix for hospitalized infants

Infants with congenital heart disease and central sleep apnea are four times more likely to die in the hospital, researchers find.

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Study provides roadmap for measuring animal, plant traits to meet biodiversity goals

An international team of researchers has outlined a plan for how to measure changes in key traits of animals and plants and provide these data to policymakers to improve natural resource management and keep nations on track to meet global biodiversity and sustainability goals.

1d

Particles surf their own waves, reveal how microbes and cells move through human body

Surf's up for microbes swimming beside red blood cells. New calculations and experiments model for the first time how spherical particles submerged in gooey liquid travel along a flexible rubber sheet; comparable conditions are common in the human body, such as blood cells flowing through a capillary or the journeys of self-propelled microbes. All these particles, it turns out, catch a wave.

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Epidural stimulation leads to recovery of cardiovascular function in spinal-cord-injured

Four research participants with chronic, complete cervical spinal cord injury, persistent low resting blood pressure and blood pressure decrease when sitting up experienced improvements in blood pressure and heart rate regulation during and after spinal cord epidural stimulation (scES).

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Artificial intelligence can determine lung cancer type

A new computer program can analyze images of patients' lung tumors, specify cancer types, and even identify altered genes driving abnormal cell growth, a new study shows.

1d

Knowing your neighbor cares about the environment encourages people to use less energy

Giving people information about how much gas or electricity their neighbors use encourages them to use less energy, research shows.

1d

Ceres takes life an ice volcano at a time

In new study by University of Arizona planetary scientists, observations prove that ice volcanoes on the dwarf planet Ceres generate enough material to fill one movie theater each year.

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Earth's oldest animals formed complex ecological communities

Ediacara biota were forming complex communities tens of millions of years before the Cambrian explosion.

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Machine learning technique to predict human cell organization published in nature methods

Scientists at the Allen Institute have used machine learning to train computers to see parts of the cell the human eye cannot easily distinguish. Using 3D images of fluorescently labeled cells, the research team taught computers to find structures inside living cells without fluorescent labels, using only black and white images generated by an inexpensive technique known as brightfield microscopy.

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Tiny fossils reveal how shrinking was essential for successful evolution

A new study published today in Nature shows that getting smaller was a key factor contributing to the exceptional evolution of mammals over the last 200 million years.

1d

Updated Estimates of frequency of adverse childhood experiences

A new survey study suggests childhood adversity is common across sociodemographic groups but that some people are at higher risk of having experienced childhood adversity. The study updates the estimated frequency of adverse childhood experiences in the US adult population using a representative sample of people from 23 states.

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Small study evaluates use of medical scribes in primary care

Medical scribes transcribe information during clinical visits in real time into electronic health records (EHRs) under physician supervision. A small study of 18 primary care physicians evaluated the association of using medical scribes with physician workflow and patient experience.

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New method more than doubles sugar production from plants

EPFL chemists have developed a method that can significantly increase the yield of sugars from plants, improving the production of renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials.

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Cannabis use in e-cigarettes by US youth

An analysis of survey data estimates nearly 1 in 11 US middle and high school students used cannabis in electronic-cigarettes in 2016. Among e-cigarette users, nearly 1 in 3 high school students and nearly 1 in 4 middle school students reported having ever used cannabis in e-cigarettes. Data were from a 2016 survey of students in the 6th through 12th grades which used a nationally representative s

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Large-scale shift causing lower-oxygen water to invade Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence

Rapid deoxygenation in the Gulf of the St. Lawrence is caused by shifts in two of the ocean's most powerful currents: the Gulf Stream and the Labrador Current. A detailed model shows that large-scale climate change is causing oxygen to drop in the deeper parts of this biologically rich waterway.

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Paris climate targets could be exceeded sooner than expected

A new study has for the first time comprehensively accounted for permafrost carbon release when estimating emission budgets for climate targets. The results show that the world might be closer to exceeding the budget for the long-term target of the Paris climate agreement than previously thought.

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X-rays uncover a hidden property that leads to failure in a lithium-ion battery material

X-ray experiments at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that the pathways lithium ions take through a common battery material are more complex than previously thought.

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Study IDs why some TB bacteria prove deadly

A new study has found that the same mutation that gives TB bacteria drug resistance also elicits a different — and potentially weaker — immune response.

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We are predisposed to forgive, new research suggests

When assessing the moral character of others, people cling to good impressions but readily adjust their opinions about those who have behaved badly, according to new research.This flexibility in judging transgressors might help explain both how humans forgive — and why they sometimes stay in bad relationships, said the study's authors.

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Gene therapy via skin protects mice from lethal cocaine doses

A study in Nature Biomedical Engineering shows that skin stem cells, modified via CRISPR and transplanted back to donor mice, can protect addicted mice from cocaine-seeking and overdose.

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Liver allocation system disadvantages children awaiting transplants

Children are at a considerable disadvantage when competing with adults for livers from deceased organ donors in the US allocation system for liver transplants.

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Scientists determine four personality types based on new data

Northwestern University researchers have sifted through data from more than 1.5 million questionnaire respondents and found at least four distinct clusters of personality types exist: average, reserved, self-centered and role model. They are based on the five widely accepted basic personality traits: neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness. The findings challenge e

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Study of 1 million people leads to world's biggest advance in blood pressure genetics

Over 500 new gene regions that influence people's blood pressure have been discovered in the largest global genetic study of blood pressure to date, led by Queen Mary University of London and Imperial College London.

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Scientists reveal way to map vast unknown territory of long non-coding RNA

Scientists from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a powerful method for exploring the properties of mysterious molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), some of which have big roles in cancer and other serious conditions.

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How the brain bounces back

When recovering from a brain injury, getting back in the swing of things may be more effective than a prolonged period of rest, according to a new Columbia study in mice. These findings offer a compelling example of the brain's remarkable capacity to adapt in response to trauma. They also point to new, activity-centered treatment strategies that could one day result in faster and more complete rec

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Resynchronizing neurons to erase schizophrenia

Today, a decisive step in understanding schizophrenia has been taken. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have succeeded not only in deciphering a cellular mechanism leading to the desynchronization of neural networks, but also in correcting this organizational defect in an adult animal model, thereby suppressing abnormal behaviors associated with schizophrenia. Results that show that

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Nanoparticle therapeutic restores function of tumor suppressor in prostate cancer

Leveraging advances in mRNA and nanotechnology, investigators demonstrate that tumor suppressor PTEN can be restored in preclinical models of prostate cancer.

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Honeybee swarms act like superorganisms to stay together in high winds

A honeybee swarm behaves like a superorganism by changing shape in response to physical stress – although doing so means individuals take on a greater burden

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Skin genetically engineered to destroy cocaine could prevent addiction

Engineered skin cells inserted beneath the skin of mice help destroy cocaine in the blood before it reaches the brain – and the therapy might work in people too

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Escape from the heat island

Dangerously high temperatures, especially in cities, often cause conditions such as heat stroke and heat exhaustion or exacerbate preexisting medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease. Between 1999 and 2010, at least 8,081 people died in the United States due to heat-related illnesses.

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The effectiveness of online cannabis responsible vendor training program

A new study on the quality of online responsible marijuana vendor for cannabis (RMV) training has just been released. The study used an online RMV training that was developed in consultation with state regulators, store personnel, and local law enforcement in Colorado and Washington state. The training focused on knowledge of state statutes and regulations, ID checking, the health effects of marij

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Air pollution affects thyroid development in fetuses

Soot and dust alters thyroid development in fetuses before they are born in smoggy cities, raising concern about health impacts later in life, new research shows. Scientists focused on more than 2,000 kids in smoggy Southern California as part of USC's ongoing Children's Health Study.

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New blood test detects early stage pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is currently very difficult to detect while it is still resectable. A new blood test can detect pancreatic cancer in the very earliest stages of the disease.

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Method for video promo clips via facial expression tracking

Researchers have developed a method to effectively compress the plot of a feature-length film in just a few, sometimes, silent seconds.

1d

Knowing your neighbor cares about the environment encourages people to use less energy

Giving people information about how much gas or electricity their neighbours use encourages them to use less energy, research shows.

1d

Study provides roadmap for measuring animal, plant traits to meet biodiversity goals

An international team of researchers has outlined a plan for how to measure changes in key traits of animals and plants and provide these data to policymakers to improve natural resource management and keep nations on track to meet global biodiversity and sustainability goals.

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Saudi sovereign fund invests $1B in US electric car firm (Update)

Saudi Arabia's sovereign wealth fund invested over $1 billion Monday in an American electric car manufacturer just weeks after Tesla CEO Elon Musk earlier claimed the kingdom would help his own firm go private.

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The truth about human pheromones

submitted by /u/thisisme54321 [link] [comments]

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Ny rapport: Verdens energibehov går ned fra 2035 – og elbiler får en stor del af æren

Ifølge det norske konsulentfirma DNV GL vil elbilsalget tage fart om få år.

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Cure for cocaine addiction in reach, say scientists

Gene therapists have developed a stem cell implant that could help overcome addiction and prevent overdoses A radical gene therapy for drug addiction has been shown to dampen down cravings for cocaine and protect against overdoses of the substance that would normally be lethal. The therapy uses implants of stem cells which have been genetically engineered to release a powerful enzyme that removes

1d

Facebook Broadens Its Bug Bounty to Include Third-Party Apps

Starting Monday, Facebook will pay at least $600 to researchers who spot third-party apps behaving badly on its platform.

