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Nyheder2018september20

 

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Famed mathematician claims proof of 160-year-old Riemann hypothesis

Michael Atiyah, a famed UK mathematician, claims that he has a "simple proof" of the Riemann hypothesis, a key unsolved question about the nature of prime numbers

12h

KAL’s cartoon

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21h

Trods baneinvesteringer på 74 milliarder: Passagererne flygter fra DSB

For første gang i nyere tid er den danske togtransport faldet over en længere periode. Vi foretrækker billige biler og bliver svære at lokke tilbage i toget, forudser forskere og politikere.

17h

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Emissions from most diesel cars in Europe greatly exceed laboratory testing levels

A new study reports that Volkswagen is not the only auto manufacturer to make diesel cars that produce vastly more emissions on the road than in laboratory tests. The study finds that in Europe, 10 major auto manufacturers produced diesel cars, sold between 2000 and 2015, that generate up to 16 times more emissions on the road than in regulatory tests.

19min

Gut fungus exacerbates asthma in antibiotic-treated mice

A non-pathogenic fungus can expand in the intestines of antibiotic-treated mice and enhance the severity of allergic airways disease, according to a new study. The findings suggest that alterations in gut microbiota induced by intestinal fungi might be a previously unrecognized but potentially important risk of antibiotic therapy in patients with asthma and other respiratory diseases.

19min

The Gut of Mice Communicates with the Brain Through the Vagus Nerve

The researchers who made the discovery suggest the signaling may form a sixth sense.

22min

The Hidden Artists in Bugs

Steven Kutcher has never felt much at ease around people. In fact, his preferred companions are most people’s greatest adversaries, if not merely the bane of their existence—bugs. Kutcher has made a living studying, befriending, and creating art with arthropods. Rather than fear them, he reveres them. In Iqbal Ahmed ’s short documentary, Bug Man , Kutcher explains how he has derived inspiration f

26min

Study of protein 'trafficker' provides insight into autism and other brain disorders

Researchers have discovered that the protein ASTN2 shuttles receptors away from the surface of neurons, a process that facilitates efficient brain activity.

40min

Model 3 Crash Tests Hammer Home Tesla's Safety Excellence

Apart from a few hiccups and questions about Autopilot, Elon Musk's automaker knows how to make very safe cars.

49min

How to build a teleportation-assisted telescope

Building bigger telescopes is challenging and expensive. But quantum teleportation can help, physicists say.

1h

Oklahoma astronaut corn maze photographed from space

It's apt that a maze cut into an Oklahoma cornfield featuring the likeness of a former NASA astronaut can be seen from space—and has been photographed by a satellite orbiting Earth.

1h

Research Funds Reallocated to Child Immigrant Detention Centers

Money from the NIH's budget, among others, will be used to care for kids in federal custody.

1h

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Each year, fishermen harvest more than $500 million worth of Atlantic sea scallops from the waters off the east coast of the United States. A new model created by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, predicts that those fisheries may potentially be in danger. As levels of carbon dioxide increase in the Earth's atmosphere, the upper oceans become increasingly acid

1h

New nanotherapy offers hope in treating drug-resistant renal cell carcinoma

A research team led by Arun Iyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Wayne State University, has developed a nanoplatform technology that works in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs that may reverse drug-resistance in renal cell carcinoma.

1h

NASA’s newest planet hunter has already found two potential exoplanets

Space And TESS is just getting started. Less than two months after TESS started its science operations, astronomers have detected two brand-new exoplanet candidates.

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10 best books on design

Design is all around us in a myriad of forms. From the screen interfaces on your phones and devices to the handles on your shower faucets. We often know instinctively what constitutes great design, there's an almost ephemeral quality to it. Great design offers comfort, ease of use and a feeling of being in the know and in control. Bad design on the other hand hits us like an ill-shaped rock – har

1h

How exercise helps your gut bacteria

Two studies from the University of Illinois show that gut bacteria can be changed by exercise alone. Our understanding of how gut bacteria impacts our overall health is an emerging field, and this research sheds light on the many different ways exercise affects your body. Exercising to improve your gut bacteria will prevent diseases and encourage brain health. None Exercise gets a lot of attentio

1h

New nanotherapy offers hope in treating drug-resistant renal cell carcinoma

A research team led by Arun Iyer, Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in the Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences at Wayne State University, has developed a nanoplatform technology that works in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs that may reverse drug-resistance in renal cell carcinoma.

1h

A Trojan Horse delivery for treating a rare, potentially deadly, blood-clotting disorder

In proof-of-concept experiments, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have highlighted a potential therapy for a rare but potentially deadly blood-clotting disorder, TTP. The researchers deliver this therapeutic enzyme via the cellular equivalent of a Trojan Horse, using tiny blood cell platelets as their protective delivery vehicle, with a key enzyme hidden inside.

1h

Mutant Green Crabs Are Mean, and They're Invading Maine's Waters

Fearless crabs threaten the state's shellfish industry.

2h

Kavanaugh Bears the Burden of Proof

The manner in which Senate Republicans and Brett Kavanaugh’s supposed allies are championing the judge’s innocence should sting as the ultimate humiliation. They apparently don’t have sufficient confidence in the nominee to let a routine investigation take place before holding a hearing. They apparently don’t believe in him enough to make minor accommodations on the date of a hearing to a woman w

2h

Amazon Is Invading Your Home With Micro-Convenience

Almost every day I make a pot of tea. Strong, black tea, the kind you have to steep properly in a ritual that involves a kettle, a tea tin, tea lights, a tea cozy. It’s a four-minute brew, so I set a timer. I used to do it on the microwave, but some time ago I just started asking Alexa, via the Amazon Echo on my kitchen counter. “Alexa, set a timer for four minutes.” I can do this while pouring f

2h

Octopuses trip on ecstasy the same way we do

Science We may have more in common with invertebrates than we thought. More than 500 million years of evolutionary history separates these marine aliens from humans on the evolutionary tree, but MDMA has similar effects on both of our…

2h

Facial hair on pilots: Study busts myth

Do airline pilots need a clean-shaven face to ensure a proper seal on face masks during emergency cabin depressurization? A recent study offers an answer.

2h

Spray coated tactile sensor on 3D surface for robotic skin

Scientists have reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating.

2h

Latest research hints at predicting autism risk for pregnant mothers

Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute–led by Juergen Hahn, professor and head of biomedical engineering–are continuing to make remarkable progress with their research focused on autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

2h

Study documents poor mental and physical health in rural borderland community members

A new study offers vivid picture of health consequences of life events and chronic strain among foreign-born Mexicans in farm working communities.

2h

Reducing false positives in credit card fraud detection

Consumers' credit cards are declined surprisingly often in legitimate transactions. One cause is that fraud-detecting technologies used by a consumer's bank have incorrectly flagged the sale as suspicious. Now researchers have employed a new machine-learning technique to drastically reduce these false positives, saving banks money and easing customer frustration.

2h

A Conservative Judge Takes Aim at Roe v. Wade in Face of a Shifting Supreme Court

Three years ago, Judge Bobby Shepherd of the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals struck down a North Dakota law banning abortions after six weeks. But he made clear that he was not happy about it. “We have no choice” but to follow Supreme Court precedent, he wrote, but there are “good reasons” for the high court “to reevaluate.” Among them: “protecting unborn children” and a “connection between

2h

Brain-gut link may be way faster than we thought

New research with mice may upend our understanding of the connection between the gut and the brain, as well as appetite. If you’ve ever felt nauseous before an important presentation, or foggy after a big meal, then you know the power of the gut-brain connection. Scientists now believe that a surprising array of conditions, including appetite disorders, obesity, arthritis, and depression, may get

2h

Ocean acidification may reduce sea scallop fisheries

Each year, fishermen harvest more than $500 million worth of Atlantic sea scallops from the waters off the east coast of the United States. A new model created by scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), however, predicts that those fisheries may potentially be in danger.

3h

Genomic study brings us closer to precision medicine for type 2 diabetes

Most patients with type 2 diabetes are treated with a 'one-size-fits-all' protocol, but this approach can leave many cases inadequately managed. New work by scientists at Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital indicates that inherited genetic changes may underlie the variability seen among diabetes patients, with different physiological processes potentially leading

3h

Spray-on antennas could unlock potential of smart, connected technology

In research recently published in Science Advances, a group of Drexel University engineering researchers reports a method for spraying invisibly thin antennas, made from a type of two-dimensional, metallic material called MXene, that perform as well as those being used in mobile devices, wireless routers and portable transducers.

3h

Photos of the Week: Grassy Biker, Welsh Surfer, Chilean Pups

A White Walker roams Northern Ireland; mass performances take place in Mexico and North Korea; Chinese tourists dine in a cliffside restaurant; Cher performs in New Zealand; the sun rises over Japan; flooding threatens parts of the U.S. and Mali; artworks are displayed in England, Italy, and Turkey; a Japanese satellite visits an asteroid; American bison are raised in Mexico; and much more

3h

Climate Change May Worsen Spread of Invasive Superweed

Climate Change May Worsen Spread of Invasive Superweed Much of the world's farmland is already at risk from palmer amaranth. The threat could spread further north as the climate warms. PigweedCrisp_cropped.jpg Stanley Culpepper stands in a Georgia cotton field that is full of palmer amaranth. Image credits: Courtesy of Stanley Culpepper Rights information: This image may be reproduced only with t

3h

Surprise finding uncovers balancing act between birth defects and cancer

Researchers have made a surprise discovery about how subtle changes in the way cell survival is regulated during embryonic development can have drastic health implications.

3h

A new approach towards developing a vaccine against vivax malaria

A study indicates the possibility of using tiny vesicles derived from human immature red blood cell as a vaccine platform.

3h

Pairing zebrafish by personality improves fitness of the species

Scientists have challenged the theory of 'love at first sight' after discovering that they can boost the reproductive success of zebrafish by pairing them by personality, rather than appearance.

3h

These new superthin antennas are made from metallic nanomaterials

Superthin antennas could bring household devices and wearable technology online.

3h

Human skeletal stem cells isolated in breakthrough discovery

Scientists have isolated skeletal stem cells in adult and fetal bones for the first time. These cells could one day help treat damaged bone and cartilage. The team was able to grow skeletal stem cells from cells found within liposuctioned fat. None Scientists have isolated human skeletal stem cells from fetal and adult bones, a breakthrough that could lead to better treatments for osteoporosis, f

3h

Why "nuclear pasta" is the strongest material in the universe

The strongest material in the universe may be the whimsically named "nuclear pasta." You can find this substance in the crust of neutron stars. This amazing material is super-dense, and is 10 billion times harder to break than steel. None Superman is known as the "Man of Steel" for his strength and indestructibility. But the discovery of a new material that's 10 billion times harder to break than

3h

4 new personality types revealed by huge study

An analysis of a massive amount of data reveals four new personality types. The study is the first to take self-reporting out of the equation. The four new types are "average," "reserved," "self-centered," and "role model". What type of person are you? How about that other person? We've long been interested in sorting ourselves and others into personality types, as if knowing what type of person

3h

Why the “slow metabolism” is a myth

Vox senior health correspondent Julia Belluz spent a day inside of a metabolic chamber at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. Her 90 minutes on stationary cycle only burned 405 calories, just 17% of the day's total calories. Resting metabolism uses up the bulk of the body's energy. None The list of excuses quickly piles up. It's genes—there's nothing I can do about it. No, it must

3h

Why are U.S. Supreme Court justices appointed for life?

With a second nomination to the Supreme Court, President Trump has the ability to alter the political leanings of the country's highest court for decades. The Founding Fathers gave justices and other federal judges a lifetime appointment to prevent them from being influenced by other branches of government. Today, many argue that federal judges should be subject to term limits as modern politics

3h

Origami opens up smart options for architecture on the Moon and Mars

Origami and high-performance textiles are transforming architecture plans for smart human habitats and research stations on the Moon and Mars. Initial field tests of the MoonMars project's origami prototype will be presented at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) 2018 in Berlin by Dr. Anna Sitnikova.

3h

Spray-on antennas could unlock potential of smart, connected technology

The promise of wearables, functional fabrics, the Internet of Things, and their "next-generation" technological cohort seems tantalizingly within reach. But researchers in the field will tell you a prime reason for their delayed "arrival" is the problem of seamlessly integrating connection technology—namely, antennas—with shape-shifting and flexible "things."

3h

The reclusive inventor of the Rubik's Cube wants to do more than amuse you

Technology Math, man vs. nature, and me. The Rubik's cube is back and bigger than ever. Why is it still so hard for me to solve?

3h

Questions raised about US museum's Abraham Lincoln hat

It has been a question plaguing the museum dedicated to one of America's greatest presidents: Is the hat real?

