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Nyheder2018september24

 

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LGBT community has poorer health outcomes, assessment finds

The local LGBT community reports twice the number of poor mental health days as the general population of Richmond and Columbia Counties, and those who identified as transgender report twice that, according to a health needs assessment conducted by faculty and students at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

16h

Common weed killer linked to bee deaths

The world's most widely used weed killer may also be indirectly killing bees. New research from The University of Texas at Austin shows that honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria.

1h

Rosenstein’s Departure Is a National Emergency

Update: After a morning of contradictory reports, it now seems that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will remain on the job at least until Thursday. The topsy-turvy story—and the still uncertain ultimate outcome—remind of a core lesson of the Trump years: What happens to U.S. institutions is not something only to watch. An energized public can deter the administration’s worst instincts—whet

5h

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Why Doesn't Your Vision 'Go Dark' When You Blink?

Blinking doesn't interrupt what we see, but how does that work?

3min

An Unlikely Alliance in Syria Comes Under Strain

Russia’s unlikely alliance with Israel in Syria is in peril. Today, Moscow announced it would supply Syria with a sophisticated S-300 air-defense system over explicit Israeli reservations. The announcement comes one week after Syria shot down a Russian Ilyushin-20 over the Mediterranean, killing 15 Russian military personnel. Syrian defenses had been targeting Israeli fighter jets that had bombed

9min

NIRS-IVUS detects patients and plaques vulnerable to subsequent adverse coronary events

Results from the Lipid-Rich Plaque (LRP) study demonstrate the correlation between the presence of non-flow-limiting, non-intervened upon, lipid-rich plaques detected by NIRS-IVUS imaging and the development of a major adverse cardiac event (MACE) from a de novo culprit lesion at both the patient level (vulnerable patients) and segment level (vulnerable plaques) within 24 months post intravascular

18min

Results from the ULTIMATE trial reported at TCT 2018 and published simultaneously in JACC

The first study designed to determine the benefits of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) guidance over angiography guidance during drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation in all-comer patients found that IVUS improved clinical outcomes by lowering the rate of target vessel failure at one year.

18min

How fruits got their eye-catching colors

New evidence supports the idea that plants owe their rainbow of fruit colors to the different animals that eat them. Researchers first had to get past the fact that most animals don't see colors quite the way humans do.

18min

Photosynthesis discovery could help next-gen biotechnologies

Researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ) and the University of Münster (WWU) have purified and visualized the 'Cyclic Electron Flow' (CEF) supercomplex, a critical part of the photosynthetic machinery in all plants, in a discovery that could help guide the development of next-generation solar biotechnologies.

18min

Illinois team finds Wigner crystal — not Mott insulator — in 'magic-angle' graphene

Recently, scientists at MIT created a stir in the field of condensed matter physics when they showed that two sheets of graphene twisted at specific angles display two emergent phases of matter. Philip Phillips, professor of Condensed Matter Physics at the University of Illinois, says a careful review of the MIT experimental data revealed that the insulating behavior of the "magic-angle" graphene

18min

'Ground coffee' with soil perks in Brazil

Coffee harvesting is often done with heavy machinery that can compact the soil. Additionally, up to 20 percent of coffee berries fall to the ground. Researchers brewed up a solution to restore soil and decrease the loss.

24min

Exploring links between senses and cognitive health

Experts are examining the link between impaired vision, hearing, and cognition.

24min

Sex in plants requires thrust

In plants, to fertilize the egg, the pollen tube (which is between 1/20 and 1/5 of the width of a human hair) has to navigate through a maze of tissue, no matter what obstacles it encounters. Thanks to the lab-on-a chip technology scientists were able to actually see and measure exactly what was going on within the pollen tube as it grew.

