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Nyheder2018september19

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The biology of Alzheimer’s – and how we might find a cure

How does Alzheimer's disease work? Alzheimer's kills about 83,000 people a year and over 5 million people are afflicted with it. Lou Reese, the co-founder of start-up United Neuroscience , thinks that there's a cure on the horizon.

7h

End-Permian extinction, which wiped out most of Earth's species, was instantaneous in geological time

The most severe mass extinction in Earth's history occurred with almost no early warning signs, according to a new study by scientists at MIT, China, and elsewhere.

6h

Fedtstof kan stoppe immunforsvar, der løber løbsk

Aarhus-forskere har fundet fedtstof, som kan bremse immunforsvaret og dermed måske afhjælpe en række autoimmune sygdomme.

10h

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Regular, low-intensity exercise reduces severity of stroke

In an editorial in this week's Neurology, Nicole Spartano, Ph.D., research assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), agrees that a recent study (Reinholdsson et. al.), which proposes that individuals who reported being physically active (defined as either two hours of moderate intensity or four hours of light activity per week) before their stroke had milder s

3min

People who walk just 35 minutes a day may have less severe strokes

People who participate in light to moderate physical activity, such as walking at least four hours a week or swimming two to three hours a week, may have less severe strokes than people who are physically inactive, according to a study published in the Sept. 19, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

3min

For the first time ever, a space junk collector has succeeded

It's a prototype but the test just conducted has proven its viability It was designed by the University of Surrey Space Centre Watch the video below on how it works The net worked in testing, just as intended. More tests to come. There are two possible ways for the craft, named — appropriately enough — RemoveDEBRIS, to accomplish its goals. 1) A large net that will capture space junk and drag it

8min

Why are Americans so bad at math?

Americans continually score either in the mid- or bottom-tier when it comes to math and science compared to their international peers. Students have a fundamental misunderstanding of what math is and what it can do. By viewing it as a language, students and teachers can begin to conceptualize it in easier and more practical ways. A lot of mistakes come from worrying too much about rote memorizati

8min

How swimming in cold water could treat depression

A new report shows how cold-water swimming was an effective treatment for a 24-year-old mother. The treatment is based on cross-adaptation, a phenomenon where individuals become less sensitive to a stimulus after being exposed to another. Getting used to the shock of cold-water swimming could blunt your body's sensitivity to other stressors. None As antidepressant prescriptions have surged in rec

8min

Eating your kids may improve your sex life? Sounds fishy.

The study looks at cannibalism in fish. If it doesn't look like the brood is going to be 'productive,' it might get eaten. Don't try this at home. Seriously, don't. Human beings deserve love and respect. If you are a male fish who doesn't understand why your reproductive impulse has dimmed and you haven't yet read Jonathan Swift's Modest Proposal , what, with the mysteries of human communication

8min

Are people with more self-disipline happier?

Research demonstrates that people with higher levels of self-control are happier over both the short and long run. Higher levels of self-control are correlated with educational, occupational, and social success. It was found that the people with the greatest levels of self-control avoid temptation rather than resist it at every turn. Self-discipline seems like a devil's bargain. A trade that allo

8min

Quantum computing is on the way

For a time, quantum computing was more theory than fact. That's starting to change. New quantum computer designs look like they might be scalable. None Quantum computing has existed in theory since the 1980's. It's slowly making its way into fact, the latest of which can be seen in a paper published in Nature called, " Deterministic teleportation of a quantum gate between two logical qubits ." To

8min

Why Japan's hikikomori isolate themselves from others for years

A hikikomori is a type of person in Japan who locks themselves away in their bedrooms, sometimes for years. This is a relatively new phenomenon in Japan, likely due to rigid social customs and high expectations for academic and business success. Many believe hikikomori to be a result of how Japan interprets and handles mental health issues. None There's a particular type of person in Japan. They

8min

Commercially relevant bismuth-based thin film processing

Researchers prepared 2D layered, visible-light-absorbing bismuth sulfide semiconductors using a two-step process. The resulting film exhibited morphology that supported excellent semiconductor performance. The simplicity and versatility of the processing method, which uses non-toxic, abundant materials, makes bismuth sulfide a viable alternative to commercially available photoresponsive devices.

10min

Characterization of pregnancy microbiome reveals variations in bacterial diversity

Researchers performed detailed whole-community sequencing on the microbial communities of three maternal body sites (vagina, gut, and oral cavity) over the course of pregnancy from the first trimester through delivery revealing variations in bacterial diversity.

10min

Microbubble scrubber destroys dangerous biofilms

Stiff microbial films often coat medical devices, household items and infrastructure such as the inside of water supply pipes, and can lead to dangerous infections. Researchers have developed a system that harnesses the power of bubbles to propel tiny particles through the surfaces of these tough films and deliver an antiseptic deathblow to the microbes living inside.

10min

People can handle the truth (more than you think)

New research explores the consequences of honesty in everyday life and determines that people can often afford to be more honest than they think.

10min

New research identifies abundant endangered fish below waterfall in San Juan River

A new study provides insight into the magnitude of the effect this waterfall has on endangered fishes in the San Juan River. From 2015-2017 more than 1,000 razorback sucker and dozens of Colorado pikeminnow were detected downstream of the waterfall. Some fish moved to this location from up to 600 miles away in the Colorado River.

10min

Fiber optic sensor measures tiny magnetic fields

Researchers have developed a light-based technique for measuring very weak magnetic fields, such as those produced when neurons fire in the brain.

10min

Scientists examine variations in a cell's protein factory

Scientists are studying the factors within a cell that can influence noise. They discovered that for 85 percent of genes, the noise magnitude is higher in the last step as compared to the first step.

10min

Strategies to protect bone health in hematologic stem cell transplant recipients

A new review looks at the major factors affecting bone health in mematologic stem cell transplant recipients, and provides expert guidance for the monitoring, evaluation and treatment of bone loss in these patients.

10min

News Analysis: Humans Are Making Hurricanes Worse. Here’s How.

We’re making natural disasters unnaturally harmful, scientists say. And the number of ways we’re doing it is fairly astonishing.

20min

DNA Tests Helps Conservationists Track Down Ivory Smugglers

The cartels that run the ivory trade try to cover their tracks — among other things, they smuggle tusks from the same elephant separately. But DNA testing can help find patterns. (Image credit: Simon Maina/Getty Images)

23min

How climate change could derail fish farmers

Aquaculture, the cultivation of fish and other aquatic species, is the world’s fastest growing food sector, but preparing for climate change is vital for future generations of aquafarmers to succeed, according to new research. The study explores how climate change could affect marine aquaculture production, specifically of finfish and bivalves (such as oysters), around the world. The findings rev

24min

Simulations of every woman's breast tissue address delay on enhanced MRI cancer detection

Purdue University researchers have simulated how over 20 different breast tissue ratios respond to heat given off by MRIs at higher field strengths than available in hospitals today.

24min

Finance Law Isn’t Ready for Elon Musk

The Department of Justice has begun an investigation of Tesla, the company confirmed to Bloomberg , following the revelation of an earlier SEC probe . The total scope of the inquiry is unclear, but one obvious place to look is Elon Musk’s August 7 tweet about taking the company private: “Am considering taking Tesla private at $420. Funding secured.” A review of Department of Justice prosecutions

35min

38min

Super cheap earth element to advance new battery tech to the industry

Worldwide efforts to make sodium-ion batteries just as functional as lithium-ion batteries have long since controlled sodium's tendency to explode, but not yet resolved how to prevent sodium-ions from 'getting lost' during the first few times a battery charges and discharges. Now, Purdue University researchers made a sodium powder version that fixes this problem and holds a charge properly.

39min

Flu season forecasts could be more accurate with access to health care companies' data

New research shows that data routinely collected by health care companies — if made available to researchers and public health agencies — could enable more accurate forecasts of when the next flu season will peak, how long it will last and how many people will get sick.

39min

Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers

Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study.

39min

Seeing pesticides spread through insect bodies

A team provides insights into the distribution of pesticides within insects using a newly developed method of insect sample preparation.

39min

Instilling persistence in children

Encouraging children 'to help,' rather than asking them to 'be helpers,' can instill persistence as they work to fulfill daily tasks that are difficult to complete, finds a new psychology study.

39min

Searching for new bridge forms that can span further

Newly identified bridge forms could enable significantly longer bridge spans to be achieved in the future, potentially making a crossing over the Strait of Gibraltar, from the Iberian Peninsula to Morocco, feasible. The new bridge forms — identified by a team of researchers from the University of Sheffield and Brunel University London, working with long span bridge expert Ian Firth of engineering

39min

A tiny galaxy almost collided with the Milky Way and astronomers can see the effects

Space A galactic near-miss. Our galaxy’s history was a lot more turbulent than previously thought.

41min

Experts Are Underwhelmed By North Korea's Promise To Dismantle Missile Site

North Korea had already promised to dismantle part of the site. Now, with fanfare, it's offering to let the world watch — which analysts say is not that much of a step forward. (Image credit: David Guttenfelder/AP)

45min

Florence Unleashing a Flood of Pig Poop on North Carolina

Rain and flooding is causing a pig poop problem in North Carolina.

51min

Election Security Can Be as Simple as Preserving Paper

Election Security Can Be as Simple as Preserving Paper Some states still fall behind in election security for the midterms. ElectionSecurity.jpg Image credits: Joseph Sohm /shutterstock Culture Wednesday, September 19, 2018 – 14:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Joseph Stalin, no friend of free elections, is credited with saying it was not the people who cast the votes that decide

52min

From crystals to climate: 'Gold standard' timeline links flood basalts to climate change

Princeton geologists used tiny zircon crystals found in volcanic ash to rewrite the timeline for the eruptions of the Columbia River flood basalts, a series of massive lava flows that coincided with an ancient global warming period 16 million years ago.

53min

Brett Kavanaugh, Mark Judge, and the Romanticizing of Teenage Indiscretion

According to Christine Blasey Ford, there was one witness to Brett Kavanaugh’s attempted rape of her at a high-school party in the 1980s: Kavanaugh’s Georgetown Preparatory School classmate Mark Judge. She says he was in the bedroom where she was attacked, laughing “maniacally” with the future federal appointee, and that she was able to get free once Judge jumped on top of her and Kavanaugh. Judg

55min

MS researchers find well-being differs with age in multiple sclerosis

The oldest group reported the lowest levels of depressive symptoms and the highest levels of Physical QOL. 'These results were unexpected,' said Dr. Strober, 'given the functional limitations, disease progression, and neurological lesions seen in the aging MS population. Contrary to our hypothesis, the trend by age paralleled the general population. Younger individuals with MS are at greater risk

1h

'Robotic Skins' turn everyday objects into robots

When you think of robotics, you likely think of something rigid, heavy, and built for a specific purpose. New 'Robotic Skins' technology flips that notion on its head, allowing users to animate the inanimate and turn everyday objects into robots.

1h

DNA tests of illegal ivory link multiple ivory shipments to same dealers

Scientists report that DNA test results of large ivory seizures made by law enforcement have linked multiple ivory shipments over the three-year period, when this trafficking reached its peak, to the same network of dealers operating out of a handful of African ports.

1h

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap

In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study. That dwarfs the ice's previous average speed of about 2 inches per day and has challenged scientists' assumptions about the stability of the cold ice caps dotting Earth's high latitudes.

1h

Quantum anomaly: Breaking a classical symmetry with ultracold atoms

A new study of ultracold atomic gases finds a quantum anomaly: strongly interacting particles breaking classical symmetry in a 2-D Fermi gas.

1h

Anti-inflammatory protein promotes healthy gut bacteria to curb obesity

Scientists have discovered that the anti-inflammatory protein NLRP12 normally helps protect mice against obesity and insulin resistance when they are fed a high-fat diet. The researchers also reported that the NLRP12 gene is underactive in people who are obese, making it a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and diabetes, both of which are risk factors for cardiovascular disease and

1h

More doctor visits lead to fewer suicide attempts for fibromyalgia patients

Fibromyalgia patients who regularly visit their physicians are much less likely to attempt suicide than those who do not, according to a new study.

1h

Lighting it up: A new non-toxic, cheap, and stable blue photoluminescent material

Scientists have designed a novel photoluminescent material that is cheap to fabricate, does not use toxic starting materials, and is very stable, enhancing our understanding of the quantic nature of photoluminescence.

1h

Cannabinoid drugs make pain feel 'less unpleasant, more tolerable'

Researchers have determined that cannabinoid drugs do not appear to reduce the intensity of experimental pain, but, instead, may make pain feel less unpleasant and more tolerable.

1h

Dårlig taber i ludo? Derfor er nogle mere konkurrence-mennesker end andre

Mængden af testosteron og antallet af søskende kan blandt andet have betydning for din konkurrencelyst, forklarer forsker.

1h

What disasters like Hurricane Florence teach policymakers

Town and city leaders are working to get operations running again after Hurricane Florence. The next step will be to think about what their communities can do differently so the next big weather event doesn’t cause as many problems. Elizabeth Albright, assistant professor of the practice of environmental science and policy methods at Duke University’s Nicholas School of the Environment, studies h

1h

Mexico ranch helps American bison make a comeback

Hundreds of years ago, the American bison roamed freely across the widest natural range of any herbivore on the continent—a vast habitat extending from northern Mexico across the United States to Alaska, and Canada.

1h

Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers

Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, Princeton University and Aix-Marseille University, published today in Science Advances.