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Google AI Tool Identifies a Tumor's Mutations From an Image

The algorithm can distinguish between different kinds of lung cancer, and could speed up a patient's diagnosis by weeks.

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3,2,1: SpaceX counts down to reveal mystery Moon traveller (Update)

SpaceX says it will reveal on Monday the name of the mysterious passenger it plans to send into orbit around the Moon, an ambitious project spearheaded by eccentric CEO Elon Musk.

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Scientists followed a leatherback turtle through Hurricane Florence—here's what they saw

Animals Satellites, sharks, and turtles, oh my. “We’re monitoring where she is right now, and it just happens to be in the middle of a hurricane,” Kelly Martin says.

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Anesthesia drugs: Muscle relaxants increase risk of respiratory complications

Muscle relaxants are a necessary part of anesthesia during certain major operations. Studies have, however, hinted at respiratory risks connected with these drugs. POPULAR, a major prospective observational European study supported by the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) and led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM), has confirmed the association between use of muscle relaxants and

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Is resveratrol an effective add-on to NSAIDS to treat knee osteoarthritis?

In what researchers state is the first pilot clinical trial to assess the effects of resveratrol on pain severity and levels of inflammatory biomarkers in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis, the scientists compared treatment with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) combined with either resveratrol or placebo over 90 days.

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Soil holds the secret to mitigating climate change

New research from Michigan State University suggests that crop yields and the global food supply chain can be preserved by harnessing the critical, and often overlooked, partner in food supply — soil.

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Keep cool: Researchers develop magnetic cooling cycle

A novel technology could provide a solution for cooling processes: refrigeration using magnetic materials in magnetic fields. Researchers have developed the idea of a cooling cycle based on the 'magnetic memory' of special alloys.

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Graphene helps protect photocathodes for physics experiments

Researchers have used thin sheets of graphene to prevent photocathode materials from interacting with air, which increases their lifetimes. Photocathodes are used to convert light to electricity in accelerators and other physics experiments.

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World's first passive anti-frosting surface fights ice with ice

Nothing foretells the coming of winter like frost on windshields. While the inconvenience of scraping or defrosting car windows may define cold mornings for many drivers, the toll frost takes on the larger economy is more than just a nuisance. From delayed flights to power outages, ice buildup can cost consumers and companies billions of dollars every year in lost efficiency and mechanical breakdo

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Injuries associated with infant walkers still sending children to the emergency department

A recent study found that more than 230,000 children younger than 15 months old were treated in hospital emergency departments in the United States for infant walker-related injuries from 1990 through 2014. The number of infant walker-related injuries decreased dramatically during the study period, dropping from 20,650 in 1990 to 2,001 in 2014.

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New photonic chip promises more robust quantum computers

Scientists have developed a topological photonic chip to process quantum information, promising a more robust option for scalable quantum computers. The research team has for the first time demonstrated that quantum information can be encoded, processed and transferred at a distance with topological circuits on the chip.

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Here’s how clumps of honeybees may survive blowing in the wind

Honeybees clumped on trees may adjust their positions to keep the cluster together when it’s jostled by wind, a new study suggests.

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Here’s how many U.S. kids are vaping marijuana

A new study suggests that nearly 1 in 11 middle and high school students in the United States has vaped marijuana, raising concerns about addiction.

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The ghosts of nearly two dozen icy volcanoes haunt dwarf planet Ceres

The slumped remains of 21 ice volcanoes suggest that the dwarf planet Ceres has been volcanically active for billions of years.

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Gene-Edited Skin Patch Prevents Cocaine Overdose in Mice

With a built-in supply of a powerful cocaine-chomping enzyme, the transplant might also curb addiction.

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Soil holds the secret to mitigating climate change

Food production doesn't have to be a victim of climate change. New research from Michigan State University suggests that crop yields and the global food supply chain can be preserved by harnessing the critical, and often overlooked, partner in food supply—soil.

1d

Machine learning technique to predict human cell organization published in nature methods

Scientists at the Allen Institute have used machine learning to train computers to see parts of the cell the human eye cannot easily distinguish. Using 3-D images of fluorescently labeled cells, the research team taught computers to find structures inside living cells without fluorescent labels, using only black and white images generated by an inexpensive technique known as brightfield microscopy

1d

X-rays uncover a hidden property that leads to failure in a lithium-ion battery material

Over the past three decades, lithium-ion batteries, rechargeable batteries that move lithium ions back and forth to charge and discharge, have enabled smaller devices that juice up faster and last longer.

1d

Large-scale shift causing lower-oxygen water to invade Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence

The Gulf of St. Lawrence has warmed and lost oxygen faster than almost anywhere else in the global oceans. The broad, biologically rich waterway in Eastern Canada drains North America's Great Lakes and is popular with fishing boats, whales and tourists.

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Single mutation protects TB bacteria from antibiotics, immune assault

People who fall sick with drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) face daunting odds. Only about two in three survive the illness, unlike people with drug-sensitive TB, of whom more than 90 percent survive.

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Earth's oldest animals formed complex ecological communities

A new analysis is shedding light on the earth's first macroscopic animals: the 570-million-year-old, enigmatic Ediacara biota.

1d

Paris climate targets could be exceeded sooner than expected

A new study has for the first time comprehensively accounted for permafrost carbon release when estimating emission budgets for climate targets. The results show that the world might be closer to exceeding the budget for the long-term target of the Paris climate agreement than previously thought.

1d

Tiny fossils reveal how shrinking was essential for successful evolution

A new study published today in Nature shows that getting smaller was a key factor contributing to the exceptional evolution of mammals over the last 200 million years.

1d

Scientists reveal way to map vast unknown territory of long non-coding RNA

Scientists from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have developed a powerful method for exploring the properties of mysterious molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), some of which have big roles in cancer and other serious conditions. Until now, scientists have lacked the proper methods for identifying the functions of the tens of thousands of different lncRNAs produced

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New method more than doubles sugar production from plants

Producing fuels and chemicals from biomass (wood, grasses, etc.) is one of the most promising solutions for building a renewable economy. The process involves deconstructing plants to produce single carbohydrates, mostly in the form of simple sugars like xylose and glucose. But even though these sugars are valuable, current processes for plant deconstruction often end up degrading them.

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Skal du opdatere din iPhone? Denne gang risikerer den at blive hurtigere

Årets store opdatering af styresystemet til iPhone er nu klar til download. Som altid er der grund til at slå kold vand i blodet – selvom iOS 12 muligvis giver din telefon et boost.

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Eelgrass wasting disease has new enemies: Drones and artificial intelligence

Every year, the world loses an estimated 7 percent of its seagrasses. While the reasons are manifold, one culprit has long confounded scientists: eelgrass wasting disease. This September a team of biologists is zeroing in on the problem, in the first study of the disease to stretch along the Pacific Coast from southern California to Alaska, with a $1.3 million grant from the National Science Found

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How plants harness microbes to get nutrients

A Rutgers-led team has discovered how plants harness microbes in soil to get nutrients, a process that could be exploited to boost crop growth, fight weeds and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides.

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Your fingerprints reveal more than you think | Simona Francese

Our fingerprints are what make us unique — but they're also home to a world of information hidden in molecules that reveal our actions, lifestyles and routines. In this riveting talk, chemist Simona Francese shows how she studies these microscopic traces using mass spectrometry, a technology that analyzes fingerprints in previously impossible detail, and demonstrates how this cutting-edge forensi

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'Accessory To War' An Uncomfortable Wake-Up Call For Some

An "unspoken alliance" between scientists and the military had been brewing for millennia prior to Hiroshima. Neil deGrasse Tyson and Avis Lang excel at detailing this union and its possible future. (Image credit: Araya Diaz/Getty Images)

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Multi-joint, personalized soft exosuit breaks new ground

In the future, smart textile-based soft robotic exosuits could be worn by soldiers, fire fighters and rescue workers to help them traverse difficult terrain and arrive fresh at their destinations so that they can perform their respective tasks more effectively. They could also become a powerful means to enhance mobility and quality of living for people suffering from neurodegenerative disorders an

1d

Genetic mutations thwart scientific efforts to fully predict our future

The effects of genetic mutations are strongly influenced by pre-existing genetic differences among individuals and the environment, a study finds.

1d

Gunshot victims require much more blood and are more likely to die than other trauma patients

A study using Maryland data finds that gunshot victims are approximately five times more likely to require blood transfusions, they require 10 times more blood units and are 14 times more likely to die than people seriously injured by motor vehicles, non-gun assaults, falls or stabs.

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How plants harness microbes to get nutrients

A Rutgers-led team has discovered how plants harness microbes in soil to get nutrients, a process that could be exploited to boost crop growth, fight weeds and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides.

1d

Sperm quality study updates advice for couples trying to conceive

New clinical and molecular evidence shows sperm quality and reproductive outcomes are improved when semen is provided after just 1-3 hours of abstinence.

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Counting (on) sheep? Promising gene therapy for visually impaired sheep now safe for human trials

A promising gene therapy for visually impaired sheep is now safe for human trials.