24min

#WhyIDidntReport and the Weaponization of Haste

“We’re going to plow right through it.” That was Mitch McConnell, speaking at the Values Voters Summit last Friday, assuring the gathered crowds that Brett Kavanaugh, despite some recent setbacks to his nomination, will soon be confirmed for a lifetime appointment to the United States Supreme Court. The timing of McConnell’s assurance-making is significant: The Senate majority leader made his pro

31min

Via Truck And Helicopter, Mountain Goats Find New Home

The National Park Service is transporting hundreds of wild mountain goats via truck and helicopter from Olympic National Park to the North Cascades in Washington state. (Image credit: Ashley Ahearn/NPR)

33min

Desert ants have an amazing odor memory

Desert ants can quickly learn many different food odors and remember them for the rest of their lives. Their memory for nest odors seems to differ from their food odor memory: Whereas food odors are learned and kept after a single contact, ants need several trials to memorize nest odors and forget a nest-associated odor quickly after it has been removed from the nest. Hence, ants process food and

39min

Cryo-EM reveals structure of protein responsible for regulating body temperature

Scientists have revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of TRPM2, a protein that may be a promising drug target for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorder.

39min

Crowd counting through walls with WiFi

Researchers have given the first demonstration of crowd counting through walls using only everyday communication signals such as WiFi. The technique, which requires only a wireless transmitter and receiver outside the area of interest, could have a variety of applications, including smart energy management, retail business planning and security.

39min

'Ground coffee' with soil perks in Brazil

Coffee harvesting is often done with heavy machinery that can compact the soil. Additionally, up to 20 percent of coffee berries fall to the ground. Researchers brewed up a solution to restore soil and decrease the loss.

40min

Organs are not just bystanders, may be active participants in fighting autoimmune disease

Findings from mouse study suggest organs affected by autoimmune disease suppress immune cells using methods similar to those used by cancer cells to evade detection.

40min

Protein produced in gut could stave off deadly bone marrow transplant complication

Researchers at Mount Sinai have discovered that an antimicrobial protein found in the gut can stave off a common and highly lethal side effect of bone marrow transplants, according to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation in September.

40min

Violence at home pushes Central American migrants to U.S.

Being a victim of crime is a powerful motivation for migrants from El Salvador and Honduras to come to the United States, despite understanding the risks of the journey and challenges of the US immigration system. The findings of a new study suggest that current migration deterrence policies, which mainly target economic migrants, are ineffective against those fleeing violence. In 2014, the Unite

51min

Even mild physical activity immediately improves memory function

Researchers found that even very light workouts can increase the connectivity between parts of the brain responsible for memory formation and storage.

53min

How Galileo used some trickery to throw the Catholic Inquisition off his trail

It was found in the Royal Society Library in London after at least 250 years The letter indicates how Galileo censored himself a bit in order to fly more under the radar, but it didn't work The Royal Society Journal will publish the variants of the letters shortly, and scholars will begin to analyze the results Heresy? The idea that the planets, including Earth, revolved around the Sun was first

53min

How does alcohol affect your brain?

Alcohol is the world's most popular drug and has been a part of human culture for at least 9,000 years. Alcohol's effects on the brain range from temporarily limiting mental activity to sustained brain damage, depending on levels consumed and frequency of use. Understanding how alcohol affects your brain can help you determine what drinking habits are best for you. Alcohol has enjoyed a near univ

53min

Megapixels: A rover snaps a pic as it hops along the surface of an asteroid

Space Japan landed two spacecraft on the surface of Ryugu. It's one of the first images taken by a rover on the surface of an asteroid.

54min

Sex in plants requires thrust

In plants, to fertilize the egg, the pollen tube (which is between 1/20 and 1/5 of the width of a human hair) has to navigate through a maze of tissue, no matter what obstacles it encounters. Thanks to the lab-on-a chip technology scientists were able to actually see and measure exactly what was going on within the pollen tube as it grew.

54min

Breakthrough in designing a better Salmonella vaccine

UC Davis researchers have made a breakthrough in understanding which cells afford optimal protection against Salmonella infection — a critical step in developing a more effective and safe vaccine against a bacterium that annually kills an estimated one million people worldwide.

54min

Leading addiction experts call for more neuroscience research on long-term recovery

Warren Bickel, the director of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute (VTCRI) Addiction Recovery Research Center, and Keith Humphreys, the Esther Ting Memorial Professor in psychiatry and behavioral science at Stanford University, called their colleagues to action in an article published in JAMA Psychiatry, a journal of the American Medical Association.

