Search Posts

Nyheder2018september21

 

Plug-and-play technology automates chemical synthesis

MIT researchers have developed an automated chemical synthesis machine that can take over many tedious aspects of chemical experimentation, freeing chemists to spend time on the more analytical and creative aspects of their work.

1d

Like our sun, other stars spin faster at the equator than at the poles

Finally providing insights into the spin behavior of sun-like stars outside our solar system, researchers now report that, much like the sun, some other solar-type stars spin faster at their equators than at their poles.

1d

Analysis of global fossils informs evolution of mammalian spine

The three stages of mammalian backbone evolution are far clearer now, thanks to work by a team of researchers that examined fossilized backbones of primitive mammal ancestors and applied novel statistical analyses.

1d

Unraveling the exponential rise of the US drug overdose epidemic

The exponential growth in overall mortality from unintentional drug overdoses in recent decades is a composite of multiple underlying sub-epidemics of different drug types, each with its own unique set of social and geographic characteristics, reports a new study.

1d

Molecular fossils confirm Dickinsonia as one of Earth's earliest animals

By identifying specific biomarkers preserved alongside fossils of oval-shaped life forms from the Ediacaran Period, fossils from which are typically considered one of the greatest mysteries in paleontology, researchers say the ovular organism is not a fungus or protist, as some have thought, but an early animal.

1d

'Gut sense' is hardwired, not hormonal

Searching for a more direct connection between the gut and the brain, Duke researchers were shocked to see that distance spanned by a single synapse, relaying the signal in less than 100 milliseconds, less than the blink of an eye. The finding in the journal Science has profound implications for the understanding of appetite and appetite suppressants, most of which target slow-acting hormones rath

1d

Breaking down backbones

A new study is challenging the long-held belief that specialization in mammal backbones date back to the earliest land animals. Evidence suggests that the spine gained regions during mammal evolution, with the first — located in close proximity to the shoulders and front legs — appearing some 250 million years ago, just as dramatic changes began to appear in the forelimbs of animals known as non

1d

When mammal ancestors evolved flexible shoulders, their backbones changed too

Dolphins swim, horses gallop, and humans walk on two legs — mammals are able to move in lots of different ways. That's because we have unique backbones. And scientists exploring how mammals' backbones evolved have discovered that the key to our complex spines lies in mammals' flexible shoulders.

1d

Simulations enable 'choose-your-own-adventure' stereochemistry

"We used our data-driven tools to derive significant insight into how the process works that allows us to design the correct additives to get the desired outcomes," Sigman said. The results allow chemists to control which stereochemical product comes out of the reaction, simply by selecting the right ligand. It's more than just a laboratory convenience, though. The study also reveals much more abo

1d

Drug overdose epidemic has been growing exponentially for decades

Death rates from drug overdoses in the US have been on an exponential growth curve that began at least 15 years before the mid-1990s surge in opioid prescribing, suggesting that overdose death rates may continue along this same historical growth trajectory for years to come. These findings suggest that, to be successful, prevention efforts must extend beyond control of specific drugs to address de

1d

Gut fungus exacerbates asthma in antibiotic-treated mice

A non-pathogenic fungus can expand in the intestines of antibiotic-treated mice and enhance the severity of allergic airways disease, according to a study published Sept. 20 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by David Underhill of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, and colleagues. The findings suggest that alterations in gut microbiota induced by intestinal fungi might be a previously unrecognize

1d

Preventing a dengue outbreak at the 2020 Summer Olympics

In 2014, a dengue outbreak unexpectedly occurred in Tokyo. What does that mean for the 2020 summer Olympics and Paralympics being held in the city? Researchers report this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that new controls and frameworks are recommended to detect dengue and other infectious diseases and help prevent their spread during the summer games.

1d

1d

558m-year-old fossils identified as oldest known animal

Oval-shaped Dickinsonia lifeform existed at least 20m years before the ‘Cambrian explosion’ of animal life A fossilised lifeform that existed 558m years ago has been identified as the oldest known animal, according to new research. The findings confirm that animals existed at least 20m years before the so-called Cambrian explosion of animal life, which took place about 540m years ago and saw the

1d

Cholesterol traces suggest these mysterious fossils were animals, not fungi

Traces of cholesterol still clinging to a group of enigmatic Ediacaran fossils suggests the weird critters were animals, not fungi or lichen.

1d

Changing dynamics of the drug overdose epidemic in the United States from 1979 through 2016

Better understanding of the dynamics of the current U.S. overdose epidemic may aid in the development of more effective prevention and control strategies. We analyzed records of 599,255 deaths from 1979 through 2016 from the National Vital Statistics System in which accidental drug poisoning was identified as the main cause of death. By examining all available data on accidental poisoning deaths

1d

Asteroseismic detection of latitudinal differential rotation in 13 Sun-like stars

The differentially rotating outer layers of stars are thought to play a role in driving their magnetic activity, but the underlying mechanisms that generate and sustain differential rotation are poorly understood. We report the measurement using asteroseismology of latitudinal differential rotation in the convection zones of 40 Sun-like stars. For the most significant detections, the stars’ equat

1d

Unlocking P(V): Reagents for chiral phosphorothioate synthesis

Phosphorothioate nucleotides have emerged as powerful pharmacological substitutes of their native phosphodiester analogs with important translational applications in antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) therapeutics and cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) synthesis. Stereocontrolled installation of this chiral motif has long been hampered by the systemic use of phosphorus(III) [P(III)]–based reagent systems as

1d

Measurement of a superconducting qubit with a microwave photon counter

Fast, high-fidelity measurement is a key ingredient for quantum error correction. Conventional approaches to the measurement of superconducting qubits, involving linear amplification of a microwave probe tone followed by heterodyne detection at room temperature, do not scale well to large system sizes. We introduce an approach to measurement based on a microwave photon counter demonstrating raw s

1d

Self-assembly of lattices with high structural complexity from a geometrically simple molecule

Here we report an anomalous porous molecular crystal built of C–H···N-bonded double-layered roof-floor components and wall components of a segregatively interdigitated architecture. This complicated porous structure consists of only one type of fully aromatic multijoint molecule carrying three identical dipyridylphenyl wedges. Despite its high symmetry, this molecule accomplishes difficult tasks

1d

Ancient steroids establish the Ediacaran fossil Dickinsonia as one of the earliest animals

The enigmatic Ediacara biota (571 million to 541 million years ago) represents the first macroscopic complex organisms in the geological record and may hold the key to our understanding of the origin of animals. Ediacaran macrofossils are as "strange as life on another planet" and have evaded taxonomic classification, with interpretations ranging from marine animals or giant single-celled protist

1d

Fossils reveal the complex evolutionary history of the mammalian regionalized spine

A unique characteristic of mammals is a vertebral column with anatomically distinct regions, but when and how this trait evolved remains unknown. We reconstructed vertebral regions and their morphological disparity in the extinct forerunners of mammals, the nonmammalian synapsids, to elucidate the evolution of mammalian axial differentiation. Mapping patterns of regionalization and disparity (het

1d

Programmable protein circuits in living cells

Synthetic protein-level circuits could enable engineering of powerful new cellular behaviors. Rational protein circuit design would be facilitated by a composable protein-protein regulation system in which individual protein components can regulate one another to create a variety of different circuit architectures. In this study, we show that engineered viral proteases can function as composable

1d

Engineered CRISPR-Cas9 nuclease with expanded targeting space

The RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 cleaves its target DNA and is a powerful genome-editing tool. However, the widely used Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 enzyme (SpCas9) requires an NGG protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) for target recognition, thereby restricting the targetable genomic loci. Here, we report a rationally engineered SpCas9 variant (SpCas9-NG) that can recognize relaxed NG PAMs. The crysta

1d

1d

New Products

[no content]

1d

1d

Comment on "U-Th dating of carbonate crusts reveals Neandertal origin of Iberian cave art"

Hoffmann et al . (Reports, 23 February 2018, p. 912) report the discovery of parietal art older than 64,800 years and attributed to Neanderthals, at least 25 millennia before the oldest parietal art ever found. Instead, critical evaluation of their geochronological data seems to provide stronger support for an age of 47,000 years, which is much more consistent with the archaeological background i

1d

Bacterial antagonism in host-associated microbial communities

Antagonistic interactions are abundant in microbial communities and contribute not only to the composition and relative proportions of their members but also to the longer-term stability of a community. This Review will largely focus on bacterial antagonism mediated by ribosomally synthesized peptides and proteins produced by members of host-associated microbial communities. We discuss recent fin

1d

1d

The periodic coloration in birds forms through a prepattern of somite origin

The periodic stripes and spots that often adorn animals’ coats have been largely viewed as self-organizing patterns, forming through dynamics such as Turing’s reaction-diffusion within the developing skin. Whether preexisting positional information also contributes to the periodicity and orientation of these patterns has, however, remained unclear. We used natural variation in colored stripes of

1d

A gut-brain neural circuit for nutrient sensory transduction

The brain is thought to sense gut stimuli only via the passive release of hormones. This is because no connection has been described between the vagus and the putative gut epithelial sensor cell—the enteroendocrine cell. However, these electrically excitable cells contain several features of epithelial transducers. Using a mouse model, we found that enteroendocrine cells synapse with vagal neuron

1d

Challenges for commercializing perovskite solar cells

Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have witnessed rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, together with advances in stability and upscaling. Despite these advances, their limited stability and need to prove upscaling remain crucial hurdles on the path to commercialization. We summarize recent advances toward commercially viable PSCs and discuss challenges that remain. We expound the development

1d

Cellular checkpoint control using programmable sequential logic

Biological processes that require orderly progression, such as growth and differentiation, proceed via regulatory checkpoints where the cell waits for signals before continuing to the next state. Implementing such control would allow genetic engineers to divide complex tasks into stages. We present genetic circuits that encode sequential logic to instruct Escherichia coli to proceed through a lin

1d

1d

News at a glance

[no content]

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Research on research

[no content]

1d

1d

The metawars

[no content]

1d

The truth squad

[no content]

1d

A recipe for rigor

[no content]

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

A gut feeling

[no content]

1d

Bang or whimper?

[no content]

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

1d

Plasticity pow!

[no content]

1d

1d

1d

Cagey coordination

[no content]

1d

1d

Anti-CRISPR RNA?

[no content]

1d

Unlucky devils

[no content]

1d

Reconfigurable system for automated optimization of diverse chemical reactions

Chemical synthesis generally requires labor-intensive, sometimes tedious trial-and-error optimization of reaction conditions. Here, we describe a plug-and-play, continuous-flow chemical synthesis system that mitigates this challenge with an integrated combination of hardware, software, and analytics. The system software controls the user-selected reagents and unit operations (reactors and separat

1d

Suppressing spatiotemporal lasing instabilities with wave-chaotic microcavities

Spatiotemporal instabilities are widespread phenomena resulting from complexity and nonlinearity. In broad-area edge-emitting semiconductor lasers, the nonlinear interactions of multiple spatial modes with the active medium can result in filamentation and spatiotemporal chaos. These instabilities degrade the laser performance and are extremely challenging to control. We demonstrate a powerful app

1d

Understanding epilepsy in pediatric tumors

Researchers have identified a neuronal BRAF somatic mutation that causes intrinsic epileptogenicity in pediatric brain tumors.

1d

Astrophysicists measure precise rotation pattern of sun-like stars for the first time

Sun-like stars rotate up to two and a half times faster at the equator than at higher latitudes, a finding by researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi that challenges current science on how stars rotate.

1d

What makes a mammal a mammal? Our spine, say scientists

Mammals are unique in many ways. We're warm-blooded and agile in comparison with our reptilian relatives.

1d

Plug-and-play technology automates chemical synthesis

Designing a new chemical synthesis can be a laborious process with a fair amount of drudgery involved—mixing chemicals, measuring temperatures, analyzing the results, then starting over again if it doesn't work out.

1d

Fat from 558 million years ago reveals earliest known animal

Scientists from The Australian National University (ANU) and overseas have discovered molecules of fat in an ancient fossil to reveal the earliest confirmed animal in the geological record that lived on Earth 558 million years ago.

1d

Simulations enable 'choose-your-own-adventure' stereochemistry

Stereochemistry is a science of reflection. Two chemical molecules with the same composition and structure, but with one as the mirror image of the other, can produce wildly varying effects. Controlling which molecule emerges from a given reaction is a critical, but sometimes poorly understood, process.

1d

A 558-Million-Year-Old Mystery Has Been Solved

Around 558 million years ago, a strange … something dies on the floor of an ancient ocean. Its body, if you could call it that, is a two-inch-long oval with symmetric ribs running from its midline to its fringes. It is quickly buried in sediment, and gradually turns into a fossil. While it sits in place, petrifying, waiting, the world around it changes. The Earth’s landmasses merge into a single

1d

Global Health: ‘Latent’ Tuberculosis? It’s Not That Common, Experts Find

Active infections kill 4,000 people a day worldwide, more than AIDS does. But the notion that a quarter of the global population harbors silent tuberculosis is “a fundamental misunderstanding.”