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Lupus discovery could help manage disease in African patients

New discoveries about the most common form of the autoimmune disease lupus could improve diagnosis and treatment of the condition in black Africans.

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RUDN University physicists gave a more accurate solution of the quantum three-body problem

RUDN University researchers have developed a mathematical method that allowed to solve the quantum Coulomb three body problem for bound states with high accuracy. They also showed that previous calculations performed by a group of Japanese scientists is incorrect. The work will help to calculate the trajectories of quantum particles motion in space accurately. Its results will be useful in solving

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A protective shield for sensitive enzymes in biofuel cells

Researchers have developed a new mechanism to protect enzymes from oxygen as biocatalysts in fuel cells. The enzymes, known as hydrogenases, are just as efficient as precious metal catalysts, but unstable when they come into contact with oxygen. They are therefore not yet suitable for technological applications. The new protective mechanism is based on oxygen-consuming enzymes that draw their ener

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Sådan laver man en kemisk binding til et 'spøgelsesatom'

På en smart måde kan man snyde en ydre elektron i et atom til at tro, at den er bundet til et andet ikke-eksisterende atom.

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One big reason why women drop out of doctoral STEM programs

Many women in doctoral degree programs in fields like engineering and physics are in a class of their own—and that's not a good thing.

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When is a star not a star? The line that separates stars from brown dwarfs may soon be clearer

The line that separates stars from brown dwarfs may soon be clearer thanks to new work led by Carnegie's Serge Dieterich. Published by the Astrophysical Journal, his team's findings demonstrate that brown dwarfs can be more massive than astronomers previously thought.

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New light on the controversial question of species abundance and population density

Inspired by the negative results in the recently published largest-scale analysis of the relation between population density and positions in geographic ranges and environmental niches, Drs Jorge Soberon and Andrew Townsend Peterson of the University of Kansas, USA, teamed up with Luis Osorio-Olvera, National University of Mexico (UNAM), and identified several issues in the methodology used, able

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Blood test could aid cattle health and productivity, study suggests

A simple blood test could be used in the future to predict the health and productivity of dairy cows, research shows.

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Graphene helps protect photocathodes for physics experiments

Transforming light into electricity is no mean feat. Some devices, like solar cells, use a closed circuit to generate an electric current from incoming light. But another class of materials, called photocathodes, generate large quantities of free electrons that can be used for state-of-the-art science.

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Psykologer kortlægger menneskets mørke personlighedstræk

Egoisme, narcissisme, Machiavellisme, selvpromovering, ondsindethed, psykopati, sadisme og skruppelløshed…

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Condensation enhancement: Toward practical energy and water applications

Vapor-to-liquid condensation has been widely exploited in various energy-intensive industrial applications. Promoting dropwise condensation by surface modification has thus been of great interest since its discovery. However, the long-standing challenge for better condensation heat transfer performance is to improve both droplet growth and surface refreshing. Ronggui Yang and colleagues demonstrat

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Scientists locate parent lightning strokes of sprites

A research team from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the location results for the parent lightning strokes of more than 30 red sprites observed over an asymmetric mesoscale convective system (MCS) on July 30, 2015 in Shandong Province, China. This is probably the most productive sprite-producing thunderstorm system ever reported in China.

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Artificial neural network now capable of finding medication complaints in social networks

'Cannot get asleep all night', 'a little giddy' and other complaints in social networks can now be translated into formal medical terms, such as insomnia or vertigo. The task of comparing syndromes mentioned by patients and specific medical terms is called the normalization of medical concepts.

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Blood test could aid cattle health and productivity, study suggests

A simple blood test could be used in the future to predict the health and productivity of dairy cows, research by experts at the University's Roslin Institute and Scotland's Rural College shows.

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Undiagnosed STIs can increase negative PMS symptoms

Women that have undiagnosed sexually transmitted infections may be at greater risk of experiencing negative premenstrual symptoms (PMS), according to new Oxford University research. The study was conducted as part of a long term partnership with the female health, fertility and period-tracking app, CLUE. The findings, published in Evolution Medicine & Public Health, suggest that the presence of an

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Novel carbon source sustains deep-sea microorganism communities

A carbon source stemming from daily fish migrations is implicated in the global carbon cycle.

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Keep cool: Researchers develop magnetic cooling cycle

A novel technology could provide a solution for cooling processes: refrigeration using magnetic materials in magnetic fields. Researchers at the Technische Universität (TU) Darmstadt and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have developed the idea of a cooling cycle based on the 'magnetic memory' of special alloys. Relevant initial experimental results have been published in the journal

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When is a star not a star?

The line that separates stars from brown dwarfs may soon be clearer thanks to new work led by Carnegie's Serge Dieterich. His team's findings demonstrate that brown dwarfs can be more massive than astronomers previously thought.

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New blood test detects early stage pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is currently very difficult to detect while it is still resectable. A new blood test developed by researchers at Lund University in Sweden, Herlev Hospital, Knight Cancer Center and Immunovia AB, can detect pancreatic cancer in the very earliest stages of the disease. The results have been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Asteroid Hides Behind Sparkling Spiral Galaxy in This Dazzling Telescope View

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile has a busy observation schedule, but sometimes cloudy or moonlit skies mean a temporary halt to scientific measurements. Then, it grabs images like this.

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Are today's white kids less racist than their grandparents?

In America's children, we often see hope for a better future, especially when it comes to reducing racism.

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The Human Eye Can See 'Ghost Images'

Scientists have discovered that the human eye has a spooky ability.

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How the zebrafish got its stripes

Stripes are common in our lives. It's a pretty basic pattern, and easy to take for granted.

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Digitizing the vast 'dark data' in museum fossil collections

The great museums of the world harbor a secret: They're home to millions upon millions of natural history specimens that almost never see the light of day. They lie hidden from public view, typically housed behind or above the public exhibit halls, or in off-site buildings.

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Paracetamol i barndommen koblet til øget risiko for at få astma

Forbrug af paracetamol i barndommen kan øge risikoen for udvikling af astma senere i livet. Specielt én specifik genvariant ser ud til at spille en stor rolle i forhold til risikoen for at udvikle lungeproblemer.

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Peter Gøtzsche fortsætter som chef for Det Nordiske Cochrane Center

Peter Gøtzsche er blevet ekskluderet fra det internationale Cochrane, men arbejdet i Det Nordiske Cochrane Center fortsætter som hidtil med ham som chef, bekræfter Peter Gøtzsche.

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Closest planet ever discovered outside solar system could be habitable with a dayside ocean

In August of 2016, astronomers from the European Southern Observatory (ESO) confirmed the existence of an Earth-like planet around Proxima Centauri – the closest star to our solar system. In addition, they confirmed that this planet (Proxima b) orbited within its star's habitable zone. Since then, multiple studies have been conducted to determine if Proxima b could in fact be habitable.

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Protein for deeper insights into the brain

To be able to examine the function of individual cells or structures in intact tissue, these need to be visible. This may sound trivial, but it is not. To achieve this, researchers implant fluorescent proteins into cells. These will then produce the proteins themselves, without the cell functions being disturbed: cells, structures or their activities thus become visible under the microscope. Howev

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DowDuPont names leaders for Corteva Agriscience, DuPont

DowDuPont has named the chief executives who will lead its agriculture and specialty products businesses once they're split off from the company.

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Czech Republic to restrict use of glyphosate weedkiller

The Czech Republic will limit the use of substances containing the controversial glyphosate weedkiller as of next year, the agriculture ministry said on Monday.

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Brett Kavanaugh and the Revealing Logic of ‘Boys Will Be Boys’

There’s been a lot of talk , over the weekend, about youthful indiscretion—about kids being kids , about boys being boys , about the liminal space that separates adulthood and its stark accountabilities from the heady years that precede them. The discussion’s most recent round has come because, on Sunday, a research psychologist and professor named Christine Blasey Ford revealed that she was the

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Woman's Liver Problems Tied to Her Turmeric Supplement

For one woman in Arizona, taking a turmeric supplement may have triggered an uncommon liver problem.

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If You Throw a Compostable Cup in the Trash, Does It Still Break Down?

Compostable products are all the rage these days. But what happens to these items — including compostable straws and silverware — when they're thrown into a landfill instead of a compost heap?

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Germany rolls out world's first hydrogen train

Germany on Monday rolled out the world's first hydrogen-powered train, signalling the start of a push to challenge the might of polluting diesel trains with costlier but more eco-friendly technology.

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Breaking the symmetry between fundamental forces

A fraction of a second after the Big Bang, a single unified force may have shattered. Scientists from the CDF and DZero Collaborations used data from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider to re-create the early universe conditions. They measured the weak mixing angle that controls the breaking of the unified force. Measuring this angle, a key parameter of the standard model, improves our understanding of

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Sinemia's Unlimited Movie Ticket Plan Costs $30 a MonthSinemia MoviePass Plan

MoviePass competitor Sinemia is introducing an unlimited plan of its own, but it'll cost you.

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A novel approach of improving battery performance

A team of researchers affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has introduced a novel technology that promises to significantly boost the performance of lithium metal batteries.

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You can't tell whether an online restaurant review is fake — but this AI can

Researchers find AI-generated reviews and comments pose a significant threat to consumers, but machine learning can help detect the fakes.