54min

The White House’s Plans for Kavanaugh? ‘Plow Ahead’

On Monday morning, the White House hastily arranged a conference call with surrogates across the country to address the latest sexual-misconduct allegations levied against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. According to a source on the call, it was an unwelcome start to the day: Republicans had begun to breathe easier over the weekend, with Kavanaugh’s second hearing finally confirmed. But a

56min

Scarlet, the Struggling Orca, Now Presumed Dead

Despite rescuers' best efforts, Scarlet, a young ailing orca, is now presumed dead.

56min

When moms smoke marijuana, kids try it earlier

Children whose mothers use marijuana between the time they’re born and when they turn 12 start using marijuana two years earlier than their peers whose mothers did not use marijuana, according to a new study. A number of studies have shown that child and adolescent marijuana use is associated with impairments in attention and concentration—and that those who start using marijuana early are at inc

1h

High-carbohydrates diet lead to weight loss, according to new study

Diets high in carbohydrates reduce body weight and body fat and improve insulin function in overweight individuals, according to a new study published in Nutrients.

1h

Cryo-EM reveals structure of protein responsible for regulating body temperature

A team led by Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of TRPM2, a protein that may be a promising drug target for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorder.

1h

A biomarker in the brain's circulation system may be Alzheimer's earliest warning

Leaks in the blood-brain barrier can provide early detection for Alzheimer's and diseases.

1h

New AGS-NIA conference report explores links between senses and cognitive health

Experts at a prestigious medical conference hosted by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) and funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) hope their work –reported today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society — will have colleagues seeing eye-to-eye on an important but under-researched area of health care: The link between impaired vision, hearing, and cognition (the medical ter

1h

A Credibility Crisis in Food Science

Your life has almost certainly been affected by Brian Wansink. Wansink is a professor at Cornell University—for nine more months, before he is to retire, as he described it to me Sunday evening, “sooner and under different circumstances than I expected.” Others describe it as disgrace, an abrupt fall from a position of great prestige that casts a shadow on a highly consequential but already widel

1h

How nature, nurture shape the sleeping brain

Some patterns of electrical activity generated by the brain during sleep are inherited, according to a study of teenage twins. Pinpointing the relative contributions of biology and experience to sleep neurophysiology could inform therapies for numerous psychiatric disorders in which alterations in brain activity during sleep can be detected.

1h

Children found capable of using the 'wisdom of crowds'

Children, like adults, can improve their response to difficult tasks by the power of group work, new research has found.

1h

Challenge continues in developing effective drug treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Nilvadipine shows no benefit for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in mild and moderate stages of the disease, but further studies targeting the early phase of the disease may be warranted.

1h

Common painkiller not effective for chronic pain after traumatic nerve injury

A new study finds that pregabalin is not effective in controlling the chronic pain that sometimes develops following traumatic nerve injury. The results of the international study, which was driven by an effort to identify effective non-opioid pain medications, did show potential in relieving in pain that sometimes lingers after surgery.

1h

Four extremely young asteroid families identified

Researchers dated the families using a numerical simulation method to process current data to go back in time to the asteroid formation era.

1h

What Are Coral Reefs?

Hundreds of species of coral come together to create large, underwater structures that are full of different shapes and sizes and bright colors. About 25 percent of all known marine life rely on coral reefs.

1h

Two-Headed Viper Could End Up in Virginia Zoo — If It Stops Fighting with Itself

What has two brains, two tracheas and a single heart? This rare, two-headed viper.

1h

‘Evil’ protein may be key in common breast cancer

New research untangles some of the mysteries of a protein called EVL (pronounced “evil”), which may reduce the ability of a common kind of breast cancer to spread to other parts of the body. About 80 percent of all breast cancers are estrogen receptor-positive, in which estrogen fuels cancer growth. The new discovery could have implications for developing more precise treatments for this estrogen

1h

Parasite makes quick exit when researchers remove the handbrake

Researchers have discovered a way to halt the invasion of the toxoplasmosis-causing parasite into cells, depriving the parasite of a key factor necessary for its growth. The findings are a key step in getting closer to a vaccine to protect pregnant women from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which carries a serious risk of miscarriage or birth defects.

1h

Physical activity necessary to maintain heart-healthy lifestyle

Exercise and physical activity are of vast global importance to prevent and control the increasing problem of heart disease and stroke, according to a review article.