1d

Fossilized Lipids Confirm Dickinsonia as One of the Earliest Animals

An analysis of organic material from 500-million-year-old fossils upholds the theory that the mysterious creatures were early forms of animal life.

1d

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

A Japanese research team made immature human eggs from stem cells that were derived from human blood. The technique brings scientists a step closer to being able to mass-produce human eggs. (Image credit: Courtesy of Saitou Lab)

1d

Say Hello to Dickinsonia, the Animal Kingdom's Newest (and Oldest) Member

Half-billion-year-old fossils reveal new details about one of the most mysterious chapters in Earth’s history — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

1d

Scientists quantify the vast and valuable finds stored on museum shelves

Researchers estimates only 3 to 4 percent of recorded fossil locations from across the globe are currently accounted for in published scientific literature.

1d

Simpler and safer method for handling a useful but foul-smelling gas in chemical synthesis

Researchers have developed both an ingenious, as well as a safe procedure for using the 'rotten egg' smelling and flammable gas, methanethiol, in certain chemical reactions.

1d

Hidden costs of cobalt mining in DR Congo

Cobalt mining comes at a great cost to public health in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. New research reveals that children are particularly vulnerable: their urine and blood samples contain high concentrations of cobalt and other metals.

1d

The Love Between Man and Beast

Every night for more than 35 years, Yussuf Mume Saleh has ventured outside the walls of the ancient city of Harar, Ethiopia, to feed his beloved spotted hyenas. For Jessica Beshir, a filmmaker who grew up in Harar, visions of Saleh and the delicately-cultivated bond he shares with these wild—and often dangerous—animals are embedded in her childhood nostalgia. “It was like going to see a magical p

1d

Matematisk mudderkastning

Usædvanlig afpublicering af videnskabelig artikel giver voldsomme reaktioner.

1d

Graphene bilayer provides efficient transport and control of spins

University of Groningen physicists in collaboration with a theoretical physics group from Universität Regensburg have built an optimized bilayer graphene device which displays both long spin lifetimes and electrically controllable spin-lifetime anisotropy. It has the potential for practical applications such as spin-based logic devices. The results were published in Physical Review Letters on 20 S

1d

Dr. Bernard Carroll: blogger, funny tweeter, and critic of scientific and ethical lapses in psychiatry

Dr. Bernard Carroll ( Nov 21, 1940 – Sep 10, 2018 ) The sound of one hand clapping while putting lipstick on pigs: Ketamine, A Promising Depression Treatment, Seems To Act Like An Opioid https://t.co/79eBIWmPqE — Bernard Carroll (@bcarroll40) August 29, 2018 I was friends with Dr. Carroll (“Barney”) on Twitter, and always enjoyed his wit. As we await McCain’s interment, Not forgetting Trump’s def

1d

Air pollution sickens us in a car-addicted society | Letters

Readers join the dots between various recent reports on the effects of air pollution on human health and the part played by cars in turning the atmosphere toxic Your report ( School run is the ‘biggest polluter’ of air children breathe , 18 September) highlights the continuing failure of government to recognise the dangers of air pollution, specifically from diesel engines, and to take necessary a

1d

Early Halloween in this Greek town: Massive, 1000-foot spiderwebs

Aitoliko, in Western Greece is the town these images are from Tetragnatha is the genus — known as "stretch spiders" because of their elongated bodies They can run faster on water than on land. Don't panic, though: They will be gone in days None In a phenomenon that can should only be in nightmares and Halloween horror films, stretch spiders have covered the beach of a Western Grecian island lagoo

1d

Divers are attempting to regrow Great Barrier Reef with electricity

It may be possible to restore damaged parts of the Great Barrier Reef by electrically stimulating coral fragments grown on underwater metal frames

1d

Why Schools Are Banning Yoga

In certain parts of the United States, it’s getting more and more likely that rather than a game of dodgeball in gym class or a round of Heads-up, Seven-up as a break between lessons, students will instead find themselves doing downward-facing dog. The internet is saturated with yoga-based lesson plans , teacher-training courses , and “mindful” music playlists designed for schools, while programs

1d

Child-Porn Investigation Caused New Mexico Observatory Closure: Report

An FBI investigation into child pornography caused the peculiar closure of a New Mexico solar observatory earlier this month, according to the news agency Reuters.

1d

Affordable Care Act: Study finds surprising gaps in HIV care providers' knowledge

More than a quarter of providers were unable to say whether their state had expanded Medicaid, the national survey found. The survey also sought to assess the healthcare providers' views on the effects of the ACA.

1d

To save us, half of Earth needs to be given to animals

Scientists says our survival depends on biodiversity. A natural climate strategy we often forget. Seeing our place among the Earth's living creatures. When we talk about the loss of habitat for animals, it's usually discussed in altruistic terms. Those who love animals are eager to fix it, while others feel it's our planet to do with what we will. It turns out that there may be a 100 percent self

1d

7 habits of the best self-directed learners

Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, and Ellen DeGeneres all dropped out of college, yet they became leaders in their fields. Their secret? Self-directed learning. Self-directed learning can help people expand their knowledge, gain new skills, and improve upon their liberal education. Following habits like Benjamin Franklin's five-hour rule, the 80/20 rule, and SMART goals can help self-directed learners

1d

Nerve cells in the human brain can 'count'

How do we know if we're looking at three apples or four? Researchers were able to demonstrate that some brain cells fire mainly for quantities of three, others for quantities of four and others for other quantities. A similar effect can be observed for digits: In humans, the neurons activated in response to a '2' are for instance not the same as the neurons activated for a '5'.

1d

Researchers patent technology for smart seat cushion, adaptable prosthetics

Researchers have patented a smart seat cushion that uses changes in air pressure to redistribute body weight and help prevent the painful ulcers caused by sitting for long periods of time in a wheelchair. The same technology can be used to create prosthetic liners that adapt their shape to accommodate changes in body volume.

1d

Mathematics meets biology to uncover unexpected biorhythms

A novel mathematical approach has uncovered that some animal cells have robust 12-hour cycles of genetic activity, in addition to circadian or 24-hour cycles.

1d

Sample size matters in multisensory integration studies

Sample size (the number of individuals examined for a study) is the most important factor determining the accuracy of the study results.

1d

Fish-rich diets in pregnancy may boost babies' brain development

Women could enhance the development of their unborn child's eyesight and brain function by regularly eating fatty fish during pregnancy. This is the suggestion from a small-scale study. The research supports previous findings that show how important a prospective mother's diet and lifestyle choices are for the development of her baby.

1d

Opioid controlled substance agreements safely reduce health care visits, Mayo study finds

The medical community has long known that patients on long-term opioid therapy often have significantly more health care visits. But adhering to a standardized care process model for opioid prescriptions appears to reduce the overall number of health care visits for these patients while maintaining safety, shows new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

1d

In cardiac injury, the NSAID carprofen causes dysfunction of the immune system

Attention has focused on how NSAIDs may cause dysfunction of the immune system. Researchers now have found that sub-acute pretreatment with the NSAID carprofen before experimental heart attack in mice impaired resolution of acute inflammation following cardiac injury. They focused on three aspects of the inflammation resolution axis — cardiac function, leukocyte profiling and inflammation-resolut

1d

German league launches eSports tournament for Bundesliga clubs

Bundesliga teams will battle it out on-line this season with the German Football League (DFL) announcing plans for an eSports competition for the clubs in Germany's top two leagues.

1d

1d

Tiny crystals could slash the cost of X-rays

Researchers have developed a highly-sensitive kind of X-ray flat panel detector using cheaper materials than current detectors. Since the 1890s, X-ray imaging technology has been widely used for many applications, including medical diagnostics, homeland security, national defense, advanced manufacturing, nuclear technology, and environmental monitoring. Modern X-ray imaging uses scintillator mate

1d

Can science build a better burger?

Researchers hope to replace whole animal agriculture and feed the world with lab-made meats or plants.

1d

Why do people share? It's contagious, six-year study of Hadza people shows

In the modern world, people cooperate with other people including strangers all the time. We give blood, tip providers of various services, and donate to charity even though there is seemingly nothing in it for us. Now, researchers who've studied Hadza hunter-gatherer people in Tanzania over a six-year period have new and surprising insight into why people work together.

1d

How lactoferrin clamps down on free roaming iron ions to stop nefarious effects on cells

What prevents our cells being damaged due to overexposure to iron ions is a protein called lactoferrin, known for its ability to bind tightly to such ions. Researchers used a combined experimental and molecular dynamics simulation to study the changes in the structure of lactoferrin as it binds to iron ions.

1d

Hookworms employ live fast/die young strategy in fur seal pup hosts

Hookworms exploit a live fast/die young strategy in their South American fur seal pup hosts. As a result, they often kill their host, rather than finding a happy equilibrium. Scientists are concerned that this type of hookworm infection could eventually pose a risk to critically endangered populations of fur seals.

1d

Matter falling into a black hole at 30 percent of the speed of light

Astronomers report the first detection of matter falling into a black hole at 30% of the speed of light, located in the center of the billion-light year distant galaxy PG211+143. The team used data from the European Space Agency's X-ray observatory XMM-Newton to observe the black hole.

1d

In depression the brain region for stress control is larger

Although depression is one of the leading psychiatric disorders, its cause remains unclear. A recent study found that those affected by depressive disorder have a larger hypothalamus compared to their healthy counterparts. This could explain why many sufferers show increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol and are very often afflicted with periods of tension.

1d

Intestines modify their cellular structure in response to diet

Body organs such as the intestine and ovaries undergo structural changes in response to dietary nutrients that can have lasting impacts on metabolism, as well as cancer susceptibility.

1d

Spotify to let artists post music without labels

In a move with the power to shake up the music industry, Spotify said Thursday that it will allow select artists to upload songs directly without record labels or distributors.

1d

Decoding the structure of an RNA-based CRISPR system

Over the past several years, CRISPR-Cas9 has moved beyond the lab bench and into the public zeitgeist. This gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 holds promise for correcting defects inside individual cells and potentially healing or preventing many human ailments. But the Cas9 system alters DNA, not RNA, and some experts believe that being able to modify RNA ultimately may prove just as useful.

1d

Reducing false positives in credit card fraud detection

Consumers' credit cards are declined surprisingly often in legitimate transactions. One cause is that fraud-detecting technologies used by a consumer's bank have incorrectly flagged the sale as suspicious. Now MIT researchers have employed a new machine-learning technique to drastically reduce these false positives, saving banks money and easing customer frustration.

1d

Decoding the structure of an RNA-based CRISPR system

Scientists from the Salk Institute are reporting for the first time the detailed molecular structure of CRISPR-Cas13d, a promising enzyme for emerging RNA-editing technology. They were able to visualize the enzyme thanks to cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), a cutting-edge technology that enables researchers to capture the structure of complex molecules in unprecedented detail.

1d

Study finds a conserved role for serotonin in regulating behavior in octopus, humans

The mood-altering drug MDMA — which promotes positive, friendly social interactions in humans by inhibiting serotonin uptake in nerve cells — has a similar behavioral effect in an octopus species, scientists reported today. This indicates that serotonin has been functioning as a regulator of social behavior for at least 500 million years, when the human and octopus lineages evolutionarily diverg

1d

Researchers identify a new cause of childhood mitochondrial disease

A rapid genetic test developed by Newcastle researchers has identified the first four patients with inherited mutations in a new disease gene, a building block of complex I called NDUFA6.

1d

Hookworms employ live fast/die young strategy in fur seal pup hosts, study finds

Hookworms exploit a live fast/die young strategy in their South American fur seal pup hosts, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia. As a result, they often kill their host, rather than finding a happy equilibrium. Scientists are concerned that this type of hookworm infection could eventually pose a risk to critically endangered populations of fur seals.

1d

Intestines modify their cellular structure in response to diet

Body organs such as the intestine and ovaries undergo structural changes in response to dietary nutrients that can have lasting impacts on metabolism, as well as cancer susceptibility, according to Carnegie's Rebecca Obniski, Matthew Sieber, and Allan Spradling.

1d

The undersea and the ecstasy: MDMA leaves octopuses loved up

Normally antisocial sea creature becomes friendly and tactile after being given the drug, scientists say What happens when you give an octopus MDMA? It sounds like a question that might flit through the meandering mind of someone who had been dabbling in psychedelics. But now the matter has become the focus of an unlikely-sounding scientific experiment to uncover the ancient origins of social beh

1d

Carbon Prices Are Too Low to Reduce Emissions

Though carbon taxes are spreading, they do not reflect actual climate costs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Seismic research cruise provides new data on US Atlantic margin gas hydrates

Data acquired by the U.S. Geological Survey on the U.S. Atlantic margin in August 2018 reveal new information about the distribution of gas hydrates in the sector stretching from the upper continental slope to deep water areas offshore New Jersey to North Carolina. The Mid-Atlantic Resource Imaging Experiment (MATRIX), which was jointly sponsored by the USGS Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources Pr

1d

Researchers patent technology for smart seat cushion, adaptable prosthetics

The University of Texas at Arlington has patented a smart seat cushion that uses changes in air pressure to redistribute body weight and help prevent the painful ulcers caused by sitting for long periods of time in a wheelchair.