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Organic ferromagnetism: Trapping spins in the glassy state of an organic network structure

A team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) presents alternative approaches for versatile future applications of plastic magnets.

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The effectiveness of online cannabis responsible vendor training program

A new study on the quality of online responsible marijuana vendor for cannabis (RMV) training has just been released. The study used an online RMV training that was developed in consultation with state regulators, store personnel, and local law enforcement in Colorado and Washington state. The training focused on knowledge of state statutes and regulations, ID checking, the health effects of marij

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How a 1965 law—and TV—changed US immigration

A new book and website explores how the Immigration Act of 1965—along with technological advances in communications and transportation affecting immigration—continue to shape American society today. When President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the law on October 3 of that year, it eliminated quotas that effectively kept Asians, Africans, and other ethnic groups out of the United States. Johnson downpl

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Predicting flood risk better

Engineers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new statistical model that predicts how likely extreme flood events are in Germany. In contrast to earlier models, they distinguish between several types of floods with different causes, such as heavy rain, snow or spatially extended rain events with long durations. The model improves the assessment of flood risks and to plan appropriate protec

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Maker Faire 2018 preview: A car-crushing hand, cotton-candy robot, and DIY catapult competition

DIY Eight amazing displays to check out. This weekend, New York City will host World Maker Faire. Here are a few of the displays you should check out while you're there.

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New light on the controversial question of species abundance and population density

Inspired by the negative results in the recently published largest-scale analysis of the relation between population density and positions in geographic ranges and environmental niches, a team of US and Mexican scientists identified several issues in the methodology used, able to turn the tables in the ongoing debate. Their findings are published in the innovative open access journal Rethinking Ec

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Understanding surface science to manufacture quality cosmetics

A team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has identified variables that control the cavity-filling rates, required for liquids to penetrate into the cavities.

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A complex interplay between transport and dispersion across wiggling nanopores

Physicist Richard Feynman highlighted the importance of fluctuations in living matter when he stated, "Everything that living things do can be understood in terms of the jigglings and wigglings of atoms." This holds true for the widely investigated transport driven by fluctuations in biological nanopores and for similar observations in non-living fluid phases, where bulk hydrodynamic fluctuations

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Why nuclear energy should be part of Africa's energy mix

Africa has the least nuclear power of any continent in the world, with the exception of Australia where nuclear power is banned. All the largest economies in the world have nuclear power as part of their energy mix.

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Pepper-picking robot demonstrates its skills in greenhouse labour automation

With the rising shortage of skilled workforce in agriculture, there's a growing need for robotisation to perform labour-intensive and repetitive tasks in greenhouses. Enter SWEEPER, the EU-funded project developing a sweet pepper-harvesting robot that can help farmers reduce their costs.

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Mummified penguins tell of past and future deadly weather

New research links the mummified remains of penguin chicks in Antarctica to two massive weather-related calamities that could become more commonplace with climate change.

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Statsministeren opretter særlig enhed til sundhedsreformen

Et nyoprettet sekretariat i Finansministeriet skal komme med løsninger til den kommende sundhedsreform.

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NOx-fix til nye Skodaer gjorde blot problemet værre

Ny EU-rapport viser, at en diesel-Skoda med det teknologi-fix, som skulle gøre bilene lovlige, udsender mere NOx end før den blev opgraderet.

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Novel carbon source sustains deep-sea microorganism communities

The first in-depth analyses of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) cycling in the Red Sea highlights the important role of migrating shoals of fish in sustaining deep-ocean microorganisms and potentially the global carbon cycle.

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A protective shield for sensitive enzymes in biofuel cells

An international team of researchers has developed a new mechanism to protect enzymes from oxygen as biocatalysts in fuel cells. The enzymes, known as hydrogenases, are just as efficient as precious metal catalysts, but unstable when they come into contact with oxygen. They are therefore not yet suitable for technological applications. The new protective mechanism is based on oxygen-consuming enzy

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Wheat genome blueprint accelerates innovation

"The wheat blueprint will enable us to decipher the genetic basis of important traits in wheat, such as genes responsible for resistance to fungal diseases and pests. That is the disruptive part. What took years to do before can now be done in a matter of a few weeks," said Pozniak, a wheat breeder at the Crop Development Centre (CDC) in the U of S College of Agriculture and Bioresources.

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Structural map of bacterial toxins raises hopes for new anti-infectives

The bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa can cause serious and difficult to treat infections. The infection process involves the activation of toxic substances from the bacteria by a common protein in our cells. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now show how this happens and that the activation can be stopped with drug-like molecules. The results are presented in Nature Communications.

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Opioid users could benefit from meth-relapse prevention strategy, study finds

New research raises the possibility that a wider group of people battling substance use disorders may benefit from a Scripps Research-developed relapse-prevention compound than previously thought.

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Aspirin found not to prolong healthy aging

Taking a low-dose aspirin daily does not prolong healthy living in older adults, according to findings from the ASPirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) trial published online Sept. 16 in three papers in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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Multi-joint, personalized soft exosuit breaks new ground

in a studies, Conor Walsh's team at the Wyss Institute presented their latest generation of a mobile multi-joint exosuit, which has been improved on all fronts and tested in the field through long marches over uneven terrain. The researchers developed an automatic tuning method to customize its assistance based on how an individual's body is responding to it, and demonstrated significant energy sa

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Genetic mutations thwart scientific efforts to fully predict our future

The effects of genetic mutations are strongly influenced by pre-existing genetic differences among individuals and the environment, a study finds.

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World's first passive anti-frosting surface fights ice with ice

Researchers see immediate applications for the technology in the HVAC industry. Other applications include aerospace materials, like airplane wings. And with a little more development, car windshields are also an option for the anti-frosting technology, which has already been granted a full patent.

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Researchers find children experience concussion symptoms three times longer than adults

Parents should be aware that significant changes in concussion treatment have emerged in recent years. Primarily, there has been a major shift to promoting active recovery — including a quick return to social, academic, and athletic activities, as well as specialized rehabilitation. Also important is an understanding that children take three times longer than adults to recover from concussion sym

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Scientific analysis shows probiotic use is associated with fewer antibiotic prescriptions

New analysis shows that infants and children who receive probiotics as a preventative measure are less likely to receive antibiotic prescriptions. Probiotics deserve consideration as a strategy for addressing the problem of antibiotic over-use.

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Air pollution affects thyroid development in fetuses, USC research finds

Soot and dust alters thyroid development in fetuses before they are born in smoggy cities, raising concern about health impacts later in life, new USC research shows. Scientists focused on more than 2,000 kids in smoggy Southern California as part of USC's ongoing Children's Health Study.

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Climate change, water and the spread of diseases: Connecting the dots differently

A half-century ago, concerns about climate change, environment vulnerability, population density and the sustainability of earth systems reached a broad audience. This was clear from books like the Silent Spring published in 1962, and The Limits to Growth published 10 years later.

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Wildfire season: Is this the new normal?

More than 500 wildfires were still burning in B.C. in September, with the Yukon, Alberta, Ontario, Quebec, and parts of the Atlantic provinces all experiencing one of the worst fire seasons in history. Globally, wildfires in the United States, the United Kingdom, Spain, Portugal, Greece, Sweden and Australia are burning at an alarming rate.

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Tiny moth from Asia spreading fast on Siberian elms in eastern North America

Since 2010, a tiny moth originating from East Asia has been spreading over eastern North America. Its green larvae, or caterpillars, make narrow tunnels in the leaves of Siberian elms. Sometimes very abundant, they can be seen to descend en masse from the trees when they are done feeding. The moth species was described independently from Russia as Stigmella multispicata in 2014.

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Witnessing violence in high school as bad as being bullied

Over the long term, being a bystander of high-school violence can be as damaging to mental health as being directly bullied, a new study finds.

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More than half of parents of sleep-deprived teens blame electronics

Fifty-six percent of parents of teens who have sleep troubles believe the use of electronics is hurting their child's shut-eye.

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One big reason why women drop out of doctoral STEM programs

Many women in doctoral degree programs in fields like engineering and physics are in a class of their own — and that's not a good thing. A new study found that the fewer females who enter a doctoral program at the same time, the less likely any one of them will graduate within six years.

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Slowest-spinning radio pulsar detected by astronomers

An international team of astronomers has discovered a new radio pulsar as part of the LOFAR Tied-Array All-Sky Survey (LOTAAS). The newly detected object, designated PSR J0250+5854, turns out to be the slowest-spinning radio pulsar known to date. The finding is reported in a paper published September 4 on arXiv.org.

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African countries aren't doing enough to prepare for rising sea levels

Sea levels are rising around the world. In the last quarter century, on the north-eastern African coastline, sea levels have risen by as much as 12cm. The future looks even more worrying.

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Volcano under glacier offers clues to thicker Antarctic ice

Researchers have found a new clue that may explain strange behavior in the ice in one area of Antarctica. A volcano under the ice sheet has left an almost 6,000-year record of the glacier’s motion, a new study reports. A region of West Antarctica is behaving differently from most of the rest of the continent: A large patch of ice there is thickening, unlike other parts of West Antarctica that are

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Poorest older Americans most likely to use opioids

Among older Americans, the poorest are the most likely to use prescription opiods, according to a new study. The findings raise important questions about access to pain management options for the disadvantaged in the current climate of the opioid epidemic. “The poor had about double the rate of opioid use compared to wealthier groups,” says lead study author Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk, an assistant pr

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Landmark Australian-US study of 19,000 over 70s reveals can aspirin prolong good health?