1h

Martian moon may have come from impact on home planet

Phobos, the larger of Mars' two tiny satellites, is the darkest moon in the solar system. This dark aspect inspired the hypothesis that the close-orbiting moon may be a captured asteroid, but its orbital dynamics seemed to disagree. A new study suggests Phobos' composition may be more like the volcanic crust of the Red Planet than it appears, consistent with an origin for the moon in an ancient, v

1h

How will climate change stress the power grid? Hint: Look at dew point temperatures

A new study suggests the power industry is underestimating how climate change could affect the long-term demand for electricity in the United States. The research describes the limitations of prediction models used by electricity providers and regulators for medium- and long-term energy forecasting. It outlines a new model that includes key climate predictors that researchers say present a more ac

1h

Shedding light on — and through — 2D materials

Scientists use a computational method to calculate the optical properties of two-dimensional materials. Their work promises to simplify the process of identifying the right materials for next-generation optoelectronic devices.

1h

Exploring the effects of integrative health in cancer

A Special Focus Issue on Integrative Oncology takes a wide-ranging view of the possible approaches and potential therapeutic benefits of complementary and integrative medicine in multiple age groups, nations, and special populations.

1h

NASA's Terra Satellite glares at the 37-mile wide eye of Super Typhoon Trami

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Super Typhoon Trami as it continued moving in a northwesterly direction in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Terra provided an amazing image of the large eye.

1h

Overlooked signal in MRI scans reflects amount, kind of brain cells

A six-minute MRI scan gives enough data for researchers to study how the brain develops, or to detect the loss of brain cells due to injury or illness.

1h

Thousands of DNA changes in the developing brain revealed by machine learning

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have developed new single-cell approaches wedded to machine learning that allow detection of CNVs below one million base pairs. This has revealed thousands of previously unknown DNA changes arising during prenatal life in the developing mouse brain. The researchers also identified when these changes peaked: evidence that potent

1h

How Earth sheds heat into space

New insights into the role of water vapor may help researchers predict how the planet will respond to warming.

1h

Desert ants have an amazing odor memory

Desert ants can quickly learn many different food odors and remember them for the rest of their lives. Their memory for nest odors seems to differ from their food odor memory: Whereas food odors are learned and kept after a single contact, ants need several trials to memorize nest odors and forget a nest-associated odor quickly after it has been removed from the nest. Hence, ants process food and

1h

Chinese Cretaceous fossil highlights avian evolution

A newly identified extinct bird species from a 127-million-year-old fossil deposit in northeastern China provides new information about avian development during the early evolution of flight. Drs. WANG Min, Thomas Stidham, and ZHOU Zhonghe from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology reported their study of the well-preserved complete skeleton and feathers of this early bird

1h

Urbanization is cutting off life support to NYC's wetlands

Using sediment cores to trace the evolution of Jamaica Bay's wetlands, a team led by researchers within Columbia's Earth Institute finds that urbanization is weakening the shoreline and starving the marshes of vital mineral sediment, causing their gradual but dramatic erosion.

1h

New earthquake risk model could better inform disaster planning

Researchers have developed a new way to model seismic risk, which they hope will better inform disaster risk reduction planning in earthquake-prone areas.

1h

Evidence that addictive behaviors have strong links with ancient retroviral infection

New research from an international team led by Oxford University's Department of Zoology and the National-Kapodistrian University of Athens, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), shows that an ancient retrovirus — HK2 — is more frequently found in drug addicts and thus is significantly associated with addiction.

1h

Cambridge scientists reveal ground-breaking plan to target cause of Alzheimer's disease

A breakthrough has been made in the fight against Alzheimer's disease — researchers have found a new way to target the toxic particles that destroy healthy brain cells. Academics at the University of Cambridge and at Lund University in Sweden have devised the first strategy to 'go after' the cause of the devastating disease, leading to hope that new drugs could be developed to treat dementia.

1h

Taking a catnap? Mouse mutation shown to increase need for sleep

Researchers at University of Tsukuba showed that mutation of a single amino acid in the SIK3 protein caused mice to exhibit more non-REM sleep and increased 'sleep need,' including when awake, reflected in particular patterns of brainwave activity. The findings could help research on human sleep disorders given the similarity of this protein to that in humans.