1d

Cane toad: Scientists crack genetic code

Scientists have unlocked the DNA of the cane toad, a poisonous amphibian that is a threat to many native Australian species.

1d

Do Trump’s Core Supporters Even Want the GOP to Win the Midterms?

The Republican Party’s prospects in the midterm elections are threatened in part by their trust in Donald Trump, Joshua Green argues this week in Bloomberg Businessweek , citing an internal poll by the Republican National Committee. It reportedly shows that while most American voters believe that Democrats are well-positioned to take back the House, a majority who describe themselves as strong Tr

1d

Will We Ever Stop Eating Animal Meat?

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play There are two big truths about eating meat from animals. First, animal flesh imposes a high moral and ecological price for a tender medallion of food. Factory farming incurs the torturous treatment of millions of chickens, cows, and pigs each year. This constitutes a rolling moral catastrophe. What’s more, one-sixth of

1d

Matter falling into a black hole at 30 percent of the speed of light

A UK team of astronomers report the first detection of matter falling into a black hole at 30% of the speed of light, located in the centre of the billion-light year distant galaxy PG211+143. The team, led by Professor Ken Pounds of the University of Leicester, used data from the European Space Agency's X-ray observatory XMM-Newton to observe the black hole. Their results appear in a new paper in

1d

Hookworms employ live fast/die young strategy in fur seal pup hosts

Hookworms exploit a live fast/die young strategy in their South American fur seal pup hosts, report Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at the University of Georgia. As a result, they often kill their host, rather than finding a happy equilibrium. Scientists are concerned that this type of hookworm infection could eventually pose a risk to critically endangered populations of fur seals.

1d

Even the best healthcare facilities can do more to prevent infections

Healthcare-associated infections can be reduced by up to 55 percent by systematically implementing evidence-based infection prevention and control strategies, according to a review of 144 studies published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA). The study suggests that there is considerable room for improvement i

1d

There's Nothing Wrong with Being a Luddite

It enables critical reflection and evaluation of the technological world we’re building — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Anti-cancer drugs may hold key to overcoming antimalarial drug resistance

Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the antimalarial drug artemesinin with the help of chemotherapy medicines. Artemisinin works through a 'double whammy' attack on the deadly parasite. The drug damages proteins in malaria parasites and clogs the parasite's waste disposal system, known as the proteasome, which chemo can target.

1d

New method enables accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

A new brain imaging method can show the spread of specific tau protein depositions, which are unique to cases with Alzheimer's.

1d

Getting help with parenting makes a difference — at any age

Parenting interventions for helping children with behavior problems are just as effective in school age, as in younger children, a new study finds.

1d

Human Skeletal Stem Cell Found

Researchers recovered the cells that give rise to bone and cartilage from fetal and adult bone marrow and also derived them from induced pluripotent stem cells.

1d

In-class exercise breaks gets kids up and moving

Two-minute bursts of in-class exercise sessions increase the amount of daily physical activity for elementary children without hurting math performance, a series of studies show. As childhood obesity rates rise and physical education offerings dwindle, elementary schools keep searching for ways to incorporate the federally mandated half-hour of physical activity into the school day. Teachers say

1d

Coastal wetlands will survive rising seas, but only if we let them

A global study addresses a major uncertainty in how saltmarshes and mangroves will respond to sea-level rise; stresses importance of preserving 'accommodation space' for landward migration.

1d

Gut branches of vagus nerve essential components of brain's reward and motivation system

A novel gut-to-brain neural circuit establishes the vagus nerve as an essential component of the brain system that regulates reward and motivation, according to research conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published Sept. 20 in the journal Cell.

1d

Sample size matters in multisensory integration studies

Sample size (the number of individuals examined for a study) is the most important factor determining the accuracy of the study results.

1d

Machine Learning Confronts the Elephant in the Room

Score one for the human brain. In a new study , computer scientists found that artificial intelligence systems fail a vision test a child could accomplish with ease. “It’s a clever and important study that reminds us that ‘deep learning’ isn’t really that deep,” said Gary Marcus , a neuroscientist at New York University who was not affiliated with the work. The result takes place in the field of

1d

Robot created to monitor key wine vineyard parameters

Grapes must be picked at the exact point of maturation, and its plant must have the appropriate intake of water during development so that the wine ends up with desired properties. Controlling those parameters is complicated and expensive, and few can afford to use pressure chambers that measure water potential.

1d

How Nordic marine forests can help fight climate change

Research suggests that are many reasons to fall in love with marine forests, even the seaweed that gets wrapped around your feet when taking a dip in the sea.

1d

1d

The mystery of the dinosaur with crocodile jaws, bear claws and a sail

No one knows why dinosaurs never conquered the seas. But giant semi-aquatic predator Spinosaurus is revealing some teasing hints

1d

Octopuses taking MDMA get all huggy and loved-up with each other

Octopuses respond to ecstasy in the same way as we do, suggesting the basis for social behaviour evolved more than 500 million years ago

1d

Animals can count, but can’t read numbers – and now we know why

Humans but not animals learn that symbols like ‘2’ and ‘4’ represent numbers by recruiting a unique set of neurons to identify them

1d

Forskere: Hvepsen er udsat for unfair hetz

Hvepsen har et imageproblem – til gengæld elsker vi bier. Men det er uretfærdigt, for hvepsen er nyttedyr, ligesom dens mere populære flyvende fætter, mener britiske forskere.

1d

Immediate compression could help prevent complications after deep-vein thrombosis

People with deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) can substantially cut their risk of potentially debilitating complications by starting adequate compression therapy in the first 24 hours of DVT therapy (known as the acute phase of treatment), suggests a new study.

1d

Basking sharks can jump as high and as fast as great whites

These gentle giants, which can grow up to 10 m in length, have been recorded jumping out of the water as high and as fast as great white sharks. Marine biologists are unsure why they do this, but have pointed to this phenomenon as evidence of how much we still have to learn about marine life.

1d

New test procedure accelerates the diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens

The diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens is now possible in 45 minutes instead of 72 hours. Further research is necessary before the procedure is ready for clinical application.

1d

Climate change modifies the composition of reefs

Corals devastated by climate change are being replaced naturally by other species such as gorgonians, which are less efficient in acting as a carbon sink. A study has analyzes for the first time why gorgonians are more resistant than corals to human impacts and global climate change.

1d

Fatty acids can slow down an overheated immune system

The STING protein is normally an important part of our immune system, but in some autoimmune diseases it is itself the source of the disease. The pharmaceutical industry is therefore engaged in a race to find a drug that can inhibit STING. Now, researchers may have found it.

1d

Test could detect patients at risk from lethal fungal spores

Scientists have discovered a genetic mutation in humans linked to a 17-fold increase in the amount of dangerous fungal spores in the lungs. The study could allow doctors to screen patients at risk from Aspergillus, and could easily be developed into a test.

1d

If pigeons were brilliant, would they flock?

Researcher looked at how people behave in simple reasoning games and found that people are usually driven to 'flock,' or behave similarly to others in a given situation.

1d

Cell mechanism regulating protein synthesis in stress conditions discovered

New research has uncovered the mechanism used by cells to optimize the production of proteins in stressful situations by altering tRNA abundance.

1d

Heartbeat paces learning, study finds

A new study shows that the processing of external information varies during the phases of the cardiac cycle.

1d

Difficult people have most to gain from practicing compassion

New research finds that the most disagreeable individuals, who are also the least likely to be kind, can benefit most from behaving more compassionately.

1d

Relaxed environmental regulations heighten risk during natural disasters

Heavy rains following Hurricane Florence have raised concerns over the release of toxic materials. Ash from coal-fired power plants stored at a landfill has spilled out and the state of North Carolina has said dozens of sites have released hog waste or are at risk of doing so.

1d

The future of food is ready for harvest

For more than 20 years, a movement has been building that recognizes the vital role that small-scale farmers, fishers and harvesters, women, traditional knowledge and appropriate technologies will play in transforming our unsustainable and inequitable food system.

1d

Mathematics meets biology to uncover unexpected biorhythms

A novel mathematical approach has uncovered that some animal cells have robust 12-hour cycles of genetic activity, in addition to circadian or 24-hour cycles.

1d

Study reveals a promising alternative to corticosteroids in acute renal failure treatment

In search of an option for the drug known for causing several side effects, scientists describe the anti-inflammatory properties of protein galectin-1 in tests with rats involving ischemia-reperfusion scenarios.

1d

UTA researchers patent technology for smart seat cushion, adaptable prosthetics

The University of Texas at Arlington has patented a smart seat cushion that uses changes in air pressure to redistribute body weight and help prevent the painful ulcers caused by sitting for long periods of time in a wheelchair. The same technology can be used to create prosthetic liners that adapt their shape to accommodate changes in body volume.

1d

Intestines modify their cellular structure in response to diet

Body organs such as the intestine and ovaries undergo structural changes in response to dietary nutrients that can have lasting impacts on metabolism, as well as cancer susceptibility, according to Carnegie's Rebecca Obniski, Matthew Sieber, and Allan Spradling. 'Children born to malnourished mothers often struggle with obesity later in life and our findings could explain the physiology of why tha

1d

Nerve cells in the human brain can 'count'

How do we know if we're looking at three apples or four? Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Tübingen were able to demonstrate that some brain cells fire mainly for quantities of three, others for quantities of four and others for other quantities. A similar effect can be observed for digits: In humans, the neurons activated in response to a '2' are for instance not the same as the neurons

1d

A one-way street for salt

Barely heard of a couple of years ago, quinoa today is common on European supermarket shelves. The hardy plant thrives even in saline soils. Researchers from the University of Würzburg have now determined how the plant gets rid of the excess salt.

1d

Scientists make significant discovery in the fight against drug-resistant tuberculosis

Researchers from Newcastle University and Demuris Ltd have identified that a naturally occurring antibiotic, called kanglemycin A — related to the antibiotic rifampicin — is active against rifampicin-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

1d

What can salad dressing tell us about cancer? Think oil and vinegar

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have identified another way the process that causes oil to form droplets in water may contribute to solid tumors, such as prostate and breast cancer. Researchers found evidence that mutations in the tumor suppressor gene SPOP contribute to cancer by disrupting a process called liquid-liquid phase separation. Liquid-liquid phase separation is seen of

1d

Octopuses given mood drug 'ecstasy' reveal genetic link to evolution of social behaviors in humans

By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or 'ecstasy,' scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree.

1d

Scientists grow human esophagus in lab

Scientists working to bioengineer the entire human gastrointestinal system in a laboratory now report using pluripotent stem cells to grow human esophageal organoids. The newly published research in the journal Cell Stem Cell is the first time scientists have been able to grow human esophageal tissue entirely from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), which can form any tissue type in the body.

1d

Novel biomarker found in ovarian cancer patients can predict response to therapy

Researchers have identified an independent prognostic factor, cancer/testis antigen 45, that is associated with extended disease-free survival for women with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients with high levels of CT45 in their tumors lived more than seven times as long as patients who lacked sufficient CT45.

1d

What's eating these endangered orchids?

A species of seed-feeding fly is critically damaging the seed production of multiple orchid species, as revealed by a group of Japanese researchers. If the damage caused by this fly is occurring long-term and across Japan, these already-endangered orchid species could become unable to reproduce using seeds, and their dwindling numbers will take a large hit.

1d

Nomadic hunter-gatherers show that cooperation is flexible, not fixed

Why do humans cooperate? For six years, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have worked to answer this great puzzle, focusing on the Hadza, a nomadic hunter-gatherer population in Tanzania. New findings suggest that cooperation is flexible, not fixed.

1d

Gambling monkeys help scientists find brain area linked to high-risk behavior

Monkeys who learned how to gamble have helped researchers pinpoint an area of the brain key to one's willingness to make risky decisions.

1d

Stanford study identifies stem cell that gives rise to new bone and cartilage in humans

A decade-long effort led by Stanford University School of Medicine scientists has been rewarded with the identification of the human skeletal stem cell.

1d

We are bombarded by thousands of diverse species and chemicals, Stanford study finds

Stanford scientists have measured the human 'exposome,' or the particulates, chemicals and microbes that individually swaddle us all, in unprecedented detail.

1d

Kiwifruit duplicated its vitamin C genes twice, 50 million and 20 million years ago

Today's kiwifruit, a member of the Chinese gooseberry family, contains about as much vitamin C as an orange. This extra boost in vitamin C production is the result of the kiwifruit's ancestors' spontaneously duplicating their DNA in two separate evolutionary events approximately 50-57 million and 18-20 million years ago, as reported September 20 in the journal iScience.