3h

NASA sees areas of strength in Tropical Storm Trami

NASA's Terra satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Trami, located just over 100 miles from Guam on Sept. 21. Infrared data provides temperature information that showed two areas of the highest, coldest cloud tops and most powerful storms within the tropical storm.

3h

New battery gobbles up carbon dioxide

A new type of battery developed by researchers at MIT could be made partly from carbon dioxide captured from power plants. Rather than attempting to convert carbon dioxide to specialized chemicals using metal catalysts, which is currently highly challenging, this battery could continuously convert carbon dioxide into a solid mineral carbonate as it discharges.

3h

NASA sees areas of strength in Tropical Storm Trami

NASA's Terra satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Trami, located just over 100 miles from Guam on Sept. 21, 2018. Infrared data provides temperature information that showed two areas of the highest, coldest cloud tops and most powerful storms within the tropical storm.

3h

Barrow Researchers deploy novel clinical trial regimen for glioblastoma

Combating glioblastoma remains a major challenge due the complex nature of these tumors, the inability of drugs to penetrate the brain tissue, and lack of correlation between animal models and the human condition.

3h

Three NASA missions return first-light data

NASA's continued quest to explore our solar system and beyond received a boost of new information this week with three key missions proving not only that they are up and running, but that their science potential is exceptional. On Sept. 17, 2018, TESS—the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite—shared its first science observations. Later in the week, the latest two missions to join NASA's heliophys

3h

Space-related start-up technology companies create synergistic innovation

Researchers have developed innovative business models underlying the successful launch of space-related start-up technology companies in Costa Rica. A fascinating article describes how the company DIT (design, innovation, technology) Space identified key market sectors that could benefit from spaced-based technology and how implementation of the technology could benefit the company and create syne

3h

Florence’s Floodwaters Breach Defenses at Power Plant, Sending Toxic Coal Ash Into River

Duke Energy shut down a power plant in Wilmington, N.C., after a dam at the site breached and allowed coal ash to enter the nearby Cape Fear River.

3h

George Washington’s Broken Dream of a National University

It had not yet been two decades since the revolution when George Washington stood before Congress on January 8, 1790, to deliver what was, effectively, the inaugural State of the Union address in the provisional U.S. capital of New York City. “Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness,” Washington told those gathered. He believed that people—at the time, white men—should

3h

A one-way street for salt

Barely heard of a couple of years ago, quinoa today is common on European supermarket shelves. The hardy plant thrives even in saline soils. Researchers have now determined how the plant gets rid of the excess salt.

3h

The way hunter-gatherers share food shows how cooperation evolved

Camp customs override selfishness and generosity when foragers divvy up food, a study of East Africa’s Hazda hunter-gatherers shows.

3h

New findings on the muscle disease Laing early-onset distal myopathy

New avenues are now being opened for future treatment of Laing distal myopathy, a rare disorder that causes muscles in the feet, hands and elsewhere to atrophy. In a study published in the journal PNAS, researchers have identified an enzyme with a clear link to how the disease develops.

3h

New battery gobbles up carbon dioxide

New technology developed at MIT could use carbon dioxide captured from power plants to make a new kind of lithium battery.

3h

Researchers explore how changes in diet alter microbiome in artificial intestine

Using an artificial intestine they created, researchers have shown that the microbiome can quickly adapt from the bacterial equivalent of a typical western diet to one composed exclusively of dietary fats. That adaptation involved an increase in the populations of fatty-acid metabolizing species and a drop in those of protein and carbohydrate metabolizers. These changes led to diminished productio

3h

Soot from Air Pollution Found in Placentas of City-Dwelling Women

The harmful effects of air pollution affect far more than a person's respiratory system; previous research has found that it can also hurt babies in the womb.

4h

The Magical-Thinking Defenses of Brett Kavanaugh

Early this week, Christine Blasey Ford came forward : She was the woman, the research psychologist said, who had earlier alleged that in 1982, she had attended a house party that had also been attended by the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh; that during the party, Kavanaugh and his friend had corralled her into an empty bedroom; that Kavanaugh had pinned her down on a bed; that he had grope

4h

FDA researchers report first evidence of ESBL producing E. coli in US retail meat

A new study using antimicrobial susceptibility testing and whole genome sequencing to test extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) producing E. coli isolated from cattle for food production and from various retail meat products has shown that all were resistant to at least three antimicrobial classes.

4h

Prepare for 10 Feet of Sea Level Rise, California Commission Tells Coastal Cities

Though an extreme scenario, it should be factored in to coastal infrastructure planning, new guidance suggests — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Report slams 'high flying' UN environment chief

Erik Solheim is criticised for risking the UN's reputation by extensive use of expensive air travel.

4h

What Teens Think of the Kavanaugh Accusations

As soon as Christine Blasey Ford went public with her accusation that the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when the two were teens, a chorus of conservative political commentators came to his defense. Some of them aimed primarily to sow doubt about Ford’s story, but others weighed the accusations, only to conclude that the behavior described was characteristically adol

4h

Researchers Take Action to End Airlines' Restrictions on Lab Animals

United Airlines, British Airways, China Southern Airlines, and Qatar Airways face a formal complaint over their refusal to transport animals for scientific research.

4h

Watch now: Sporting superheroes at New Scientist Live

Technology can give athletes that extra crucial edge over their rivals, but is technology in sport always a good thing?

4h

Can banning plastic straws save the oceans?

Growing public concern has led to calls to ban single-use plastics, most notably straws. But can that have a meaningful effect? Plastic waste, mostly in the form of tiny particles, floats in huge blobs that together cover as much as 40 percent of the Earth’s ocean surface. In California, a bill to ban straws unless requested at dine-in restaurants is awaiting a signature from the governor. Other

4h

AFib linked to family history in blacks, Latinos

Study shows there is a genetic predisposition to early-onset AFib in blacks and Latinos that is greater than what is observed in whites.

4h

Space-related start-up technology companies create synergistic innovation

Researchers have developed innovative business models underlying the successful launch of space-related start-up technology companies in Costa Rica.

4h

The Kavanaugh Confirmation Process Is Getting Even Uglier

On Thursday afternoon, CNN reported that White House aides were “stunned” by how restrained President Donald Trump had been in responding to the sexual-assault allegations lodged against Brett Kavanaugh. Another official told Axios , “Hopefully he can keep it together until Monday. That’s only, like, another 48 hours right?” By Friday morning, Trump aides’ luck ran out. In a pair of Twitter posts

4h

Major breakthrough in controlling the 3D structure of molecules

Scientists have made a major breakthrough in chemical synthesis that now makes it possible to quickly and reliably modify the 3D structure of molecules used in drug discovery. The new method allows scientists to employ cross-coupling reactions to generate new compounds while controlling their 3D architecture.

4h

Manganese plays a key role in bacterial infection

The ability to acquire manganese during infection is essential for the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis in animals, according to a new study.

4h

Workshy bosses breed contempt and abuse in the workforce, research shows

Workshy bosses can promote a contemptuous attitude amongst their staff — leading to anger, frustration and abuse in the work place, new research has shown.

4h

10 mysteries of the universe: Is Earth in a special place?

From Copernicus on, we’ve resisted the idea that Earth has a special place in the cosmos. Whisper it, but recent discoveries suggest that’s not the whole truth

4h

Infinity war: The ongoing battle over the world’s hardest maths proof

The new claims are a blow for the theory – but the ongoing saga of a fiendish 500-page proof could expose fundamental flaws in the way mathematicians work

4h

Why You’re Probably Getting a Microchip Implant Someday

When Patrick McMullan first heard in early 2017 that thousands of Swedish citizens were unlocking their car doors and turning on coffee machines with a wave of their palm , he wasn’t too impressed. Sure, the technology—a millimeters-long microchip equipped with near-field communication capabilities and lodged just under the skin—had a niche, cutting-edge appeal, but in practical terms, a fob or p

5h

Checklist helps assess early feeding skills in premature infants

Infants born prematurely face challenges in developing the complex, interrelated skills needed for effective feeding. An assessment called the Early Feeding Skills (EFS) checklist is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating the emergence of feeding skills in preterm infants, reports a study in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal i

5h

Three NASA missions return first-light data

NASA's continued quest to explore our solar system and beyond received a boost of new information this week with three key missions proving not only that they are up and running, but that their science potential is exceptional.

5h

Boosting emotional intelligence in physicians can protect against burnout

A Loyola Medicine study demonstrates that an educational curriculum for resident physicians improves their emotional intelligence, which may help protect against burnout. Physician burnout has reached alarming levels, with one study finding it affects at least half of all doctors.

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On ecstasy, antisocial octopuses reach out for a hug

The way a normally antisocial octopus reacts to the mood-altering drug MDMA is similar to what happens in people, according to a new study. The findings suggest an evolutionary link between their social behaviors and those of humans—despite the fact that the two species are separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree. “The brains of octopuses are more similar to those of snails than h

5h

Detecting epigenetic signature may help people stay ahead of IBD

Researchers have found an epigenetic signature in patient cells that appears to predict inflammation risk in a serious type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) called Crohn's disease.

5h

Midterm Time Capsule, 46 Days to Go: Backtracking, Plowing Ahead

Last night around 1 a.m., I mentioned that a fevered and insanely conspiratorial tweetstorm then online was almost certain to disappear. It was filed by Ed Whelan, a friend of Brett Kavanaugh’s and a prominent figure in conservative judicial circles; it laid out elaborate (but crazy) forensic evidence pointing to one of Kavanaugh’s Georgetown Prep classmates as the likely “real” aggressor in the

5h

The Sisters Brothers Is a Brutal, Funny, and Surprisingly Graceful Western

Charlie (Joaquin Phoenix) and Eli Sisters (John C. Reilly) are hired guns who roam the Pacific Northwest in the 1850s, as the Gold Rush booms in new states such as California and Oregon. The duo are, as Charlie puts it, “good at what we do,” and what they do is sow bloodshed—shooting whomever they’re told, barging in where they don’t belong, and generally letting might make right. Yet somehow the

5h

Big Spenders Come Out in Anticipation of the 2018 Midterms

With fewer than 50 days remaining before the 2018 midterms, political-action committees and super PAC s are raising and spending huge amounts of money with Democrats surging in their quest to seize control of the House, which would put them in the position to begin nonstop investigations of the Trump administration and, depending upon the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller, possibly comme

5h

MSU-Spectrum Health researchers identify new genetic disorder

Researchers from Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and physicians from Spectrum Health have identified for the first time in a human patient a genetic disorder only previously described in animal models.

5h

Discovery of Galileo's Long-Lost Letter Shows He Edited His Heretical Ideas to Fool the Inquisition

Document shows he lied about his alterations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Remembrance For Walter Mischel, Psychologist Who Devised The Marshmallow Test

Walter Mischel had an idea that became a pop culture touchstone. He wanted to see if preschoolers seated in front of a marshmallow could delay their gratification. What did the experiment really mean? (Image credit: Marcie LaCerte/NPR)

5h

Want to save the planet? Don’t drain the swamps.

Environment Swamps and bogs are more important than you think. “Drain the swamp” has long meant getting rid of something distasteful. Actually, the world needs more swamps – and bogs, fens, marshes and other types of wetlands.

5h

Eight of 10 people with cancer risk genes don't know it

Genomic screening of more than 50,000 people shows that more than 80 percent of those who carry an identifiable genetic risk for breast, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic cancer don't know it despite frequent interaction with the healthcare system.

6h

DNA vaccine leads to immune responses in HPV-related head and neck cancer

A therapeutic vaccine can boost antibodies and T cells, helping them infiltrate tumors and fight off human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania tested the immunotherapy approach in two groups of patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa) and found 86 percent showed elevated T cell

6h

Patient-centered visual aid helps physicians discuss risks, treatments with parents

A series of illustrations and charts designed as decision aids for parents of children with minor head injuries helped them communicate with emergency medicine physicians and make informed decisions about their child's care.

6h

Helping parents decide on care for children with minor head trauma

More than 450,000 children visit emergency departments every year because of head trauma and many will undergo head computed tomography (CT) imaging, although few scans will show evidence of traumatic brain injury. Efforts have been made to avoid unnecessary CT imaging in children and to reduce radiation exposure. An information tool to help parents decide about care for their children with minor

6h

Is survival associated with time to defibrillation for in-hospital cardiac arrest in pediatric patients?

The time until a first attempt at defibrillation in pediatric patients who experienced cardiac arrest in the hospital wasn't associated with survival or other main outcomes. This is in contrast to children who have a cardiac arrest outside of the hospital setting, or adult patients in or out of the hospital, where worse outcomes are associated with defibrillation delayed more than two minutes.

6h

Proof-of-concept HIV immunotherapy study passes Phase 1 safety trial

Preliminary results from a phase I clinical trial have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of a cell therapy involving the ex vivo expansion of T cells and their subsequent infusion into HIV-infected individuals previously treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART). The study appears Sept. 21 in the journal Molecular Therapy.