1h

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap

In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study led by CIRES Fellow Mike Willis, an assistant professor of Geology at CU Boulder. That dwarfs the ice's previous average speed of about 2 inches per day and has challenged scientists' assumptions about

1h

Hurricane Communication Is as Complex as the Storms Themselves

Wind intensity categories are a narrow and misleading gauge of hurricane-related risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Gaia hints at our Galaxy’s turbulent life

Our Milky Way galaxy is still enduring the effects of a near collision that set millions of stars moving like ripples on a pond, the Gaia star mapping mission has shown.

1h

Women who breastfeed for at least five months have more kids

New research shows that women who breastfeed their first child for five months or longer are more likely to have three or more children, and less likely to have only one child.

1h

Oldest-known aquatic reptiles probably spent time on land

A comprehensive analysis of Mesosaurus fossils shows that bones from adults share similarities with land-dwelling animals — suggesting older Mesosaurus were semi-aquatic, whereas the juveniles spent their time in the water. This new research emphasizes the importance of thoroughly analyzing fossilized remains from across all stages of a reptile's life to get a full appreciation of its lifestyle a

1h

Multi-directional activity control of cellular processes as a new tool

The spatial and temporal dynamics of proteins or organelles plays a crucial role in controlling various cellular processes and in development of diseases. Yet, acute control of activity at distinct locations within a cell cannot be achieved. Scientists now present a new chemo-optogenetic method that enables tunable, reversible, and rapid control of activity at multiple subcellular compartments wit

1h

Looking back in time to watch for a different kind of black hole

A simulation has suggested what astronomers should look for if they search the skies for a direct collapse black hole in its early stages.

1h

Premature brains develop differently in boys and girls

Brains of baby boys born prematurely are affected differently and more severely than premature infant girls' brains.

1h

Fly mating choices may help explain variation across species

Scientists have shed new light on the impact of sexual selection on species diversity after studying the mating rituals of dance flies.

1h

New micro-platform reveals cancer cells' natural behavior

A new cell culture platform allows researchers to observe never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope, leading to explanations of long-known cancer characteristics.

1h

College students have unequal access to reliable technology, study finds

Smartphones and laptops seem ubiquitous at US universities, but there is still a 'digital divide,' with some students less likely than others to have consistent access to reliable technology, according to a new study.

1h

Two quantum dots are better than one: Using one dot to sense changes in another

Researchers developed the first device that can detect single-electron events in a self-assembled quantum dot in real time. The device detects the single-electron tunneling events of one quantum dot as changes in the current produced by a second quantum dot in close proximity. This device allows single-electron events in quantum dots to be investigated, which is beneficial for the development of p

1h

Attractor Networks

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1h

Studying Greenland’s Ice to Understand Climate Change

Earlier this year, Lucas Jackson, a photographer with Reuters, joined a team of scientists affiliated with a NASA project named Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) and traveled with it to the Greenland ice sheet and fjords. Jackson photographed the researchers as they set up their scientific equipment and took readings to help understand the ongoing impact of the melting glaciers and map out what to e

1h

Humans have been messing with the climate for thousands of years

Nexus Media News By clearing forests and raising animals, early farmers cranked up the global thermostat, possibly preventing another ice age. If not for these earliest agronomists, Earth might be significantly cooler today than it is.

1h

NIH Announces Plans to Update Harassment Policies

The agency also declares its intent to better educate the scientific community about sexual harassment.

1h

How long does a quantum jump take?

Quantum jumps are usually regarded to be instantaneous. However, new measurement methods are so precise that it has now become possible to observe such a process and to measure its duration precisely — for example the famous 'photoelectric effect', first described by Albert Einstein.

1h

Moderate warming could melt East Antarctic Ice Sheet

Parts of the world's largest ice sheet would melt if Antarctic warming of just 2°C is sustained for millennia, according to international research. Scientists used evidence from warm periods in Earth's history to see how the East Antarctic Ice Sheet might react to a warming climate.

1h

New nanoparticle superstructures made from pyramid-shaped building blocks

In research that may help bridge the divide between the nano and the macro, chemists have used pyramid-shaped nanoparticles to create what might be the most complex macroscale superstructure ever assembled.

1h

Diverse forests are stronger against drought

Researchers report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. The results, which expand on previous work that looked at individual tree species' resilience based on hydraulic traits, lead to new research directions on forest resilience and inform forest managers working to rebuild forests after logging or wildfire.

1h

Zombie cells found in brains of mice prior to cognitive loss

Zombie cells are the ones that can't die but are equally unable to perform the functions of a normal cell. These zombie, or senescent, cells are implicated in a number of age-related diseases. Researchers have now expanded that list.

1h

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of cl

1h

Wildlife Detective Uses DNA to Link Stolen Ivory to Big Cartels

A new method looks at the DNA of elephant tusks to pinpoint the crime networks behind disparate stashes of poached ivory.

1h

Trilobites: Elephant Tusk DNA Helps Track Ivory Poachers

Researchers are examining the genetic data in seized elephant ivory to trace it back to the animals’ homelands and connect it to global trafficking crimes.

2h

Giant Ice Volcanoes Once Covered Dwarf Planet Ceres

A new study suggests a strange and surprisingly lively geological cycle for the small world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap

In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study led by CIRES Fellow Mike Willis, an assistant professor of Geology at CU Boulder. That dwarfs the ice's previous average speed of about 2 inches per day and has challenged scientists' assumptions about

2h

Outside competition breeds more trust among coworkers: Study

Working in a competitive industry fosters a greater level of trust amongst workers, finds a new study from the University of British Columbia, Princeton University and Aix-Marseille University, published today in Science: Advances.

2h

From crystals to climate: 'Gold standard' timeline links flood basalts to climate change

Princeton geologists used tiny zircon crystals found in volcanic ash to rewrite the timeline for the eruptions of the Columbia River flood basalts, a series of massive lava flows that coincided with an ancient global warming period 16 million years ago.

2h

Three major cartels exposed for large shipments of illegal ivory

By genetically matching elephant tusks from large ivory seizures and comparing this information to details including the ivory's shipping port of export, researchers have exposed the three major exporters illegally smuggling the greatest amount of ivory out of Africa.

2h

Amino acid deficiency connected to new viral disease

In their study of hospital patients infected with SFTS (severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome) virus, Xiao-Kun Li and colleagues show that lower levels of the amino acid arginine are associated with low blood platelet count and immune suppression among the patients.

2h

French 2017 presidential election: Social media, fake news, and political communities

CNRS and EHESS researchers analyzed nearly 60 million political tweets posted during the 2017 presidential election in France. They noted that fake news flagged by the Le Monde Decodex fact-checking website accounted for only 0.1 percent of all Twitter content, and that 73 percent of the bogus information was spread by two political communities. Their findings are published in PLOS ONE.

2h

Flood frequency of the world's largest river has increased fivefold

A recent study of more than 100 years of river level records from the Amazon shows a significant increase in frequency and severity of floods.

2h

When refugees are barred from working, long-term integration suffers

Many European countries prevent asylum seekers from working for a certain waiting period after arrival. These policies can considerably slow their integration years later. Five years after Germany introduced a shorter waiting period in 2000, employment rates were 20 percent lower for refugees who, under the previous policy, had to wait an additional 7 months before entering the labor market. It to

2h

DNA tests of illegal ivory link multiple ivory shipments to same dealers

In a paper published Sept. 19 in the journal Science Advances, an international team led by scientists at the University of Washington reports that DNA test results of large ivory seizures made by law enforcement have linked multiple ivory shipments over the three-year period, when this trafficking reached its peak, to the same network of dealers operating out of a handful of African ports.

2h

'Robotic Skins' turn everyday objects into robots

When you think of robotics, you likely think of something rigid, heavy, and built for a specific purpose. New 'Robotic Skins' technology developed by Yale researchers flips that notion on its head, allowing users to animate the inanimate and turn everyday objects into robots.

2h

Scientists Just Found the Guys Who Are Killing Africa’s Elephants

How do you crack the complicated empire of cartels that kill hundreds of thousands of elephants every year for their ivory? You put an international slew of gumshoe geneticists on their tail.

2h

DIY Gun Activist Cody Wilson Accused of Child Sexual Assault

A Texas court issued a warrant for the Defense Distributed founder's arrest on Wednesday.

2h

The Three Major Cartels Behind the Downfall of Africa’s Elephants

Samuel Wasser has noticed that the tusks are getting smaller. Since 2005, he has been helping customs officials analyze the vast quantities of illegally smuggled elephant ivory that circulate around the world. Such shipments are on the rise , and more than 40 tons are seized every year. At the same time, the average size of the confiscated tusks has fallen; having killed off many of the largest e

2h

Milk alternatives: Which are good for both you and the planet?

Milks made from peas, nuts and more are taking supermarket shelves by storm. Here's what you should be drinking if you care about your health and the environment

2h

Killing ‘zombie’ brain cells can prevent memory loss in mice

Dysfunctional, or 'senescent', brain cells can drive brain degeneration – and killing them saved mice from further damage and memory loss

2h

Photos: Seized Elephant Ivory Reveals How Massive Cartels Operate

Scientists are using elephant DNA to crack the code on ivory cartels.

2h

DNA from seized elephant ivory unmasks 3 big trafficking cartels in Africa

Scientists can sleuth out wildlife crime and aid law enforcement by tracing elephant DNA from ivory seizures back to the source.

2h

High-tech ‘skins’ turn everyday objects into robots

Robotic skins turn inanimate objects into multipurpose machines.

2h

Jon M. Chu Shot This Short Film Entirely on an iPhone XS Max

The _Crazy Rich Asians_ director shot a kinetic short for WIRED titled _Somewhere_, and he did the whole thing on a new iPhone.

2h

Flood frequency of the world's largest river has increased fivefold

A recent study of more than 100 years of river level records from the Amazon shows a significant increase in frequency and severity of floods. The scientists' analysis of the potential causes could contribute to more accurate flood prediction for the Amazon Basin.

2h

From crystals to climate: 'Gold standard' timeline links flood basalts to climate change

Imagine an enormous volcano erupting in the Pacific Northwest, pouring lava across Washington, Oregon and Idaho. Imagine the lava flooding out until river valleys are filled in. Until bushes and shrubs are buried in liquid rock. Until the tallest trees are completely covered.

2h

When refugees are barred from working, long-term integration suffers

As refugee flows have increased around the world, many governments are grappling with acute political pressure along with the logistical challenges of supporting refugees and processing asylum applications. Perhaps most notably in Europe, where populist and other opposition parties have seized on the refugee crisis, leaders are pulled in two different directions as they seek both political self-pr

2h

DNA tests of illegal ivory link multiple ivory shipments to same dealers

The international trade in elephant ivory has been illegal since 1989, yet African elephant numbers continue to decline. In 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature cited ivory poaching as a primary reason for a staggering loss of about 111,000 elephants between 2005 and 2015—leaving their total numbers at an estimated 415,000.

2h

Monsanto asks judge to throw out $289M award in cancer suit

Agribusiness company Monsanto has asked a San Francisco judge to throw out a jury's $289 million award to a former school groundskeeper who said the company's Roundup weed killer left him dying of cancer.

2h

Deadly plant disease threatens $250M rose business

The outlook for American-grown roses is becoming a bit less rosy, with the spread of an incurable virus that's causing major damage to the nation's $250-million-a-year rose business.

2h

Mosquitoes Could Carry Plastic Particles Into the Food Chain

Microplastics stay in the insects’ bodies from larva to adulthood — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Mouth bacteria may predict child’s obesity risk

The kind of oral bacteria—even the good kind—in a two-year-old’s mouth may predict their weight gain, a new study reports. The findings suggest this understudied collection of microorganisms could serve as an early indicator for childhood obesity, according to the paper, which appears in Scientific Reports . “One in three children in the United States is overweight or obese,” says senior author K

2h

Plant growth-promoting bacteria enhance plant salinity tolerance

Soil salinity is a serious problem in crop production, but the work of scientists helps to relieve it.

2h

Light provides spin

Physicists have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. They have thus found the key to an important characteristic of these crystals, which could play an important role in the development of new solar cells.

2h

EU opens investigation into how Amazon uses dataEU M. Vestager Amazon

European authorities said Wednesday they have opened a preliminary antitrust investigation into Amazon over the e-commerce giant's treatment of smaller merchants on its website.

2h

Florence death toll climbs to 37; Trump visits stricken area

The death toll from Hurricane Florence climbed to at least 37, including two women who drowned when a sheriff's van taking them to a mental health facility was swept away by floodwaters, and North Carolina's governor pleaded with thousands of evacuees not to return home just yet.

2h

New research identifies abundant endangered fish below waterfall in San Juan River

Prolonged drought and increased water use in the southwest United States have led to shrinking reservoirs and the emergence of natural features that are affecting endangered species and river recreation. One feature, a waterfall known as the Piute Farms Waterfall, has formed in an area upstream of Lake Powell where the San Juan River serves as a border between the Navajo Nation to the south and Gl

2h

Study finds people flock, or behave similarly to others, despite reasoning abilities

Crowd panics, market bubbles, and other unpredictable collective behaviors would not happen if people were smart about these things and just thought through their behavior before they acted. Right? That's the perspective in economics, and even psychology and sociology.