1d

Researchers identify human skeletal stem cells

Human skeletal stem cells that become bone, cartilage, or stroma cells have been isolated from fetal and adult bones. This is the first time that skeletal stem cells, which had been observed in rodent models, have been identified in humans. The researchers were also able to derive the skeletal stem cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells, opening up new therapeutic possibilities. The disco

1d

MDMA (a.k.a. ecstasy) makes octopuses more social too

When people take MDMA, the drug popularly known as ecstasy, a rush of serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin produces feelings of emotional closeness and euphoria, making people more interested than normal in connecting with other people. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 20 have made the surprising discovery that a species of octopus considered to be primarily solitary and asocial

1d

Why do people share? It's contagious, six-year study of Hadza people shows

In the modern world, people cooperate with other people including strangers all the time. We give blood, tip providers of various services, and donate to charity even though there is seemingly nothing in it for us. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 20 who've studied Hadza hunter-gatherer people in Tanzania over a six-year period have new and surprising insight into why people

1d

StemExpress Leukopak Now Available in Frozen Format

StemExpress, a Folsom, California based leading supplier of human biospecimens, announces the release of frozen Peripheral Blood Leukopaks. Leukopaks provide an enriched source of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with low granulocyte and red blood cells that can be used in a variety of downstream cell-based applications.

1d

Polygraph tests don't work as lie detectors and they never have

Science It’s time to stop pinning our hopes on pseudoscience. Americans love to take, deliver, and judge the results of polygraph tests. Too bad they’re mostly worthless.

1d

Humans have skeletal stem cells that help bones and cartilage grow

Human skeletal stem cells have been found for the first time.

1d

How Do You Dispose of a Dead Whale? (Hint: Not in a Tiny Dumpster)

Big whales washing ashore create logistical challenges, as the city of Rye, New Hampshire, found out the hard way.

1d

Pairing zebrafish by personality improves fitness of the species

Scientists have challenged the theory of "love at first sight" after discovering that they can boost the reproductive success of zebrafish by pairing them by personality, rather than appearance.

1d

A different outlook would make the oil industry safer

The oil industry should pay more attention to human and organizational aspects in order to fundamentally improve safety. The industry does not learn enough from oil spills because learning is a conflict of interests: "Parties try to protect or promote their interest and try – consciously or subconsciously – to exclude each other from the learning process." This conclusion is the result of an inves

1d

How ad 'heroes' move us… and connect us to their brands

You may have seen it: the Nike ad in which tennis star Serena Williams ignores the judgements of others and chooses her own path. These and similar ads use storylines that have seemingly little to do with the brand itself in order to attract people to that brand. Communication and Information Studies researchers José Sanders and Kobie van Krieken explain how this works in their article published i

1d

How lactoferrin clamps down on free roaming iron ions to stop nefarious effects on cells

What prevents our cells from being overexposed to iron ions roaming freely in the body is a protein called lactoferrin, known for its ability to bind tightly to such ions. These free ions are essential for a number of biological processes. If found in excessive quantities, however, they could cause damage to proteins and DNA in the body, sometimes even leading to cell death. This is because free i

1d

1d

Widely used nonprofit efficiency tool doesn't work

A recent study finds that the tool most often used to assess the efficiency of nonprofit organizations isn't just inaccurate — it is negatively correlated with efficiency.

1d

American girls read and write better than boys

As early as the fourth grade, girls perform better than boys on standardized tests in reading and writing, and as they get older that achievement gap widens even more.

1d

Southeast Asian population boomed 4,000 years ago

Researchers have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth.

1d

Analysis of sea squirt embryo reveals key molecules in dopaminergic neuron differentiation

Researchers have used a novel approach for analyzing the central nervous system of a proto-vertebrate to identify a regulatory cocktail that induces the creation of dopaminergic neurons/coronet cells, a primitive version of the hypothalamus. The findings shed more light on how neurons differentiate into particular subtypes, with potential implications for the treatment of conditions such as Parkin

1d

'Hoppy' beer without exploding bottles and too much alcohol

'Dry-hopping' beer enhances flavor but sometimes has undesirable side effects, such as an unexpectedly high alcohol content and high pressures. Now, new research explains the biochemical basis of these unintended consequences, which could help brewers create better 'hoppy' beverages.

1d

Invisible Swarms of Particles Envelop Us All. Come Have a Look

Scientists have demonstrated a promising technique for measuring and mapping your exposome—the flecks of animate and inanimate stuff that surround you at all times.

1d

What Ecstasy Does to Octopuses

When Gül Dölen first gave ecstasy to octopuses , she didn’t know what to expect. Dölen is a neuroscientist at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who studies how the cells and chemicals in animal brains influence animals’ social lives. Ecstasy, also known as MDMA, interests her because it’s known to make people feel more sociable , more interested in others, and less defensive. The same effects

1d

The Logical Fallacy of Christine Blasey Ford’s ‘Choice’

Earlier this week, Tucker Carlson did the thing Tucker Carlson is consummately good at doing: He got angry on national television. The Fox News host’s performance, this time around, concerned the allegations of sexual assault Christine Blasey Ford has made against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh; Carlson, echoing an idea that has become a common one in the heated national debate that ha

1d

China and America May Be Forging a New Economic Order

“New U.S.-China Tariffs Raise Fears of an Economic Cold War,” proclaimed a Washington Post headline. The New York Times alleged that the United States and China were already “on the cusp” of such a “new Cold War.” Driving this hysteria was the Trump administration’s Monday announcement unveiling tariffs on an additional $200 billion of Chinese imports, followed nearly immediately by a Chinese pro

1d

Video: How silver nanoparticles cut odors

Trendy workout clothes may advertise that special silver nanoparticles embedded in the fabric will cut the sweaty odor that builds up from repeated gym visits. It turns out there's some truth to these claims.

1d

Why do so many people fall for fake profiles online?

The first step in conducting online propaganda efforts and misinformation campaigns is almost always a fake social media profile. Phony profiles for nonexistent people worm their way into the social networks of real people, where they can spread their falsehoods. But neither social media companies nor technological innovations offer reliable ways to identify and remove social media profiles that d

1d

Nomadic hunter-gatherers show that cooperation is flexible, not fixed

In the realm of evolutionary biology and survival of the fittest, cooperation is a risky business. Yet humans do it on a scope and a scale unmatched by any group in the animal world.

1d

How to teach kids where food comes from – get them gardening

Survey the shelves of most supermarkets and you'll no doubt be confronted with row upon row of food designed to appeal to children. Be it chicken nuggets or turkey twizzlers – many foods now bear little resemblance to their original ingredients – "junk foods" now line the supermarket shelves to appeal to young consumers.

1d

What's eating these endangered orchids?

A species of seed-feeding fly is critically damaging the seed production of multiple orchid species, as revealed by a group of Japanese researchers. If the damage caused by this fly is occurring long-term and across Japan, these already-endangered orchid species could become unable to reproduce using seeds, and their dwindling numbers will take a large hit.

1d

Kiwifruit duplicated its vitamin C genes twice, 50 million and 20 million years ago

Today's kiwifruit, a member of the Chinese gooseberry family, contains about as much vitamin C as an orange. This extra boost in vitamin C production is the result of the kiwifruit's ancestors' spontaneously duplicating their DNA in two separate evolutionary events approximately 50-57 million and 18-20 million years ago, as reported September 20 in the journal iScience.

1d

We are bombarded by thousands of diverse species and chemicals, study finds

We are all exposed to a vast and dynamic cloud of microbes, chemicals and particulates that, if visible, might make us look something like Pig-Pen from Peanuts.

1d

Octopuses given mood drug 'ecstasy' reveal genetic link to evolution of social behaviors in humans

By studying the genome of a kind of octopus not known for its friendliness toward its peers, then testing its behavioral reaction to a popular mood-altering drug called MDMA or "ecstasy," scientists say they have found preliminary evidence of an evolutionary link between the social behaviors of the sea creature and humans, species separated by 500 million years on the evolutionary tree.

1d

Farmers fume as France announces more bears for the Pyrenees

Dozens of farmers and lawmakers stormed out of a meeting Thursday with France's new environment minister after he confirmed that two more bears would soon be released into the Pyrenees mountains.

1d

In Lab Turned Casino, Gambling Monkeys Help Scientists Find Risk-Taking Brain Area

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have identified a brain region in monkeys that influences their desire to take big risks. When this area is inactivated, the monkeys tend to hedge their bets. (Image credit: Fotofeeling/Getty Images/Westend61 RM)

1d

Octopuses Get Strangely Cuddly On The Mood Drug Ecstasy

The drug makes the usually antisocial creatures much more interested in friendly contact with other octopuses. It's one more sign that the chemistry of social behavior has deep evolutionary roots. (Image credit: Tom Kleindinst/Marine Biological Laboratory)

1d

The inventor who plans to build a city under the sea

After spending decades exploring the deep sea, Phil Nuytten plans to build a colony there.

1d

How we could teach our bodies to heal faster | Kaitlyn Sadtler

What if we could help our bodies heal faster and without scars, like Wolverine in X-Men? TED Fellow Kaitlyn Sadtler is working to make this dream a reality by developing new biomaterials that could change how our immune system responds to injuries. In this quick talk, she shows the different ways these products could help the body regenerate.

1d

How lactoferrin clamps down on free roaming iron ions to stop nefarious effects on cells

What prevents our cells being damaged due to overexposure to iron ions is a protein called lactoferrin, known for its ability to bind tightly to such ions. In a new study published in EPJ E, Lilia Anghel from the Institute of Chemistry in Chisinau, Republic of Moldova, and research collaborators use combined experimental and molecular dynamics simulationto study the changes in the structure of lac

1d

In depression the brain region for stress control is larger

Although depression is one of the leading psychiatric disorders in Germany, its cause remains unclear. A recent study at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig, Germany, found that those affected by depressive disorder have a larger hypothalamus compared to their healthy counterparts. This could explain why many sufferers show increased levels of the s

1d

New research finds annual well visit increases likelihood of preventive services

A new Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute study assesses the effect of receiving an Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) between 2011 and 2013 on the annual rate of eight preventive services recommended for the Medicare population following the AWV. The study is published online in Preventive Medicine.

1d

Scientists solve the golden puzzle of calaverite

There's quite a story behind calaverite. Apart from its marked impact on the Gold Rush, the mineral has been a headache and a great paradox for crystallographers for decades. The deeper researchers dug into it, the more new questions came up. Scientists from Russia and Germany have succeeded in interlacing all the oddities of calaverite within a simple model, so experimenters can now hunt for the

1d

Indonesia halts new palm oil plantation development

Indonesia's president has signed a moratorium on all new palm oil plantation development, an official said Thursday, in a move hailed by environmentalists.

1d

Few hatchery brook trout genes present in Pennsylvania watershed wild fish

Despite many decades of annual brook trout stocking in one northcentral Pennsylvania watershed, the wild brook trout populations show few genes from hatchery fish, according to researchers who genotyped about 2,000 brook trout in Loyalsock Creek watershed, a 500-square-mile drainage in Lycoming and Sullivan counties celebrated by anglers for its trout fishing.

1d

Out of office: New Baylor study examines relationship between stress and remote work

Many U.S. employees believe working from home—or at least away from the office—can bring freedom and stress-free job satisfaction. A new Baylor University study says, "Not so fast."

1d

Glacial engineering could limit sea-level rise, if we get our emissions under control

Targeted engineering projects to hold off glacier melting could slow down ice-sheet collapse and limit sea-level rise, according to a new study. While an intervention similar in size to existing large civil engineering projects could only have a 30 percent chance of success, a larger project would have better odds of holding off ice-sheet collapse. But the researchers caution that reducing emissio

1d

Physicists train robotic gliders to soar like birds

Scientists know that upward currents of warm air assist birds in flight. To understand how birds find and navigate these thermal plumes, researchers used reinforcement learning to train gliders to autonomously navigate atmospheric thermals. The research highlights the role of vertical wind accelerations and roll-wise torques as viable biological cues for soaring birds. The findings also provide a

1d

What your cell phone camera tells you about your brain

Your brain is structured to make the best possible decision given its limited resources, according to new research that unites cognitive science and information theory — the branch of mathematics that underlies modern communications technology.

1d

More prevention efforts needed to curb the growing risk of future wildfires

The latest report from the Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) on forest fires shows the need to tackle climate change "to leave a healthier planet for those that follow," as President Jean-Claude Juncker highlighted in his latest State of the Union Address. The report calls for stronger measures to prevent wildfires.

1d

Discovering the secrets of business success in modern rural areas

A new European initiative is working to identify the vital ingredients for developing rural entrepreneurship and successful business models in high potential sectors such as food and agriculture, bio-based value chains and services. We spoke with Thomas Norrby, senior extensionist at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) to get a flavour.

1d

Most preschool math, literacy apps not designed to help children learn, study finds

Most literacy and math educational apps for preschoolers are not designed to help youngsters actually learn, according to a new study from the University of California, Irvine. Few incorporate features informed by evidence-based best teaching practices or age-appropriate in-play guidance.

1d

EU Fisheries failures jeopardise sustainability of small fishing communities

Traditional artisanal fishing has been harmed by EU fishing policies that favour big businesses and ignores other more sustainable approaches to conserving fish stocks, according to new research from the University of Kent.