Three groundbreaking papers published in the New England Journal of Medicine, led by a team of Monash University researchers in Melbourne, reveal the results from a seven-year study of the benefits and risks of a low daily dose of aspirin to the lives of people over 70.

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Graphene helps protect photocathodes for physics experiments

Argonne researchers have used thin sheets of graphene to prevent photocathode materials from interacting with air, which increases their lifetimes. Photocathodes are used to convert light to electricity in accelerators and other physics experiments.

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Household cleaning products may contribute to kids' overweight by altering their gut microbiota

Commonly used household cleaners could be making children overweight by altering their gut microbiota, suggests a new study.

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It's time to train accountants in sustainability

It seems that everywhere we turn these days sustainability is a hot topic. From individuals to corporations, (almost) everyone is jumping on board with the idea that we all need to live more sustainably.

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World's first passive anti-frosting surface fights ice with ice

Nothing foretells the coming of winter like frost on windshields.

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"Rebelosis" / "Rebel Rock" / "Rebel on That Level" | The Soul Rebels

Live and direct from New Orleans, The Soul Rebels rock the TED stage with a tight, energetic performance blending elements of hip-hop, jazz and funk. The eight-piece brass band plays three songs — "Rebelosis," "Rebel Rock" and "Rebel on That Level" — turning the red circle into a joyful French Quarter street corner.

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Better tests and legal deterrence could clean up the mess left behind by fake honey row

Last week's fake honey scandal, involving Australia's largest honey producer Capilano, prompted calls for better purity tests and regulation of the industry.

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Water plays unexpected role in forming minerals

Large crystals growing in water often form from tiny nanocrystals continually attaching together. During attachment, these tiny particles snap to the surface, like LEGO bricks. A bit of torque is needed to rotate the particles into position for attachment. By measuring and calculating the forces that provide this torque, researchers found that water has a more significant role than previously thou

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Does South Africa have a microplastics problem? Our research says yes

The dangers of plastics, and more specifically microplastics, is increasingly grabbing the world's attention. A growing body of research shows that plastics and microplastics in the marine environment are having a devastating effect on life in the sea. The impact has been tracked particularly closely in laboratory setups where conditions can be managed and effects monitored.

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Big Tech is overselling AI as the solution to online extremism

In mid-September the European Union threatened to fine the Big Tech companies if they did not remove terrorist content within one hour of appearing online. The change came because rising tensions are now developing and being played out on social media platforms.

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You can't tell whether an online restaurant review is fake—but this AI can

Researchers find AI-generated reviews and comments pose a significant threat to consumers, but machine learning can help detect the fakes.

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The Large Hadron Collider prepares for the future

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is stopping proton collisions for five days this week to undergo numerous tests. Accelerator specialists need to test the LHC when it is not in production mode and there are only several weeks left in which they can do it. At the end of the year, CERN's accelerators will be shut down for a major two-year upgrade programme that will result in a renovated accelerator

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Nanoparticles with a shell structure improve the performance of zinc-oxide photodetectors

Improving the sensitivity of light sensors or the efficiency of solar cells requires fine-tuning of light capturing. KAUST researchers have used complex geometry to develop tiny shell-shaped coverings that can increase the efficiency and speed of photodetectors.

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Proteins surf to mitochondria – a novel transport pathway discovered

Prof. Johannes Herrmann, a researcher at the Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, Germany, and his team discovered a novel mechanism by which newly synthesized proteins reach their respective target compartment in the cell. Proteins destined to mitochondria, the cell's powerhouse, are not directly transported to mitochondria but are directed to the surface of the endoplasmic reticulum, where the

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Keep cool: Researchers develop magnetic cooling cycle

As a result of climate change, population growth, and rising expectations regarding quality of life, energy requirements for cooling processes are growing much faster worldwide than for heating. Another problem that besets today's refrigeration systems is that most coolants cause environmental and health damage. A novel technology could provide a solution: refrigeration using magnetic materials in

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Best of Last Week – Seven photons acting like billions, how plants communicate and an anti-aging molecule

It was another good week for physics as a team at the University of Chicago found gravitational waves provided a dose of reality about extra dimensions—they did not offer evidence of gravity "leaking" into additional dimensions. And a team with members from Imperial College London, the University of Oxford and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology found that just seven photons could act like billions,

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Advanced Diagnostics for Personalized Medicine

A new generation of tools could help end one-size-fits-all therapeutics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New guideline recommends weight loss strategies for sleep apnea patients

A new guideline focused on the role of weight management in treating adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been published online by the American Thoracic Society in the Sept. 15 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Gunshot victims require much more blood and are more likely to die than other trauma patients

In a new analysis of data submitted to Maryland's state trauma registry from 2005 to 2017, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers found that gunshot victims are approximately five times more likely to require blood transfusions, they require 10 times more blood units and are 14 times more likely to die than people seriously injured by motor vehicles, non-gun assaults, falls or stabs.

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New research warns of primate extinction in China

Up to 80 per cent of China's primate species are at risk of extinction according to a new study by a group of international primatologists including The University of Western Australia.

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Human spit is actually a great cleaning solution (and other award-winning scientific finds)

Science The annual Ig Nobel awards are a treasure. Some of the research honored by the Ig Nobel awards is just for fun, but some of it also serves some greater purpose. Here are all this year's winners.

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Made for Water | Diesel Brothers: Forces of Nature

Moving through flood waters to coasting high over streams, we see what goes into creating powerful truck to do exactly what you aren't supposed to do…drive through water. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.f

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Why creating a chemical brain will be how we understand consciousness

Unorthodox chemist Lee Cronin is leading a radical quest to use chemistry to explain consciousness and create artificial life

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Hospitalsenheden Midt har fundet ny lægefaglig direktør

Claus Brøckner Nielsen er ansat som ny lægefaglig direktør på Hospitalsenhed Midt.

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DF vil lade Forsvaret overtage lægehelikoptere

Forsvaret bør overtage opgaven om at drive lægehelikoptere fra regionerne, mener Dansk Folkepartis gruppeformand Peter Skaarup.

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Tyskland får sit første batteritog i 2019

Næste år sætter Deutsche Bahn et batteridrevet tog i prøvedrift i Tyskland.

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'American Vandal': In Its Second Season, the Netflix Gem Gets Even Smarter

Amidst all the gross-out humor is a show that demonstrates real insight into the way tech shapes our social lives.

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Tern GSD S10 Review: Our Favorite Cargo Bike

A compact cargo e-bike broadens the definition of what a cargo bike can be.

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Image of the Day: Seaweed Sequence

The genome of Ulva mutabilis is the first of a green seaweed to be sequenced.

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The Tiny Blond Bible Teacher Taking on the Evangelical Political Machine

When Beth Moore arrived in Houston in the 1980s, she found few models for young women who wanted to teach scripture. Many conservative Christian denominations believed that women should not hold authority over men, whether in church or at home; many denominations still believe this. In some congregations, women could not speak from the lectern on a Sunday or even read the Bible in front of men. B

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An artist's surreal view of Australia – created from satellite data captured 700km above Earth

There are more than 4,800 satellites orbiting Earth. They bristle with sensors – trained towards Earth and into space – recording and transmitting many different wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation.

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Tenfold improvement in liquid batteries mean electric car refuelling could take minutes

One of the biggest drawbacks of electric vehicles – that they require hours and hours to charge – could be obliterated by new type of liquid battery that is roughly ten times more energy-dense than existing models, according to Professor Lee Cronin, the Regius Chair of Chemistry at the University of Glasgow, UK.

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New study identifies possible ancestors of RNA

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology may have made headway in helping determine the origin of life by identifying three different molecules that self-assemble to form a molecular structure with features characteristic of modern RNA.

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Augmented Reality Everywhere

Coming soon: the world overlaid with data — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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En ikke irriterende bananflue? Robot flyver ligesom et insekt

Robotforskere har lavet en robot, der kopierer bananfluens utrolige evne til at manøvrere. Det kan give os hypermobile flyvende robotter i fremtiden.

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Copernicus Sentinel maps Hurricane Florence flooding

Making landfall in the US state of North Carolina on 14 September, Hurricane Florence is causing widespread damage and flooding. The Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission is being used to map affected areas.

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Fossils reveal diverse Mesozoic pollinating lacewings

Insect pollination played an important role in the evolution of angiosperms. Little is known, however, about ancient pollination insects and their niche diversity during the pre-angiosperm period due to the rarity of fossil evidence of plant-pollinator interactions.

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Virtual simulation and 3-D modeling assure high performance of projects

Tau Flow, a computational engineering startup based in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil, offers the market customized mathematical solutions for the optimization of project performance. It uses 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to develop "virtual prototypes" of any process or environment that involves flows of liquids or gases (defined in physics as fluids).