2h

INL's TREAT reactor successfully completes first fueled experiment

Today at 5:05 p.m., the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) pulsed for a few seconds, subjecting a small capsule of light water reactor fuel to radiation and heat. The test marked the return of a capability that is critical to the United States' role in the development of nuclear fuels, for both the existing fleet and a new generation of advanced reactors und

2h

Where you live might influence how you measure up against your peers

Social psychologists uncover important mechanisms of social comparison, showing that it depends on specific, universal social settings and situations.

2h

New research identifies abundant endangered fish below waterfall in San Juan River

A new study published in the journal River Research and Applications provides insight into the magnitude of the effect this waterfall has on endangered fishes in the San Juan River. From 2015-2017 more than 1,000 razorback sucker and dozens of Colorado pikeminnow were detected downstream of the waterfall. Some fish moved to this location from up to 600 miles away in the Colorado River.

3h

Women who breastfeed for at least five months have more kids

Cornell University professor of sociology Vida Maralani found in new research that women who breastfeed their first child for five months or longer are more likely to have three of more children, and less likely to have only one child.

3h

Gaia detects a shake in the Milky Way

A team led by researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB, UB-IEEC) and the University of Groningen has found, through the analysis of Gaia data, substructures which were unknown so far in the Milky Way. The findings, which appeared when combining positions and speed of six million stars from our galaxy's disk, have been published in the journal Nature.

3h

How long does a quantum jump take?

Quantum jumps are usually regarded to be instantaneous. However, new measurement methods are so precise that it has now become possible to observe such a process and to measure its duration precisely — for example the famous 'photoelectric effect', first described by Albert Einstein.

3h

New nanoparticle superstructures made from pyramid-shaped building blocks

In research that may help bridge the divide between the nano and the macro, Brown University chemists have used pyramid-shaped nanoparticles to create what might be the most complex macroscale superstructure ever assembled.

3h

Team of researchers determines absolute duration of photoelectric effect for the first time

It provides the basis for solar energy and global communications: the photoelectric effect. Albert Einstein described it over a century ago. For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ), and the TU Wien have now measured the absolute duration of the light absorption and of the resulting photoelectron which is release

3h

Sustained levels of moderate warming could melt the East Antarctic Ice Sheet

Imperial experts have predicted that sustained Antarctic warming of just 2°C could melt the largest ice sheet on earth.

3h

Moderate warming could melt East Antarctic Ice Sheet

Parts of the world's largest ice sheet would melt if Antarctic warming of just 2°C is sustained for millennia, according to international research.University of Queensland scientist Dr Kevin Welsh was part of a team that used evidence from warm periods in Earth's history to see how the East Antarctic Ice Sheet might react to a warming climate.

3h

Diverse forests are stronger against drought

In a paper published in Nature, researchers including University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. The results, which expand on previous work that looked at individual tree species' resilience based on hydraulic traits, lead to new research directions on forest resilie

3h

Zombie cells found in brains of mice prior to cognitive loss

Zombie cells are the ones that can't die but are equally unable to perform the functions of a normal cell. These zombie, or senescent, cells are implicated in a number of age-related diseases. And with a new letter in Nature, Mayo Clinic researchers have expanded that list.

3h

Characterization of pregnancy microbiome reveals variations in bacterial diversity

In a study published today in Genome Research, researchers performed detailed whole-community sequencing on the microbial communities of three maternal body sites (vagina, gut, and oral cavity) over the course of pregnancy from the first trimester through delivery revealing variations in bacterial diversity.

3h

John Deere Just Cost Farmers Their Right to Repair

The California Farm Bureau has given away the right of farmers to fix their equipment without going through a dealer.

3h

New White House Biodefense Plan Omits Climate Change

Research has shown that warming may aide the spread of some infectious diseases — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Islandsk kæmpevulkan vågnet: 'Kan blive meget større og voldsommere end i 2010'

Vulkanen Katla har været i udbrud minimum en gang per århundrede. Sidste gang var i oktober 1918.

3h

Wiping Out the Brain’s Retired Cells Prevents a Hallmark of Alzheimer's

In 2016, Darren Baker and Jan van Deursen from the Mayo Clinic announced that they had discovered a new way to prolong the life of mice: They cleansed the rodents of retired cells. Over time, the cells of complex organisms accrue damage in their DNA, which threatens to turn them into tumors. Some cells defuse this threat by entering a state called senescence: They don’t die, but they permanently

3h

The Wrong Question for Brett Kavanaugh

Updated on September 19 at 3:25 p.m. ET In the three days since the public first learned of Christine Blasey Ford’s allegation that a teenage Brett Kavanaugh attacked her, Kavanaugh and his defenders have focused on the specifics of Ford’s claim with clinical precision. Kavanaugh said in a statement on Monday that “I have never done anything like what the accuser describes—to her or to anyone.” M

3h

Midterm Time Capsule, 48 Days to Go: Children, the Future, Cancer, Due Process

Here are some items from the news that barely break the consciousness-barrier, amid the Kavanaugh confirmation fight and other chaos, but that I expect will be considered significant in the history of our times: (1) Children . Starting back in the Clinton administration, U.S. immigration authorities have been under court supervision for handling any children who are caught with parents or other a

3h

Removing faulty brain cells staves off dementia in mice

Researchers say that when they swept away the senescent brain cells in mice, the outwards symptoms of their dementia vanished Purging “zombie cells” from the brain could stave off the effects of dementia, a groundbreaking study has found. The research in mice is the first to show that so-called senescent cells, which enter a state of suspended animation as the body ages, contribute to neurodegene

3h

Over-the-hill cells may cause trouble in the aging brain

Killing dormant cells in the brains of mice staved off memory trouble.

3h

Pirates Needed Science Too

On International Talk Like a Pirate Day, here's an eye-patch-witness account of how science helps in all peg-leg walks of life, even piracy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Clearing out old cells might help the brain

A popular anti-aging strategy keeps mice from getting senile.

3h

7 ways Michigan’s Medicaid expansion paid off financially

When low-income Michigan residents enrolled in an expanded Medicaid program, many got more than just coverage for their health needs—they also got a boost to their wallets, according to a new study. People who enrolled in the state’s new health plan have experienced fewer debt problems, bankruptcies, evictions, and other financial issues than they had before enrollment, a new analysis of thousand

3h

A little labeling goes a long way

New research from Northwestern University reveals that infants can use even a few labeled examples to spark the acquisition of object categories. Those labeled examples lead infants to initiate the process of categorization, after which they can integrate all subsequent objects, labeled or unlabeled, into their evolving category representation.

3h

People can handle the truth (more than you think)

New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business explores the consequences of honesty in everyday life and determines that people can often afford to be more honest than they think.

3h

Firmware at the blink of an eye: Scientists develop new technology of alloy steel rolling

A research team from the NUST MISIS Department of Pressure Metal Treatment has developed a new technology which simplifies the process of hot rolling seamless pipes made of alloy and high-alloy steel. The consistent use of two simple male punches, tools that turn an unruly steel blank into a hollow "sleeve", is a distinctive feature of the technology.

3h

if pigeons were brilliant, would they flock?

UC Davis researcher looked at how people behave in simple reasoning games and found that people are usually driven to 'flock,' or behave similarly to others in a given situation.

3h

UA study reveals Arizona EMTs face 39-percent greater risk of suicide

UA medical student creates resiliency website for emergency workers and develops partnership with forest firefighters to measure its effectiveness.

3h

Diverse forests are stronger against drought

Diversity is strength, even among forests. In a paper published in Nature, researchers led by University of Utah biologist William Anderegg report that forests with trees that employ a high diversity of traits related to water use suffer less of an impact from drought. The results, which expand on previous work that looked at individual tree species' resilience based on hydraulic traits, lead to n

3h

Sustained levels of moderate warming could melt the East Antarctic Ice Sheet

New research on marine sediment layers from Antarctica indicates that the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) retreated during extended warm periods in the past, when temperatures were like those predicted for this century.

3h

New nanoparticle superstructures made from pyramid-shaped building blocks

Researchers from Brown University have assembled complex macroscale superstructures from pyramid-shaped nanoparticle building blocks. The research, described in the journal Nature, demonstrates a promising new way to bring the useful properties of nanoparticles to macroscale materials and devices.

3h

Former exec sues Spotify over boys-only events and pay

A former sales executive is suing Spotify for gender discrimination and equal pay violations, saying executives organized "boys' trips" that excluded women and that the company paid men more for the same work.

3h

UMN researchers discover influenza virus doesn't replicate equally in all cells

The seasonal flu is caused by different subtypes of Influenza A virus and typically leads to the death of half a million people each year. In order to better understand this virus and how it spreads, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers took a closer look at the cells inside the lungs. What they discovered is not only is the immune system response tuned to the amount of virus replica

3h

Camping equipment made by people that truly know the great outdoors

Gadgets Outdoor Life's gear is designed for quality and comfort. Outdoor Life magazine recently designed, tested, and launched their own line of equipment under the name OL Guide Life. Their gear focuses on quality and comfort.

3h

New study examines changing soil structures and influence on water resources in US

From the garden in your backyard to your local watershed to the entirety of North America, structural changes are taking place in the soil underfoot—and evidence suggests it's happening faster than previously thought, altering water quality and availability throughout the U.S.

3h

Researchers develop microbubble scrubber to destroy dangerous biofilms

Stiff microbial films often coat medical devices, household items and infrastructure such as the inside of water supply pipes, and can lead to dangerous infections. Researchers have developed a system that harnesses the power of bubbles to propel tiny particles through the surfaces of these tough films and deliver an antiseptic deathblow to the microbes living inside.

3h

Optical detection of picomolar concentrations of RNA using switches in plasmonic chirality

Even tiny amounts of viruses can have disastrous consequences. RNA identification can reveal the type of virus present. A fast and sensitive technique based on optical detection has now been outlined in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Scientists from Germany and Finland have demonstrated the binding of an RNA target to a probe made of gold nanorods and a DNA origami structure. Chirality switches tr

3h

Luigi Cavalli-Sforza, 96, Who Tracked Genes Through History, Dies

Before 23andMe and Ancestry.com, he did groundbreaking work exploring how genes reveal where people come from and whom they’re related to.

3h

Trilobites: Kidney Stones Are More Beautiful Than You Might Think

New research found that the painful deposits are surprisingly dynamic, forming much like microscopic coral reefs, and could help with treating them.

3h

New insight into aging

Researchers examined the effects of aging on neuroplasticity in the primary auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes auditory information. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's ability to modify its connections and function in response to environmental demands, an important process in learning.

3h

When a chemical tag makes the difference in cell fate and gene expression

Scientists have uncovered the role of special chemical 'tags' in controlling vital genes involved in early mammalian development.

3h

‘Even the Best-Run Hurricane Shelters Can Be Highly Stressful’

When Hurricane Florence made landfall in coastal North Carolina on Friday morning, some 20,000 residents had evacuated from their home and were taking refuge in 157 shelters, according to Governor Roy Cooper. “We’ve spent the last week telling people to evacuate. Now we’re working very hard to save lives,” Cooper said Friday in an interview with NPR . In the days since, some of those evacuees hav

3h

A Man Says His DNA Test Proves He’s Black, and He’s Suing

In 2014, Ralph Taylor applied to have his insurance company in Washington State certified as a “disadvantaged business enterprise.” The DBE program at the U.S. Department of Transportation was originally designed to help minority- and woman-owned businesses win government contracts. So as proof of his minority status, Taylor submitted the results of a DNA test, estimating his ancestry to be 90 pe

3h

Do IVF And Other Infertility Tech Lead To Health Risks For The Baby? Maybe

A small study of teens who were conceived via assisted reproductive technology finds a significant number already have hypertension and premature "age-related changes" in their blood vessels. (Image credit: Steve Debenport/Getty Images)

3h

Journal of the American Medical Association shines spotlight on geroscience

Highlighting how geroscience paves the way for therapeutic interventions and extending healthspan at large, three articles co-authored by five AFAR experts will appear in the October 2, 2018 print edition of JAMA and are now available online.

3h

Researchers develop microbubble scrubber to destroy dangerous biofilms

Stiff microbial films often coat medical devices, household items and infrastructure such as the inside of water supply pipes, and can lead to dangerous infections. Researchers have developed a system that harnesses the power of bubbles to propel tiny particles through the surfaces of these tough films and deliver an antiseptic deathblow to the microbes living inside.

3h

Viral RNA sensing

Even tiny amounts of viruses can have disastrous consequences. RNA identification can reveal the type of virus present. A fast and sensitive technique based on optical detection has now been outlined in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Scientists from Germany and Finland have demonstrated the binding of an RNA target to a probe made of gold nanorods and a DNA origami structure. Chirality switches tr

3h

Newborn opioid withdrawal requires a 'cascade of care,' study suggests

Effective management of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) — withdrawal symptoms occurring in infants exposed to opioids in utero — requires a coordinated 'cascade of care' from prevention through long-term follow-up, reports a study in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwe

3h

Chinese-led team shows mass extinction happened in geological 'instant'

Scientists from China, the USA and Canada combined new high-resolution radiometric dating of seven closely spaced layers of volcanic material from South China's Penglaitan section with detailed biostratigraphy and geochemical analyses. Results show the duration of the end-Permian mass extinction to be about 31,000 years, essentially instantaneous by geological standards.

3h

Mineral weathering from thawing permafrost can release substantial CO2

The amount of carbon dioxide released from thawing permafrost might be greater than previously thought, according to a new study by ecologists. The research is the first to document the potential for substantial contributions of CO2 from thawing permafrost to the atmosphere through an inorganic process called mineral weathering.