1d

Centerchef fra Rigshospitalet bliver vicedirektør i Sundhedsstyrelsen

Lars Juhl Petersen skifter jobbet som centerchef på Rigshospitalet ud med en post som vicedirektør i Sundhedsstyrelsen. Derudover får styrelsen to nye centerchefer.

1d

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

1d

Business this week

[no content]

1d

Politics this week

[no content]

1d

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

1d

Politics this week

[no content]

1d

Business this week

[no content]

1d

KAL’s cartoon

[no content]

1d

Politics this week

[no content]

1d

Business this week

[no content]

1d

Basking sharks can jump as high and as fast as great whites

A collaborative team of marine biologists has discovered that basking sharks, hundreds of which are found off the shores of Ireland, Cornwall, the Isle of Man and Scotland, can jump as fast and as high out of the water as their cousins, the famously powerful and predatory great white shark.

1d

Few hatchery brook trout genes present in Pennsylvania watershed wild fish

Despite many decades of annual brook trout stocking in one northcentral Pennsylvania watershed, the wild brook trout populations show few genes from hatchery fish, according to researchers who genotyped about 2,000 brook trout in Loyalsock Creek watershed, a 500-square-mile drainage in Lycoming and Sullivan counties celebrated by anglers for its trout fishing.

1d

Journal of Dairy Science® presents collection on calf health and management

The United States Department of Agriculture-National Animal Health Monitoring System (USDA-NAHMS) conducted a survey of 2,545 preweaned heifer calves across 104 dairy operations in 2014. The study, which took place in 13 states over 18 months, covered a large cross-section of management of preweaned heifer calves in the United States, and the results have been published in six new articles in the

1d

New way to target advanced breast cancers

IL1b, a member of the interleukin 1 family of cytokines (proteins released by certain cells of the immune system) drives the inflammation often found in cancer, and appears as an 'IL1 signature' in women with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. This signature can not only serve as a diagnostic tool for HER2-negative cancers but also offer an effective treatment target.

1d

Ny planetjæger spotter dampende varm super-Jord

Det nye NASA-rumteleskop TESS har opdaget sin første planet, der stort set kun består af vand. Den kredser om en stjerne 59,5 lysår borte.

1d

Praying Mantis That Catches Fish Is a Guppy's Worst Nightmare

Scientists observed the first-ever evidence of praying mantises hunting fish.

1d

What Katrina taught us about saving Puerto Rico's youngest storm victims

The catastrophe that followed Hurricane Maria's landfall in Puerto Rico, on Sept. 20, 2017, affected all of Puerto Rico's 3.3 million citizens.

1d

Meshed offshore transmission grids key to a sustainable energy future

Coordinated development of electricity infrastructure connecting offshore wind farms to land will bring financial and environmental benefits.

1d

The Dambusters raid took place 75 years ago – here's how they made a bomb bounce

Sir Barnes Wallis was a genius engineer who designed a very special bomb during World War II. The idea was that it would bounce across water and destroy German dams along the Ruhr Valley, causing massive flooding and damage to water and hydroelectricity supplies.

1d

New Antifade Mounting Media from Vector Laboratories Enhances Immunofluorescence Applications

Vector Laboratories, a leader in the development and manufacture of labeling and detection reagents for biomedical research, introduces VECTASHIELD® Vibrance™ – antifade mounting media that delivers significant improvements to the immunofluorescence workflow.

1d

The effects of anthropogenic noise

Hans Slabbekoorn, researcher at the Institute of Biology Leiden, is one of the editors of the latest volume of the Springer Handbook of Auditory Research (SHAR). This book is filled with everything known about the effects of sound on vertebrates. Slabbekoorn's contribution to the book as a co-author is in two chapters on hearing and noise impact for terrestrial mammals and birds.

1d

Climate change modifies the composition of reefs

Corals devastated by climate change are being replaced naturally by other species such as gorgonians, which are less efficient in acting as a carbon sink. A study by the ICTA-UAB analyzes for the first time why gorgonians are more resistant than corals to human impacts and global climate change.

1d

First detection of matter falling into a black hole at 30 percent of the speed of light

A UK team of astronomers report the first detection of matter falling into a black hole at 30 percent of the speed of light, located in the centre of the billion-light year distant galaxy PG211+143. The team, led by Professor Ken Pounds of the University of Leicester, used data from the European Space Agency's X-ray observatory XMM-Newton to observe the black hole. Their results appear in a new pa

1d

ScanMars demonstrates water detection device for astronauts on Mars

Analogue astronauts have successfully tested a radar that could help future Mars explorers identify where to dig for water. ScanMars is an Italian experiment that was used to identify subsurface water features in the Mars-like Dhofar region of Oman during the AMADEE-18 analogue mission in February 2018. The results will be presented by Alessandro Frigeri of the Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (I

1d

Candy-pink lagoon serves up salt-rich diet for potential life on Mars

The discovery of a microorganism that gives a candy-pink lagoon in central Spain its startling colour is providing new evidence for how life could survive on a high-salt diet on Mars or Europa. The Laguna de Peña Hueca, part of the Lake Tirez system in La Mancha, has very high concentrations of salt and sulphur and is a good analogue for chloride deposits found in the Southern highlands of Mars an

1d

AI could help drones ride air currents like birds

Birds have long inspired humans to create their own ways to fly. We know that soaring bird species that migrate long distances use thermal updrafts to stay in the air without using up energy flapping their wings. And glider pilots similarly use thermals currents and other areas of rising air in order to remain airborne for longer.

1d

'Penis bones' – an evolutionary puzzle explained using innovative 3-D scanning

For ferrets, sex is a prolonged affair. In total, the act of mating might last up to three hours. Fortunately for the males of the species, they are packing a secret weapon to help them through this daunting task. Some modern mammals (including ferrets, mice, dogs and even apes) have a bone inside their penis, called the baculum.

1d

Widely used nonprofit efficiency tool doesn't work, study says

A recent study from North Carolina State University finds that the tool most often used to assess the efficiency of nonprofit organizations isn't just inaccurate – it can actually be negatively correlated with efficiency.

1d

Recent tectonics on Mars

These prominent trenches were formed by faults that pulled the planet's surface apart less than 10 million years ago.

1d

1d

Can a common heart condition cause sudden death?

About one person out of 500 has a heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This condition causes thickening of the heart muscle and results in defects in the heart's electrical system. Under conditions of environmental stress such as exercise, HCM can result in sudden death. In other cases, patients may go undiagnosed, with their heart function declining gradually over decades.

1d

Giant pandas can tell a mate from their calls

Pandas have to be within 20 metres of each other to identify each other's calls in their bamboo forest home.

1d

Study: Widely used nonprofit efficiency tool doesn't work

A recent study finds that the tool most often used to assess the efficiency of nonprofit organizations isn't just inaccurate — it is negatively correlated with efficiency.

1d

New observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics

In the current issue of the science journal Nature, an international team of scientists presents an analysis of a series of experiments which sheds light on the nature of the phase transition after the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago.

1d

Fish-rich diets may boost babies' brain development

Women could enhance the development of their unborn child's eyesight and brain function by regularly eating fatty fish during pregnancy. This is the suggestion from a small-scale study led by Kirsi Laitinen of the University of Turku and Turku University Hospital in Finland, in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research. The research supports previous findings that show how important a

1d

Fatty acids can slow down an overheated immune system

The STING protein is normally an important part of our immune system, but in some autoimmune diseases it is itself the source of the disease. The pharmaceutical industry is therefore engaged in a race to find a drug that can inhibit STING. Now, researchers from Aarhus may have found it.

1d

Study: Immediate compression could help prevent complications after deep-vein thrombosis

People with deep-vein thrombosis (DVT) can substantially cut their risk of potentially debilitating complications by starting adequate compression therapy in the first 24 hours of DVT therapy (known as the acute phase of treatment), suggests a study published today in the journal Blood.

1d

Quick and not-so-dirty: A rapid nano-filter for clean water

Researchers harness naturally occurring nano-structures that grow on liquid metals to develop an ultra-fast water filter.

1d

Two fish a day keep the mantid coming back to prey: The first fishing praying mantis

For the first time, a praying mantis is recorded to fish. For five days in a row, an adult male was observed hunting and devouring a total of nine guppies from a pond located in a private roof garden in Karnataka, India. Apart from demonstrating such repetitive behaviour, the event is remarkable in the fact that it occurred naturally, without external interference. The phenomenon is described in t

1d

Solving real-world problems

Tools developed by Håvard Rue have transformed data analysis, interpretation and communication, and are applied broadly: from modeling the spread of infectious diseases to mapping fish stocks.

1d

Two fishes a day keep the mantid coming back to prey: The first fishing praying mantis

Commonly known to predate on insects, praying mantises have occasionally been observed to feed on vertebrates, including small birds, lizards, frogs, newts, mice, snakes and turtles. Mostly, such records have either not been scientifically validated or have occurred under induced and human-manipulated circumstances.

1d

Quick and not-so-dirty: A rapid nano-filter for clean water

Australian researchers have designed a rapid nano-filter that can clean dirty water over 100 times faster than current technology.

1d

Talking with the doctor makes it easier to deal with grief and bereavement

In a comprehensive study, researchers from Aarhus University show that grieving patients who receive what is known as talk therapy at the general practitioner shortly after a relative's death, have a lower risk of suicide and psychiatric illness than others. Data from 207,000 million Danes is included in the register-based study, which can contribute to new practices in the preventative area.

1d

EU fisheries failures jeopardize sustainability of small fishing communities

Traditional artisanal fishing has been harmed by EU fishing policies that favor big businesses and ignores other more sustainable approaches to conserving fish stocks, according to new research from the University of Kent. This is the main finding of research by Dr. Alicia Said, Professor Douglas MacMillan, and Dr Joseph Tzanopoulos of the School of Anthropology and Conservation (SAC) published in

1d

Scientists reveal the hidden costs of cobalt mining in DR Congo

Cobalt mining comes at a great cost to public health in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. New research reveals that children are particularly vulnerable: their urine and blood samples contain high concentrations of cobalt and other metals.

1d

Basking sharks can jump as high and as fast as great whites

These gentle giants, which can grow up to 10 m in length, have been recorded jumping out of the water as high and as fast as great white sharks. Marine biologists are unsure why they do this, but have pointed to this phenomenon as evidence of how much we still have to learn about marine life.

1d

Simpler and safer method for handling a useful but foul-smelling gas in chemical synthesis

Researchers at the Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO) and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, have developed both an ingenious, as well as a safe procedure for using the 'rotten egg' smelling and flammable gas, methanethiol, in certain chemical reactions.

1d

Drop in EU/EEA measles cases between March and July 2018

During the month of July, a total of 758 cases of measles were reported across seventeen countries in the EU/EEA, which is a decrease from the 1054 cases reported during the month of June.

1d

New test procedure accelerates the diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens

A research team from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Cologne and the German Centre for Infection Research has achieved a breakthrough: The diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens is now possible in 45 minutes instead of 72 hours. Further research is necessary before the procedure is ready for clinical application.

1d

Nykøbing F. Sygehus får ny lægefaglig vicedirektør

Thomas Houe tiltræder 1. november som ny lægefaglig vicedirektør på Nykøbing F. Sygehus.

1d

Hospitalsdirektører får gyldent håndtryk til mio. efter afskedigelse

Afskedigelserne af de to hospitalsdirektører ved Hospitalsenheden Midt har medført et sammenlagt gyldent håndtryk på omkring fire mio. kr.

1d

A Lack of Confidence Isn't What’s Holding Back Working Women

This much we know: There’s a wide and stubborn gender gap, both in terms of pay and leadership opportunities . What we still can’t figure out are the causes. Some argue that inflexible workplaces are to blame. Others point to sexist cultural norms and even outright discrimination . While the truth is probably a combination of all these factors, and more, another theory has gained ground in recent

1d

How Puberty Kills Girls’ Confidence

The change can be baffling to many parents: Their young girls are masters of the universe, full of gutsy fire. But as puberty sets in, their confidence nose-dives, and those same daughters can transform into unrecognizably timid, cautious, risk-averse versions of their former self. Over the course of writing our latest book , we spoke with hundreds of tween and teen girls who detailed a striking

1d

Climate change modifies the composition of reefs

Corals devastated by climate change are being replaced naturally by other species such as gorgonians, which are less efficient in acting as a carbon sink. A study by the ICTA-UAB analyzes for the first time why gorgonians are more resistant than corals to human impacts and global climate change.

1d

Pairing zebrafish by personality improves fitness of the species

Scientists have challenged the theory of 'love at first sight' after discovering that they can boost the reproductive success of zebrafish by pairing them by personality, rather than appearance.