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World speed record for polymer simulations shattered by over a hundred-fold

From a humble plastic bag to ultra-light airplane wings, polymers are everywhere. These molecules are long chains of atoms that play many roles for good and bad, from organic photovoltaics to indestructible plastic pollution. Polymers are useful in liquid form, as well: The difference between tomato puree and ketchup is merely 0.5 percent of xanthan gum, which is a polymer made from sugar. Ketchup

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A new type of symmetry: How a tetrahedral substance can be more symmetrical than a spherical atom

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have theoretically demonstrated that special tetrahedron nanostructures composed of certain metals have a higher degree of symmetry than the geometrical symmetry of spherical atoms. Nanomaterials with unique and unprecedented electrical and magnetic properties arising from this symmetry will be developed and used for next-generation electronic devices.

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Chandra detection of diskless young stars

Stars frequently form in crowded environments. By combining the resources of multi-wavelength missions like Chandra in the X-ray and Spitzer in the infrared, astronomers are able to resolve ambiguities and assemble a much more complete census of cluster content and the individual properties of the population. A case in point is the development of disks (possibly protoplanetary) around new stars. D

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Video: Aeolus timelapse

This timelapse video shows ESA's Aeolus satellite being prepared for liftoff. It includes shots from the cleanroom in France, its arrival by ship in French Guiana, preparations at Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, roll out to the launch pad and, finally, liftoff on a Vega rocket on 22 August 2018.

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New kid on the block picks up relay for ozone

For more than 20 years, changes in ozone over Antarctica have been carefully monitored by a succession of European satellites. This important long-term record is now being added to by the Copernicus Sentinel-5P mission, which is dedicated to atmospheric monitoring.

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How phytoplankton survive in ocean gyres with low nutrient supplies

Subtropical gyres are huge, sustained currents spanning thousands of kilometers across the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, where very little grows.

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Juno captures elusive 'brown barge'

A long, brown oval known as a "brown barge" in Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt is captured in this color-enhanced image from NASA's Juno spacecraft.

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Bizarre Physics Phenomenon Suggests Objects Can Be Two Temperatures at Once

Schrödinger's cat has a new friend: Schrödinger's thermometer.

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Ancient Three-Way Collision Formed British Mainland

A surprising third party was involved in the creation of Britain.

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'Thor's Well' Seems to Drain to the Underworld in Incredible Photo (Here’s Why)

The ocean seems to disappear into Oregon's rocky coastline.

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Trove of Art Stolen from Jewish Family Rediscovered, Identified as Nazi Loot

Four pieces of Nazi loot connected to the Gurlitt trove have been rediscovered.

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Dear Therapist: I'm Not Overweight, But My Mom Keeps Telling Me I Am

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, My mom and I have had a contentious relationship ever since I was a young teenager. She’s always been very preoccupied with weight, and anytime she thought I gained a few pounds, she would point it out and ber

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At the Edge of the World, Facing the End of the World

Want to feel better about climate change? Last week’s climate summit showed that the most ambitious action isn’t happening on the national scale—it’s cities and states that are leading the way.

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A recount of human genes ups the number to at least 46,831

A new estimate of the number of human genes adds in some RNA-producing genes.

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A New Front in Fighting the Bias against Women in Science

We’re working to get copies of Angela Saini’s Inferior into all of New York City’s middle and high schools — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Higgs hunter has just turned 10. Why is nobody celebrating?

The Large Hadron Collider unleashed unprecedented euphoria when it switched on, but the search for the true nature of reality has proved harder than we thought

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The Future of Fish Farming May Be Indoors

New advancements in water filtration and circulation make it possible for indoor fish farms to dramatically grow in size and production — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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One big reason why women drop out of doctoral STEM programs

Many women in doctoral degree programs in fields like engineering and physics are in a class of their own — and that's not a good thing. A new study found that the fewer females who enter a doctoral program at the same time, the less likely any one of them will graduate within six years.

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Diversity + Innovation = Business Success | Amway

Why a more diverse workplace is also a more talented one Ram Charan has spent his working life as a business mentor and consultant to CEOs of global companies. He's the guy that Coca-Cola, KLM, GE, and Bank of America (just to name a few) call when they need help. And he's a firm believer in a diverse workplace. If a 90-year-old can do the job the best, then why not hire them? Raw talent doesn't

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How power affects the way you behave—and the way you’re punished

Rules, whether they're visible or invisible, govern our behavior every day. Different groups have different rules, and have different views on how strict those rules are. Powerful and dominant social groups have more flexible rules where obeisance is less mandatory. Michele Gelfand: Yes, so I wrote this book to give a lens to people to view the world differently. It's something that we take for g

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Superhumans: The remarkable brain waves of high-level meditators

People who have meditated for thousands of hours exhibit a remarkable difference in their brainwaves. Psychologist and author Daniel Goleman says we can actually see what happens in the heads of those who have achieved "enlightenment" and the results are unprecedented in science.

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Coparenting: A lifestyle innovation from our broke middle class

Economic necessity and growing isolation are making some middle-class families try coparenting, explains author Alissa Quart. Is the practice of sharing living spaces and parenting responsibilities across families a depressing trend or a "revolutionary" adaptation?

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Techtopia #70: 150 læresætninger til tech-branchen

På Techfestival i København samledes 150 mennesker fra 35 lande og skrev 150 principper til en branche i moralsk krise.

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Danskere i front med thorium-reaktorer til Asien

GRAFIK: Asien og Afrika har stigende behov for strøm. Thorium kan blive den danske løsning inden 2030.

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Amazon efterforsker ansatte for salg af interne data

Amazon-ansatte mistænkes for at lække 'salgs- og søgedata', slette negative anmeldelser og genoprette bandlyste konti for bestikkelse.

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Rådgiverdirektør efter ny MgO-kendelse: Stor lettelse for rådgiverne

Selv om en rådgiver godkendte en entreprenørs forslag om at bruge MgO-plader, skal entreprenøren betale erstatning, fordi han ikke havde advaret om, at det var et nyt og uprøvet produkt.

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The Latest Course Catalog Trend? Blockchain 101

A growing number of colleges and universities are offering courses in blockchain technology or establishing blockchain research institutes.

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The Growing Partisan Split Over Sexual-Misconduct Allegations

In the year since the #MeToo movement began, Americans have relearned one old truth and learned one new one. The old truth is that, when it comes to perpetrators of sexual harassment, politics doesn’t matter. Liberal men and conservative men, socialist men and fascist men, anti-feminist men and avowedly feminist men—some percentage of all these subspecies prey on women. For every Clarence Thomas,

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Advice for After the Hurricane

The other night at a neighborhood library event in New Orleans, someone asked me if I was experiencing any PTSD from the media coverage of Florence churning toward the Carolinas. While the images were similar to Katrina in their alarming scope, the answer was actually “no.” Thirteen years living in the aftermath of a natural and man-made disaster, you can develop a sort of deep weariness, an almo

1d

The Emmys Should Be Political

Once upon a time, years ago, two awards-show hosts made a rape joke . The month was January of 2015, and the location was the Beverly Hilton Hotel, where Tina Fey and Amy Poehler were hosting the Golden Globes. The pair riffed on the fairy-tale subversion of a Sondheim musical that had recently been adapted for the big screen. “In Into the Woods , Cinderella runs from her prince, Rapunzel is thro

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Fossils reveal diverse Mesozoic pollinating lacewings

A research group led by professor WANG Bo from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology has provided new insight into the niche diversity, chemical communication, and defense mechanisms of Mesozoic pollinating insects. They reported 27 well-preserved kalligrammatids from late Cretaceous Burmese amber (99 Ma) and Chinese Early Cretaceous (125 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (165 Ma) compression r

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Nonfiction: A Nobel Laureate Asks What Makes a ‘Disordered Mind’

In his new book, the neuroscientist Eric Kandel explores the science of unusual brains, locating many of his answers in genetics.

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Europe’s Triumphs and Troubles Are Written in Swiss Ice

Pollen frozen in ice in the Alps traces Europe’s calamities, since the time Macbeth ruled Scotland.

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Update: A Rwandan Game Park Defying the Odds

Despite modest tourism numbers, Akagera National Park is a success story in the making, particularly considering that, like its host country, it survived catastrophe.

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Putin Won’t Stop the Slaughter of Idlib

Bashar al-Assad has never been coy about his plans. Through much of Syria’s civil war, its president has proclaimed that opposition is equivalent to terrorism, and must be wiped out. His regime is simply following the policy that grew out of its supporters’ favorite slogan: “Assad, or we burn the country.” This is why no amount of pablum from the Russia-sponsored process to craft a political reso

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Ticket To Ride: Pot Sellers Put Seniors On The Canna-Bus

Marijuana dispensaries are reaching out to seniors seeking help with the aches and pains of aging. They're discovering an array of products and some interesting side effects. (Image credit: Stephanie O'Neill for NPR)

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Efter ny MgO-kendelse: MT Højgaard hensætter 400 mio. kr. til erstatninger

Voldgiftsretten har ifølge MT Højgaard skærpet retspraksis i MgO-sager. Kendelsen får entreprenøren til at hensætte mindst 400 mio. kr. til erstatninger

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Crowdfunding: The fuel for cancer quackery

Ever since I first started taking notice about cancer quacks like Stanislaw Burzynski, I noticed how crowdfunding using social media and sites like GoFundMe appear to be an integral part of the business model of quack clinics. Thanks to an investigation by The Good Thinking Society published in BMJ last week, I now have a feel for the scope of the problem. The question, though, is: What can be don

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Undervisning på engelsk har store konsekvenser for universiteterne

De fleste danske og nordiske universiteter har indført engelsk som undervisningssprog på…

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Researchers turn to oysters as pollution-tracking sentinels

French researchers hoping to get an early warning on pollution in the ocean have found an unlikely ally in a mollusc more often destined for the dinner table.