1h

Birds' voiceboxes are odd ducks

Birds' voiceboxes are in their chests instead of their throats like mammals and reptiles. Scientists aren't sure how or why birds evolved these unique voiceboxes, but a new study in PNAS sheds some light on how they came about. Similarities in the windpipes of birds, crocodiles, cats, mice, and salamanders suggest that birds' weird voiceboxes might have arisen from a windpipe reinforcement. From t

1h

Birds reinvent voice box in novel evolutionary twist

Birds tote around two vocal organs inside their bodies, but only one works. New interdisciplinary research suggests that this distinctly avian anatomy arose because birds, somewhere in their evolutionary history, opted for building a brand new vocal organ — the syrinx– instead of modifying an existing one that is present in an array of animals but silent in birds — the larynx.

1h

Common weed killer linked to bee deaths

Honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. Scientists believe this is evidence that glyphosate might be contributing to the decline of honey bees and native bees around the world.

1h

Even mild physical activity immediately improves memory function, UCI-led study finds

Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and Japan's University of Tsukuba found that even very light workouts can increase the connectivity between parts of the brain responsible for memory formation and storage.

1h

‘Old Age Is a Ceremony of Losses’

Before Donald Hall died this June, the 89-year-old American poet laureate let a filmmaker into his home in bucolic New Hampshire. Paul Szynol’s Quiet Hours , premiering on The Atlantic today, observes Hall—whose prolific body of work is preoccupied with death , loss, and memory—in his senescence. Much like Hall’s poetry, the film has a meditative quality. Its long, slow takes “underscore the slow

1h

Horizon Discovery introduces Myeloid DNA Reference Standard to support genetic testing of leukemia

Horizon Discovery Group plc, a global leader in gene editing and gene modulation technologies, today announced the launch of its Myeloid DNA Reference Standard. The first-to-market large cell-line derived myeloid cancer reference standard designed enables faster, more reliable and more cost-effective assay validation, to support the market in bringing routine testing into practice.

1h

To dispel myths, redirect the belief, study says

Beliefs can be hard to change, even if they are scientifically wrong. But those on the fence about an idea can be swayed after hearing facts related to the misinformation, according to a new study.

1h

10 minutes of exercise a day improves memory

Researchers have shown that the brain’s ability to store memories improves after a short burst of exercise Just 10 minutes of light physical activity is enough to boost brain connectivity and help the brain to distinguish between similar memories, a new study suggests. Scientists at the University of California studying brain activity found connectivity between parts of the brain responsible for

1h

NASA's Terra Satellite finds Subtropical Storm Leslie drifting in Central Atlantic

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Subtropical Storm Leslie as it was meandering around the North Central Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 24, 2018.

1h

Crowd counting through walls with WiFi

Researchers in UC Santa Barbara professor Yasamin Mostofi's lab have given the first demonstration of crowd counting through walls using only everyday communication signals such as WiFi. The technique, which requires only a wireless transmitter and receiver outside the area of interest, could have a variety of applications, including smart energy management, retail business planning and security.

1h

Urbanization is cutting off life support to NYC's wetlands

Historically, salt marshes have not only served as ecological nurseries for fish, birds, and other wildlife—they've been stalwart defenses against coastal storms. But recently, coastal development coupled with accelerated sea level rise has threatened wetlands across the globe. Among them are the salt marshes in New York City's Jamaica Bay, an 18,000-acre estuary bordered by Queens and Brooklyn.

1h

How Earth sheds heat into space

Just as an oven gives off more heat to the surrounding kitchen as its internal temperature rises, the Earth sheds more heat into space as its surface warms up. Since the 1950s, scientists have observed a surprisingly straightforward, linear relationship between the Earth's surface temperature and its outgoing heat.

1h

New earthquake risk model could better inform disaster planning

Researchers have developed a new way to model seismic risk, which they hope will better inform disaster risk reduction planning in earthquake-prone areas.

1h

Chinese Cretaceous fossil highlights avian evolution

A newly identified extinct bird species from a 127 million-year-old fossil deposit in northeastern China provides new information about avian development during the early evolution of flight.