4h

Strange, long-lasting stellar explosion births new star

Scientists have witnessed the birth of a new star from a strange stellar explosion. The explosions of stars, known as supernovae, can be so bright they outshine their host galaxies. They take months or years to fade away, and sometimes, the gaseous remains of the explosion slam into hydrogen-rich gas and temporarily get bright again—but could they remain luminous without any outside interference?

4h

What Is 13,000 Feet Tall, Millions of Years Old, and Spews Out Ice?

Ice volcanoes sound like something out of a Syfy-channel movie, perhaps produced by the same people behind the Sharknado franchise: a muddy mix of ice, rock, and salts erupting through cracks in the terrain and scattering out onto the landscape, freezing everything in its path. But they are in fact a natural phenomenon that scientists believe occurs across our solar system and beyond. For several

4h

‘I’d Do Her’: Mike Bloomberg and the Underbelly of #MeToo

If you find yourself seeking, in these turbulent times, evidence of steadiness among the chaos—proof that even as the seas rise and the winds whip and the world that was gives way to the world that will be, some things will remain the same—here is a fact that seems always to be true: Mike Bloomberg is considering a run for president . The newest version of the old truth comes from an article publ

4h

Strategies to protect bone health in hematologic stem cell transplant recipients

A new review by the International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group on Cancer and Bone Disease looks at the major factors affecting bone health in mematologic stem cell transplant recipients, and provides expert guidance for the monitoring, evaluation and treatment of bone loss in these patients.

4h

10 mysteries of the universe: What came before the big bang?

Searing bursts of radio waves first spotted a decade ago could come from bouncing black holes – and that suggests a universe might have existed before ours

4h

Smart pills can transmit data to your doctors, but what about privacy?

Medicines that record when they have been taken are already being prescribed. Ethical issues must be addressed, say I. Glenn Cohen and Alex Pearlman

4h

Plutonium and Its Discontents

Technology For 75 years, scientists have been trying to devise a way to make a vast supply of radioactive and chemically dangerous waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation safe. 09/19/2018 Valerie Brown, Contributor To read more…

4h

Scientists examine variations in a cell's protein factory

You can think of a cell in your body like a miniature factory, creating a final product called proteins, which carry out various tasks and functions. In this cellular factory, genes control the series of sequential steps needed to create proteins, much like an assembly line moving a product along to completion. This process is known as gene expression.

4h

Leaving Academic Science Doesn't Make You a Failure

The notion that intellectual freedom and fulfilling careers can't be found elsewhere is simply wrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Drug fights liver cancer with fewer side effects

Researchers have developed a new drug called FFW that could potentially stop the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or primary liver cancer. The discovery opens the door for more effective treatments with fewer side effects. HCC is a fast-growing cancer of the liver, and patients typically survive 11 months after diagnosis. HCC accounts for over 90 percent of all liver cancers and pose

4h

A Short History of the Missing Universe

The cosmos plays hide-and-seek. Sometimes, though, even when astronomers have a hunch for where their prey might hide, it can take them decades of searching to confirm it. The case of the universe’s missing matter — a case that appears to now be closed, as I reported earlier this month — is one such instance. To me, it is a fascinating tale in which clever cosmological models drew a treasure map

4h

Fiber optic sensor measures tiny magnetic fields

Researchers have developed a light-based technique for measuring very weak magnetic fields, such as those produced when neurons fire in the brain. The inexpensive and compact sensors could offer an alternative to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems currently used to map brain activity without the expensive cooling or electromagnetic shielding required by MRI machines.

4h

Engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors

In a breakthrough for nanotechnology, engineers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed the first method for selecting and switching the mechanical motion of nanomotors among multiple modes with simple visible light as the stimulus.

4h

Have A Cool Idea To Help End World Hunger? Pitch It To The U.N.

At the World Food Programme's Innovation Accelerator, teams test out new proposals to stop hunger. Anyone can submit an idea. And September deadlines are coming up. (Image credit: Cem Genco/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

4h

Scientists crack genetic code of cane toad

A group of scientists from UNSW Sydney, the University of Sydney, Deakin University, Portugal and Brazil have unlocked the DNA of the cane toad, a poisonous amphibian that is a threat to many native Australian species. The findings were published in academic journal GigaScience today.

4h

Going viral: Investors pay more attention to social media stocks

What is a social media firm worth? Following how retail investors pay attention to company tickers is one piece of the puzzle. In a new study published this week in International Journal of Economics and Finance, a finance scholar from Michigan Technological University delves into the pricing behavior of social media firms. The study found that investors pay attention to social media stocks over o

4h

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of cl

4h

Oldest-known aquatic reptiles probably spent time on land

The oldest known aquatic reptiles, the mesosaurs, probably spent part of their life on land, reveals a new study published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. The fossilized bones of adult Mesosaurus share similarities with land-dwelling animals, which—coupled with the relative scarcity of land-weathered fossilized remains of large specimens—suggests that older mesosaurs were semi-aquatic, wher

4h

Fiber optic sensor measures tiny magnetic fields

Researchers have developed a light-based technique for measuring very weak magnetic fields, such as those produced when neurons fire in the brain.

4h

More doctor visits lead to less suicide attempts for fibromyalgia patients

Fibromyalgia patients who regularly visit their physicians are much less likely to attempt suicide than those who do not, according to a new Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Arthritis Care & Research.

4h

New insight into aging

Researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital (The Neuro) of McGill University examined the effects of aging on neuroplasticity in the primary auditory cortex, the part of the brain that processes auditory information. Neuroplasticity refers to the brain's ability to modify its connections and function in response to environmental demands, an important process in learning.

4h

UT engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors

Engineers at UT Austin develop world's first method for controlling the motion of nanomotors with simple visible light as the stimulus.

4h

Scientists examine variations in a cell's protein factory

A group led by Leor S. Weinberger, PhD, director of the Center for Cell Circuitry at the Gladstone Institutes, are studying the factors within a cell that can influence noise. They discovered that for 85 percent of genes, the noise magnitude is higher in the last step as compared to the first step.

4h

Mineral weathering from thawing permafrost can release substantial CO2

The amount of carbon dioxide released from thawing permafrost might be greater than previously thought, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. The research is the first to document the potential for substantial contributions of CO2 from thawing permafrost to the atmosphere through an inorganic process called mineral weathering.

4h

Anti-inflammatory protein promotes healthy gut bacteria to curb obesity

Scientists from the UNC School of Medicine discovered that the anti-inflammatory protein NLRP12 normally helps protect mice against obesity and insulin resistance when they are fed a high-fat diet. The researchers also reported that the NLRP12 gene is underactive in people who are obese, making it a potential therapeutic target for treating obesity and diabetes, both of which are risk factors for

4h

'The Peace of Westphalia also had its dark side'

The 52nd German Historians' Convention (Deutscher Historikertag) is to reevaluate the peace agreement 370 years ago – "It was only with the Peace of Westphalia that the politics of colonization became possible" – "Its global historical dimensions have long been overlooked" – Two years after Steinmeier's speech, the Historians' Convention will also conduct an interim review of the debate "Peace of

4h

The Alt-Right Are Savvy Internet Users. Stop Letting Them Surprise You

A new study from Data & Society reveals how reactionary, far-right commentators have built an alternative media ecosystem on YouTube: by using the platform exactly as intended.

4h

PlayStation Classic: Release Date, Price, Specs, How to Pre-Order

Sony’s upcoming throwback console promises to include such hits as Final Fantasy VII and Ridge Racer.

4h

'Hoppy' beer without exploding bottles and too much alcohol

The forgotten art of "dry-hopping" beer to enhance flavor is back in vogue. But this practice sometimes has undesirable side effects, such as an unexpectedly high alcohol content and high pressures that could cause beer bottles to break. Now, research published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explains the biochemical basis of these unintended consequences, which could help brewe

4h

California wants to stop hackers from taking control of smart gadgets

A proposed state law would help bolster the security of internet-connected devices, but what’s really needed is federal action.

4h

Newly identified African bird species already in trouble

Central Africa's Albertine Rift region is a biodiversity hotspot consisting of a system of highlands that spans six countries. Recent studies have shown that the population of sooty bush-shrikes occupying the region's mid-elevation forests is a distinct species, and new research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications reveals that this newly discovered species may already be endangered due to

4h

Improving 'silvopastures' for bird conservation

The adoption of "silvopastures"—incorporating trees into pastureland—can provide habitat for forest bird species and improve connectivity in landscapes fragmented by agriculture. But how do silvopastures measure up to natural forest habitat? New research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that birds in silvopasture forage less efficiently than those in forest fragments but offers s

4h

What Sorry for Your Loss Understands About Grief

By the end of the fourth episode of Sorry for Your Loss , a new drama debuting on Facebook Watch, I’d cried so hard that one of my contact lenses had been physically dislodged from my eye. It’s the kind of series that’s instantly so fully formed, so funny and candid and wrenching right from the start, that you almost question the emotional propriety of it all. Should dead husbands be such an effi

4h

Going viral: Investors pay more attention to social media stocks

What is the value of a social media firm? Paying attention to what investors tune into keeps a finger on the pulse of market fluctuations. And a new study finds that retail investors pay attention to social media stocks over other stocks.

5h

When a chemical tag makes the difference in cell fate and gene expression

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain, have uncovered the role of special chemical 'tags' in controlling vital genes involved in early mammalian development, publishing their findings in the journal Nature Genetics.

5h

Origami inspires highly efficient solar steam generator

Water covers most of the globe, yet many regions still suffer from a lack of clean drinking water. If scientists could efficiently and sustainably turn seawater into clean water, a looming global water crisis might be averted. Now, inspired by origami, the Japanese art of paper folding, researchers have devised a solar steam generator that approaches 100 percent efficiency for the production of cl

5h

Syracuse study reveals cannabinoid drugs make pain feel 'less unpleasant, more tolerable'

Researchers have determined that cannabinoid drugs do not appear to reduce the intensity of experimental pain, but, instead, may make pain feel less unpleasant and more tolerable. The paper, whose publication coincides with 'Pain Awareness Month,' represents the first systematic review of experimental research into the effects of cannabis on pain.

5h

New insights into the way the brain combines memories to solve problems

Humans can creatively combine their memories to solve problems and draw new insights, a process that depends on episodic memory. But current theories do not easily explain how people can use their episodic memories to arrive at these novel insights. Results from researchers at DeepMind and Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, publishing in the journal Neuron on Sept. 19, provide a window into t

5h

Scientists crack genetic code of cane toad

A group of scientists from UNSW Sydney, the University of Sydney, Deakin University, Portugal and Brazil have unlocked the DNA of the cane toad, a poisonous amphibian that is a threat to many native Australian species. The findings were published in academic journal GigaScience today.

5h

Milliarder er på spil i verdens første autonome vaske- og afisningshal for fly

Reducerer vasketiden fra 4-10 timer til 20 minutter.

5h

We already know air pollution hurts your heart—and it might also hurt your brain

Health Higher levels of air pollution may be linked to higher risk of dementia. The air you breathe could impact your brain. Exposure to high levels of air pollution might contribute to the development of dementia later in life.

5h

Astronomer finder Star Trek-karakters hjemplanet

Astronomer har fundet en planet omkring stjernen 40 Eridani A, som minder om den kultfiguren Spock kommer fra.

5h

The satellite that can clean up space rubbish from Earth's orbit

It's part of a plan to clean up the millions of pieces of rubbish floating in Earth's orbit.

5h

Starvation fears after piglets stolen from London farm

There are fears for the welfare of 11 tiny piglets stolen from a farm in London.

5h

A Five-Letter Adjective Is Shaking Up Politics in Eastern Europe

There is plenty to consider when a country decides to change its name. What impact, for example, will it have on its government institutions, its passports, or its currency? Will the change affect its national airline or its sports teams? How does a country go about registering its new name with international institutions? When Macedonians head to the polls later this month to cast their vote in

5h

A Surprising Finding About Refugees in Europe Amid a Political Reckoning

Three years after an estimated 1.3 million people sought asylum in Europe, immigration remains a polarizing issue that has reshaped the political landscape across the continent. It’s almost certain to dominate the agenda at a meeting of European Union leaders that begins Wednesday in Salzburg, Vienna: Immigration policy is a priority for Sebastian Kurz, the conservative chancellor of Austria whos

5h

What does it mean to represent? A semantic challenge for computational neuroscience.

Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons Philosophy, the love of knowledge, and science, the pursuit and application of knowledge, are kind of like siblings. Sometimes they fight, but most of the time they get along quite well. Today, I wanted to show how the two relate to one another by developing two stories. The first is a scientific paper by Zipser and Andersen from the late 1980s, and the second is

5h

The way plants get nutrients could fight weeds

Researchers have figured out how plants harness microbes in the soil to get nutrients, according to a new study. What they learned could help boost crop growth, fight weeds, and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides. In a process the team has named the “rhizophagy cycle” (rhizophagy means root eating), bacteria and fungi cycle between a free-living phase in the soil and a plant-de

5h

Why Do We Dream?