1d

Analysis of sea squirt embryo reveals key molecules in dopaminergic neuron differentiation

Researchers at University of Tsukuba used a novel approach for analyzing the central nervous system of a proto-vertebrate to identify a regulatory cocktail that induces the creation of dopaminergic neurons/coronet cells, a primitive version of the hypothalamus. The findings shed more light on how neurons differentiate into particular subtypes, with potential implications for the treatment of condi

1d

Anti-cancer drugs may hold key to overcoming antimalarial drug resistance

Scientists have found a way to boost the efficacy of the antimalarial drug artemesinin with the help of chemotherapy medicines. Artemisinin works through a 'double whammy' attack on the deadly parasite.The drug damages proteins in malaria parasites and clogs the parasite's waste disposal system, known as the proteasome, which chemo can target.

1d

New method improves temperature imaging accuracy in fat-containing tissues

A research team led by Prof. ZHENG Hairong from the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology developed a "dual-step iterative temperature estimation (DITE)" method for fat-referenced PRFS temperature imaging in fat-containing tissues. By modulating BAT activity, this study provides crucial insight relevant to the treatment of metabolic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty

1d

Physicists train robotic gliders to soar like birds

Researchers from the Salk Institute and the University of California San Diego used reinforcement learning to train gliders to autonomously navigate atmospheric thermals, soaring to heights of 700 meters — nearly 2,300 feet.

1d

'Walking into a headwind' – what it feels like for women building science careers

Australia's parliament has a problem retaining experienced women. As a workplace, it's not alone.

1d

Aboriginal people lived in Australia's desert interior 50,000 years ago, earlier than first thought

New evidence shows that people have lived inland in Western Australia for more than 50,000 years. That's 10,000 years earlier than previously known for Australian deserts.

1d

EU consumer chief "impatient" with Facebook over data

The European Union's consumer protection chief said Thursday she's growing impatient with Facebook's lack of action in complying with the bloc's demands to be more transparent with users about their data.

1d

1d

Danmarkskort: Her halter internetforbindelsen

Der er stor forskel på, hvor stor del af befolkningen, der har en internethastighed på maksimalt 10/2 Mbit, som politikerne har defineret som langsomt. Det viser en opgørelse fra Bredbaand.dk.

1d

Fredningsforening efter museumsaffredning: Find flere penge eller affred mere

Kulturministerens beslutning om at affrede Vikingeskibsmuseet er ifølge foreningen Historiske Huse konsekvensen af manglende politisk vilje til at prioritere fredede bygninger. Politikerne bør gøre op med sig selv, om de vil finde flere penge eller affrede flere funktionstømte bygninger.

1d

Without Claws or Armor, 520-Million-Year-Old 'Naked' Critter Was Likely a Loner

A 'naked,' wormlike creature that lived in the ocean 520 million years ago was so defenseless, it likely lived as a recluse, evading hungry predators by hiding in dark crevices or among clusters of sponges, a new study finds.

1d

Surprise finding uncovers balancing act between birth defects and cancer

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have made a surprise discovery about how subtle changes in the way cell survival is regulated during embryonic development can have drastic health implications.

1d

Scientists quantify the vast and valuable finds stored on museum shelves

Days after a fire tore through Brazil's National Museum and destroyed specimens of irreplaceable heritage, a team of scientists has quantified the vast number of fossils that sit unstudied in natural history collections. Researchers from the California Academy of Sciences, University of California Museum of Paleontology (UCMP), and partner institutions are working to preserve these "dark data" in

1d

Study at Johns Hopkins hospital leads to changes in reporting patient safety concerns

In a case study published online last week in Academic Medicine, an international team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge and Johns Hopkins Medicine looked at what prevented employees from raising concerns.

1d

Smartphone, M.D.

In a potential game changer for the health care industry, a new cell phone app and lab kit now allow a smartphone to identify bacteria from patients anywhere in the world. With the new app, doctors will be able to diagnose diseases and prescribe the appropriate antibiotic within a one-hour office visit, meaning faster recovery — and lower treatment costs — for patients.

1d

Researchers look to immune cell shapes to predict how well body will fight lung cancers

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have discovered how to quickly and accurately predict which lung cancer patients will benefit from chemotherapy by analyzing the arrangement–not the number– of cells the body sends out to fight the disease.

1d

A new approach towards developing a vaccine against vivax malaria

A novel study indicates promising avenues in an innovative approach for developing a vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, the most prevalent human malaria parasite outside sub-Saharan Africa. The study, led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health, indicates the possibility of using small vesicles (or exosomes) secreted by immature red blood cells as a vaccine platform against ma

1d

American girls read and write better than boys

As early as the fourth grade, girls perform better than boys on standardized tests in reading and writing, and as they get older that achievement gap widens even more, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

1d

Detecting epigenetic signature may help people stay ahead of IBD

With an estimated 1.6 million people in the US dealing with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), physicians can have a hard time telling which newly diagnosed patients have a high risk of severe inflammation or what therapies will be most effective. Now researchers report in the journal JCI Insights finding an epigenetic signature in patient cells that appears to predict inflammation risk in a seriou

1d

Out of office: New Baylor study examines relationship between stress and remote work

Many US employees believe working from home — or at least away from the office — can bring freedom and stress-free job satisfaction. A new Baylor University study says, 'Not so fast.'

1d

Japan's largest complete dinosaur skeleton comes to life

The unearthed bones of Mukawaryu, Japan's largest complete dinosaur skeleton, have now been prepared and pieced together, giving us a fuller and clearer image of the 72 million-year-old dinosaur.

1d

Researcher using bird's eye view to reduce building strikes

Brandon Samuels plans to set up cameras this January in hopes of catching footage of birds crashing into windows across campus. Honestly, he really is a nice guy – it's for science.

1d

Paraffin-infused porous graphene film (PIPGF) with programmable wettability

In materials science, the surface wettability of a biomaterial can be measured using the surface water contact angle as an important characterization of its hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity. The technique has attracted remarkable attention in recent years for materials development in the areas of energy, healthcare and environmental science. Bioinspired surfaces have been engineered with a variety

1d

Best Running Gear (2018): Shoes, Headphones, Lights, and More

Whether you’re pounding the pavement or cheering your friends on, we have the gear for you.

1d

Here's What to Expect from Today's Amazon Hardware Event

Amazon is about to announce a some hardware at an event in Seattle, where Alexa will be the star of the show.

1d

GoPro Hero7 Black Review: Not a Whole Lotta Shakin' Going On

Stabilized action-cam footage has gotten a whole lot better.

1d

Want a Robot to *Really* Get a Grip? Make It Like Baymax

Inflatable graspers don’t have to be taught how to hold something, the way robo-hands do.

1d

Trilobites: Decoding Pandas’ Come-Hither Calls

During mating season, the solitary mammals bleat important information to each other through their dense bamboo habitat.

1d

Is it possible to stop Turkey’s economic meltdown?

Turkey is in the middle of an economic crisis. Can anything be done to stave off financial disaster? The country’s currency, the lira, has fallen nearly 40 percent against the dollar since the start of the year. Double-digit inflation has sent prices of food, energy, and other goods soaring. Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has consolidated immense power since his rise to head of state in 2003, is strug

1d

Putting underused smart devices to work

There are currently millions of heavily underutilized devices in the World. The storage, networking, sensing and computational power of laptops, smartphones, routers or base stations grows with each newversion and product release. Why not put all those extra gigabytes of memory and those powerful processing units to work collaboratively and expand the services available to all of us?

1d

Physicists train robotic gliders to soar like birds

Scientists know that upward currents of warm air assist birds in flight. To understand how birds find and navigate these thermal plumes, researchers used reinforcement learning to train gliders to autonomously navigate atmospheric thermals. The research highlights the role of vertical wind accelerations and roll-wise torques as viable biological cues for soaring birds. The findings also provide a

1d

Workshy bosses breed contempt and abuse in the workforce, research shows

Workshy bosses can promote a contemptuous attitude amongst their staff — leading to anger, frustration and abuse in the work place, new research has shown.

1d

Private banks do too little to communicate their sustainable investment products

More and more private banks are offering sustainable investment options to wealthy clients. How do these products differ from one another? And do the banks' advisory services meet the expectations of investors? A study by the University of Zurich into the products and services of the 15 leading European private banks shows that most still have room for improvement.

1d

Dwarf companion to EPIC 206011496 detected by astronomers

Using ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), European astronomers have uncovered the presence of an M-dwarf around the star EPIC 206011496. The newly found object is more than 60 percent less massive than our sun and is bounded to the primary star. The finding is reported in a paper published September 10 on arXiv.org.

1d

Statistician examines Beatles mystery

Mark Glickman is Fixing a Hole in Beatles lore.

1d

Research finds Aboriginals lived in Western Desert 50,000 years ago

Archaeologists from The University of Western Australia working with Traditional Custodians from the Birriliburru Indigenous Protected Area (IPA) have recovered evidence that people lived in the Australian arid zone 50,000 years ago.

1d

Ryanair chairman gets shareholder slapdown amid strikes

Ryanair shareholders delivered a blow to the no-frills airline's chairman on Thursday amid widespread strike action by European staff that has rattled confidence in the company.

1d

Fox-Comcast battle to buy Sky to be settled by auction in UK

Comcast and 21st Century Fox will settle their battle for control of broadcaster Sky through a rare auction designed to put an end to months of offers and counteroffers from the American media empires seeking a foothold in the European pay TV market.

1d

Bye bye bugs? Scientists fear non-pest insects are declining

A staple of summer—swarms of bugs—seems to be a thing of the past. And that's got scientists worried.

1d

Rising housing costs are re-segregating the Bay Area, study shows

New reports from the Urban Displacement Project at UC Berkeley and the California Housing Partnership confirm that rising housing costs between 2000 and 2015 have contributed to displacement of low-income people of color and resulted in new concentrations of poverty and racial segregation in the Bay Area.

1d

World-first major desalination field study finds minimal marine impact

Highly saline flows from the Sydney Desalination Plant will not affect surrounding marine life as commonly believed, a major new study led by UNSW Sydney shows.

1d

Research proves South East Asian population boom 4,000 years ago

Researchers have uncovered a previously unconfirmed population boom across South East Asia that occurred 4,000 years ago, thanks to a new method for measuring prehistoric population growth.

1d

Fish Oil Doesn’t Help Dry Eyes

Dry eyes? Despite guidelines that recommend fish oil consumption, a new trial demonstrate that they are not effective.

1d

Image: First light data for NASA's Parker Solar Probe

Just over a month into its mission, NASA's Parker Solar Probe has returned first-light data from each of its four instrument suites. These early observations – while not yet examples of the key science observations Parker Solar Probe will take closer to the sun – show that each of the instruments is working well. The instruments work in tandem to measure the sun's electric and magnetic fields, par

1d

Scientists predict extinction risk for hard-to-track species

Species are going extinct all over the world: Scientists believe that Earth is losing between 200 and 2,000 species every year. That number is squishy, partly because there are so many species for which they lack good data—particularly those living in the oceans, which are difficult to track but still critically important to ecosystems and livelihoods. Even the most comprehensive evaluation of ext

1d

Build walls on seafloor to stop glaciers melting, scientists say

Barriers could halt slide of undersea glaciers and hold back sea level rises predicted to result from global warming Building walls on the seafloor may become the next frontier of climate science, as engineers seek novel ways to hold back the sea level rises predicted to result from global warming. By erecting barriers of rock and sand, researchers believe they could halt the slide of undersea gl

1d

NASA’s new exoplanet-hunter has spotted its first alien world

NASA’s recently launched exoplanet-hunting satellite has uncovered a new world twice the size of Earth orbiting a star 60 light years away

1d

Up to children in rainbow families to explain their background

Schools and other institutions such as churches and children's sport clubs have limited knowledge about how to deal with children growing up in rainbow families. According to a new doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg, the task of informing about and explaining non-normative sexuality, transgender identity and queer family ties is instead left up to the children themselves.

1d

Commercially relevant bismuth-based thin film processing

Developing materials suitable for use in optoelectronic devices is currently a very active area of research. The search for materials for use in photoelectric conversion elements has to be carried out in parallel with developing the optimal film formation process for each material, and this can take a few years for just one material. Until now there has been a trade-off, balancing electronic prope

1d

Researchers determine absolute duration of photoelectric effect for the first time

The photoelectric effect provides the basis for solar energy and global communications; Albert Einstein described it over a century ago. For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ), and the TU Wien have now measured the absolute duration of the light absorption and of the resulting photoelectron released from a soli

1d

Spacey street art

The winner of ESA's 'Graffiti without Gravity' street art competition has left a permanent mark on the Agency's technical heart, with this mural on the wall next to ESA's Compact Antenna Test Range.

1d

Eric Kandel is Alan Alda’s Podcast Guest

Image courtesy of Alda Communication Training Co. On the latest episode of the Clear + Vivid podcast , host Alan Alda, well-known actor, writer, and, in recent years, crusader of science outreach , sits down with old friend and Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives member Eric R. Kandel, director of the Kavli Institute for Brain Science at Columbia University and author of The Disordered Mind: What

1d

Gene Drive

A genetic tool that can alter—and potentially eliminate—entire species has taken a dramatic leap forward — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Flood frequency of Amazon River has increased fivefold

A recent study of more than 100 years of river level records from the Amazon shows a significant increase in frequency and severity of floods.