1h

Desert ants have an amazing odor memory

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology used behavioral experiments to show that desert ants quickly learn many food odors and remember them for the rest of their lives. However, their memory for nest odors seems to differ from their food odor memory. Whereas food odors are learned and kept after a single contact, ants need several trials to memorize nest odors. Moreover, ants

1h

Birds' voiceboxes are odd ducks

Birds sing from the heart. While other four-limbed animals like mammals and reptiles make sounds with voiceboxes in their throats, birds' chirps originate in a unique vocal organ called the syrinx, located in their chests. No other animals have a syrinx, and scientists aren't sure how or when it evolved. In a new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, an interdisciplinary tea

1h

You've Heard of Post-Traumatic Stress, but What about Post-Traumatic Growth?

It’s the flip side: the deep psychological health that emerges surprisingly often when people have a close brush with a disaster like Hurricane Florence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Ancient Egyptian 'Magic Spell' Deciphered

An ancient Egyptian papyrus with an image showing two bird-like creatures, possibly with a penis connecting them, has been deciphered, revealing a magic spell of love.

2h

Your brain and body remember trauma differently than other events

Health How fear makes your brain write memories differently. Life-threatening events—things like getting mugged or escaping from a fire—can be impossible to forget, even if you make every possible effort.

2h

A paralyzed man makes great strides with spinal stimulation and rehab

Researchers find success at restoring movement to paralyzed legs, giving hope to people with paraplegia.

2h

North Korea's 2017 bomb test set off later earthquakes, new analysis finds

Using newly refined analysis methods, scientists have discovered that a North Korean nuclear bomb test last fall set off aftershocks over a period of eight months. The shocks, which occurred on a previously unmapped nearby fault, are a window into both the physics of nuclear explosions, and how natural earthquakes can be triggered.

2h

How to Stop Poaching and Protect Endangered Species? Forget the ‘Kingpins.’

Authorities keep arresting people said to be bosses of wildlife trafficking, but that isn’t making a dent in the problem.

2h

2h

More federal money to states means fewer infant deaths

Increases in federal transfers—the amount of money that the federal government sends to states to improve the well-being of citizens—are strongly linked to a decrease in infant mortality rates, according to a new study. “Holding all other variables constant, a $200 increase in the amount of federal transfers per capita would save one child’s life for every 10,000 live births,” says Michael McLaug

2h

To dispel myths, redirect the belief, study says

Beliefs can be hard to change, even if they are scientifically wrong. But those on the fence about an idea can be swayed after hearing facts related to the misinformation, according to a study led by Princeton University.

2h

Four extremely young asteroid families identified

Brazilian researchers dated the families using a numerical simulation method to process current data to go back in time to the asteroid formation era.

2h

Children found capable of using the 'wisdom of crowds'

Children, like adults, can improve their response to difficult tasks by the power of group work, new research led by the University of Bristol has found.

2h

Parasite makes quick exit when researchers remove the handbrake

Australian researchers have discovered a way to halt the invasion of the toxoplasmosis-causing parasite into cells, depriving the parasite of a key factor necessary for its growth.The findings are a key step in getting closer to a vaccine to protect pregnant women from the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which carries a serious risk of miscarriage or birth defects.

2h

Physical activity necessary to maintain heart-healthy lifestyle

Exercise and physical activity are of vast global importance to prevent and control the increasing problem of heart disease and stroke, according to a review paper published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. This paper is part of an eight-part health promotion series where each paper will focus on a different risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

2h

Challenge continues in developing effective drug treatment for Alzheimer's disease

Nilvadipine shows no benefit for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in mild and moderate stages of the disease, but further studies targeting the early phase of the disease may be warranted.