6h

How I became part sea urchin | Catherine Mohr

As a young scientist, Catherine Mohr was on her dream scuba trip — when she put her hand right down on a spiny sea urchin. While a school of sharks circled above. What happened next? More than you can possibly imagine. Settle in for this fabulous story with a dash of science.

6h

Why a Brick Oven Is Best for Cooking Pizza

Why a Brick Oven Is Best for Cooking Pizza The science of heat transfer confirms the wisdom of Italian pizzaiolos. Pizza_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Glen MacLarty via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Friday, September 21, 2018 – 10:30 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) — Connoisseurs of pizza know that there's something special about a pizza cooked in a traditional wood-fire

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New study estimates the caregiving costs for families

In a new study, researchers focused on one of the most common caregiving arrangements: daughters between the ages of 40 and 70 who were likely to need to provide informal care to their mothers at some point in the near future. Participants were identified using the Health and Retirement Study, a survey conducted by the University of Michigan since 1992. Findings from this new analysis were publish

6h

What Magazines Can’t Do in the Age of #MeToo

Last week, the New York Review of Books published a long essay entitled “ Reflections from a Hashtag ” by the disgraced Canadian broadcaster Jian Ghomeshi, who was fired from his job at CBC in 2014 and then pilloried in the press when multiple women alleged that he had engaged them in non-consensual sexual violence. In the essay, Ghomeshi proposes to “inject nuance” into his “mass shaming.” The r

6h

Hayabusa-2: Japan hopes for historic asteroid landing

Officials believe the spaceship Hayabusa-2 has put rovers on an asteroid's surface, making history.

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Historien gentager sig: Morfin-epidemi har hærget før

For godt 100 år siden var forbruget af opioider, som for eksempel morfin og heroin, så udbredt i USA, at det kunne betegnes som en epidemi – fuldstændig som vi ser i dag

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Tone matters for trusting people with different accents

A new study shows that we tend to believe speakers who sound the same as us, although much depends on their tone of voice. Imagine you’re in a strange neighborhood, your cell phone’s dead, and you desperately need to find the closest garage. A couple of people on the street chime in, each sending you in opposite directions. One person sounds like a local and speaks in a nonchalant manner, while t

6h

Is $1,100 too much for an iPhone? Get an older one for less

The $1,100 price tag on Apple's latest iPhone turned heads when the company announced it last week. But for less than half as much, you can still get a good camera, a decent-sized screen and other popular features.

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Emissions from most diesel cars in Europe greatly exceed laboratory testing levels

In September 2015, the German automaker Volkswagen was found to have illegally cheated federal emissions tests in the United States, by intentionally programming emissions control devices to turn on only during laboratory testing. The devices enabled more than 11 million passenger vehicles to meet U.S. emissions standards in the laboratory despite producing emissions up to 40 times higher than the

6h

S.Africa rhino poaching drops by a quarter

The number of rhino killed for their horns by poachers in South Africa dipped by 26 percent in the first eight months of the year, officials said on Friday.

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Congressmen question Google over kids' privacy on YouTube

Two members of Congress are calling on Google to address concerns that YouTube might violate children's privacy.

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Philly refinery fails to include public input in cleanup efforts

Over a decade of remediation planning and regulatory approvals at Philadelphia's neighborhood refinery has occurred without the benefit of municipal or public involvement, says a new report from the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania School of Design. Sunoco, an Energy Transfer Partners subsidiary, has not complied with the community involvement and public notice r

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Paper-based electronics could fold, biodegrade and be the basis for the next generation of devices

It seems like every few months there's a new cellphone, laptop or tablet that is so exciting people line up around the block to get their hands on it. While the perpetual introduction of new, slightly more advanced electronics has made businesses like Apple hugely successful, the short shelf life of these electronics is bad for the environment.

6h

Combining multiple CCTV images could help catch suspects

Combining multiple poor quality CCTV images into a single, computer-enhanced composite could improve the accuracy of facial recognition systems used to identify criminal suspects, new research suggests.

6h

Study: Emissions from most diesel cars in Europe greatly exceed laboratory testing levels

A new MIT study reports that Volkswagen is not the only auto manufacturer to make diesel cars that produce vastly more emissions on the road than in laboratory tests. The study, published this month in Atmospheric Environment, finds that in Europe, 10 major auto manufacturers produced diesel cars, sold between 2000 and 2015, that generate up to 16 times more emissions on the road than in regulator

6h

Brown researchers teach computers to see optical illusions

By making a neural-network computer model that can be fooled by optical illusions like humans, the researchers advanced knowledge of the human visual system and may help improve artificial vision.

6h

The link between cognitive function and sexuality in older adults

Researchers learn more about the relationship between sexual behavior, function, and cognition (people's ability to think and make decisions).

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Light pollution makes fish more courageous

Artificial light at night also makes guppies more courageous during the day, according to a behavioural study led by researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development.

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Philly refinery fails to include public input in cleanup efforts

New research uncovers Sunoco's decade-long effort to cleanup legacy contamination at the East Coast's oldest and largest petroleum refinery site did not include legally required public Involvement. Data indicate Philadelphia Energy Solutions, current owner of the refinery, may be poised for another bankruptcy by 2022, opening industrial redevelopment opportunities. This report recommends steps to

6h

The Couple Who Helped Decode Dyslexia

In 1983, Sally and Bennett Shaywitz began studying the reading skills of more than 400 children. The subjects are in their 40s now, and the Shaywitzes are still tracking them.

6h

New robot picks a peck of peppers and more

The world's most advanced sweet pepper harvesting robot, developed in a consortium including Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researchers, was introduced last week at the Research Station for Vegetable Production at St. Katelijne Waver in Belgium.

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Letters: ‘Why Not Create a New Word?’

Call Them What They Wants English speakers must simply accept the adoption of the singular they as a rejection of the gender binary, John McWhorter argued recently. “Pronouns change, just as we do .” I admire John McWhorter’s great readiness to embrace changes in language as they happen, and am entertained by his antagonism to pointless grammatical rigors. English has needed a generic third-perso

6h

Overwhelming evidence shows hepatitis C treatment effective for people who inject drugs

Researchers are calling on an end to discriminatory health and illicit drugs policies, based on overwhelming evidence that new hepatitis C therapies are effective at curing the virus in people who inject drugs.

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Land-based bird populations are at risk of local extinction

A new report finds that land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world — raising the risk of global extinction — due to the loss of suitable habitat.

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Enabling Genomics-Guided Precision Medicine

Download this eBook from Qiagen to learn more about the promise of precision medicine and how QCITM Interpret can help deliver better care with better knowledge.

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Study busts myth about facial hair on pilots

A study conducted in Simon Fraser University's hypobaric chamber has sealed Air Canada's decision to allow pilots to sport facial hair.

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Samsung's foldable phone could soon be a reality

We rarely see a truly remarkable new technology more than once a decade. After years of undelivered promises, such a technology looks finally set to enter the market: the flexible computer screen.

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Vegan dogs: Should they go meat free?

Over the last ten years, it's estimated there has been a 360% rise in veganism in Britain – around 542,000 people have "gone vegan". As a nation of animal lovers, with around 44% of homes owning a pet – and somewhere in the region of 8.5m dogs in the UK – it's only natural this phenomenon should start to spill over into the pet food world. This has led to a rise in the availability of both vegetar

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Gulper eel caught on camera in Hawaii

A rare gulper eel is caught on camera displaying its huge pouch-like mouth in Hawaii.

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Researchers discover the strongest material in the universe

Nuclear pasta may be the strongest material in the Universe. You can find this substance in the crust of neutron stars. This amazing material is super-dense, 10 billion times harder to break than steel. Superman is known as the "Man of Steel" for his strength and indestructibility. But the discovery of a new material that's 10 billion times harder to break than steel begs the question – is it tim

7h

Giving octopuses ecstasy reveals surprising link to humans

Octopuses, like humans, have genes that seem to code for serotonin transporters. Scientists gave MDMA to octopuses to see whether those genes translated into a binding site for serotonin, which regulates emotions and behavior in humans Octopuses, which are typically asocial creatures, seem to get friendlier while on MDMA, suggesting humans have more in common with the strange invertebrates than p

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Radio Atlantic: The Reputations and Reckonings of #MeToo

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play As Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh faces assault allegations, the #MeToo movement reaches its first anniversary. Beyond a potential hearing reminiscent of the Anita Hill testimony 27 years ago, recent days have seen the head of CBS toppled , the editor of The New York Review of Books gone , and even a glacier ren

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Is Your Local Coffee Shop a Low-Key Opioid Clinic?

People searching for places to use opioids often rely on public bathrooms . This has been an issue in hospitals; at least eight people overdosed in Massachusetts General Hospital in about a year. But it’s not just hospitals. People also overdose in the easily accessible restrooms of popular businesses. In May, a man in Illinois died of a suspected overdose in a Starbucks. Last month, a pregnant w

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Researchers successfully train employees to respond to opioid overdose, administer naloxone

A small study shows that business managers and staff — such as those running coffee shops and fast-food restaurants — can be trained to reverse opioid overdoses, which are known to occur in public bathrooms.

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Heavy metal music is inclusive and governed by rules of etiquette

Forget wild and chaotic behaviour, heavy metal music culture is inclusive and governed by etiquette and codes of conduct, according to new UCL research.

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Image: São Miguel

The Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over the largest island of the Azores: São Miguel. Resting at the intersection of the Eurasian, African and North American tectonic plates, the Azores form a string of volcanic islands in the North Atlantic Ocean, some 1500 km west of mainland Portugal. The nine major islands are divided into three groups, with São Miguel falling into the eastern group

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Mobile device could make it easier to predict and control harmful algal blooms

In the past 10 years, harmful algal blooms—sudden increases in the population of algae, typically in coastal regions and freshwater systems—have become a more serious problem for marine life throughout the U.S. The blooms are made up of phytoplankton, which naturally produce biotoxins, and those toxins can affect not only fish and plant life in the water, but also mammals, birds and humans who liv

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How to Measure Things That Are Astronomically Far Away

Light-years, parsecs and more: these are the units for describing distances between planets and other astronomical objects.

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'Destiny 2: Forsaken' Is a Massive, Vital Expansion—But It Lost Me

Forsaken is a shot of energy to a game that has been limping since it released. And I'm just not that into it.

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Deep neural networks help to identify the neutrinoless double beta decay signal

A group of researchers from Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Peking University greatly improved the discrimination power of tracks from different particles passing through the gaseous detector with the help of deep convolutional neural networks. The work will help to improve the sensitivity of detection for the PandaX-III neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, and deepen our knowledge of the

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When gold prices go up, so does the cost of a dowry – and baby girl survival rates in India fall

When world gold prices go up, fewer girl babies in India survive the first month of life, according to our new research. My colleagues and I suggest that this is linked to gold often being part of bridal dowries in India – so when gold prices go up, the cost of raising girls rises and families tend to neglect or abort them.

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BU researchers define possible molecular pathway for neurodegeneration in prion diseases

A new study has shed light on the mechanisms underlying the progression of prion diseases and identified a potential target for treatment.

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Tobacco display ban linked to fewer children buying cigarettes in shops

Removing displays of tobacco products from shops may have reduced the proportion of children buying cigarettes by 17 percent, according to new research from Imperial College London.

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Scientists discovered 20 new gnat species in Brazil

In cooperation of scientists from Estonia, Finland and Brazil 20 new species of gnat were found in Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

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The first predators and their self-repairing teeth

The earliest predators appeared on Earth 480 million years ago — and they even had teeth which were capable of repairing themselves. A team of palaeontologists led by Bryan Shirley and Madleen Grohganz from the Chair for Palaeoenviromental Research at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have been able to discover more about how these organisms were able to grow and regenerate

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The Milky Way Is Still Feeling the Effects of an Ancient Encounter

Nearly 1 million miles away from Earth, a top-hat-shaped spacecraft called Gaia has spent the past five years scanning the galaxy and studying its stellar inhabitants. In April, Gaia produced the best census of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy to date, a cornucopia of precise information about nearly 1.7 billion stars in our galaxy. The previous census, released in 2016, contained data on just 2

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It’s bare sick that the OED cares how young people speak | Coco Khan

With culture wars raging, it matters that such an institution would reach out to Britain’s young for help with slang words Anyone’s who’s played a heated game of Scrabble will know that the dictionary is much more than a simple resource that records and define common words. It is also a place where history and culture is preserved. When a word enters the dictionary, it is “real”; established, bona

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NASA balloon mission captures electric blue clouds

Scientists share mesmerizing new images of electric blue clouds from NASA's PMC Turbo balloon mission that flew in over the Arctic in July 2018.