Why Do We Dream? Do dreams have a purpose, or are they all just stories and images our minds create? Why Do We Dream? Video of Why Do We Dream? Human Wednesday, September 19, 2018 – 10:45 Alistair Jennings, Contributor (Inside Science) — Why do we dream? Sigmund Freud said dreams are the hallucinatory fulfilment of an oppressed infantile wish. Well, that was 100 years ago — how do we think abou

5h

Remains of weapons, sandals and coins shed new light on Roman conquest of Northwest Iberia

Newly discovered remains of weapons, hobnails from sandals and coins will help experts piece together the untold story of how the Romans won control of Galicia and Northern Portugal from local tribes for the first time.

5h

'Hoppy' beer without exploding bottles and too much alcohol

The forgotten art of 'dry-hopping' beer to enhance flavor is back in vogue. But this practice sometimes has undesirable side effects, such as an unexpectedly high alcohol content and high pressures that could cause beer bottles to break. Now, research published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explains the biochemical basis of these unintended consequences, which could help brewe

5h

CTLA4 targeted therapy plus PD-1 targeted therapy could benefit women with ovarian cancer

An analysis of the NRG Oncology clinical trial NRG-GY003 suggests that adding ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the protein receptor CTLA-4, to a regimen with the checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab could improve the proportion with tumor response and progression-free survival hazard rates for women with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. These results were presented as a late-breaking a

5h

Oldest-known aquatic reptiles probably spent time on land

A comprehensive analysis of Mesosaurus fossils shows that bones from adults share similarities with land-dwelling animals — suggesting older Mesosaurus were semi-aquatic, whereas the juveniles spent their time in the water. This new research emphasizes the importance of thoroughly analyzing fossilized remains from across all stages of a reptile's life to get a full appreciation of its lifestyle a

5h

Study: Difficult people have most to gain from practicing compassion

The most disagreeable individuals, who are also the least likely to be kind, can benefit most from behaving more compassionately, a York University study has found. Disagreeable participants who performed acts of kindness in close relationships showed the greatest reductions in depression and greatest increases in life satisfaction.

5h

Aging Europe

Demographers from the Higher School of Economics and the University of Southern Denmark have created a detailed color map of population ageing in European countries; a collection of demographic stories, it uses color coding to indicate the varying stages of population aging across Europe.

5h

Heartbeat paces learning

The processing of external information varies during the phases of the cardiac cycle, shows a new study from the University of Jyväskylä.

5h

What your cell phone camera tells you about your brain

Your brain is structured to make the best possible decision given its limited resources, according to new research that unites cognitive science and information theory — the branch of mathematics that underlies modern communications technology.

5h

Why the hospital of the future will be your own home | Niels van Namen

Nobody likes going to the hospital, whether it's because of the logistical challenges of getting there, the astronomical costs of procedures or the alarming risks of complications like antibiotic-resistant bacteria. But what if we could get the lifesaving care provided by hospitals in our own homes? Health care futurist Niels van Namen shows how advances in technology are making home care a cheape

5h

Publicer eller forsvind: Ny undersøgelse identificerer verdens mest hyperaktive forskere

Flere end 9.000 forskere har publiceret mere end 72 studier på et enkelt år, viser kortlægning, der udstiller vidt forskellige opfattelser af medforfatter-rollen.

5h

The wider impact of illegal wildlife trade

Next month, world leaders will gather in London at the 2018 Illegal Wildlife Trade conference with the aim of stimulating the greater political commitment needed to stamp out wildlife crime.

5h

Cell mechanism regulating protein synthesis in stress conditions discovered

Researchers from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and the Medical Research Council Cambridge (UK), for the first time describe the mechanism used by cells to optimise the production of proteins in stressful situations by altering tRNA abundance.

5h

Getting help with parenting makes a difference — at any age

New Oxford University study finds that parenting interventions for helping children with behaviour problems are just as effective in school age, as in younger children.

5h

Lighting it up: A new non-toxic, cheap, and stable blue photoluminescent material

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have designed a novel photoluminescent material that is cheap to fabricate, does not use toxic starting materials, and is very stable, enhancing our understanding of the quantic nature of photoluminescence.

5h

Looking back in time to watch for a different kind of black hole

Black holes form when stars die, allowing the matter in them to collapse into an extremely dense object from which not even light can escape. Astronomers theorize that massive black holes could also form at the birth of a galaxy, but so far nobody has been able to look far enough back in time to observe the conditions creating these direct collapse black holes (DCBH).

5h

Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Drinking green tea has been linked to health benefits ranging from cardiovascular disease prevention to weight loss. Although many of these claims still need to be verified in the clinic, an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) appears to have beneficial effects in cells and animals. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for EGCG: sneaking therapeutic RNAs into ce

5h

Three things we can all learn from people who don't use smartphones or social media

Many of us spend hours every day tethered to our devices, pawing at the screen to see if it will deliver a few more likes or emails, monitoring the world and honing our online presence. Social networking platforms such as Whatsapp, Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook and Twitter are supposed to make us feel more connected. Yet our reliance on technology to "see" the social world around us can be a heavy

5h

Cell mechanism regulating protein synthesis in stress conditions discovered

Genes must be expressed in precise levels and at the exact moment if the complex balance regulating cell activity is to be maintained. Messenger RNA (mRNA) conveys genetic information from DNA to ribosomes, where proteins are synthesised through the union of amino acids. These amino acids are supplied by fragments of transfer RNA (tRNA), which decode the information contained within the mRNA codon

5h

Back to the future: Sony to release 'classic' PlayStationPlayStation Classic

Sony announced Wednesday it plans to launch a miniature games console designed like the original PlayStation pre-loaded with 20 vintage games as it joins the retro gaming craze just in time for Christmas.

5h

College students have unequal access to reliable technology, study finds

Smartphones and laptops seem ubiquitous at U.S. universities, but there is still a "digital divide," with some students less likely than others to have consistent access to reliable technology, according to a study co-authored by an Indiana University sociologist.

5h

Wave-particle interactions allow collision-free energy transfer in space plasma

A team finds evidence of collisionless energy transfer occurring in the plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

5h

Co-evolution between a 'parasite gene' and its host

A research team has delineated a complex symbiosis between a 'parasitic' noncoding RNA gene and its protein coding 'host' gene in human cells. The study reveals how co-evolution of the host gene and parasite gene has shaped a feedback mechanism in which the parasite gene plays a completely new and surprising part as regulator of the host gene protein production. The breakthrough finding opens an e

5h

Cobra-Crowned Sphinx Statue with Ceremonial Beard Discovered in Egypt

The small statue was found at the Temple of Kom Ombo.

5h

The Curse of America’s Illogical School-Day Schedule

The world does not revolve around you , teens are often told. Indeed it doesn’t, as they are reminded every school-day morning when disabling their alarms. The average start time for public high schools, 7:59, requires teens to get up earlier than is ideal for their biological clocks, meaning many teens disrupt their natural sleep patterns every school day . The world, apparently, does not revolv

5h

A new carbon material with Na storage capacity over 400mAh/g

Developing the high-capacity carbon anode materials can further improve the energy density of sodium-ion batteries (NIBs). Recently, researchers from the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOP-CAS) reported a high-capacity carbon anode (~400 mAh g-1) for NIBs in Science Bulletin.

6h

Where you live might influence how you measure up against your peers

Social psychologists uncover important mechanisms of social comparison, showing that it depends on specific, universal social settings and situations.

6h

Commercially relevant bismuth-based thin film processing

Osaka University researchers prepared 2D layered, visible-light-absorbing bismuth sulfide semiconductors using a two-step process. The resulting film exhibited morphology that supported excellent semiconductor performance. The simplicity and versatility of the processing method, which uses non-toxic, abundant materials, makes bismuth sulfide a viable alternative to commercially available photoresp

6h

New method enables accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Diagnosing Alzheimer's disease can be difficult, as several other conditions can cause similar symptoms. Now a new brain imaging method can show the spread of specific tau protein depositions, which are unique to cases with Alzheimer's. "The method works very well. I believe it will be applied clinically all over the world in only a few years", says Oskar Hansson.

6h

New micro-platform reveals cancer cells' natural behavior

A new cell culture platform allows researchers to observe never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope, leading to explanations of long-known cancer characteristics.

6h

Can video game exercises help chronic low back pain?

New research from University of Sydney has found home-based video-game exercises can reduce chronic low back pain in older people by 27 percent, which is comparable to benefits gained under programs supervised by a physiotherapist.

6h

Forskere: Spionage-værktøj vendt mod journalister og ngo'er identificeret i 45 lande

En kortlægning viser ifølge forskere, at Pegasus-spyware bliver brugt på tværs af landegrænser.

6h

How medicine literally gets under your skin

If drugs are to enter the body painlessly and efficiently, they can be administered via skin patches. Researchers at Empa and the University of Fribourg are currently developing nano-containers for therapeutic agents that can be controlled by light.

6h

The US has become a nation of suburbs

Since 1970, more Americans have lived in the suburbs than central cities. In 2010, suburbanites outnumbered city and rural dwellers combined for the first time. We Americans live in a suburban nation.

6h

Supporting brace for historical steel bridges

Empa scientists are saving iron bridges from the 19th century from collapse. Carbon fiber plasters are strengthening the crumbling structures. A railway bridge in Switzerland and a road bridge in Australia have already been reinforced successfully. Many historical bridges could follow. "Partners in crime" are specialists for steel fatigue at EPFL.

6h

Cyprus, Egypt sign accord for Mediterranean gas pipeline

Cyprus and Egypt on Wednesday signed an agreement paving the way for the Mediterranean's first subsea pipeline to carry Cypriot natural gas to the Arab country for re-export to Europe.

6h

UK lawmakers: 'Wild West' cryptocurrencies need regulation

British lawmakers have backed calls for greater regulation of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin in order to bring an element of control to a market that more resembles the "Wild West."

6h

Edmunds highlights newest safety and technology trends

Historically, the latest innovations in vehicle technology debut on high-end luxury vehicles. Developing new features is an expensive endeavor, and usually only wealthy shoppers are willing to pay for them. Features such as a navigation system, stability control and even traffic-adaptive cruise control were once the domain of high-priced cars, but now they are commonplace on even budget models.

6h

Germany to have 1 million electric cars by 2022

Germans are beginning to embrace electric cars, with experts predicting the country will have a million hybrid or battery-electric vehicles on the road by 2022.

6h

Psychologists test societal acceptance of underground storage of CO2

How can we reduce CO2 emissions from industry? Leiden psychologists Emma Mors and Christine Boomsma examined the public perception and acceptance around the capture and storage of carbon dioxide. This is part of the ALIGN CCUS European research programme.

6h

To avoid vision problems in space, astronauts will need some kind of artificial gravity

Ever since astronauts began going to space for extended periods of time, it has been known that long-term exposure to zero-gravity or microgravity comes with its share of health effects. These include muscle atrophy and loss of bone density, but also extend to other areas of the body leading to diminished organ function, circulation, and even genetic changes.

6h

South Korea May Have Just Helped Break a Nuclear Impasse

Over the past year, the South Korean government has pursued what could be called the Field of Dreams approach to resolving the North Korean nuclear crisis: If you build peace, they will come. President Moon Jae In, a longtime practitioner of the liberal “Sunshine Policy” of engagement with North Korea, has repeatedly sought to establish facts on the ground that favor diplomacy when the ground has

6h

Should Journalists Be Insiders?

It’s been more than 40 years since Walter Lippmann died, but journalists are still grappling with many of the issues that defined his career: the value of reporting versus commentary; the question of who warrants our attention as journalists—the wealthy and influential or the marginalized and ignored. Perhaps above all, a journalist’s relationship with power: Should journalists be outsiders or in

6h

Letters: ‘Is There Anything Wrong With a Simple “Hello”?’

The Problem With ‘Hey Guys’ In August, Joe Pinsker wrote about the greeting —and why many people are looking for a more inclusive alternative. Don’t reinvent the wheel. The perfect word already exists: everyone . Benjamin Kim New York, N.Y. I grew up using guys to address any group. Now I’m the lone female on and a manager of a small, entirely male team. The first and only time I used guys to add

6h

The medicinal cannabis panel is already failing children like my daughter | Tannine Clarry

CBD oil is being treated as the option of last resort. This is simply no good to my four-year-old and many others Before I took the decision to try treating my daughter Indie with medicinal cannabis she was on a trial of a “traditional” pharmaceutical drug. My four-year-old has Dravet syndrome , a severe form of epilepsy. It was the eighth different drug that we had tried, none of which had reduce

6h

The Physics of a Star Wars Bomber Dropping Bombs in Space

The Empire Strikes Back brought us the TIE bomber—and new physics questions to try to solve.

6h

Coral skeletons act as archive of desert conditions from Little Ice Age

The Sahara and Arabian deserts did not cool as much as the rest of the Northern Hemisphere during the Little Ice Age, but in fact were drier 200 years ago than they are today, according to a new study.

6h

Surprise finding uncovers balancing act between birth defects and cancer

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have made a surprise discovery about how subtle changes in the way cell survival is regulated during embryonic development can have drastic health implications.

6h

Research shows SE Asian population boom 4,000 years ago

Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth.

6h

Advancing local terahertz oscillators to enable cosmic observations

NASA is developing a new type of detector that will provide insight into the formation and structure of the universe. Many of the radiative and mechanical interactions that shape the interstellar medium of galaxies and drive galactic evolution (e.g., shock waves from stellar winds and jets, supernova explosions, etc.) are best observed in the 4.744 terahertz (THz) spectral region for the oxygen li

6h

Going off-road in the search for dark skies

An out-of-this-world mobile observatory, developed in collaboration with Nissan Design Europe in London, UK, was unveiled at the 2018 Hannover Motor Show this week, proving that the sky is never the limit.