1d

Crunched for time? High-intensity exercise gives same cell benefits in fewer minutes

A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research.

1d

A behavioral intervention for cancer patients that works

This is a story about something rare in health psychology: a treatment that has gone from scientific discovery, through development and testing, to dissemination and successful implementation nationwide.In a new study, researchers found that a program designed at The Ohio State University to reduce harmful stress in cancer patients can be taught to therapists from around the country and implemente

1d

Glacial engineering could limit sea-level rise, if we get our emissions under control

Targeted engineering projects to hold off glacier melting could slow down ice-sheet collapse and limit sea-level rise, according to a new The Cryosphere study. While an intervention similar in size to existing large civil engineering projects could only have a 30 percent chance of success, a larger project would have better odds of holding off ice-sheet collapse. But the researchers caution that r

1d

A new carbon material with Na storage capacity over 400mAh/g

Developing high-capacity carbon anode materials can further improve the energy density of sodium-ion batteries (NIBs). Recently, researchers from the Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IOP-CAS), reported a high-capacity carbon anode (~400 mAh g-1) for NIBs. The results are published in Science Bulletin.

1d

Fagudvalg inddrager tre nye gigtmidler i behandlingsvejledning

De to JAK-kinase hæmmere Tofacitinib og Baricitinib samt samt IL-6 hæmmeren Sarilumab er inkluderet i Medicinrådets seneste vejledning over lægemidler, der anbefales som muligt førstevalg i behandlingen af patienter med kronisk leddegigt.

1d

A pair of tiny hopping rovers are about to land on an asteroid

Japan’s Hayabusa 2 spacecraft has arrived at the asteroid Ryugu, and now it is dropping off two tiny landers that will hop around the surface and take pictures

1d

Watch now: Follow the action at New Scientist Live

Follow all the action live from the world's biggest festival of ideas and discovery – New Scientist Live, at the ExCeL Centre in London from 20-23 September

1d

Mathematics meets biology to uncover unexpected biorhythms

A novel mathematical approach has uncovered that some animal cells have robust 12-hour cycles of genetic activity, in addition to circadian or 24-hour cycles. The method, published in the journal PLOS ONE, assessed the periodicity of gene expression data and compared the results with those obtained with other computational methods. As opposed to the other methods, this novel approach showed not on

1d

Scientists ID three causes of Earth's spin axis drift

A typical desk globe is designed to be a geometric sphere and to rotate smoothly when you spin it. Our actual planet is far less perfect—in both shape and in rotation.

1d

"Wide learning" AI technology enables highly precise learning even from imbalanced data sets

Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. today announced the development of "Wide Learning," a machine learning technology capable of accurate judgements even when operators cannot obtain the volume of data necessary for training. AI is now often used to leverage data in a variety of fields, but the accuracy of AI may be impacted in cases where the volume of data to be analyzed is small or imbalanced. Fujitsu's

1d

Restoring cells to an uninfected state once a virus is destroyed

New research, pioneered by a first year Ph.D. student and researchers at the University of St Andrews' School of Biology, has identified an important new component of the CRISPR genome engineering toolkit, which is revolutionising the treatment of genetic disease and infection.

1d

Study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?

1d

Hayabusa-2: Japan's rovers ready for touchdown on asteroid

If successful, the Japanese mission would be the first rover landing on the surface of an asteroid.

1d

We can't blame Hurricane Maria's high death toll on the storm

Environment Here's the devastating truth. The devastating truth is that most of the deaths in Puerto Rico were avoidable.

1d

Insulin viser stort potentiale mod kronisk tarmbetændelse

Det er ikke kun diabetes, som insulin virker mod, ser det ud til. Forskere på blandt andet Københavns…

1d

Image of the Day: This Little Piggy

Recordings of electrical activity in porcine brains finds similarities to rodent neural tissue.

1d

Glacial engineering could limit sea-level rise, if we get our emissions under control

Targeted engineering projects to hold off glacier melting could slow down the collapse of ice sheets and limit sea-level rise, according to a new study published in the European Geosciences Union journal The Cryosphere. While an intervention similar in size to existing large civil engineering projects could only have a 30% chance of success, a larger project would have better odds of holding off i

1d

Electroceuticals

Nerve-stimulating therapies could soon replace drugs for many chronic conditions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Lighting it up: A new non-toxic, cheap, and stable blue photoluminescent material

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have designed a novel photoluminescent material that is cheap to fabricate, does not use toxic starting materials, and is very stable, enhancing the understanding of the quantic nature of photoluminescence.

1d

Researchers decipher the dynamics of electrons in perovskite crystals

Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate, thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. They have thus found the key to an important characteristic of these crystals, which could play an important role in the development of new solar cells. The results have now been p

1d

Worms, water fleas and bacteria could bring clean water to remote areas

Earthworms and tiny water fleas could help deliver clean water to billions of people living in remote areas of the world by eating up sewage and other pollution.

1d

Chemists produce and test novel solid oxide electrolysis cell

Researchers of the Institute of Chemical Engineering of Ural Federal University and the Institute of High-temperature Electrochemistry (Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences have developed new electrochemical cells for the electrolysis of water in the presence of carbon dioxide. The findings were published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry A.

1d

Plant growth-promoting bacteria enhance plant salinity tolerance

Soil salinity is one of the key abiotic stress factors affecting agricultural productivity worldwide. Every day, nearly 2000 hectares of fertile agricultural land degrades due to salinity. There are only limited agricultural options to cope with increasing salinification of soils, especially in the case of salt-sensitive staple crops such as rice and wheat, productivity of which is seriously curbe

1d

A game of pool in the live cell

Cells need to react to environmental changes and maintain a balanced system of signaling cascades within the cell. Proteins outside of the cell, on the cellular surface, inside the cellular membrane, and within the cell orchestrate many fine-tuned signaling pathways, which result in reactions to environmental conditions or changes in the organism itself. The spatio-temporal organization of cellula

1d

Co-evolution between a 'parasite gene' and its host

A Danish research team has delineated a complex symbiosis between a 'parasitic' noncoding RNA gene and its protein-coding 'host' gene in human cells. The study reveals how co-evolution of the host gene and parasite gene has shaped a feedback mechanism in which the parasite gene plays a completely new and surprising part as regulator of the host gene protein production. The breakthrough finding ope

1d

Quantum anomaly—breaking a classical symmetry with ultracold atoms

A FLEET study of ultracold atomic gases—a billionth the temperature of outer space—has unlocked new, fundamental quantum effects. The researchers at Swinburne University of Technology studied collective oscillations in ultracold atomic gases, identifying where quantum effects occur to break symmetries predicted by classical physics. They also observed the transition between two-dimensional (2-D) b

1d

Plutonium and Its Discontents

Plutonium and Its Discontents For 75 years, scientists have been trying to devise a way to make a vast supply of radioactive and chemically dangerous waste at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation safe. hanford_topNteaser3.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Technology Wednesday, September 19, 2018 – 10:30 Valerie Brown, Contr

1d

Using one quantum dot to sense changes in another

Quantum dots are nanometer-sized boxes that have attracted much scientific interest for use in nanotechnology because their properties obey quantum mechanics and are requisites to developing advanced electronic and photonic devices. Quantum dots that self-assemble during their formation are particularly attractive as tunable light emitters in nanoelectronic devices and for studying quantum physics

1d

Chitinase as 'burnt-bridge' Brownian monorail efficiently hydrolyzing recalcitrant biomass

Molecular motors convert energy into unidirectional mechanical motion. Most biomolecular motors in cells use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a chemical energy source. Recently, however, Serratia marcescens chitinase A (SmChiA) has been rediscovered as a molecular motor working in extracellular environments without using ATP. Similar to a monorail car (Fig. 1), SmChiA has cleft-like polysaccharide

1d

Interfacial engineering core@shell nanoparticles for active and selective direct H2O2 generation

A class of supported Pd@NiO-x core@shell catalysts have been constructed for direct H2O2 generation. The optimized Pd@NiO-3/TiO2 exhibited high activity, superior selectivity, low degradation activity and excellent stability. The unique, cavity-contained interface structure can suppress the overbinding between Pd-core and (O-O)*, which is effective to prevent H2O formation and guarantees high sele

1d

Ny asbest-aftale: »Ikke noget, der rykker væsentligt«

Aftalen, der skulle sikre medarbejdere i byggeriet mod farligt asbest-støv fra gamle bygninger, er så begrænset, at den ikke gør en væsentlig forskel. Det mener en af dem, der har været med til at lave anbefalingerne.

1d

In Life Itself, Death Is the Ultimate Plot Twist

Halfway through Life Itself —Dan Fogelman’s multigenerational saga of love, death, and manufactured trauma—the film abruptly cuts from a tragic scene to a brand-new story. A rich vineyard owner in Spain, Mr. Saccione (played by Antonio Banderas), pours himself a glass of Manzanilla and rambles to his employee Javier (Sergio Peris-Mencheta) about his childhood, his fractured relationship with his

1d

Porsche's Sleek Chargers Will Power up EVs in Just 15 Minutes

The German automaker’s “electric pit stops” promise to put 250 miles of range on the Taycan’s batteries nearly three times faster than a Tesla Supercharger.

1d

If VCs Aren't Socially Responsible, the Robots Will Win

Social impact in the age of AI must take on a new dimension: the creation of large numbers of service jobs for displaced workers.

1d

Meet the winner of robotics’ World Cup

Designers of the top adult-size robot in RoboCup’s humanoid soccer league share their work.

1d

Why Women Are Still Attracted to 'Benevolently Sexist' Men

But researchers have also revealed a paradox: Women prefer men who behave in ways that could be described as benevolently sexist over those who don't.

1d

Already Weird Atoms Get Stranger, May Hold Ability to Bond with 'Nothing'

Trilobite atoms can bind to ghost atoms, aka those that don't exist.

1d

Rare Footage Shows Beautiful Orcas Toying with Helpless Sea Turtles

Caught on camera: orcas torment awkward sea turtles.

1d

Pufferfish 'Artist' Crafts Intricate Sand Wheel in Captivating Video

Mating time offers Japanese pufferfish a chance to demonstrate their artistic side.

1d

A Pioneering Female Scientific Illustrator, Rediscovered

Orra White Hitchcock’s elegant 19th century geological drawings shine at the American Folk Art Museum — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

10 mysteries of the universe: How will it all end?

Supernovae are violent stellar explosions that pepper the cosmos. Studying them revealed the enigma of dark energy – a force that will determine the universe's fate

1d

Nu skal de kun køre 75 km: Fjernbusser vil nuppe 250.000 passagerer fra busser og tog

Regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti lemper de afstandskrav, som privatejede selskaber skal leve op til for at køre fjernbusser. Det vil stjæle passagerer fra kollektiv transport, men stort set ikke fjerne biler fra vejene.

1d

Maveproblemer: Insulin kan forhindre kroppen i at angribe tyktarmen

Resultaterne af forsøg på mus viser, at insulin kan have en positiv effekt på tyktarmsbetændelse. Det kan potentielt hjælpe over 20.000 danskere.

1d

Traces of the World's First 'Microbrew' Found in a Cave in Israel

The world's oldest beer may have been brewed for a funeral 13,000 years ago.

1d

How Will Trump's Emergency Text Alerts Work?

The president plans to send a test message in a system that would notify Americans of an imminent attack or other catastrophe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Patient døde efter mangelfuld behandling: Medicin forsvandt i Sundhedsplatformen

Manglende medicin kan være årsagen til, at en kræftpatient på Sjællands Universitetshospital døde. Læger havde ellers ordineret medicinen gennem Sundhedsplatformen, men ordinationerne forsvandt i systemet.

1d

Trump Is Reinventing the U.S. Approach to the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict

Recent months have seen a series of dramatic steps by the Trump administration with respect to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, defunding the agency responsible for Palestinian refugees, cutting West Bank aid, shutting down the PLO mission in Washington, and persistently promising to present its own peace plan. The flurry of activity comes even as the prospe

1d

Brett Kavanaugh Could Make the Midterms a Landmark Election for Women

Anita Hill’s testimony in Congress triggered the first “Year of the Woman” in 1992, after she accused the Republican Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas of sexually harassing her. But that wave of enthusiasm and outrage mostly elected white women. The new allegation of sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh, another Republican Supreme Court nominee, comes from a white woman. But in a rapidly di

1d

Worry Less About Crumbling Roads, More About Crumbling Libraries

Every four years, the American Society for Civil Engineers issues grades for the nation’s infrastructure. In the most recent evaluation , released in 2017, America’s overall infrastructure score was a D+, the same as in 2013. Although seven systems, including hazardous waste and levees, received modestly better grades than in the previous assessment, transit and solid waste, among others, did wor

1d

A Heartbreaking Reality for Mets Fans

In a mostly meaningless game in late July, the New York Mets went down 19–0 against the Washington Nationals in the fifth inning. The game devolved into a circus. Mets broadcasters gave up announcing and instead started reminiscing about the team’s 1969 World Series victory and reading aloud from the media guide. Then, in the ninth inning, with the bull pen low on fresh arms, the veteran infielde

1d

Facebook Dating Is Rolling Out. Here’s How It Differs From Tinder

Facebook starts publicly testing its dating service with users in Colombia today.