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Investigational steroid mirrors prednisone's benefits while taming its side effects

A head-to-head trial comparing the decades-old steroid, prednisone, and a promising new steroid, vamorolone, finds both act on the same key set of genetic pathways involved in controlling inflammation, indicates a new study. However, the study suggests the new investigational steroid doesn't activate several additional pathways involved in prednisone's bevy of undesirable side effects.

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Full, but still feasting: Mouse study reveals how urge to eat overpowers a signal to stop

A new study explores the mystery of what drives eating past the point of fullness, at the most basic level in the brain. It shows that two tiny clusters of cells battle for control of feeding behavior — and the one that drives eating overpowers the one that says to stop. It also shows that the brain's own natural opioid system gets involved — and that blocking it with the drug naloxone can stop

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Genomic dark matter activity connects Parkinson's and psychiatric diseases

Using a new technique known as laser-capture RNA seq, that involves cutting out dopamine neurons from a human brain section with a laser, investigators have cataloged more than 70,000 novel elements active in these brain cells.

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Solar panels replaced tarmac on a motorway—here are the results

Four years ago a viral campaign wooed the world with a promise of fighting climate change and jump-starting the economy by replacing tarmac on the world's roads with solar panels. The bold idea has undergone some road testing since then. The first results from preliminary studies have recently come out, and they're a bit underwhelming.

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Scientists have discovered how to predict life of implants without animal testing

An international team of researchers consisting of scientists from NUST MISIS and TU Dortmund University has developed a technology to study the behavior of orthopedic implants in laboratory conditions as close as possible to the human body. The technology is notable for its ethics: the research can be carried out in vitro — that is, without involving lab animals. The research article has been pu

7h

Lyme disease: A study on the speed of transmission by infected ticks

Lyme borreliosis is a disease caused by bacteria of the genus Borrelia that are transmitted by a bite from a tick of the genus Ixodes. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur found evidence of rapid bacterial transmission following a bite, with infection occurring within 24 hours of an adult tick bite. This is a timely reminder of the importance of removing ticks as soon as possible after being bitte

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In zebrafish, a way to find new cancer therapies, targeting tumor modulators

Fast-breeding zebrafish, combined with fluorescent tagging, could be a powerful way to find new cancer drugs. This study tested >3,800 drugs in high-throughput fashion and found that retinoic acid, best known as an acne treatment, may be effective for adenoid cystic carcinoma. A clinical trial is now being planned at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

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Breast milk may be best for premature babies' brain development

Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula, a study from the University of Edinburgh has found.

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Insulin shows great potential against chronic colitis

Diabetes is not the only disease on which insulin has an effect, it appears. In a new study that involved tests on mice researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, have discovered a new method for treating chronic colitis with regular insulin. The researchers have set up a company with a view to testing the treatment and hopefully making it available to patients.

7h

Combining multiple CCTV images could help catch suspects

Combining multiple poor quality CCTV images into a single, computer-enhanced composite could improve the accuracy of facial recognition systems used to identify criminal suspects, new research suggests.

7h

SFU study busts myth about facial hair on pilots

A study conducted in Simon Fraser University's hypobaric chamber has sealed Air Canada's decision to allow pilots to sport facial hair.

7h

Extra Arctic observations can improve predictability of tropical cyclones

Japanese scientists and their international partners have found that additional weather observations in the Arctic can help predict the track and intensity of tropical and mid-latitude cyclones more accurately, improving weather forecasting of extreme weather events.

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Freezer bags are the secret to eating well on your next camping trip

DIY Easy preparation before meals, no dishwashing after. Nobody’s going to hike all day on just a handful of trail mix. And the best way to eat hearty meals in the backcountry is to cook them in freezer bags.

7h

University working hard to reduce use of plastic bags

A year ago, China enacted a trash import ban on 24 varieties of waste, which brought the world into a state of environmental panic. Now, countries are not easily able to dispose of their trash like they have in the past.

7h

One in 20 of all deaths due to alcohol, says WHO

Report finds 13.5% of deaths among people in their 20s are linked to booze Alcohol is responsible for more than 5% of all deaths worldwide, or around 3 million a year, new figures have revealed. The data, part of a report from the World Health Organization, shows that about 2.3 million of those deaths in 2016 were of men, and that almost 29% of all alcohol-caused deaths were down to injuries – in

7h

Simulations enable 'choose-your-own-adventure' stereochemistry

Stereochemistry is a science of reflection. Two chemical molecules with the same composition and structure, but with one as the mirror image of the other, can produce wildly varying effects. Controlling which molecule emerges from a given reaction is a critical, but sometimes poorly understood, process.

7h

Trump’s Dirty War in Yemen

Earlier this year, three United States senators, including the Vermont progressive Bernie Sanders and the Utah conservative Mike Lee, authored a resolution to force the withdrawal of U.S. forces from a foreign war. But their effort did not concern Iraq, or Afghanistan, or Syria, as a casual observer of American foreign policy might expect. They sought “to direct the removal of United States Armed

7h

Stupid AI: How humans can stop machines from falling for visual tricks

Adversarial images that trick computers into seeing what isn’t there are a big problem for AI – but mimicking human perception might provide a fix

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Innovationsfonden giver 30 mio. til dansk Crispr/Cas9-projekt

Selv om EU-Domstolen har besluttet, at afgrøder forædlet med gensaksen skal underkastes samme regler som GMO, håber Danmark at speede planteforædlingen op med netop Crispr.

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Group dynamics play a heavy hand in correctly identifying true online sources

Your squad, or social group, can have a huge impact on how you view the world. Now, new research shows that the people you hang out or work with might also impact how well you can identify fact from fiction.

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Læger: Gode toner og få penge i ny plan for psykiatrien

Psykiatere glæder sig over, at de har fået politikernes opmærksomhed og ser positive initiativer i regeringens plan for psykiatrien.

7h

Algorithms for Quantum Computers

Developers are perfecting programs meant to run on quantum computers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against dementia and other diseases of aging

New research from USC has uncovered a previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The study provides insights on how these conditions, and other diseases of aging, might one day be treated and prevented.

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Deep neural networks help to identify the neutrinoless double beta decay signal

A recent study reveals that deep convolutional neural networks can significantly improve the efficiency of discrimination between neutrinoless double beta decay signals and backgrounds, thus the detection efficiency could be improved accordingly. The results are reported in latest issue of SCIENCE CHINA Physics, Mechanics & Astronomy.

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Spray coated tactile sensor on a 3D surface for robotic skin

A KAIST research team has reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating.

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Kiwi teenagers less fit than a generation ago, Otago research reveals

New Zealand teenagers are less fit and weigh more than their parents were at the same age, new University of Otago research reveals.

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Narrowing down the mass of the Milky Way

Since the birth of modern astronomy, scientists have sought to determine the full extent of the Milky Way galaxy and learn more about its structure, formation and evolution. At present, astronomers estimate that it is 100,000 to 180,000 light-years in diameter and consists of 100 to 400 billion stars – though some estimates say there could be as many as 1 trillion.

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Why teachers should embrace digital devices in the classroom

France's recent decision to pass a law banning the use of cellphones, tablets and smart watches at school for children under 15 is just the latest example of moral panic around new digital technologies, according to a University of Alberta education researcher.

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Beyond ivory – championing the neglected victims of illegal wildlife trade

The many threats to our planet's biodiversity posed by illegal wildlife trade are as varied as they are daunting, and you could be forgiven for feeling deflated after reading the first installment of this two-part blog. But that was only half the story. Encouragingly, Fauna & Flora International (FFI) has met with considerable success in its efforts to combat illegal wildlife trade and secure the

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Your social circle stymies your ‘fake news’ radar

Your social group can have a huge impact on how you view the world. But new research shows that the people you hang out or work with might also affect how well you can identify fact from fiction. Many people have difficulty authenticating online information, and today’s personalized systems on social media are making it even harder to distinguish fact from fake news. A 2016 study , for example, f

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Subducting slabs of the Earth's crust may generate unusual features spotted near the core

Nearly 1,800 miles below the earth's surface, there are large odd structures lurking at the base of the mantle, sitting just above the core. The mantle is a thick layer of hot, mostly plastic rock that surrounds the core; atop the mantle is the thin shell of the earth's crust. On geologic time scales, the mantle behaves like a viscous liquid, with solid elements sinking and rising through its dept

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Trump's 'all-out effort' on climate is derelict and risky

As Hurricane Florence made landfall, we could not help but reflect on the enormous human and financial toll of weather and climate-related disasters from last year. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), these disasters, which included severe storms, cyclones, floods and wildfire, exceeded US$300 billion —making 2017 the costliest year ever.

8h

Can e-scooters solve the 'last mile' problem? They'll need to avoid the fate of dockless bikes

As urban planners, we have not been good at integrating land uses, such as homes, shops and offices, with our transport infrastructure. Thus many people find the nearest train or bus stop is too far too walk and too close to drive (even if they could be sure of finding parking). This has created what is commonly known as the "last mile" problem.

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New small satellite peers inside Hurricane Florence

A new experimental weather satellite no bigger than a cereal box got an inside look at Hurricane Florence in a test of technology that could influence the future of storm monitoring from space. The satellite took its first images of Hurricane Florence on Tuesday, Sept. 11, just hours after its instrument was turned on.

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India probes death of 12 endangered lions

Indian authorities Friday ordered a probe into the deaths of a dozen endangered wild Asiatic lions, half of them cubs, over the last 10 days, officials said.

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Brown's climate efforts look to space

When Gov. Jerry Brown said California should launch its own satellite in the 1970s, the plan was considered so far-fetched that critics dubbed him Gov. Moonbeam.

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Octopuses given mood drug 'ecstasy' reveal genetic link to evolution of social behaviors in humans

By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or 'ecstasy,' scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree.

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Plug-and-play technology automates chemical synthesis

Researchers have developed an automated chemical synthesis machine that can take over many tedious aspects of chemical experimentation, freeing chemists to spend time on the more analytical and creative aspects of their work.

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50 years ago, a flu pandemic spurred vaccine research

A half-century after the Hong Kong flu pandemic, scientists are getting closer to a universal vaccine.

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Plasmonic Materials

Light-controlled nanomaterials are revolutionizing sensor technology — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Red Dead Redemption 2' Goes 'GTA' and the Rest of the Week in Games

Tiny PlayStations ahoy! Let's catch up on the week's gaming news.

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Siemen's Self-Driving Street Car Puts Autonomous Tech on Track

The company is developing autonomous street car tech, where vehicles on tracks make the challenge simpler, but still worth solving.

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Ancient Mystery Creature That Defied Classification Is Earth's Oldest Animal

Fat molecules show that a mystery creature that lived 558 million years ago was in fact an animal.

8h

How rats are killing our coral reefs

It's an invasion of rats! Some remote islands are crawling with these rodents, and even the coral reefs are suffering from it.

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Eye infection in contact lens wearers can cause blindness

A new outbreak of a rare but preventable eye infection that can cause blindness, has been identified in contact lens wearers in a new study. The research team found a threefold increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis since 2011 in South-East England.

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Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk

Following a Mediterranean-style diet (high in fish, fruits and nuts, vegetables and beans and lower in meat and dairy) reduced stroke risk in women over 40, but not in men. The Mediterranean-style diet reduced stroke risk among white adults who were at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

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"Afterneath" / "Killing Me" | Luke Sital-Singh

Luke Sital-Singh sings songs of love, longing and grief in this stirring performance of "Afterneath" and "Killing Me." "These are the songs I just never tire of hearing and I never tire of writing, because they make me feel less alone," Sital-Singh says.

8h

Archaeologists celebrate spectacular discovery of Iron Age treasure

In the year 536 CE, a volcano erupted in El Salvador.

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On-demand room-temperature single photon array—a quantum communication breakthrough

Physicists at The City College of New York have used atomically thin two-dimensional materials to realize an array of quantum emitters operating at room temperature that can be integrated into next generation quantum communication systems.