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Mexico marks twin anniversaries of deadly quakes

Mexico marks the anniversaries Wednesday of two deadly earthquakes: one that devastated the country last year, claiming 369 lives, and another that killed more than 10,000 people on the same date in 1985.

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Facing hurricane floodwaters, US town takes lessons from the past

Hidden in North Carolina's coastal plain, Contentnea Creek is a local treasure, a place to fish, paddle and birdwatch—but after Hurricane Florence's torrential rains, the stream has morphed into a menace.

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Massive clean-up in Hong Kong after typhoon chaos

Hong Kong began a massive clean-up Monday after Typhoon Mangkhut raked the city, shredding trees and bringing damaging floods, in a trail of destruction that left dozens dead in the Philippines and millions evacuated in southern China.

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Machines will do more tasks than humans by 2025: WEF

Robots will handle 52 percent of current work tasks by 2025, almost twice as many as now, a World Economic Forum (WEF) study said Monday.

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Amazon probing staff data leaks

Amazon is investigating allegations that some of its staff sold confidential customer data to third party companies particularly in China, the online giant confirmed on Sunday.

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Dominica's beloved wildlife still shaky a year after Maria

'Sad' parrots and 'stressed-out' frogs might be unlikely contenders for concern in the aftermath of a catastrophic natural disaster.

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New Mexico observatory closed for security reasons to reopen

An observatory in the mountains of southern New Mexico that had been closed since early September because of an undisclosed security concern is scheduled to reopen on Monday, officials managing the facility said.

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Dansk virksomhed skal udvikle astronauters træningsudstyr

High tech-selskabet Danish Aerospace Company har indgået en ny aftale med Den Europæiske Rumsorganisation (ESA) om at bygge et nyt, multifunktionelt træningssystem til astronauter på mission i rummet.

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Amazon launches small business shop

Amazon wants you to shop small.

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Co-founder of Salesforce buys Time magazine for $190 million

Time Magazine is being sold by Meredith Corp. to Marc Benioff, a co-founder of Salesforce, and his wife, it was announced Sunday.

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Tiny moth from Asia spreading fast on Siberian elms in eastern North America

In 2010, moth collector James Vargo began finding numerous specimens of a hitherto unknown pygmy moth in his light traps on his property in Indiana, USA. When handed to Erik van Nieukerken, researcher at Naturalis Biodiversity Center (Leiden, the Netherlands) and specialist in pygmy moths (family Nepticulidae), the scientist failed to identify it as a previously known species.

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Danmarks spritnye jernbane åbner alligevel med kun to tog i timen

Banedanmark lovede fem afgange i timen, men der vil tidligst køre mere end to tog i timen på Ringstedbanen i midten af 2020.

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12.000 borgere udtages årligt af Udbetaling Danmarks til datatjek for fejl og snyd

Udbetaling Danmarks omfattende registersamkøring udpegede sidste år 12.000 potentielle sager om fejludbetalinger. I 20 procent af sagerne endte borgerne med at skulle betale penge tilbage eller miste ydelser.

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We hold people with power to account. Why not algorithms? | Hannah Fry

As we delegate technology more responsibility to diagnose illness or identify suspects, we must regulate it Robert Jones was driving home through the pretty town of Todmorden, in West Yorkshire, when he noticed the fuel light flashing on the dashboard of his car. He had just a few miles to find a petrol station, which was cutting things rather fine, but thankfully his GPS seemed to have found a sh

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Tech streamlines computational science projects

A new research team has continuously updated a workflow management system they first developed in 2010 to help computational scientists develop software, visualize data, and solve problems, saving time and effort expended in support of modeling and simulation experiments.

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Daily low-dose aspirin found to have no effect on healthy life span in older people

In a clinical trial to determine the effects of daily low-dose aspirin in healthy older adults without previous cardiovascular events, aspirin did not prolong healthy, independent living free of dementia or physical disability.

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First evidence that soot from polluted air is reaching placenta

Evidence of tiny particles of carbon, typically created by burning fossil fuels, has been found in placentas for the first time, in new research.

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Opråb fra forskere: Op mod 75 procent af naturen skal fredes, hvis vi skal overleve

I en leder i det anerkendte tidsskrift 'Science' opfordrer eksperter til, at 25-75 procent af verdens større økosystemer skal fredes.

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New tool helps conservationists make smarter decisions

A new tool could help ensure limited conservation dollars are well spent by determining which actions would save the most species per dollar.

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People with asthma at higher risk of becoming obese

Obesity is known to be a risk factor for developing asthma but a new study shows that the reverse is also true: people with asthma are more likely to go on to become obese. The new research indicates that those who develop asthma as adults and those who have non-allergic asthma are at the greatest risk of obesity.

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Is banning cage diving actually bad for sharks?

New Zealand has ruled the practice illegal after mounting public pressure – but it can be a valuable and effective conservation tool Earlier this month the New Zealand court of appeal ruled that shark cage diving is illegal , and as a result cage diving tourism will soon cease in the country. But is a ban an appropriate course of action when shark population numbers are declining globally? Contin

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Tiny moth from Asia spreading fast on Siberian elms in eastern North America

Since 2010, a tiny moth originating from East Asia has been spreading over eastern North America. Its green larvae, or caterpillars, make narrow tunnels in the leaves of Siberian elms. Sometimes very abundant, they can be seen to descend en masse from the trees when they are done feeding. The moth species was described independently from Russia as Stigmella multispicata in 2014.

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Witnessing violence in high school as bad as being bullied

Over the long term, being a bystander of high-school violence can be as damaging to mental health as being directly bullied, a new study finds.

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Medicaid expansion boosted the financial health of low-income Michigan residents

Low-income Michigan residents who enrolled in a new state health insurance plan didn't just get coverage for their health needs — many also got a boost in their financial health, according to a new study. People who gained coverage under the state's expanded Medicaid program have experienced fewer debt problems and other financial issues than they had before enrollment, the analysis of thousands

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More than half of parents of sleep-deprived teens blame electronics

Fifty-six percent of parents of teens who have sleep troubles believe the use of electronics is hurting their child's shut-eye.

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Household cleaning products may contribute to kids' overweight by altering their gut microbiota

Commonly used household cleaners could be making children overweight by altering their gut microbiota, suggests a Canadian study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

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Injuries associated with infant walkers still sending children to the emergency department

Although infant walkers provide no benefit to children and pose a significant injury risk, many are still being used in US homes. This study found more than 230,000 children younger than 15 months old were treated in hospital emergency departments in the US for infant walker-related injuries from 1990 through 2014. The number of infant walker-related injuries decreased dramatically during the stud

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'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought — and could help spare habitats

New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the 'least bad' option for feeding the world while saving its species — provided use of such 'land-efficient' systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland.

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Repeat vaccination is safe for most kids with mild to moderate reactions

Children who experience some type of adverse event following initial immunization have a low rate of recurrent reactions to subsequent vaccinations, reports a new study.

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New soft coral species discovered in Panama

Another new coral found in Panama's Coiba National Park, a UNESCO National Heritage Site, the location of the Smithsonian's newest research site.

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'Optical rocket' created with intense laser light

An experiment has demonstrated how the application of intense light boosts electrons to their highest attainable speeds.

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How cells handle a sticky, toxic, but absolutely essential molecule

A team of researchers has solved a long-standing puzzle by identifying the protein that 'chaperones' free heme in cells.

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Research in yeast leads to serendipitous finding about a central nervous system disorder

Researchers found that an important quality control mechanism in baker's yeast is closely connected to hypomyelinating leukodystrophy, a debilitating disease found in children. The findings could indicate a therapeutic approach for this rare disease, as well as for multiple sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases.

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Sniffing out sharks

Researchers use environmental DNA to detect the presence of white sharks in local waters.

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BPA exposure in US-approved levels may alter insulin response in non-diabetic adults

In a first study of its kind study, researchers have found that a common chemical consumers are exposed to several times a day may be altering insulin release. Results of the study indicate that the Food and Drug Administration-approved 'safe' daily exposure amount of BPA may be enough to have implications for the development of Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic diseases.

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5 Great Routes for Self-Driving Trucks—When They're Ready

Traffic analytics company Inrix looked at freight and safety data to consider where robo-trucks could make the biggest impact.

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Social class determines how the unemployed talk about food insecurity

'Cherry Blossom,' a 39-year-old woman worked as a hotel breakfast bar hostess around the start of the 'Great Recession.' She lost her job, and three years later she was being interviewed to assess her struggles with her unemployment. She talked about her empty refrigerator. A study by University of Missouri researchers that began as a survey of unemployment following the recession, led researchers

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Aerial survey reveals great diversity and abundance in NE Canyons Marine National Monument

Airborne marine biologists were amazed by the sheer abundance and diversity of large marine wildlife in their recent aerial survey of the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument, the only marine national monument on the East Coast, about 150 southeast of Cape Cod.