6h

Workshy bosses breed contempt and abuse in the workforce, research shows

Workshy bosses can promote a contemptuous attitude amongst their staff—leading to anger, frustration and abuse in the workplace, new research has shown.

6h

ECOSTRESS maps L.A.'s hot spots

NASA's ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station (ECOSTRESS) captured new imagery of variations in surface-temperature patterns in Los Angeles County. The first of its kind to be taken by the agency's newest Earth-observing mission, it is more detailed than previous imagery and, unlike prior imagery, was acquired at different times of the day.

6h

AI could help to manage natural disasters – but only to an extent

Residents are struggling with the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, a record-breaking storm that has hit the US east coast and led to at least 32 deaths, floods and damaged homes. Meanwhile, Typhoon Mangkhut has been ravaging southern China. More than three million people were evacuated.

6h

The hunt for leptoquarks is on

Matter is made of elementary particles, and the Standard Model of particle physics states that these particles occur in two families: leptons (such as electrons and neutrinos) and quarks (which make up protons and neutrons). Under the Standard Model, these two families are totally distinct, with different electric charges and quantum numbers, but have the same number of generations (see image belo

6h

China’s uniform approach for students is a bad fit for other countries

A disciplined schedule may benefit some students, but there’s more to success at school and in later life than turning up on time, says Michael Brooks

6h

Fly mating choices may help explain variation across species

Scientists at the University of Stirling have shed new light on the impact of sexual selection on species diversity after studying the mating rituals of dance flies.

6h

Interfacial engineering core@shell nanoparticles for active and selective direct H2O2 generation

A class of supported Pd@NiO-x core@shell catalysts have been constructed as highly efficient catalysts toward direct H2O2 generation. The optimized Pd@NiO-3/TiO2 exhibited high activity, superior selectivity, low degradation activity and excellent stability. The cavity-contained unique interface structure can suppresses the overbinding between Pd-core and (O-O)*, which is effective to prevent H2O

6h

Premature brains develop differently in boys and girls

Brains of baby boys born prematurely are affected differently and more severely than premature infant girls' brains. This is according to a study published in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research. Lead authors Amanda Benavides and Peg Nopoulos of the University of Iowa in the US used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans as part of an ongoing study on premature babies to examine

6h

Light provides spin

Physicists at FAU have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. They have thus found the key to an important characteristic of these crystals, which could play an important role in the development of new solar cells.

6h

Plant growth-promoting bacteria enhance plant salinity tolerance

Soil salinity is a serious problem in crop production, but the work of scientists helps to relieve it.

6h

What does it mean to be cisgender?

As a term and concept, "transgender" is now firmly embedded in common parlance and popular consciousness. In Australia in the last few weeks alone there have been major news stories about transgender footballer Hannah Mouncey; Prime Minister Scott Morrison's comments regarding "gender whisperers"; and the University of Western Australia cancelling a talk by an anti-transgender US academic.

6h

10 Tips to Supercharge Your Running Routine

By rethinking our running habits we can maximize running’s benefits and minimize its shortcomings — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Why women – including feminists – are still attracted to 'benevolently sexist' men

If a man offers to help a woman with her heavy suitcase or to parallel park her car, what should she make of the offer?

6h

First look: iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, and Apple Watch Series 4

Technology Everything you need to know about Apple's latest products. Hands on with Apple's new iPhones and Apple Watch.

6h

Dansk forsker søger partnere til medicinsk detektivarbejde

Internationalt samarbejde er helt afgørende for at få løst gåden om ekstrem sjælden og uforklarlig lungesygdom hos børn, mener overlæge Frederik Buchvald.

6h

Gensignaturer åbner op for individualiseret behandling af svær astma

En ny teknik, som aktuelt er under afprøvning på Bispebjerg Hospital, rummer potentiale til at kunne afgøre, hvilke patienter med svær astma, der vil have bedst effekt af hvilket nyt biologisk lægemiddel.

6h

Sundhedsminister: Nordic Cochrane Center skal evalueres

Sundhedsministeren har sat en uafhængig evaluering af Nordic Cochrane Center og ministeriets bevilling i gang.

6h

Puerto Rico has not recovered from Hurricane Maria

Puerto Rico was in crisis long before Hurricane Maria hit on Sept. 20, 2017.

6h

Eulogy for a seastar, Australia's first recorded marine extinction

We see the surface of the sea: the rock pools, the waves, the horizon. But there is so much more going on underneath, hidden from view.

6h

Thawing permafrost may release more CO2 than previously thought, study suggests

The amount of carbon dioxide released from thawing permafrost might be greater than previously thought because of a process called mineral weathering, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists.

6h

Mercury and its depressions

One of the most surprising discoveries of the NASA's Messenger mission was the presence of unusual, bright, irregular and rimless flat-floored depressions on the surface of Mercury. These depressions, called hollows, are usually found on crater walls, rims, floors and central peaks.

6h

Helping to improve medical image analysis with deep learning

Medical imaging creates tremendous amounts of data: many emergency room radiologists must examine as many as 200 cases each day, and some medical studies contain up to 3,000 images. Each patient's image collection can contain 250GB of data, ultimately creating collections across organizations that are petabytes in size. Within IBM Research, we see potential in applying AI to help radiologists sift

6h

Male dance flies found to favor females with bigger abdominal air sacs

A team of researchers with the University of Toronto and the University of Stirling has found that male dance flies prefer to mate with females that have larger abdominal sacs. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the insects and what they found out about their mating habits.

6h

Seeing pesticides spread through insect bodies

Pesticides have been linked with declining honey bee numbers, raising questions about how we might replace the many essential uses of these chemicals in agriculture and for control of insect-borne diseases. As many governments seek to restrict uses of pesticides, more information on how pesticides affect different insects is increasingly beneficial. Greater insight into how these chemicals interac

6h

Co-evolution between a 'parasite gene' and its host

A Danish research team has delineated a complex symbiosis between a 'parasitic' noncoding RNA gene and its protein coding 'host' gene in human cells. The study reveals how co-evolution of the host gene and parasite gene has shaped a feedback mechanism in which the parasite gene plays a completely new and surprising part as regulator of the host gene protein production. The breakthrough finding ope

6h

Snooker in the live cell

The spatial and temporal dynamics of proteins or organelles plays a crucial role in controlling various cellular processes and in development of diseases. Yet, acute control of activity at distinct locations within a cell cannot be achieved. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists from Umeå University (Sweden) and the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology (Germany) present a new chemo-

6h

Chemists produce and test novel solid oxide electrolysis cell

Researchers from Ekaterinburg, Russia, have developed and tested a new solid oxide electrolysis cell. They observed increased performance of the cell when the reducing atmosphere was enriched with carbon dioxide.

6h

Chitinase as 'burnt-bridge' Brownian monorail efficiently hydrolyzing recalcitrant biomass

Serratia marcescens Chitinase A (SmChiA) is a molecular motor efficiently hydrolyzing recalcitrant crystalline chitin by moving on the surface processively. By using gold-nanoparticle probe, researchers revealed 1-nm stepping motion of SmChiA rectified forward by fast catalysis. X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulation also revealed that motion of SmChiA is driven by the Brownian mo

6h

Seeing pesticides spread through insect bodies

Osaka University-led team provides insights into the distribution of pesticides within insects using a newly developed method of insect sample preparation.

6h

Researchers push the boundaries of optical microscopy

The field of optical microscopy research has developed rapidly in recent years. Thanks to the invention of a technique called super-resolution fluorescence microscopy, it has recently become possible to view even the smaller parts of a living cell. Now, by making a smart refinement to that technique, researchers at TU Delft have pushed its boundaries even further. Where previously objects measurin

6h

Mercury studies reveal an intriguing target for BepiColombo

A month before the planned launch of the joint ESA-JAXA BepiColombo mission to Mercury, two new studies shed light on when the innermost planet formed and the puzzle of its chemical composition. The findings will be presented by Bastien Brugger and Thomas Ronnet at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) 2018 in Berlin.

6h

Three new physics experiments could revamp the standard model

New experiments that rely on very large machines have begun to probe the weak points of particle physics.

6h

Daily low-dose aspirin is not a panacea for the elderly

Healthy elderly adults don’t benefit from a daily dose of aspirin, according to results from a large-scale clinical trial.

6h

Creating 3D printed 'motion sculptures' from 2D videos

The new system uses an algorithm that can take D videos and turn them into 3D printed 'motion sculptures' that show how a human body moves through space. In addition to being an intriguing aesthetic visualization of shape and time, the team envisions that their 'MoSculp' system could enable a much more detailed study of motion for professional athletes, dancers, or anyone who wants to improve thei

6h

Nature needs people and here's why

On Sept. 12, Nature4Climate.org launched the "Forgotten Solution Campaign" at the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco. The hashtag #TheForgottenSolution rapidly populated the twittersphere. Eleven partner organizations and 18 foundations celebrated their support of the Nature4Climate initiative. Their message reached global coverage by news organizations, such as the BBC. This movement,

6h

Printed solar cell set to transform electronics manufacturing

Researchers have achieved a new efficiency record in organic photovoltaic cells. The process could improve the production of new devices for energy harvesting and lighting.

6h

Putting underused smart devices to work

There are currently millions of heavily underutilized devices in the world. The storage, networking, sensing and computational power of laptops, smartphones, routers and base stations grows with each new version and product release. Why not put all those extra gigabytes of memory and those powerful processing units to work collaboratively and expand the services available to all of us?

6h

Magnetic field milestone

Physicists from the Institute for Solid State Physics at the University of Tokyo have generated the strongest controllable magnetic field ever produced. The field was sustained for longer than any previous field of a similar strength. This research could lead to powerful investigative tools for material scientists and may have applications in fusion power generation.

6h

Wave-particle interactions allow collision-free energy transfer in space plasma

A team including researchers from Nagoya University finds evidence of collisionless energy transfer occurring in the plasma of Earth's magnetosphere.

6h

Two quantum dots are better than one: Using one dot to sense changes in another

Osaka University researchers developed the first device that can detect single-electron events in a self-assembled quantum dot in real time. The device detects the single-electron tunneling events of one quantum dot as changes in the current produced by a second quantum dot in close proximity. This device allows single-electron events in quantum dots to be investigated, which is beneficial for the

6h

Newly identified African bird species already in trouble

Central Africa's Albertine Rift region is a biodiversity hotspot consisting of a system of highlands that spans six countries. Recent studies have shown that the population of sooty bush-shrikes occupying the region's mid-elevation forests is a distinct species, and new research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications reveals that this newly discovered species may already be endangered due to

6h

Improving 'silvopastures' for bird conservation

The adoption of 'silvopastures' — incorporating trees into pastureland — can provide habitat for forest bird species and improve connectivity in landscapes fragmented by agriculture. But how do silvopastures measure up to natural forest habitat? New research from The Condor: Ornithological Applications shows that birds in silvopasture forage less efficiently than those in forest fragments but of

6h

Zebrafish research highlights role of locus coeruleus in anesthesia

Recently, researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and Zunyi Medical College, by using a larval zebrafish model, revealed that two commonly used intravenous anesthetic drugs, propofol and etomidate, suppress the excitability of locus coeruleus neurons via synergic mechanisms — thus inhibiting presynaptic excitatory inputs and inducing membrane hyperpolarization of these cells.

6h

Looking back in time to watch for a different kind of black hole

A simulation done by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology has suggested what astronomers should look for if they search the skies for a direct collapse black hole in its early stages.

6h

Quantum anomaly — breaking a classical symmetry with ultracold atoms

Fundamental research: FLEET study of ultracold atomic gases at Swinburne University of Technology finds quantum anomaly, strongly interacting particles breaking classical symmetry in a 2D Fermi gas. Out today in Physical Review Letters.

6h

No increased risk of lung infections among infants using popular anti-reflux medicines

New University of Otago research shows infants using popular anti-reflux medicines like omeprazole are not at increased risk of pneumonia or other lower respiratory tract infections, contrary to findings from other international studies.

6h

Antibiotics in landfills pose public health risk

The large quantities of discarded antibiotics in Hong Kong's landfills pose a pollution problem and a potential hazard to public health and ocean life, a new study by a Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) scholar says.

7h

Crime, not money, drives migration from El Salvador and Honduras

An analysis of data directed by Jonathan Hiskey, associate professor of political science, and his co-authors shows that being a victim of crime is a powerful motivation for migrants to come to the United States, despite understanding the risks of the journey and challenges of the U.S. immigration system.

7h

Flyvende kæmpe-antenne klarer geologiske undersøgelser på rekordtid

Snart kan droner og machine learning udføre geologisk kortlægning, håber nordmænd, der i dag bruger en helikopter og eksperter til at nærme sig fremtidens resultater.

7h

Kunstig intelligens hjælper læger med at stille diagnoser

Computer med kunstig intelligens er bedre end læger til at stille en præcis diagnose på baggrund lungefunktionstest.

7h

Behov for større opmærksomhed om lægemiddeludløst lungefibrose

Læger bør altid være opmærksomme på, om det lægemiddel, de bruger til deres patient, kan give lungeskader i form af f.eks. lungefibrose, opfordrer klinisk lektor, overlæge Elisabeth Bendstrup.

7h

Foraging of mountain gorillas for sodium-rich foods

A new Biotropica study examines mountain gorillas in Rwanda and their foraging for sodium-rich food in both national park areas and lands managed by local communities.