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Historian angers group who proposed labeling late Holocene as Meghalayan Age

Guy Middleton, a historian at the Czech Institute of Egyptology at Charles University in Prague, has angered members of the group who successfully pushed for the creation of a new unit of geological time called the Meghalayan Age. In his Perspective piece published in the journal Science, he claims that evidence of widespread collapse of civilizations following the onset of a mega-drought in 2200

8h

People more likely to migrate from small cities than large ones

Migration continues to be a frequently debated subject, with 68 percent of the world population projected to live in urban areas by 2050, according to a U.N. report. Although well-managed migration could be beneficial for economies and societies, it could also create challenges for policymakers in areas such as housing, education, health services, infrastructure and social cohesion. Therefore, it'

8h

Drug combo jams malaria’s ‘recycling system’

Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the most powerful antimalarial drug in the world with the help of chemotherapy medicine, according to a new study. As reported in Nature Communications , researchers discovered that the antimalarial drug artemisinin works through a “double whammy” attack that damages proteins in malaria parasites and clogs their waste disposal system, known as

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Gambling monkeys reveal brain area key to taking risks

Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain that is key to our willingness to take risks, according to a new study. The findings, which deepen our understanding of the neural circuits underlying risk preference in primates and could lead to better treatments for destructively risky behaviors in humans, are published in Current Biology . “People think ri

8h

Free Public Event on Autism

Autism is a mysterious and puzzling disorder. In 1943, American child psychiatrist Leo Kanner first published a paper describing 11 children who were highly intelligent but displayed “a powerful desire for aloneness” and “an obsessive insistence on persistent sameness.” He called this condition “early infantile autism.” Prior to that time, people with autism were simply called insane. Autism is n

8h

Slut med Formel 1 i København: Frank Jensen har trukket sin støtte

Københavns overborgmester Frank Jensen, som længe har arbejdet for at få racerløbet Formel 1 til København i 2020-2022, har officielt trukket sin støtte til projektet.

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Scientists find new ways to use biorefinery chemicals

Researchers of the Synthetic Organic Chemistry group at Aalto University have established an innovative system using enzymes for the valorisation of biogenic furans, leading to organic structures that are found for example in fragrances, pharmaceuticals and complex bioactive natural products, such as vitamins.

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Accelerated architecture of America's fastest supercomputer boosts QCD simulations

In pursuit of numerical predictions for exotic particles, researchers are simulating atom-building quark and gluon particles over 70 times faster on Summit, the world's most powerful scientific supercomputer, than on its predecessor Titan at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The interactions of quarks and gluons are computed using lattice quantum chromodyn

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Psykiatrien får flere penge – hvor mange er uklart

Regeringen lover 2,1 mia. kr. til psykiatrien over fire år, men sundhedsministeren kan ikke sætte præcist beløb på det reelle økonomiske løft, fordi udløbne bevillinger ikke tages med i regnestykket. OPDATERET.

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Scientists used Zika to kill aggressive brain cancer cells in mice

Health If it works in humans, it could help eliminate one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Although purposely injecting someone with a disease can seem dangerous, researchers have long worked on the development of viruses as cancer-fighting agents.

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Perovskite semiconductors seeing right through next generation X-ray detectors

From observing celestial objects to medical imaging, the sensitive detection of X-rays plays a central role in countless applications. However, the methods used to detect them have undergone an interesting evolution of their own.

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SpaceX’s Moon Trip Is the Ultimate Artist Residency

If SpaceX’s latest ambitions become a reality, a spaceship carrying one Japanese billionaire and six to eight artists will blast off from Earth and head for a trip around the moon sometime around 2023. As they approach, and the desolate gray of the moon’s cratered surface fills up their windows, they will make history as the first private astronauts to fly to Earth’s rocky companion. But the bill

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Research improves real-time visualization of trees in 3-D videogames

The work developed in the Interactive Visualization Centre provides faster and more efficient vegetation design systems.

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Labor unions help employees take more paid maternity leave

Union-represented working mothers are at least 17 percent more likely to use paid maternity leave than comparable nonunion working mothers.

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Wild African monkeys infected with the bacterium causing yaws in humans

An international research team, led by scientists from the German Primate Center, the Robert Koch Institute, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, McGill University, Masaryk University, the University of Tübingen and the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, has successfully recovered genomes of the bacterium Treponema pallidum, which causes syphilis and yaws in

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Graphene bilayer provides efficient transport and control of spins

University of Groningen physicists in collaboration with a theoretical physics group from Universität Regensburg have built an optimized bilayer graphene device that displays both long spin lifetimes and electrically controllable spin-lifetime anisotropy. It has the potential for practical applications such as spin-based logic devices. The results were published in Physical Review Letters on 20 Se

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Extreme biohacking: the tech guru who spent $250,000 trying to live for ever

Silicon Valley millionaire Serge Faguet thinks pills, injections and implants will turn him into a superhuman. Could they? In September last year, the young Silicon Valley entrepreneur Serge Faguet posted an article on the tech website Hacker Noon. It was headlined: “I’m 32 and spent $200k on biohacking. Became calmer, thinner, extroverted, healthier & happier.” Significantly more intelligent, to

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Multibit optoelectronic memory

NUS scientists have developed multibit optoelectronic memory using a heterostructure made of two-dimensional (2-D) materials for next generation devices.

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How to Set Up Your New iPhone

Welcome to your new iPhone.

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How to Sell Your Old Phone for the Most Money

Congrats on your new phone! Time to cash in on your old one.

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The Delta II Rocket That Gave Us GPS and the Mars Rovers Retires

The Delta II rocket was a workhorse, with 153 successful launches and a bevy of wild scientific missions to its credit.

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Cloudflare Embraces Google Roughtime, Giving Internet Security a Boost

Syncing clocks online is vital to web security.

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Image of the Day: On the Wing

A model helps recapitulate the geometric patterning of insect wings.

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Octopuses On Ecstasy Reveal Commonalities with Humans

Just as in people, the drug stimulates the animals to behave more socially.

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NSF Unveils New Sexual Harassment Policy

The measures include, in specific cases, terminating awards for researchers who have been found guilty in investigations by their institutions.

9h

Sparrow in a lead mine—birds adapt to life in contaminated areas

A new study of house sparrows' genes has found the first evidence of animals adapting to lead contamination in heavily polluted areas of Australia.

9h

How quinoa plants shed excess salt and thrive in saline soils

Barely heard of a couple of years ago, quinoa today is common on European supermarket shelves. The hardy plant thrives even in saline soils. Researchers from the University of Würzburg have now determined how the plant gets rid of the excess salt.

9h

Scientists solve the golden puzzle of calaverite

Scientists from Russia and Germany have shed light on the crystalline structure of calaverite, foretelling the existence of a new gold compound previously unknown to chemists. The results of their study were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

9h

Dynamic assessment can help language learners have more success

Altering or individualizing assessment procedures can propel second-language learners toward more successful mastery of that language, ongoing research by Penn State Associate Professor of Education Matt Poehner and his interdisciplinary team suggests.

9h

Research aims to boost dual-language learners' reading comprehension

A quickly growing student population of dual-language learners tends to have much lower high school graduation rates as well as reduced outcomes on measures of reading comprehension and vocabulary, and an interdisciplinary team led by Amy Crosson is researching why that particular population is a vulnerable one.

9h

Image: Small satellite demonstrates possible solution for 'space junk'

The International Space Station serves as humanity's orbital research platform, conducting a variety of experiments and research projects while in orbit around the planet.

9h

Astronauts Going to Mars Will Absorb Crazy Amounts of Radiation. Now We Know How Much.

There are plenty of challenges to putting people on Mars, whether you look at the rocket, the astronaut or the planet itself.

9h

9h

Why your brain is hardwired to be bad at economics – and how to fix it

We have evolved intuitions about the economy and globalisation that aren’t just wrong, they are damaging our futures. Fortunately, some clear thinking can protect you

9h

Restaurant Wants to Use Marijuana to Ease Lobsters’ Pain. Slow Your Roll, Maine Says.

The restaurant’s experiments have drawn publicity, regulatory pushback and scientific skepticism. Can lobsters get high? Do they feel pain?

9h

New York’s damning report on crypto exchanges will be good for the industry

Purists won’t like it, but shining a light on the exchanges’ shady practices could trigger big-time growth.

9h

Minister om DSB’s passagertab: »Det er ikke et mål i sig selv, at danskerne kører med tog«

Oppositionen kalder det en katastrofe, at togtrafikken falder. Ministeren er klar til at bygge flere veje på bekostning af jernbanen.

9h

The Rising French Star Creating Subversive Synth-Pop

As the number of prominent LGBTQ pop figures multiplies, what might have seemed like an uncontroversial hypothesis has been proven bountifully: There is not one “queer sound,” or even one “queer approach.” Certain radical dreamers might hope that singers who challenge social norms also challenge aesthetic ones, and you can indeed hear such rebellions in the cacophonous sugar highs of the electron

10h

Readers focus on fake news, neutrinos, and more

Readers pondered how to effectively combat fake news, questioned the result of a clinical trial, and wanted to know more about neutrinos.

10h

Building big experiments to study very little things

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses our behind the scenes look at the giant equipment used to study the smallest bits of matter.

10h

Revry: The Streaming Service Trying to Take Queer Content Global

Revry is like Netflix for LGBTQ shows, music, and podcasts—and it wants to make them available everywhere.

10h

For Museums, Augmented Reality Is the Next Frontier

Interactive museum exhibits like this are becoming more common as AR becomes cheaper, lighter, and easier to create.

10h

New Microscope Shows the Quantum World in Crazy Detail

The transmission electron microscope has a new bag of tricks, revealing the properties of materials at a much higher resolution than ever before.

10h

World's 2nd-Largest Shark Has an Olympic-Worthy Secret

The basking shark — known for its languid, filter-feeding lifestyle — has an Olympic-worthy secret: It can hurl its body out of the water just as fast and as high as its predatory cousin, the great white shark, a new study finds.

10h

10h

Scientists reveal the hidden costs of cobalt mining in DR Congo

In recent years, the demand for cobalt, a crucial component of rechargeable lithium-ion batteries for smartphones and electric cars, has been on the increase. Around 60 percent of the world's cobalt supply comes from the mineral-rich Katanga copper belt, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

10h

Would Lowering Fuel Economy Standards Boost New Car Sales and Make Driving Safer?

That’s what the Trump administration claims, but the arguments are dubious — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

ANALYSE: Ole Birk tager magten over Rejsekort fra genstridige trafikselskaber

Transportministeren lægger op til et fundamentalt opgør med DSB og de regionale busselskaber, når han vil tvinge dem til at lade private sælge billetter.

10h

A Recent Case Report Highlights Why Skipping the Chickenpox Vaccine is a Bad Idea

Chickenpox is a nasty infection. And though it isn't as deadly as some other vaccine-preventable illnesses, it can cause severe complications even in healthy kids, especially those too young to be vaccinated against it. Ignore anyone who shrugs it off as "no big deal".

10h

Kidney stones grow and dissolve much like geological crystals

Kidney stones are dynamic entities that grow and dissolve, a new study finds, which contradicts the prevailing medical assumption.

10h

Forsker og fleksjobber

Marie Bagger Bohn er ansat på Regionshospital Horsens som forsker på flekstid. Senfølger efter en kræftsygdom betyder, at hun ikke kan følge den slagne lægekarriere, Hun håber, at hun med sit eksempel kan ruske op i en lidt for strømlinet læge- og forskerbranche.

10h

New observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics

The building blocks of matter in our universe were formed in the first 10 microseconds of its existence, according to the currently accepted scientific picture. After the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, matter consisted mainly of quarks and gluons, two types of elementary particles whose interactions are governed by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interaction. In the earl

10h

Researchers report simpler method for safely handling methanethiol in chemical synthesis

The chemical element sulfur is an important constituent in many pharmaceuticals, and consequently, it is desirable to introduce sulfur-containing fragments efficiently in a broad range of chemical compounds. The Skrydstrup team has provided an effective way to introduce a small sulfur building block that is generally difficult to work with, a gas with an extremely repulsive odor. The team used a g

10h

Forskere: Vi kommer ikke til at afskaffe vanedannende morfin

Men der er håb for alternativer for det stigende antal danskere, der oplever smerte, lyder det fra verdenskongressen for smerte.

10h

Banks do too little to communicate their sustainable investment products

More private banks are offering sustainable investment options to wealthy clients. How do these products differ from one another? And do the banks' advisory services meet the expectations of investors? A study by the University of Zurich into the products and services of the 15 leading European private banks shows that most still have room for improvement.

10h

"Gambling Brain" Studies Make Clear Why It's Hard to Stop Rolling the Dice

Neural regions underlying risk-taking and regret may one day point toward treatments for compulsive betting — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Amerikansk forsikringsselskab vil kun forsikre kunder med fitness-ure

Det amerikanske forsikringsselskab John Hancock vil fremover kun sælge livsforsikringer til folk med eksempelvis et smartwatch, der kan sende data om kundens træning og sundhed til forsikringsselskabet.

10h

Her er de 43 initiativer i regeringens plan for psykiatrien

Børn og unge med psykiske problemer er i fokus i ny handlingsplan fra regeringen, der med 43 initiativer og 2,1 mia. kr. over fire år vil sikre, at den psykiatriske behandling i Danmark kan stå mål med udfordringerne.