1d

A Breakthrough for U.S. Troops: Combat-Ready Pizza

The latest entree to join the Army’s roster of M.R.E. field rations is a Sicilian-style slice that stays fresh for years and took decades to develop.

1d

Regeringen vil sammenlægge Rejsekortet og Rejseplanen i én app

Rejsekortet og Rejseplanen skal gøres til en del af samme system. Og private aktører skal have adgang, lyder det fra regeringen.

1d

Overraskende hurtige elektroner kan være vejen til petahertz-elektronik

Fotoemission af elektroner i ledningsbåndet wolfram sker overraskende hurtigt, fremgår det af nye superpræcise målinger.

1d

Data reveals big picture of the French 2017 presidential election: Social media, fake news, and political communities

CNRS and EHESS researchers analyzed nearly 60 million political tweets posted during the 2017 presidential election in France. They noted that fake news flagged by the Le Monde Decodex fact-checking website accounted for only 0.1 percent of all Twitter content, and that 73 percent of the bogus information was spread by two political communities. Their findings are published in PLOS ONE (September

1d

Women still fighting to get their dues in the medical profession

New exhibition at Royal College of Physicians highlights 500 years of women’s struggle to get their foot in the door of the medical profession Medicine is not a welcoming world for women, even in 2018. Women hold a tiny proportion of Britain’s professorial medical posts , while the NHS has a 23% gender pay gap . Just last month Tokyo Medical University admitted it had tampered with female student

1d

When a chemical tag makes the difference in cell fate and gene expression

Scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, Spain, have uncovered the role of special chemical 'tags' in controlling vital genes involved in early mammalian development, publishing their findings in the journal Nature Genetics on 17 September. The researchers studied the changes in epigenetics, genome architecture, accessibility and gene expression, and unraveled how cells can ma

1d

Gaia detects a shake in the Milky Way

A team led by researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona (ICCUB, UB-IEEC) and the University of Groningen has found, through the analysis of Gaia data, substructures in the Milky Way that were previously unknown. The findings, which appeared when combining positions and speed of 6 million stars from the galactic disk, have been published in the journal Nature.

1d

I was 14 when I was told I had cancer. It inspired me to pursue my dream | Lucy Speechley

It was devastating at the time, but I met amazing people who helped me pursue a career in medical science I was 14 years old when I was told I had cancer. It was just before Christmas in 2009 and I’d had terrible pain in my side for several weeks. After being seen at four different hospitals, I ended up at Birmingham children’s hospital. It was there that I was told I had alveolar rhabdomyosarcom

1d

Test could detect patients at risk from lethal fungal spores

Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a genetic mutation in humans linked to a 17-fold increase in the amount of dangerous fungal spores in the lungs.The study, published in Nature Communications could allow doctors to screen patients at risk from Aspergillus, and could easily be developed into a test.

1d

Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk

Following a Mediterranean-style diet may reduce stroke risk in women over 40 but not in men — according to new research led by the University of East Anglia.A new report, published today in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke, reveals that a diet high in fish, fruit, vegetables, nuts and beans, and lower in meat and dairy, reduces stroke risk among white adults who are at high risk of

1d

Mediterranean-style diet may lower women's stroke risk

Following a Mediterranean-style diet (high in fish, fruits and nuts, vegetables and beans and lower in meat and dairy) reduced stroke risk in women over 40, but not in men. The Mediterranean-style diet reduced stroke risk among white adults who were at high risk of cardiovascular disease.

1d

Assessing The Contamination Brought By Flooding

Aerial views of parts of North Carolina show whole buildings, including industrial livestock farms, inundated. Steve Inskeep talks with Kemp Burdette of Cape Fear River Watch.

1d

Sidste år var der 19 kilo aluminium i hver bil – snart er der 280

Virksomheden Norsk Hydro må nu investere for at imødekomme mangedoblet efterspørgsel.

1d

007 carmaker targets £5.1-billion IPO

Aston Martin, the luxury sports car brand driven by fictional spy James Bond, said Thursday that its London float will value it at up to £5.1 billion ($6.7 billion, 5.7 billion euros).

1d

Amazon considering opening 3,000 cashierless stores: Bloomberg

Amazon is considering opening up to 3,000 new cashier-less stores by 2021 to vie for shoppers at convenience stores and quick-service sandwich shops, Bloomberg News reported Wednesday.

1d

Forskere kæder diabetes sammen med gravides glutenspisning

Hvis en kvinde spiser meget gluten, mens hun er gravid, kan der være en øget risiko for, at barnet senere får type 1-diabetes.

1d

US officials face growing pressure over dicamba herbicide use

US environmental regulators are under increasing pressure over a controversial pesticide known for laying waste to nearby crops as well as the harmful weeds it is meant to control.

1d

Google Mini captures top spot in connected speaker market: survey

Google Home Mini has vaulted to the top spot in the global market for connected speakers, edging out a rival device from Amazon, a survey showed Wednesday.

1d

$60 million in virtual currency hacked in Japan

Bitcoin and other digital currency worth around 6.7 billion yen ($60 million) has been stolen in Japan following a hacking attack, a virtual exchange operator said on Thursday.

1d

Field notes: Polluted polar bears await the great Arctic land grab

As global warming melts the Arctic, all eyes are turning to the riches under the ice. But will polar bears survive the pollutants trickling into the food chain?

1d

Datatilsynet: Svært at klandre dataansvarlige for brugernes svage passwords

Det er ikke nødvendigvis den dataansvarlige, der får ørerne i maskinen, hvis forklaringen på et datalæk er dårligt valgte bruger-kodeord, oplyser Datatilsynet.

1d

Pas på, baktusser! Danske børn er på jagt efter nye bakterier

​​​​​​​35.000 danske børn leder i denne uge efter bakterier i naturen. Bakteriejagten er en del af Masseeksperimentet 2018, der skal kortlægge nye, gavnlige bakterier.

1d

Can a common heart condition cause sudden death?

About one person out of 500 has a heart condition known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). This condition causes thickening of the heart muscle and results in defects in the heart's electrical system. Under conditions of environmental stress such as exercise, HCM can result in sudden death. In other cases, patients may go undiagnosed, with their heart function declining gradually over decades.

1d

Crunched for time? High-intensity exercise = same cell benefits in fewer minutes

A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

1d

Cane toad DNA breakthrough 'may help stop' toxic pest

It may help stop the animal's rapid and destructive march across Australia, researchers say.

1d

Biomasse eller varmepumper? I Esbjerg står slaget om fremtidens fjernvarme

Ørsted og fjernvarmeselskabet Din Forsyning i Esbjerg er ikke enige om, hvordan den optimale fjernvarmeforsyning ser ud, når varmen fra det kulfyrede Esbjergværk inden længe skal erstattes. Men de skal snart tage en beslutning.

1d

How the HTC Exodus Blockchain Phone Plans to Secure Your Cryptocurrency

HTC starts filling in the details of its so-called blockchain smartphone, expected to launch later this year.

1d

1d

Discovery could explain failed clinical trials for Alzheimer's, and provide a solution

Researchers at King's College London have discovered a vicious feedback loop underlying brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease which may explain why so many drug trials have failed. The study also identifies a clinically approved drug which breaks the vicious cycle and protects against memory-loss in animal models of Alzheimer's.

1d

Scientists identify three causes of Earth's spin axis drift

Using observational and model-based data spanning the entire 20th century, scientists have for the first time have identified three broadly-categorized processes responsible for Earth's spin axis drift — contemporary mass loss primarily in Greenland, glacial rebound, and mantle convection.

1d

The Atlantic Daily: Politically Disqualifying

What We’re Following North and South: After a week of talks with South Korean President Moon Jae In, North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un has reportedly agreed to shut down one of the country’s major missile-testing sites. In steering away from bombast, the South Korean government may have broken through some of the diplomatic paralysis, though real peace on the peninsula is far from a done deal. Bloo

1d

Public Health England has failed to learn lessons over partnership with drinks industry

Public Health England (PHE) has failed to learn the lessons over its partnership with the drinks industry, warn public health experts in The BMJ today.

1d

Time to ban the sale of energy drinks to children, says senior doctor

It's time to bring in laws to ban the sale of caffeinated energy drinks to children and young people in England to tackle the twin epidemics of obesity and mental health problems, argues Professor Russell Viner, President of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health in The BMJ today.

1d

High gluten diet in pregnancy linked to increased risk of diabetes in children

A high gluten intake by mothers during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of their child developing type 1 diabetes, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.

1d

Too much gluten while pregnant linked to increased diabetes risk for baby

Experts warn against switching to a gluten-free diet because that may reduce intake of fibre, iron and B-vitamins Eating a high gluten diet when pregnant appears to be linked to an increased risk of having a child who develops type 1 diabetes, new research suggests, although experts say expectant mothers shouldn’t rush to ditch bread and pasta. While studies in rodents have suggested there a poss

1d

Slipping into this ‘skin’ turns any object into a robot

Science Robotic skins could have a place in space (and on stuffed animals). Potentially, any soft object could become a robot with the skin slipped around it: a piece of foam tube, a ball, or even a stuffed animal.

1d

A New Petition From House Democrats Could Complicate Nancy Pelosi’s Future

Updated at 8 p.m. ET In a move described as a direct shot at Nancy Pelosi, some Democrats are trying to make it more difficult for one of their own to become speaker of the House. At least 10 Democrats in the lower chamber have signed onto a letter to Caucus Chair Joe Crowley seeking a change to caucus rules that would raise the number of votes required to nominate a candidate for speaker. Curren

1d

NASA’s Beloved Mars Rovers Are Having a Rough Year

At the start of 2018, NASA had two active rovers on Mars. Now, it has one—and it’s having some issues. Earlier this summer, the Opportunity rover stopped communicating with Earth after a massive dust storm swept the planet and prevented sunlight from reaching its solar panels. The storm has mostly cleared, but NASA hasn’t heard from the rover since June, and engineers are listening daily for any

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Up in the Air

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump visited North and South Carolina to survey the damage caused by Hurricane Florence. The death toll from the storm stands at 37. Trump told reporters that it's “hard for me to imagine” that Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh assaulted a woman, but said Republicans will ulti

1d

How to track product recalls

Technology One stop for all the things you wish you hadn’t shopped. When it comes to product recall watch lists, there’s something for everything.

1d

Discomfort or death? New study maps hot spots of child mortality from diarrhea in Africa

New high-resolution maps pinpoint areas across Africa with concentrations of child deaths from diarrhea and show uneven progress over 15 years to mitigate the problem.The study, covering 2000 to 2015, maps the entire African continent in 5×5 square kilometer units and was published today in The New England Journal of Medicine. National and provincial maps of diarrhea in Africa often mask inequalit

2d

Ovary removal may increase risk of chronic kidney disease

Premenopausal women who have their ovaries surgically removed face an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease, according to a Mayo Clinic study published on Wednesday, Sept. 19, in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

2d

Super cheap earth element to advance new battery tech to the industry

Worldwide efforts to make sodium-ion batteries just as functional as lithium-ion batteries have long since controlled sodium's tendency to explode, but not yet resolved how to prevent sodium-ions from 'getting lost' during the first few times a battery charges and discharges. Now, researchers made a sodium powder version that fixes this problem and holds a charge properly.

2d

Improving 'silvopastures' for bird conservation

The adoption of 'silvopastures' — incorporating trees into pastureland — can provide habitat for forest bird species and improve connectivity in landscapes fragmented by agriculture. But how do silvopastures measure up to natural forest habitat? New research shows that birds in silvopasture forage less efficiently than those in forest fragments but offers suggestions for how silvopasture habitat

2d

Is the end of the recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) a good thing?

Recently, the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called for the eliminating involvement of the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee (RAC) in human gene therapy experiments, marking the end of an era of federal government oversight.

2d

Super cheap earth element to advance new battery tech to the industry

Most of today's batteries are made up of rare lithium mined from the mountains of South America. If the world depletes this source, then battery production could stagnate.

2d

Flu season forecasts could be more accurate with access to health care companies' data

New research shows that data routinely collected by health care companies — if made available to researchers and public health agencies — could enable more accurate forecasts of when the next flu season will peak, how long it will last and how many people will get sick.

2d

Newly identified African bird species already in trouble

Central Africa's Albertine Rift region is a biodiversity hotspot consisting of a system of highlands that spans six countries. Recent studies have shown that the population of sooty bush-shrikes occupying the region's mid-elevation forests is a distinct species, and new research reveals that this newly discovered species may already be endangered due to pressure from agricultural development.

2d

2d

JAMA Journals Retract Six Papers by Cornell Researcher

Problems with Brian Wansink’s research articles surfaced in 2017 and have now resulted in 13 retractions total.

2d

END OF FEED

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image