7h

Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Drinking green tea has been linked to health benefits ranging from cardiovascular disease prevention to weight loss. Although many of these claims still need to be verified in the clinic, an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) appears to have beneficial effects in cells and animals. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for EGCG: sneaking therapeutic RNAs into ce

7h

How heartfelt guilt affects individuals

For thousands of years, people have closely associated moral cleanliness with acts of physical cleanliness. A recent study explored this association by eliciting guilt, a threat to one's moral purity.

7h

Strength-based exercises could help child obesity fight, study finds

Encouraging young people to do strength-based exercises — such as squats, push ups and lunges — could play a key role in tackling child obesity, research suggests.

7h

Captain Marvel and the Long, Strange History of Female Superhero Names

Captain Marvel used to be a dude. Captain Marvel also used to be Ms. Marvel. It's comics; it's complicated.

7h

Wave-particle interactions allow collision-free energy transfer in space plasma

The Earth's magnetosphere contains plasma, an ionized gas composed of positive ions and negative electrons. The motion of these charged plasma particles is controlled by electromagnetic fields. The energy transfer processes that occur in this collisionless space plasma are believed to be based on wave-particle interactions such as particle acceleration by plasma waves and spontaneous wave generati

7h

New method to estimate the energy efficiency of entire neighborhoods

Researchers from Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) and Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have developed a precision tool to assess the potential for improving energy efficiency in the urban fabric from collected data of each building by using big data.

7h

Why some animals still have a penis bone

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.K. has found a possible explanation for why some animals still have a penis bone—"prolonged intromission." In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their work studying the penis bone in a wide variety of animals and what the found.

7h

Researchers work to add function to 3-D-printed objects

In the movie Terminator 2, the T-1000 robot pours itself through the ceiling of an elevator. That scene started a flow of ideas for Purdue Polytechnic Institute professor Richard Voyles.

7h

Concern about climate change unites Gens X and Y

Two generations of Australians, Generations X and Y, say climate change is their number one cause for concern, according to the latest Life Patterns reportfrom University of Melbourne researchers.

7h

New Apple Watch adds heart tracking—here's why we should welcome ECG for everyone

Leaked details of the new iPhone models were quickly relegated to second tier headlines after Apple's latest product announcement. More people seem to be excited about the fact that the new Apple Watch will come with a built-in heart monitoring electrocardiogram (ECG) function.

7h

Body support device helps people learn to walk again after a stroke, trauma

A Purdue University researcher with a passion to use engineering technology to improve health care has created a weight support system to help people suffering from walking disabilities after a stroke. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says about 795,000 people in the United States have a stroke each year, and it is the leading cause of disability in older adults.

7h

Echo chambers persist in climate politics, research shows

New research from the University of Maryland (UMD) finds that contentious climate politics continue to be influenced by the diffusion of scientific information inside "echo chambers"—social network structures in which individuals with the same viewpoint share information with each other.

7h

Family’s ‘genetic background’ sheds light on autism symptoms

The total amount of rare mutations—deletions, duplications, or other changes to the DNA sequence—in a person’s genome can explain why individuals with a disease-associated mutation can have vastly different symptoms, according to new research. Whether an individual develops a neurodevelopmental disorder like autism or ADHD, and the severity of that disorder, depends on genetic changes beyond a si

7h

College students have unequal access to reliable technology, study finds

Smartphones and laptops seem ubiquitous at US universities, but there is still a 'digital divide,' with some students less likely than others to have consistent access to reliable technology, according to a study co-authored by an Indiana University sociologist.

7h

Understanding epilepsy in pediatric tumors

A KAIST research team led by Professor Jeong Ho Lee of the Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering has recently identified a neuronal BRAF somatic mutation that causes intrinsic epileptogenicity in pediatric brain tumors.

7h

How diplomacy saves American lives

Diplomacy doesn't always look pretty or neat, but it is absolutely an antidote to and an alternative to military intervention. There are some fundamental misunderstandings about what diplomats do around the world hat's been exploited by politicians of both parties. One of the consequences of sidelining diplomacy is you see a lot more of the work that was once the domain of diplomats coming out of

7h

Plan to restore and protect the Hudson River

The Hudson River is not an ordinary river. Rather, it is an estuary, where salt water from the ocean mixes with freshwater for 153 miles, from New York Harbor to Troy, NY. During the 1950s, the Hudson was an open sewer, with industries discharging toxic chemicals, paints, heavy metals and other waste into the water. Fish were contaminated with PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) dumped from General E

7h

Study shows bacteria change their surfaces to increase antibiotic resistance

A recent study by a team of researchers at the University of Georgia provides insight into how and why bacteria become resistant to commonly used antibiotics over time.

7h

Video: Net successfully snares space debris

The RemoveDEBRIS satellite has successfully used its on-board net technology in orbit – the first demonstration in human history of active debris removal (ADR) technology.

7h

Study on jararaca pit vipers links 'giant' specimens proliferation to predators

In São Paulo, Brazil's largest city, it is easier to find giant jararaca pit vipers (Bothrops jararaca) in a small fragment of Atlantic Rainforest surrounded by urban sprawl than in a nature reserve that is 16 times larger, even though more food is available for snakes in the latter. A new study suggests that the difference may be due to the number of predators in each habitat and not to the avail

7h

Adgang til parker modvirker lungeproblemer

Forurening giver problemer med luftvejene, men adgang til grønne områder kan i en vis udstrækning modvirke problemerne. Personer med lungeproblemer bør måske søge mod parker og andre grønne steder, siger forsker.

7h

Young children's oral bacteria may predict obesity

Weight gain during early childhood is related to the composition of oral bacteria of two-year-old children, suggesting this understudied aspect of a children's collection of microorganisms could serve as an early indicator for childhood obesity.

7h

Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing

Scientists have measured the activation energy and kinetic factors of calcium carbonate's nucleation.

7h

Chemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats

New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age.

7h

Halfway mark for NOEMA construction

The completion of NOEMA phase 1, the first phase of the NOEMA project will be officially celebrated this Wednesday, September 19th. IRAM and its partner institutes have completed the first, decisive step towards one of the most important German-French-Spanish initiatives in astronomy: developing the most powerful and most sensitive telescope at millimetre wavelengths in the Northern hemisphere. Fo

7h

Roadkill report: A roadmap to avoiding wildlife collisions

Collisions with wildlife continue to cost up to half a billion dollars each year in California, primarily within the central Sierra Nevada and San Francisco Bay Area. But certain highways have especially high numbers of wildlife collisions, according to the annual roadkill report from the UC Davis Road Ecology Center.

7h

Image: Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor examines her eyes

Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, a member of the Expedition 56 crew currently aboard the International Space Station, examined her eye with a Funduscope with remote support from doctors on the ground.

7h

Despite studies, health effects of coal-burning power plants remain unknown

A review of studies over the past 30 years provides a body of evidence that people living near coal-fired power plants have higher death rates and at earlier ages, along with increased risks of respiratory disease, lung cancer, cardiovascular disease and other health problems.

7h

Space telescope to test Einstein's theories about gravity

A new space telescope designed to peer into some of the farthest regions of the universe could finally answer one of the most puzzling questions surrounding Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity.

7h

Lab-Grown Meat

Meat produced without killing animals is heading to your dinner table — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

The Pseudoscience of Kelly Brogan

Kelly Brogan sells an impressive array of pseudoscience wrapped in the standard alternative tropes.

7h

Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells

Drinking green tea has been linked to health benefits ranging from cardiovascular disease prevention to weight loss. Although many of these claims still need to be verified in the clinic, an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) appears to have beneficial effects in cells and animals. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for EGCG: sneaking therapeutic RNAs into ce

7h

Fahrenheit 11/9 Is Powerful at Times, Scattered at Others

Michael Moore’s new film, Fahrenheit 11/9, kicks things off with the kind of montage that should be banned from all documentaries, at least for the next few years: a recap of the 2016 presidential election. It’s something that plagues topical works such as Get Me Roger Stone , about Donald Trump’s former strategist; the upcoming Steve Bannon–focused film American Dharma ; and even the Crooked Med

7h

You should check how much sugar your 'healthy' yogurt really has

Health Even organic and low-fat varieties can hide half your daily recommend sugar. Researchers found that many varieties of yogurt were absolutely packed full of sugar. We did a little more digging to unmask the worst culprits.

7h

Made for Dirt | Diesel Brothers: Forces of Nature

The Diesel Brothers take off roading and hitting the dunes of the Moab Desert on wheels to another level with their nature defying desert cruising ATVs. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discover

8h

Device uses graphene plasmons to convert mid-infrared light to electrical signals

A team of researchers has developed a device that uses the material graphene to detect mid-infrared light and efficiently convert it to electrical signal at room temperature. It's a breakthrough that could lead to better communications systems, thermal imagers and other technologies.

8h

Orion's first Service Module integration complete

Last week at the Airbus integration hall in Bremen, Germany, technicians installed the last radiator on the European Service Module for NASA's Orion spacecraft marking the module's finished integration.

8h

Soot forensics: Carbon fingerprints reveal curved nanostructure

Researchers have moved one step closer to reducing air pollution from engines by imaging soot nanoparticles to reveal their unique signatures. The nanoparticle structures are like fingerprints, revealing curved fullerene-like molecules and helping to shed light on the earliest stages of soot formation.

8h

Hit-and-run heist of water by terrestrial planets in the early solar system

A study simulating the final stages of terrestrial planet formation shows that 'hit-and-run' encounters play a significant role in the acquisition of water by large protoplanets, like those that grew into Mars and Earth. The results will be presented by Christoph Burger at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) 2018 in Berlin.

8h

Novel technology will massively boost optical data transfer throughput using existing equipment

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. has developed an ultra-high capacity wavelength-division multiplexing system that considerably expands the transmission capacity of optical fibers in optical networks connecting datacenters. The new technology achieves this without the deployment of new transceivers dedicated to new wavelength. Previously, in order to expand transmission capacity between datacenters, oper

8h

Life-threatening bacteria thrives in pets' water bowls, experts discover

Dogs' water bowls are a breeding ground for dangerous germs that could put animal and human health at risk, a new study at Hartpury University has revealed.

8h

Newly discovered planet could be Spock's home world, astronomers say

Among the TV series Star Trek's many charms are its rich universe of characters and planets. Now, the Dharma Planet Survey, in a new study led by University of Florida (UF) astronomer Jian Ge and team including Tennessee State University (TSU) astronomers Matthew Muterspaugh and Gregory Henry, has shown that science fiction may be a little less so; the Dharma project has discovered what may be Sta

8h

What's the value of lost recreation days from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill?

In 2015, BP reached an $18.7 billion settlement with the U.S. Department of Justice and five states, stemming from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Leading up to that settlement, a team of researchers conducted the largest damage assessment ever to determine the value of lost recreation days, focusing specifically on the Gulf Coast. And those researchers are now explaining how they did it.

8h

How dolphins learn to work together for rewards

Cooperation can be found across the animal kingdom, in behaviours such as group hunting, raising of young, and driving away predators.

8h

Why do we love bees but hate wasps?

A lack of understanding of the important role of wasps in the ecosystem and economy is a fundamental reason why they are universally despised whereas bees are much loved, according to new research.

8h

Why Animal Extinction Is Crippling Computer Science

Opinion: As the work of biologists and computer scientists converge, algorithmic secrets are increasingly found in nature

8h

Ferrari’s Monza SP1 and SP2 Mix 21st Century Tech With 1950s Cool

The first car's in the "Icona" line offer 800 horsepower and looks borrowed from Ferrari's post-war racers.

8h

ExoMars highlights radiation risk for Mars astronauts, and watches as dust storm subsides

Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed to at least 60% of the total radiation dose limit recommended for their career during the journey itself to and from the Red Planet, according to data from the ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter being presented at the European Planetary Science Congress, EPSC, in Berlin, Germany, this week.

8h

Hey, Spock! Real-Life 'Planet Vulcan' Discovered

"Star Trek's" planet Vulcan, ancestral home of Spock and his species, just became a little more real, thanks to a team of exoplanet scientists.

8h

Scientists Play Favorites with Studying Human Genes. Here's Why.

Despite the Human Genome Project having heralded the exploration of previously unknown human genes, the focus of genetic studies remains narrow.

8h

Image of the Day: Spinning Webs

Scientists photograph a spider web in micron-scale glory.

8h

Implantable Drug-Making Cells

Releasing drugs directly into patients’ bodies as they are needed is fast becoming feasible — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Reimagining of Schrödinger's Cat Breaks Quantum Mechanics—and Stumps Physicists

In a multi-“cat” experiment the textbook interpretation of quantum theory seems to lead to contradictory pictures of reality, physicists claim — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Engineered E. coli using formic acid and CO2 as a C1-refinery platform strain

A research group at KAIST has developed an engineered E. coli strain that converts formic acid and CO2 to pyruvate and produces cellular energy from formic acid through reconstructed one-carbon pathways. The strategy described in this study provides a new platform for producing value-added chemicals from one-carbon sources.

8h

Researchers study DNA polymerases at the molecular level

Complex biological systems can be described as a network of chemical processes that take place in molecules. The scientists of the "ChemLife" research initiative at the University of Konstanz are working together in an equally active network with dynamic interconnections—both subject-specific and interdisciplinary. Recent insights into DNA polymerases acquired through interdisciplinary cooperation

8h

Bedre forundersøgelser skal komme asbestproblemer til livs

Ansatte i byggeriet skal sikres mod asbest gennem bedre forundersøgelser og klarere kommunikation om det farlige asbeststøv, lyder det i en ny politisk aftale.