10h

The Bail-Reform Tool That Activists Want Abolished

When Tyler Hubbard was arrested last year in Ocean Township, New Jersey, he was 22 years old. He, in his own words, “got into a big fight” with his stepfather, “and it went somewhere it shouldn’t have.” He was arrested around midnight, charged with second-degree aggravated assault, and taken to the county jail. Hubbard waited there for roughly a day before he, along with about 10 others, was intr

11h

The Pop Star Risking Death to Bring Change

Editor’s Note: The author, a researcher whose work focuses on a range of politically sensitive topics in contemporary Uganda, is remaining anonymous to protect the safety of sources in the country. These days, many conversations with the Ugandan pop star turned legislator Bobi Wine begin with inquiries about his health. When we met, on a gray morning in the final days of a trip he made to the Uni

11h

Why Hasn’t Trump’s Refugee Policy Repelled His Christian Supporters?

Refugees are not simply impoverished migrants. A refugee is defined , by a 1951 international convention, as a person who, “owing to well-founded fear of being persecuted … is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country.” The maximum number of refugees that the U.S. should accept in a given year is a

11h

Westworld Star Jeffrey Wright on the Lessons He Learned From Sports and Summer Jobs

During the summer of 1981, Jeffrey Wright was working at a community swimming pool in the historic Anacostia neighborhood in Washington, D.C. He had gotten the job through the Mayor Marion S. Barry Summer Youth Employment Program and worked with two other boys, one of whom would later inspire some of the mannerisms in a character Wright would play. Wright was raised in Southeast D.C. by his mothe

11h

Japan space probe drops hopping rovers towards asteroid

A Japanese space probe Friday released a pair of exploring rovers towards an egg-shaped asteroid to collect mineral samples that may shed light on the origin of the solar system.

11h

At high-tech Tokyo Game Show, old skool ones are the best

At the Tokyo Game Show, the world's top firms compete to show off their very latest in high-tech gaming gadgetry: from head-spinning virtual reality to cutting-edge multiplayer eSports.

11h

Straight up? DIY colonoscopy among weird science at Tokyo show

A gadget to "translate" dog barks for humans, a "babypod" that plays music inside the mother's vagina for unborn babies and the world's first self-colonoscopy method were among the whacky inventions on show Friday at a new Tokyo exhibition.

11h

Ice Surveys and Neckties at Dinner: Here’s Life at an Arctic Outpost

Danish soldiers, scientists and two very sturdy dogs are the only residents of Station Nord in Greenland. Like any remote outpost, there are quirky rules and rituals.

11h

A Rise in Murder? Let’s Talk About the Weather

The correlation between heat and crime suggests the need for more research on shootings in American cities.

11h

Video: Meet the low carbon pioneers — Kathrina Mannion

The world needs more energy but delivered with fewer carbon emissions. Embracing that dual challenge is the way BP thinks about every aspect of its business, says Kathrina Mannion

11h

A tiny robotic capsule could roam your intestines and suck up mucus

A small robot could travel through your gut and collect mucus in a vacuum bag to help make diagnosing stomach diseases safer and less painful

11h

Små OLED-skærme dræber VR-søsyge

Ved at bruge fire mikroskopiske OLED-skærme med en høj frame rate mener tyske forskere at kunne fjerne den ‘søsyge’, som mange oplever, når de tager et sæt virtual reality-briller på.

11h

Hør ugens podcast: Selvkørende busser og passagerflugt fra DSB

Update fra ITS World Congress, hvor det vrimler med selvkørende busser, biler og intelligente trafikløsninger. Og en sørgelig status på DSB’s passagertal, der dykker – undtagen i hovedstaden.

11h

Pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine offers hope for third generation approach

Researchers from the University of Oxford's Department of Zoology have demonstrated pre-clinical success for a universal flu vaccine in a new paper published in Nature Communications.

12h

It's not just for kids — even adults appear to benefit from a regular bedtime

In a study of 1,978 older adults publishing Sept. 21, 2018, in the journal Scientific Reports, researchers at Duke Health and the Duke Clinical Research Institute found people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every

12h

Smitsomme bakterier går i dvale og skjuler sig for antibiotika

Forskere på Københavns Universitet har opdaget en ny overraskende taktik hos sygdomsfremkaldende…

12h

Experience: I will be plastinated when I die

The challenges I face are immense. Suffering from Parkinson’s disease is like practising dying In July 1977, I was working as a research scientist at the University of Heidelberg’s Institute of Pathology and Anatomy. Looking at specimens embedded in plastic – the most advanced preservation technique then available – I wondered why the plastic was poured around bodies rather than into them. That w

12h

Trængslen på vejene er årsag til DSB’s vækst i hovedstaden

Intet sted i landet er togdriften så udskældt som i hovedstaden, og intet andet sted går den frem. Årsag: Køerne på vejene er endnu værre, og det siger lidt for meget om danskernes forhold til tog.

12h

The human league: what separates us from other animals?

From masturbating dolphins to chimps using tools, animals often display behaviours that we’d consider human. So what makes us unique? You are an animal, but a very special one. Mostly bald, you’re an ape, descended from apes; your features and actions are carved or winnowed by natural selection. But what a special simian you are. Shakespeare crystallised this thought a good 250 years before Charl

13h

Delhi's last elephants await marching orders

The mighty Heera marched through a crowded slum chewing bamboo, oblivious that freedom from life as one of Delhi's last six elephants at work in the polluted city could be just around the corner.

13h

Scientists reveal secrets of oldest known animal fossil – video

Associate Professor Jochen Brocks from the Australian National University shares a discovery which found a fossilised lifeform that existed 558m years ago. The Dickinsonia fossil has been identified as the oldest known animal, according to Brock's new research Continue reading…

13h

Outbreak of preventable eye infection in contact lens wearers

A new outbreak of a rare but preventable eye infection that can cause blindness, has been identified in contact lens wearers in a new study led by UCL and Moorfields Eye Hospital researchers.The research team found a threefold increase in Acanthamoeba keratitis since 2011 in South-East England.

14h

Zapping your guts with electricity can help relieve constipation

Passing a gentle electric current through the abdomen encourages bowel movements in people with chronic constipation, a clinical trial has found

14h

Subliminal messages can make you forget memories without realising

Being told not to remember something makes you less likely to remember it in future – and now a study has found this can happen without you even realising it

14h

Toll jumps to 22 in Philippine monsoon landslide

The death toll from a monsoon landslide in the central Philippines has risen to 22, officials said Friday, as rescuers dug through the night in a frantic search for survivors of the latest tragedy in the storm-hit nation.

14h

Ancient treasures on show in Germany reveal turbulent past

An arrowhead firmly lodged in the skull of an ancient fallen warrior, a voluptuous woman's form carved from ivory and the mask of a Roman river god are among more than 1,000 major archaeological discoveries being brought together for the first time.

14h

Crime in the vines: Alsace fights grape theft on horseback

Few places are more peaceful than the gentle slopes of France's Alsace wine region—but should any heinous crimes like grape theft occur, Jason the horse is on hand to catch the perpetrators.

14h

Commitment to democratic values predict climate change concern

Commitment to democratic values is the strongest predictor of climate change concern globally, Georgia State University faculty have found in a new study comparing climate change attitudes across 36 countries, including the U.S.

14h

To improve auto coatings, new tests do more than scratch the surface

Know that sickening feeling when you exit the grocery store and find your car has been banged up by a runaway shopping cart? It may one day be just a bad memory if auto body manufacturers make use of a new suite of tests developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and three industry partners. Data from these tests could eventually help your vehicle's exterior better defe

14h

Neutrons produce first direct 3-D maps of water during cell membrane fusion

New 3-D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion. Using neutron diffraction at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, researchers have made the first direct observations of water in lipid bilayers used to model cell membrane

14h

Synthetic organelle shows how tiny puddle-organs in our cells work

A couple of sugars, a dash of enzymes, a pinch of salt, a splash of polyethylene glycol, carefully arranged in watery baths. And researchers had made a synthetic organelle, which they used in a new study to explore some odd cellular biochemistry.

14h

California to limit use of plastic straws in restaurants

California restaurants will soon stop providing plastic straws unless customers explicitly ask for them, under a new law signed on Thursday by the state's environment-friendly governor.

14h

The extirpation of species outside protected areas

Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world—raising the risk of global extinction—due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL.

14h

Ghana flooding kills 34 during heavy rains

At least 34 people have died in northern Ghana during flooding caused by heavy rains and waters spilling from a dam in neighbouring Burkina Faso, relief agency officials said Thursday.

14h

Amazon aims to make Alexa assistant bigger part of users' lives

From the kitchen to the car, Amazon on Thursday sought to make its Alexa digital assistant and online services a bigger part of people's lives with an array of new products and partnerships.

14h

Glioblastoma: John McCain’s final battle

On August 25th, I received a news notification on my phone that Arizona Senator John McCain had passed away, just one day after halting treatment for glioblastoma and little more than one year after diagnosis. I was taken aback. I’d known this was coming, but not that it would happen so quickly. Moreover, the sorrow […]

15h

15h

Advancing life sciences research with the internet of things

The internet of things (IoT) is allowing scientists to optimize laboratory operations and combine instruments to measure and respond to complex experimental conditions. As a result, IoT is enabling more detailed and more complex experimental designs.

16h

Solving the genome puzzle

With advances in gene technology helping to diagnose very rare diseases, has the new era of personalised medicine finally arrived? Evie Walker sits on her mother’s lap, playing a game she never grows tired of: turning her mother’s hand over and over, stroking and examining it. When she takes a break and looks around, it is with the open-mouthed look of curiosity and awe that you see in many infant

16h

Opioid addiction: can the UK curb the looming crisis? – Science Weekly podcast

The US has been in the grip of an ‘opioid epidemic’ since the 1990s, and now a rise in opioid prescriptions and deaths is being seen across the pond. Ian Sample investigates and asks: what can we do the curb the looming crisis?

16h

Cybertruslen stiger – men hvem der skal gøre hvad og hvornår?

Den nye nationale cybersikkerhedsstrategi sætter ikke ret klare mål for, hvilket cybersikkerhedsniveau vi skal have nået om 4-5 år. Hverken bredt set eller for de enkelte sektorer, lyder det fra forsker.

16h

Blærebetændelse igen og igen: Sådan gemmer bakterier sig i din krop

Danske forskere har fundet det protein, der gør, at bakterier kan sove sig igennem en antibiotikakur.

16h

Midterm Time Capsule, 47 Days to Go: Derangement Comes to the Kavanaugh Fight

Way back in Trump Time Capsule #4 , when Donald Trump was about to clinch the Republican presidential nomination, I mentioned Trump’s long-standing weakness for conspiracy theories. These ranged from his lunatic suggestion that the father of (then-rival, now supplicant) Ted Cruz had been involved in the JFK assassination, to his “a lot of people are saying …” suspicion-mongering about the death

16h

Cooking with wood or coal is linked to increased risk of respiratory illness and death

Burning wood or coal to cook food is associated with increased risk of hospitalization or dying from respiratory diseases, according to new research conducted in China and published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

17h

Preventing a dengue outbreak at the 2020 Summer Olympics

New controls and frameworks are recommended to detect dengue and other infectious diseases and help prevent their spread during the 2020 summer Olympics and Paralympics being held in Tokyo, researchers report.

18h

Kiwifruit duplicated its vitamin C genes twice, 50 million and 20 million years ago

Today's kiwifruit contains about as much vitamin C as an orange — the result of the kiwifruit's ancestors' spontaneously duplicating their DNA in two separate evolutionary events approximately 50-57 million and 18-20 million years ago.

18h

Novel biomarker found in ovarian cancer patients can predict response to therapy

Researchers have identified an independent prognostic factor, cancer/testis antigen 45, that is associated with extended disease-free survival for women with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients with high levels of CT45 in their tumors lived more than seven times as long as patients who lacked sufficient CT45.

18h

A naturally occurring antibiotic active against drug-resistant tuberculosis

Researchers have discovered that a naturally occurring antibiotic called kanglemycin A is effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, even in drug-resistant strains.

18h

Neutrons produce first direct 3-D maps of water during cell membrane fusion

New 3-D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion.

18h

To improve auto coatings, new tests do more than scratch the surface

Data from new suite of tests could eventually help your vehicle's exterior better defend itself against dings, dents, scratches and things that go bump on the highway.

18h

Synthetic organelle shows how tiny puddle-organs in our cells work

Imagine your liver being just a big puddle. Some organelles in your cells are exactly that including prominent ones like the nucleolus. Now a synthetic organelle engineered in a lab shows how such puddle organs can carry out complex life-sustaining reaction chains.

18h

TINY cancer detection device proves effective in Uganda testing

About half the size of a lunch box, the Tiny Isothermal Nucleic acid quantification sYstem (or TINY) has shown promise as a point-of-care detector of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa.

18h

Commitment to democratic values predict climate change concern, study finds

In a new study comparing climate change attitudes across 36 countries, including the United States, commitment to democratic values is the strongest predictor of climate change concern globally.