2d

How a tetrahedral substance can be more symmetrical than a spherical atom

Scientists have theoretically demonstrated that special tetrahedron nanostructures composed of certain metals have a higher degree of symmetry than the geometrical symmetry of spherical atoms. Nanomaterials with unique and unprecedented electrical and magnetic properties arising from this symmetry will be developed and used for next-generation electronic devices.

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Organic farming methods favors pollinators

Pollinating insects are endangered globally, with a particularly steep decline over the last 40 years. An extensive 3-year study has found that organic farming methods can contribute to halting the pollinator decline. This beneficial effect is due to both the absence of insecticides and a higher provision of flower resources.

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Ecologists report sighting rare wild goat species in Afghanistan

Based on field surveys in northern Afghanistan, ecologists report that they have for the first time documented by direct observation the presence of two rare Asian wild goat species in the country.

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Regret is a gambler's curse, neuroscientists say

The brain's orbitofrontal cortex deals with social interactions, including regret, and has been much studied with fMRI and EEG. Using ECoG, which provides more detailed information about brain activity on millisecond timescales and with better resolution, researchers were able to follow the thoughts that swirl through this brain area during a simple betting game. Surprisingly, after placing a bet,

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Children with asthma are less likely to finish school and to work in non-manual occupations

People who suffer with persistent asthma from a young age are more likely to leave school at 16 years old and those who make it to university are more likely to drop out early, according to new research. The research also suggests that when this group of children grow up, they are less likely to work in certain non-manual occupations such as police officer, clerk or foreman.

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Spar på forsikringen: Kameraer i forruden dokumenterer alt i trafikken

I Storbritannien giver det 30 procent rabat, og politiet vil gerne modtage optagelser af fartsyndere.

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American Democracy Is in Crisis

It’s been nearly two years since Donald Trump won enough Electoral College votes to become president of the United States. On the day after, in my concession speech, I said, “We owe him an open mind and the chance to lead.” I hoped that my fears for our future were overblown. They were not. In the roughly 21 months since he took the oath of office, Trump has sunk far below the already-low bar he

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Midterm Time Capsule: Good for Jeff Flake

According to the Washington Post just now, Senator Jeff Flake , of Arizona, who is a Republican and a member of the Judiciary Committee, has said that a vote on Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court should be delayed, until his latest accuser (Christine Blasey Ford) can testify. As the story says: In an interview with The Post , Flake said that Ford “must be heard” before a committee

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How to Watch the 2018 Emmy Awards

Here's how to watch television's biggest night—even if you don't own a TV.

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Blood test tells the time of your personal clock

Researchers have developed a new simple blood test that can tell the time in your body—which might be very different from the time showing on the clock on the wall. Previously, measurements this precise could only be achieved through a costly and laborious process of taking samples every hour over a span of multiple hours. The new test, called TimeSignature, requires only two blood draws. “This i

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These neurons could be key to fighting addiction

Researchers have discovered a correlation between the number of neurons that produce orexin—a chemical messenger important for sleep and appetite—and addiction, according to a new study with cocaine-addicted rats. Restoring the number of orexin neurons to normal, or blocking orexin signaling in the brain, made the rats no longer addicted, suggesting the increased orexin neurons is an essential ch

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Eye cells change jobs to see better at night

To see under starlight and moonlight, the retina changes both the software and hardware of its light-sensing cells to create a kind of night vision, according to a new study, Retinal circuits that were thought to be unchanging and programmed for specific tasks are adaptable to different light conditions, the scientists who identified how the retina reprograms itself for low light say. “To see und

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New target could weaken ‘nightmare bacteria’

Researchers have discovered a new cellular target for weakening a daunting microbe that can become highly tolerant to a variety of antibiotics. “We identified a new function important to antibiotic tolerance, which could be targeted to enhance the activity of our current antibiotics,” says lead study author Dao Nguyen, an associate professor of medicine at McGill University and a scientist from t

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Retro Report: How an Unsolved Mystery Changed the Way We Take Pills

The origins of tamper-resistant packaging — exasperating yet reassuring — lie in a deadly episode in 1982, when cyanide-laced Tylenol killed seven people.

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Quick and easy test for viral infections reduces hospital admissions and antibiotic use

A quick and easy test for viral infections can reduce unnecessary antibiotic use and hospital admissions, according to new research presented to the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The test, which takes just 50 minutes to obtain results, could save hospitals around €2,500 per patient not admitted to hospital, would help to relieve winter pressures on available beds, and may he

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Paracetamol use in infancy is linked to increased risk of asthma in some teenagers

Children who take paracetamol during their first two years of life may be at a higher risk of developing asthma by the age of 18, especially if they have a particular genetic makeup, according to new research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

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Giant 'Pac-Man' Launched To Gobble Garbage Patch

Last Saturday, the nonprofit Ocean Cleanup dispatched a device to help clean up litter in the Pacific Ocean. NPR's Michel Martin talks with Boyan Slat, the young CEO who came up with the idea.

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Brock Long’s Sunday Morning Trifecta

When a politician “makes the rounds” on Sunday morning talk shows , it usually means getting booked for two of them. Republican Senator Thom Tillis of North Carolina appeared on two shows this week, as did Clinton-era special counsel Ken Starr. Tillis advocated for continued federal aid for his state as Hurricane Florence’s rain continues to flood inland areas. Starr promoted his book and comment

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Taste preferences connected to success of long-term weight loss after bariatric surgery

Following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), a type of bariatric surgery, many patients exhibit a reduction in taste preference for sweet and fatty foods, although this effect may only be temporary, according to new research.

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Cord blood clue to respiratory diseases

New research has found children born during high pollen months may have a greater risk of developing respiratory diseases such as asthma.

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Starwatch: the waxing moon passes Saturn and Mars

The moon rises early this week, with Mars, still bright and conspicuously red, sharing the evening sky by mid-week The moon passes close to Saturn on Monday night. Look for it low in the south just after sunset. The chart shows the view at 20:00 BST. As the week progresses, the moon moves eastwards, heading past Mars on Wednesday and Thursday. This will be easy to spot as Mars is the brightest ob

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For Millions, Florence 'Has Never Been More Dangerous'

Florence continues to churn across the Carolinas, pounding the states with a third day of high winds, unprecedented flooding, and record-shattering downpours. Since making landfall on Friday morning as a Category 1 hurricane, the storm has killed at least 14 people and brought much of the region to a standstill. It has meandered at a dangerously sluggish pace across North and South Carolina, conc

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Delay the Kavanaugh Vote

This post was updated on September 16 at 5:56 p.m. ET I worked for a president who was arrested for driving under the influence at age 30. One of the most admired and successful governors of our times was arrested as a college student for industrial-scale drug possession. Senate candidate Beto O’Rourke is inspiring liberal voters across the country despite fleeing the scene, at age 26, of a drunk

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Hate speech-detecting AIs are fools for 'love'

Hateful text and comments are an ever-increasing problem in online environments, yet addressing the rampant issue relies on being able to identify toxic content. A new study has discovered weaknesses in many machine learning detectors currently used to recognize and keep hate speech at bay.

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New Scientist Live: space is full of junk and we must clean up our act

Earth orbit is littered with old satellites and debris. At New Scientist Live next week, Hugh Lewis will explain how big the problem is – and how we can fix it

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The Subtext of Kavanaugh’s Nomination Bursts Into the Open

The last scene of the horror story that is President Trump’s Supreme Court nomination is what any screenwriter would have predicted: a cast of panicky strangers trapped in a haunted house, trying desperately not to say the words that will loose a monster hiding in the walls. That monster is sex—gender, women’s rights—as lived in America in 2018. From the beginning, gender, and nothing else, is wh

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Digital assistants hone skills to deliver the newsAmazon Alexa Microwave

"What's the news?" has become a familiar refrain for consumers with smart speakers, opening up a new channel for publishers but also raising concerns about the growing influence of tech platforms in media.

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Spanish farmers go nuts for almonds as global demand booms

Surging worldwide demand for almonds is pushing Spanish farmers to replace traditional wheat and sunflower fields with almond orchards, transforming the landscape in the south of the country.

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African tourism alarmed by rhino, elephant losses

Animal conservation in Africa has suffered several setbacks in recent months prompting experts at an African tourism conference this week in Cape Town to warn about the cost to the travel industry.

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A New World Marathon Record Almost Defies Description

We were packed into our corrals on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway Sunday morning, waiting to start the Rock ‘N’ Roll Philadelphia Half Marathon, when the announcement came: Eliud Kipchoge of Kenya had just set a new world marathon record across the world in Berlin. One of the thrills for me of running Philadelphia and the other big half marathons and marathons is just being in the same race with w

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Typhoon makes landfall in China after killing 59 in Philippines

Typhoon Mangkhut slammed into mainland China late on Sunday after leaving a trail of destruction in Hong Kong and Macau and killing at least 59 people in the northern Philippines.

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Huge squirrel population chomps crops, driving farmers nuts

There's a bumper crop of squirrels in New England, and the frenetic critters are frustrating farmers by chomping their way through apple orchards, pumpkin patches and corn fields.

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Uber glitch leaves drivers unpaid and frustrated

Drivers for the ride-hailing company Uber are frustrated over a glitch that is keeping them from being paid immediately.

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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