8h

The Strongest Material in the Universe Could Be (Nuclear) Pasta

These noodles of neutrons may be 10 billion times stronger than steel.

8h

Forskere vil vaccinere korn og grøntsager

Modstandsdygtige afgrøder kan spare jorden for sprøjtegifte.

8h

For Tiny Light Particles, 'Before' and 'After' Mean Nothing

This is how something can be both "before" and "after" something else.

8h

Extremely small and fast: Laser ignites hot plasma

When light pulses from an extremely powerful laser system are fired onto material samples, the electric field of the light rips the electrons off the atomic nuclei. For fractions of a second, a plasma is created. The electrons couple with the laser light in the process, thereby reaching nearly the speed of light. When flying out of the material sample, they pull the atomic cores (ions) behind them

8h

The Identity of This Remarkably Well-Preserved Egyptian Mummy Remains a Mystery

Archaeologists have discovered several ancient Egyptian mummies — including the remains of a remarkably well-preserved individual — in a tomb along the west bank of the Nile River, the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities said in a statement released today.

9h

Why the SpaceX Lunar Tourists Won't Walk on the Moon

Twelve people have walked on the moon, and Elon Musk won't add any Japanese billionaires to that number anytime soon.

9h

10 mysteries of the universe: How did it all begin?

A faint afterglow in the sky tells of a universe that exploded into being 13.8 billion years ago. But we haven't got the full story of the big bang nailed yet

9h

Transparent loudspeakers and mics that let your skin play music

An international team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has presented an innovative wearable technology that turns the user's skin into a loudspeaker. This breakthrough was led by Professor Hyunhyub Ko in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST. Created in part to help the hearing and speech impaired, the new technology can be further explored for applications such as wearable Io

9h

Searching for clues on extreme climate change

The remains of a buried pine forest at the foot of Mont Saint Genis in Southern France yield insightful information on a drastic climate change event. The pine tree stand initiated around 12,900 years ago during the relatively warm Allerød period, and continued growing into the cold snap of the Younger Dryas period.

9h

New insights into DNA phase separation

A new study by Professor Hajin Kim in the School of Life Sciences at UNIST presents the notion of DNA Phase Separation, which suggests that the DNA within the nucleus may trigger phase separation, like oil in water. Unlike existing biological methods, Professor Kim explains how DNA works through a basic principle of physics: "Each human cell contains approximately two meters of DNA, that are too s

9h

Increased performance and lifetime of lithium batteries in renewable energy facilities

In his Ph.D. thesis, Alberto Berrueta has investigated the physical mechanisms that govern the functioning of lithium batteries and their influence on a battery that functions when connected to a renewable facility. He also explored the way in which these batteries degrade, and has proposed a new management system.

9h

Mathematicians propose to improve cellular network coverage by using UAVs

RUDN University mathematicians have simulated the work of a cellular network and modeled the use of unmanned aerial vehicles as additional transmitters. Most of the available communication systems have flat coverage and do not take into account the difference in altitude, which results in the appearance of the so-called "blind" zones. Flying drones could solve this issue. The work is published in

9h

Searching for errors in the quantum world

The theory of quantum mechanics is well supported by experiments. Now, however, a thought experiment by ETH physicists yields unexpected contradictions. These findings raise some fundamental questions—and they're polarising experts.

9h

Graphene tunnelling junctions: beyond the breaking point

Molecular electronics is a burgeoning field of research that aims to integrate single molecules as active elements in electronic devices. Obtaining a complete picture of the charge transport properties in molecular junctions is the first step toward realizing functionality at the nanoscale. Researchers from Delft University of Technology have now studied the charge transport in a novel system, the

9h

Hovedstadens første regionsklinik kan åbne om to uger

Amager Hospital har ingen problemer med at bemande regionsklinik, der kan være klar til at åbne fra 1. oktober. I første omgang kan 1.600 patienter blive tilknyttet det nye lægetilbud.

9h

Physicists develop a more accurate solution for the quantum three-body problem

Researchers at the RUDN University have developed a mathematical method to solve the quantum Coulomb three-body problem for bound states with high accuracy. They also showed that previous calculations performed by a group of Japanese scientists are incorrect. The work will contribute to more accurate calculations of the trajectories of quantum particles in space, and its results will be useful in

9h

The Case for Expensive Antibiotics

A rogue pharmaceutical company ramped up the cost of a common antibiotic by 400 percent. While the medical community is irate, could high prices make antibiotics worth investing in?

9h

The Best Accessories for the iPhone XS, XS Max, and XR

Gear up with everything you’ll want for your iPhone—from Airpods to headphone dongles.

9h

This Supple, Squishy Robo-Jellyfish Can Explore Ocean Reefs

A new robotic jellyfish can squeeze through holes smaller than its body size.

9h

For JavaScript Developers, More Choices Mean Hard Choices

A wave of new programming tools promises to make developers' lives easier. But the turbulence makes it hard to stay current.

9h

Algorithms can turn any scene into a comic

Making your own Picasso isn’t the only thing neural style transfer can do.

9h

"Wild, Wonderful" West Virginia's Decapitated Mountains and Deformed Fish

A scientist documents the poisoning of the state’s waters by the coal industry — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Unge og midaldrende med luftvejsobstruktion har dårlig prognose

Nedsat lungefunktion i forhold til alder, køn og højde kan også være en advarsel om øget risiko for lungebetændelser, hjertesvigt og tidlig død, viser resultater af Herlev-Østerbro-undersøgelsen præsenteret på ERS-kongressen i Paris.

9h

Kühnaus forklaring: Derfor måtte Jacob Stengaard Madsen stoppe

Medarbejdernes udvandring fra møde med ledelsen var en tydelig markering af, at der skulle gøres noget for at genskabe tilliden, siger regionsrådsformand Anders Kühnau ovenpå fyringen af regionsdirektør Jacob Stengaard Madsen.

9h

Female Cockroaches May Cluster Together to Avoid Male Harassment

Pacific beetle cockroaches form groups and kick out unwanted suitors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Gæt selv: Er Danmark klodens klimaduks?

Danmark omtales ofte som et grønt foregangsland. Men det er ikke på alle områder, vi er mere klimavenlige end resten af verden.

9h

Professor om Sundhedsplatformens redningsplan: »Jeg tror ikke på den«

Regionerne Hovedstaden og Sjælland poster millioner af kroner i individuel opsætning af Sundhedsplatformen. Dansk it-professor tror ikke på projektet.

10h

‘Carter Page Is a Very Unlikely GOP Hero’

Intelligence and law-enforcement veterans broadly agree that President Donald Trump’s latest directive to the FBI and Justice Department—issued after much urging from a small group of his GOP supporters in Congress —to declassify portions of a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act ( FISA ) warrant and other documents that are part of the ongoing Russia investigation is remarkable. “This appears t

10h

Wages Are Low and Workers Are Scarce. Wait, What?

Across the country, there are more jobs available than there are workers looking for them , as the unemployment rate has dropped to a nearly two-decade low. Businesses are complaining of worker shortages, arguing they could do more and sell more and build more if they could just find the labor. Yet wages remain strikingly flat, with much of the raises that workers are making getting eaten up by i

10h

A mind-reading headset lets people fly drones using their thoughts

A group of people learnt how to pilot drones with their thoughts, using a headset that converts brain waves into flying instructions

10h

Hver fjerde dansker synes løse katte er et problem

Selvom kattekrigene endnu ikke raser på dansk grund, som det ses i udlandet, er der stadig en del…

10h

Apple Watch Series 4 Review: Be Still My Heart

The bigger screen and beefed-up sensors bring the Apple Watch to the next level.

10h

9 ud af 10 kommuner ramt af hackerangreb de seneste tre år

86 kommuner har været udsat for 650 vellykkede hackerangreb inden for de seneste tre år.

10h

»Jeg vil gerne finde ud af, hvornår det første, komplekse molekyle opstod i universet«

Interessen for rummet har Lars Egstrøm Kristensen haft siden barnsben. Nu skal han opbygge sin egen forskningsgruppe.

10h

Spock's Fictional Home Planet Discovered

Gene Roddenberry once declared that if Spock's fictional home planet Vulcan did exist, it would probably orbit the star called 40 Eridani A. Astronomers have now found this star does have a planet.

11h

Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing

Young-Shin Jun, professor of energy, environmental & chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, and Quingun Li, a former doctoral student in her lab, are the first to measure the activation energy and kinetic factors of calcium carbonate's nucleation.

11h

Young children's oral bacteria may predict obesity

Weight gain during early childhood is related to the composition of oral bacteria of two-year-old children, suggesting this understudied aspect of a children's collection of microorganisms could serve as an early indicator for childhood obesity.

11h

Cardiovascular-related deaths higher for US Hispanics who live in counties with higher Hispanic populations

US Hispanics who live in areas heavily populated by Hispanics face more cardiovascular death than those who live in more diverse counties.Compared with counties that had the lowest Hispanic populations, those with the highest had 60 percent more Hispanic mortality from cardiovascular disease (215.3 vs. 134.2 per 100,000).Counties with higher Hispanic populations may face more socioeconomic disadva

11h

Sådan vil SpaceX pendle til Mars – og videre ud i solsystemet

Elon Musk har offentliggjort navnet på SpaceX's første passager i kredsløb om månen. Samtidig er der nye justeringer af, hvordan Big Falcon Rocket skal flyve til Mars og tilbage igen.

11h

Whales And Navy Sonar

The Navy is rolling out its latest plan to manage wildlife in training waters. After years of legal battles, some environmentalists worry the Navy is backsliding in its latest plan.

11h

Tougher Laws On Pipeline Protests Face Test In Louisiana

A number of states are making it harder to protest the construction of oil and gas pipelines. Recent felony arrests in Louisiana could be a test case for these tougher new laws. (Image credit: Travis Lux/WWNO)

11h

Lagoons of Pig Waste Are Overflowing After Florence. Yes, That’s as Nasty as It Sounds.

At least 77 lagoons in North Carolina have either released pig waste into the environment or are at imminent risk of doing so, according to state officials.

11h

Nucleation a boon to sustainable nanomanufacturing

Calcium carbonate is found nearly everywhere, in sidewalk cement, wall paint, antacid tablets and deep underground. Engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have used a unique set of state-of-the-art imaging techniques to discover how calcium carbonate nanoparticles nucleate, which is important for those manufacturing the carbonate nanomaterials and controlling metal carbonation during CO2

11h

Medie: Regeringen vil have regioner uden folkevalgte politikere

Lars Løkke Rasmussen lægger op til at gøre regioner til administrative enheder. Sundhedsklynger skal skabe sammenhæng mellem almen praksis, kommuner og hospitaler.

11h

Staring at the sun: Solar Orbiter telescopes will get closest view yet

European Space Agency’s seven-year, €1bn mission will investigate the effects of the sun on satellite technology A new space mission will carry telescopes closer to the sun than ever before, capturing detailed images of its surface landscapes and taking measurements of its atmosphere. Once it reaches its destination – the sun’s orbit – the spacecraft will be able to investigate the origins of the

12h

12h

New research helps to instill persistence in children

Encouraging children 'to help,' rather than asking them to 'be helpers,' can instill persistence as they work to fulfill daily tasks that are difficult to complete, finds a new psychology study.

13h

Tyske bilproducenter skal undersøges for hemmelig aftale

EU-Kommissionen vil nu undersøge, om VW, BMW og Daimler indgik en ulovlig aftale om ikke at konkurrere på miljøteknologi.

13h

Trump rolls back pollution rules for drilling on US lands

The Trump administration on Tuesday rolled back an Obama-era rule that forced energy companies to capture methane—a key contributor to climate change that's released in huge amounts during drilling on U.S. and tribal lands.

13h

Microplastics may enter foodchain through mosquitoes

Mosquito larvae have been observed ingesting microplastics that can be passed up the food chain, researchers said Wednesday, potentially uncovering a new way that the polluting particles could damage the environment.

13h

Regionsdirektør i Region Midtjylland fratræder

Jacob Stengaard Madsen fratræder som regionsdirektør efter afskedigelserne af de to hospitalsdirektører på Hospitalsenheden Midt,

13h

Hotspots, not trouble spots: Africa seeks tourism boom

Africa draws just five percent of the world's tourists despite boasting attractions ranging from the Pyramids and Victoria Falls to wildlife safaris and endless strips of pristine beach.

13h

Canadian crabs with bad attitude threaten coastal ecosystem

Canadians are known as friendly folks, but these crabby brutes migrating from Canadian waters are better suited for the hockey rink.

13h

Study examines foraging of mountain gorillas for sodium-rich foods

A new Biotropica study examines mountain gorillas in Rwanda and their foraging for sodium-rich food in both national park areas and lands managed by local communities.

13h

Chemicals linked to endocrine disorder in older pet cats

New research suggests that there may be a link between higher levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in the environment and higher levels of hyperthyroidism in pet cats as they age. The findings are published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry.

13h

Tweaking cells' gatekeepers could lead to new way to fight cancer

If the cell nucleus is like a bank for DNA, nuclear pores are the security doors around its perimeter. Yet more security doors aren't necessarily better: some cancer cells contain a dramatic excess of nuclear pores.

13h

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