18h

Smart pills dumb down medical care, experts warn

Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers caution health care providers and policymakers to slow down when it comes to allowing this technology in patient care settings.

18h

Scientists grow human esophagus in lab

Scientists working to bioengineer the entire human gastrointestinal system in a laboratory now report using pluripotent stem cells to grow human esophageal organoids. This is the first time scientists have been able to grow human esophageal tissue entirely from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which can form any tissue type in the body.

20h

High gluten diet in pregnancy linked to increased risk of diabetes in children

A new study suggests that a high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of their child developing type 1 diabetes.

20h

Even the best healthcare facilities can do more to prevent infections

Healthcare-associated infections can be reduced by up to 55 percent by systematically implementing evidence-based infection prevention and control strategies, according to a review of 144 studies. The study suggests that there is considerable room for improvement in infection prevention and control practices, regardless of the economic status of the country.

20h

Simulations of every woman's breast tissue address delay on enhanced MRI cancer detection

Researchers have simulated how over 20 different breast tissue ratios respond to heat given off by MRIs at higher field strengths than available in hospitals today.

20h

Can video game exercises help chronic low back pain?

Home-based video-game exercises can reduce chronic low back pain in older people by 27 percent, which is comparable to benefits gained under programs supervised by a physiotherapist, new research has found.

20h

Trilobites: NASA’s TESS Starts Collecting Planets

The satellite, launched in April, has already identified at least 73 stars that may harbor exoplanets, most of them new to astronomers.

20h

Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's, and provide a solution

A vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease may explain why so many drug trials have failed, according to researchers. Their study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer's.

20h

Bagsiden: Mystisk præcisionsinstrument med et hul

Ugens fremlysning – eller 'Hvad skuffen gemte'

20h

20h

Black women more likely to skip crucial breast cancer treatments

A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute finds that black women are more likely to skip hormone therapy treatments, also known as endocrine therapy, for breast cancer.

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21h

All the plastic you can and cannot recycle

England is recycling more plastic than ever – but for this trend to continue, the system needs to change

21h

The Atlantic Daily: Not Allowed to Fail

What We’re Following Rebuilding Puerto Rico: One year after Hurricane Maria hit, Puerto Rico is still in recovery. An estimated 200,000 people have left for the mainland of the U.S. in the past year, as the island continues to grapple with problems beyond rebuilding: “A battle between past and future, a struggle between colony and colonizer, a complicated relationship between a diaspora and home,

21h

The extirpation of species outside protected areas

Land-based bird populations are becoming confined to nature reserves in some parts of the world — raising the risk of global extinction — due to the loss of suitable habitat, according to a report led by UCL. Researchers analyzed biodiversity in the peninsula of Thailand, Borneo, Malaysia, Sumatra, Java and Bali, one of the world's most biologically degraded regions. They found that up to 25 per

22h

The BMJ questions transparency of information surrounding safety of Pandemrix vaccine

An investigation published by The BMJ today raises fundamental questions about the transparency of information surrounding the safety of GlaxoSmithKline's Pandemrix vaccine used in 2009-2010.

22h

Most nations falling short of UN targets to cut premature deaths from chronic diseases

People in the UK, US and China have a higher risk of dying early from conditions like cancer, heart disease and stroke than people in Italy, France, South Korea and Australia.

22h

More than half of countries are not on track to meet global targets for chronic diseases

Peer-reviewed / Modelling and review.Cancers, cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory diseases, and diabetes were responsible for 12.5 million deaths among people aged 30-70 years worldwide in 2016.Warning as more than half of all countries are not on track to achieve a UN target to reduce by a third the rate of premature deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 2030.

22h

Overwhelming evidence shows hepatitis C treatment effective for people who inject drugs

Researchers are calling on an end to discriminatory health and illicit drugs policies, based on overwhelming evidence that new hepatitis C therapies are effective at curing the virus in people who inject drugs.

22h

Why drawing isn’t just an art

We often think of drawing as something that takes innate talent, but this kind of thinking stems from our misclassification of drawing as, primarily, an art form rather than a tool for learning. Researchers, teachers, and artists are starting to see how drawing can positively impact a wide variety of skills and disciplines. Drawing is not an innate gift; rather, it can be taught and developed. Do

22h

New infographics show how cigarette smokers are socially penalized

The home improvement company Porch recently polled 1,009 people on their feelings about smoking. The company recently published the results as infographics. In terms of dating, 80 percent of nonsmokers find the habit a turnoff Cigarette smoking has had a bad name since the first Surgeon General's warnings in the 1960s , and a lot of erstwhile buttheads consider themselves more health-conscious by

22h

Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades

Death rates from drug overdoses in the US have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come. These findings suggest that, to be successful, prevention efforts must extend beyond control of specific drugs to address de

23h

Why rivers rise long after a hurricane is gone

Environment Florence damaged the coast with storm surges, but farther inland the worst was yet to come. Though the storm surges and lashing winds we see on TV are dramatic, they’re only the first half of the story. These coastal hazards happen during the hurricane, when…

23h

Drug overdose deaths in America are rising exponentially

Tracking rising numbers of deaths from a variety of drugs over the past 38 years shows that it isn’t just an opioid problem.

23h

Everything Amazon Announced: Echo Plus, Alexa Microwave, Echo SubAmazon Echo New Alexa

Today, Amazon announced more Alexa-powered products than you'll ever need—with the hopes you'll get at least one.

23h

Biosafety Reforms Still Lagging at Military Labs

Three years after finding that laboratories had mishandled deadly pathogens, the Pentagon has no way to measure the effectiveness of its reforms, according to a new report.

23h

Trilobites: On Ecstasy, Octopuses Reached Out for a Hug

By dosing the tentacled creatures with MDMA, researchers found they share parts of an ancient messaging system involved in social behaviors with humans.

23h

Amazon's Alexa Can't Know Everything, But It Can Go Everywhere

A heap of new Alexa devices—a microwave! a wall clock!—show Amazon's strategy to put its voice assistant in everything.

23h

Amazon really wants you to put Alexa stuff all over your house—and carAmazon Echo New Alexa

Technology All the gadgets the tech giant just announced. Yes, there was even an Alexa-enabled microwave.

23h

The Simple Request of the McDonald’s Anti–Sexual Harassment Protests

Tuesday afternoon in Chicago, a McDonald’s worker and single mother named Adriana Alvarez led a group of protesters who stood with blue duct tape covering their mouths, with “#MeToo” scrawled on it in black marker. “I represent thousands of fast-food workers who are striking across the country against sexual harassment,” Alvarez said after removing the tape from her face. “Today, fast-food worker

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Terms and Conditions

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines Lawyers for Christine Blasey Ford, the woman who has accused Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault, told the Senate Judiciary Committee that Ford is “prepared to testify next week,” provided that the conditions are “fair” and her safety is ensured. Three people were killed and three others were

23h

Human skeletal stem cells identified

Human skeletal stem cells that become bone, cartilage, or stroma cells have been isolated from fetal and adult bones. This is the first time that skeletal stem cells, which had been observed in rodent models, have been identified in humans. The researchers were also able to derive the skeletal stem cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells, opening up new therapeutic possibilities.

23h

What makes a mammal a mammal? Our spine, say scientists

Mammals are unique in many ways. We're warm-blooded and agile in comparison with our reptilian relatives.

23h

Certain factors linked with kidney function recovery in children on dialysis

Among children on dialysis for end-stage kidney failure, patients with vasculitis, ischemic kidney failure, and hemolytic uremic syndrome were most likely to regain kidney function and no longer need dialysis. Younger age and initiation on hemodialysis instead of peritoneal dialysis were also associated with recovery of kidney function.

23h

A stretchy stick-on patch can take blood pressure readings from deep inside your body

The flexible stamp can collect data that usually requires bulky, invasive equipment.

1d

Gut sense: Neural superhighway conveys messages from gut to brain in milliseconds

Searching for a more direct connection between the gut and the brain, researchers were shocked to see that distance spanned by a single synapse, relaying the signal in less than 100 milliseconds, less than the blink of an eye. The finding has profound implications for the understanding of appetite and appetite suppressants, most of which target slow-acting hormones rather than fast-acting synapses

1d

Fat from 558 million years ago reveals earliest known animal

Scientists have discovered molecules of fat in an ancient fossil to reveal the earliest confirmed animal in the geological record that lived on Earth 558 million years ago.

1d

Sloan Kettering’s Cozy Deal With Start-Up Ignites a New Uproar

A for-profit venture with exclusive rights to use the center’s vast archive of tissue slides has generated concerns at the nonprofit cancer center.

1d

Scientists reverse hair loss by making scalp "smell" sandalwood

Scientists treated scalp tissue with a chemical that mimics the odor of sandalwood. This chemical bound to an olfactory receptor in the scalp and stimulated hair growth. The treatment could soon be available to the public. None A synthetic chemical that mimics the odor of sandalwood could be the key to reversing hair loss, new research suggests. In a paper published in Nature on September 18, sci

1d

Early Halloween in this Greek town: 1,000-foot spiderweb

Aitoliko, in Western Greece is the town these images are from. Tetragnatha is the genus — known as "stretch spiders" because of their elongated bodies. They can run faster on water than on land. Don't panic, though: they will be gone in days. None In a phenomenon that can should only be in nightmares and Halloween horror films, stretch spiders have covered the beach of a Western Grecian island la

1d

Calorie information on menus helps diners eat a bit less

According to the CDC, obesity is costing the U.S. $147 billion each year in medical costs. The new Cornell study found that knowing calorie information helped diners eat less. Experts believe this could force chain restaurants to offer healthier, low-calorie options. None Of all the dietary trends, superfood cleanses, high-intensity workouts, fad pills and powders, and metabolic superstar program

1d

Whatever you smoke, it’s somebody’s problem

Survey tracks the interaction between smokers and nonsmokers Whether you smoke or not, it's everywhere How normal is your reaction to smoking? Cigarette smoking has had a bad name since the first Surgeon General's warnings in the 1960s , and a lot of erstwhile buttheads consider themselves more health-conscious by smoking cigars instead. Tobacco smoke, though, regardless of its source, contains d

1d

The "catch" to being on the keto diet

Recent studies showed volunteers lost equal or more weight on high-carb, calorie-restricted diets than low-carb, calorie restricted diets. There might be positive benefits to short-term usage of a ketogenic diet. One dietician warns that the ketogenic diet could put diabetics at risk for diabetic ketoacidosis. None A few weeks ago I stopped by the Korean stand at my local farmer's market. I was p

1d

7 habits of the best self-directed learners

Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and Ellen DeGeneres all dropped out of college, yet they became leaders in their fields. Their secret? Self-directed learning. Self-directed learning can help people expand their knowledge, gain new skills, and improve upon their liberal education. Following habits like Benjamin Franklin's five-hour rule, the 80/20 rule, and SMART goals can help self-directed learners

1d

Astrophysicists measure precise rotation pattern of sun-like stars for the first time

Scientists have measured the differential rotation on Sun-like stars for the first time, and their findings challenge current science on how stars rotate.

1d

Woman's Swollen Pinkie Finger Was Rare Sign of Tuberculosis

For one woman in California, a puffy pinkie was a rare sign of tuberculosis, according to a new report of the case.

1d

Synthetic organelle shows how tiny puddle-organs in our cells work

Imagine your liver being just a big puddle. Some organelles in your cells are exactly that including prominent ones like the nucleolus. Now a synthetic organelle engineered in a lab at Georgia Tech shows how such puddle organs can carry out complex life-sustaining reaction chains.

1d

To improve auto coatings, new tests do more than scratch the surface

Know that sickening feeling when you find your car banged up by a runaway shopping cart? It may become just a bad memory if auto body manufacturers make use of a new suite of tests developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and three industry partners. Data from these tests could eventually help your vehicle's exterior better defend itself against dings, dents, scratche

1d

Neutrons produce first direct 3D maps of water during cell membrane fusion

New 3D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion. Using neutron diffraction at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, researchers have made the first direct observations of water in lipid bilayers used to model cell membrane

1d

Spacewatch: floating 'space junk' captured

Surrey Space Centre scheme for removing orbiting debris successfully nets test junk A satellite launched from the International Space Station has caught a piece of simulated space junk by ensnaring it in a net. Co-funded by the European commission, the 100kg RemoveDebris satellite was launched to the station in April as cargo on a supply mission. It was deployed from the station in June, and on 1

1d

Junk food quitters face withdrawal-like symptoms

If you plan to try and quit eating junk food, expect to suffer similar withdrawal-type symptoms—at least during the initial week—that addicts experience when they attempt to quit using drugs, according to new research. The new study is believed to be the first of its kind to evaluate withdrawal symptoms that people go through when they stop eating highly processed foods, such as pastries, French

1d

ACA health insurance ads targeted younger, healthier consumers from 2013 to 2016

The themes in television advertisements for health insurance plans have shifted over time, possibly reflecting the shrinking pool of health plans offered through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as well as rising plan premiums.

1d

Puerto Rico's Tap Water Often Goes Untested, Raising Fears About Lead Contamination

People in Puerto Rico don't trust the water supply, and with good reason. Local systems aren't adequately tested for contaminants, including lead. (Image credit: Rebecca Hersher/NPR)

1d

These words make kids more helpful and persistent

Encouraging children “to help,” rather than asking them to “be helpers,” can instill persistence as they work to fulfill daily tasks that are difficult to complete, according to a new study. The findings suggest that using verbs to talk about actions with children, such as encouraging them to help, read, and paint, may help lead to more resilience following the setbacks that they inevitably exper

1d

Photos: 25 Fridays of Protest in Gaza

For nearly six months now, Palestinians living in the Gaza Strip have been staging weekly demonstrations at points along the border between Gaza and Israel—protests they call the “Great March of Return,” which demands that Palestinian refugees be allowed to return to their lands in present-day Israel. Every Friday since March 30, large and small groups of protesters approach the border fence unde

1d

Germany’s Summer of Identity Crisis

BERLIN —“Open societies can tolerate many different opinions, but not many different truths.” So said Hans-Georg Maassen, the man who, until recently, ran Germany’s Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (or the Verfassungsschutz), which monitors religious and political extremism. Addressing a symposium of intelligence officials in May, Maassen wanted to warn his colleagues of the

1d

The government just made it easier for oil companies to leak methane on public land

Environment It's just the latest environmental rollback. The final rule is just one of three "common-sense standards" set by the Obama administration on the oil and gas industry that the Trump administration is trying to…

1d

Smart pills dumb down medical care, experts warn

Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have published a paper in the American Journal of Bioethics that cautions health care providers and policymakers to slow down when it comes to allowing this technology in patient care settings.

1d

Study: Commitment to democratic values predict climate change concern

Commitment to democratic values is the strongest predictor of climate change concern globally, Georgia State University faculty have found in a new study comparing climate change attitudes across 36 countries, including the US.

1d

Study documents poor mental and physical health in rural borderland community members

The borderlands between the United States and Mexico are home to numerous Mexican and Central American rural communities, with many members living in poverty and frustrated by limited access to basic resources. A study on inequalities and health among foreign-born Latinos in rural borderland communities, led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside, has found that this population

1d

Confirmed: If You Give an Octopus MDMA, It Will Get All Cuddly

It appears that, yes, octopuses can get high on ecstasy.

1d

1d

The Situation in Puerto Rico Is Untenable

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico— Puerto Rico se levanta . It’s become something of an official motto among officials on the island, draped across buildings and making its way into press releases and speeches. It captures an optimistic and hopeful feeling, one a world away from mainland America’s posture toward the island, which vacillates between indifference and sensationalism. The best English translatio

1d

Geologists Are Feuding About the Collapse of Civilization

This summer, the decree went out: We are living in a new geological chapter in the planet’s 4.5-billion-year history. For a certain corner of the world, this was big news. You have probably heard of the Jurassic period (when dinosaurs ruled the Earth) or the Cambrian explosion (when complex animal life arose). Now we had a new name for our own neighborhood in time: We modern humans—you, me, and J

1d

TINY cancer detection device proves effective in Uganda testing

Its name is an acronym used to convey its size, but researchers at Cornell Engineering and Weill Cornell Medicine are hoping their hand-held cancer detection device's impact in the developing world is anything but small.

1d

Genomic dark matter activity connects Parkinson's and psychiatric diseases

Using a new technique known as laser-capture RNA seq, that involves cutting out dopamine neurons from a human brain section with a laser, investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School have cataloged more than 70,000 novel elements active in these brain cells. Their results are published this week in Nature Neuroscience.

1d

This Machine Will Hug Your 'Soft Bodies' and Force Them to Be Twitchy Robots

Say goodbye to your favorite teddy bear. It's robo-Teddy now.

1d

Why museums are returning cultural treasures | Chip Colwell

Archaeologist and curator Chip Colwell collects artifacts for his museum, but he also returns them to where they came from. In a thought-provoking talk, he shares how some museums are confronting their legacies of stealing spiritual objects and pillaging ancient graves — and how they're bridging divides with communities who are demanding the return of their cultural treasures.

1d

A little labeling goes a long way

New research reveals that infants can use even a few labeled examples to spark the acquisition of object categories. Those labeled examples lead infants to initiate the process of categorization, after which they can integrate all subsequent objects, labeled or unlabeled, into their evolving category representation.

1d

Elephant tusk DNA clues lead to ivory poacher ‘hotspots’

DNA test results of large seizures of elephant ivory by law enforcement have linked multiple shipments to the same network of dealers, according to a new study. The international trade in elephant ivory has been illegal since 1989, but African elephant numbers continue to decline. In 2016, the International Union for Conservation of Nature cited ivory poaching as a primary reason for a staggering

1d

The Science Behind Home Disaster Preparedness Kits Is a Disaster

Officials are pushing for extreme self-sufficiency when the next hurricane, earthquake, or other catastrophe hits, but the advice can be unclear and impractical.

1d

Books: DeRay Mckesson and Michiko Kakutani Reckon With Trump and Truth

The writers explore, in essay and memoir, the crucial ways reality has crumbled.

1d

Propping up glaciers to avoid cataclysmic sea level rise

As global warming outpaces efforts to tame it, scientists have proposed building massive underwater structures to prevent an Antarctic glacier the size of Britain from sliding into the sea and lifting the world's oceans by several metres.

1d

Engineers develop first method for controlling nanomotors

Engineers have developed the world's first method for controlling the motion of nanomotors with simple visible light as the stimulus.

1d

Coca-Cola, Walmart to cut plastic pollution in oceans

Coca-Cola, Walmart and other big multinationals pledged on Thursday to help reduce plastic pollution in the world's oceans in support of a campaign by five of the G7 industrialized nations.

1d

Earliest animal fossils are identified

Scientists have identified the earliest known animal in the geological record.

1d

Titans of Mathematics Clash Over Epic Proof of ABC Conjecture

In a report posted online today , Peter Scholze of the University of Bonn and Jakob Stix of Goethe University Frankfurt describe what Stix calls a “serious, unfixable gap” within a mammoth series of papers by Shinichi Mochizuki , a mathematician at Kyoto University who is renowned for his brilliance. Posted online in 2012, Mochizuki’s papers supposedly prove the abc conjecture, one of the most fa

1d

Speakers Announced for CityLab Detroit, Convening Global Mayors, City Innovators, and Urban Leaders October 28-30

Washington, D.C. and New York, NY (September 20, 2018)—CityLab, the preeminent global cities summit organized by the Aspen Institute, The Atlantic, and Bloomberg Philanthropies to address the most urgent urban issues of our time, today announced the first roster of speakers for its sixth-annual summit, happening next month in Detroit. Dozens of mayors from the U.S. and cities around the world wil

1d

Investigational steroid mirrors prednisone's benefits while taming its side effects

A head-to-head trial comparing the decades-old steroid, prednisone, and a promising new steroid, vamorolone, finds both act on the same key set of genetic pathways involved in controlling inflammation, indicates a new study led by Children's National Health System researchers. However, the study suggests the new investigational steroid doesn't activate several additional pathways involved in predn

1d

After EMR implementation, surgeons spend less time interacting with patients

Implementing an electronic medical records (EMR) system at an orthopaedic clinic may have unanticipated effects on clinic efficiency and productivity – including a temporary increase in labor costs and a lasting reduction in time spent interacting with patients, reports a study in September 19, 2018 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio

1d

Full, but still feasting: Mouse study reveals how urge to eat overpowers a signal to stop

A new study explores the mystery of what drives eating past the point of fullness, at the most basic level in the brain. It shows that two tiny clusters of cells battle for control of feeding behavior — and the one that drives eating overpowers the one that says to stop. It also shows that the brain's own natural opioid system gets involved — and that blocking it with the drug naloxone can stop

1d

NASA balloon mission captures electric blue clouds

Scientists share mesmerizing new images of electric blue clouds from NASA's PMC Turbo balloon mission that flew in over the Arctic in July 2018.

1d

NASA created rainfall analysis for super Typhoon Mangkhut

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. data was used to create a map of rainfall generated by Super Typhoon Mangkhut.

1d

NASA balloon mission captures electric blue clouds

On the cusp of our atmosphere live a thin group of seasonal electric blue clouds. Forming 50 miles above the poles in summer, these clouds are known as noctilucent clouds or polar mesospheric clouds—PMCs. A recent NASA long-duration balloon mission observed these clouds over the course of five days at their home in the mesosphere. The resulting photos, which scientists have just begun to analyze,

1d

Pet Store Puppies Blamed for Drug-Resistant Infections

More than 100 people have become ill with diarrheal disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

There’s a planet exactly where Star Trek said Vulcan should be

Space Countdown: 45 years left until ‘First Contact’ Astrophysicists just found a planet orbiting the star HD 26965, 16 light years away from Earth. And it's Vulcan.

1d

The PlayStation Classic is the latest in a wave of retro video game consoles

Gadgets It will come with 20 games and two classic controllers. The PlayStation Classic is aimed clearly at thirty-somethings who miss the days of Final Fantasy VII.

1d

Skull DNA fills in picture of Rome-invading barbarians

DNA samples are giving scientists a clearer picture of 6th-century barbarian migrations, according to new research. By taking extensive DNA samples from the skulls of individuals buried in two European cemeteries—one in Italy and one in Hungary—and combining that data with artifacts from the ancient civilization, scientists are now better able to piece together how barbarians invading from north

1d

Manganese plays a key role in bacterial infection

The ability to acquire manganese during infection is essential for the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis in animals, according to a study published September 20 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by José Lemos of the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and colleagues.

1d

Earliest known animal was a half-billion-year-old underwater blob

The weird ‘Ediacaran’ fossils have stumped scientists for decades – now fat molecules found inside some of them confirm they are the most ancient animals we know

1d

Amazon’s Alexa Upgrades Give the Voice Assistant New Listening Powers

Amazon announced new listening features for Alexa, part of a suite of upgrades to the voice assistant that will expand its ability to understand the world around it.

1d

A naturally occurring antibiotic active against drug-resistant tuberculosis

A naturally occurring antibiotic called kanglemycin A is effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis, even in drug-resistant strains, according to an international team of researchers who used chemistry, molecular biology, microbiology, and X-ray crystallography to show how the compound maintains its activity.

1d

NASA created rainfall analysis for super Typhoon Mangkhut

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. data was used to create a map of rainfall generated by Super Typhoon Mangkhut.

1d

Cancer immunotherapy might benefit from previously overlooked immune players

Using a bioinformatics approach, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers found that CD4+ T cell's binding partner, a molecule called MHC-II, may have even more influence on emerging tumors than MHC-I, the better known partner of CD8+ T cells. The finding, published September 20 in Cell, may help researchers improve cancer immunotherapies and predict which patients will re

1d

Manganese plays a key role in bacterial infection

The ability to acquire manganese during infection is essential for the virulence of Enterococcus faecalis in animals, according to a study published Sept. 20, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by José Lemos of the University of Florida College of Dentistry, and colleagues.

1d

Festschrift dedicated to Mathilde Krim includes scientific research by Krim fellows

A special Festschrift dedicated to the memory of Dr. Mathilde Krim celebrates her life and medical and scientific career, including her leadership role as the Founder of the American Foundation of AIDS Research (amfAR).

1d

New evidence for coordinated hedgehog and Wnt pathway activation in appendage regeneration

Researchers have made a significant new discovery concerning the signaling mechanisms that enable newts to regrow their tails after injury.

1d

Astrophysicists measure precise rotation pattern of sun-like stars for the first time

Scientists have measured the differential rotation on Sun-like stars for the first time, and their findings challenge current science on how stars rotate.

1d

Researchers make major breakthrough in controlling the 3D structure of molecules

Scientists from The Graduate Center of The City University of New York (GC/CUNY) have made a major breakthrough in chemical synthesis that now makes it possible to quickly and reliably modify the 3D structure of molecules used in drug discovery, according to a paper appearing in the current issue of the journal Science. The new method allows scientists to employ cross-coupling reactions to generat

1d

What makes a mammal a mammal? Our spine, say scientists

Mammals are unique in many ways. We're warm-blooded and agile in comparison with our reptilian relatives.

1d

Fat from 558 million years ago reveals earliest known animal

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) and overseas have discovered molecules of fat in an ancient fossil to reveal the earliest confirmed animal in the geological record that lived on Earth 558 million years ago.

1d

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