2h

The Iliad Meets #MeToo in The Silence of the Girls

At the end of The Silence of the Girls , Briseis, a princess taken as a slave by Achilles, considers the cost of the Trojan War. Fragments of songs are running through her head, stories about voyages and adventure and “the glorious deaths of heroes.” Briseis is sick of them. The death of young men in war is a tragedy, she thinks, but worse is the fate of the women who survive. Their husbands, bro

2h

How To Write About Royalty

I met the Queen once. She came into the library of my boarding school, where a dozen or so of us were standing in dismal hairbrushed anticipation, and said, “Ah, the library.” I should explain, for my excitable American readers, that if you’re British there’s nothing particularly special about meeting the Queen; in her 66 busy years on the throne, launching ships and nodding at sculptures and plo

2h

An Intergalactic Tale Populated by Women

A starry rectangle of outer space. A dark-haired girl, her face ambivalent. A fish-shaped spaceship flying toward a gothic tower. These are the first three panels of On a Sunbeam , Tillie Walden’s new graphic novel—the tale of a girl and her interplanetary journey. Mia has joined a crew that travels through outer space, documenting and repairing old buildings. The narrative hops between the crew’

2h

How The Great Gatsby Explains Trump

There’s an eerie symmetry between Donald Trump and The Great Gatsby ’s Tom Buchanan, as if the villain of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s 1925 novel had been brought to life in a louder, gaudier guise for the 21st century. It’s not just their infamous carelessness , the smashing-up of things and creatures that propels Tom’s denouement and has seemed to many a Twitter user to be the animating force behind T

2h

Study: Gene Drive Wipes Out Lab Mosquitoes

No females were produced after eight generations, causing the population to collapse.

2h

Climate change concerns unite Gens X and Y

Two generations of Australians, Generations X and Y, say climate change is their number one cause for concern, according to a new report Contrary to stereotypes of young generations being narcissistic or complacent, researchers say both groups are united in concerns about the future of the environment. Generation X worries what climate change will mean for their own children, while Generation Y i

2h

Last week in Tech: Beyond the Alexa microwave

Technology New Amazon hardware, a new home for Pandora, and watches Vanilla Ice will love. Check out the latest episode of our podcast!

2h

11 Rising Stars of Science

These newcomers are making their mark in research across a variety of fields — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

The Decision Not to Call in the FBI Is Looking Worse and Worse

When Christine Blasey Ford publicly alleged that the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her in high school, the White House immediately rejected calls for an FBI investigation. It refused to treat Ford’s claim as a “vetting” issue and instead committed to a fully political defense of the nomination. This was a fateful mistake, which the Republican leadership seems poised to

2h

Oktoberfest 2018: Photos From the Opening Weekend

The 185th Oktoberfest beer festival opened in Munich this weekend, and organizers are expecting more than 6 million visitors over the next two weeks—the last keg will be tapped on October 7. The Bavarian beer festival, the largest in the world, is held on Munich’s Theresienwiese , a large open space just southwest of the city center. In 2018, the average price one can expect to pay for a one-lite

2h

The Clever Engineering Behind the New iPhone XS Battery

The iPhone XS has a unique shape, designed to squeeze in as much juice as chemistry and physics will allow.

3h

How will climate change stress the power grid? Hint: Look at dew point temperatures

A new study suggests the power industry is underestimating how climate change could affect the long-term demand for electricity in the United States. The research describes the limitations of prediction models used by electricity providers and regulators for medium- and long-term energy forecasting. It outlines a new model that includes key climate predictors that researchers say present a more ac

3h

From a microwave to a clock, Amazon is taking Alexa beyond speakers

Amazon's product blitz Thursday wasn't just about new Echo speakers and new Fire TV DVR. In announcing 70 new products, the tech and delivery giant made clear it will bring Alexa to new gadgets ranging from cars to clocks and even microwaves.

3h

How Hollywood Accidentally Ushered in the Age of the Celebrity Politician

Democrats and Republicans are under the same impression: A sprinkling of movie magic and celebrity glamor are just what American politics needs. But are they right?

3h

3h

Smaller, faster and more efficient modulator sets to revolutionize optoelectronic industry

A research team has successfully fabricated a tiny on-chip lithium niobate modulator, an essential component for the optoelectronic industry. The modulator is smaller, more efficient with faster data transmission and costs less than traditional ones.

3h

Satellite sees short-lived Tropical Cyclone Kirk

Tropical Storm Kirk formed on Saturday, Sept. 22. By Monday, Sept. 24, Kirk lacked the closed circulation that is a prerequisite for tropical cyclone status. The NOAA-20 satellite provided a visible image of the storm at its peak.

3h

How nature, nurture shape the sleeping brain

Some patterns of electrical activity generated by the brain during sleep are inherited, according to a study of teenage twins published in JNeurosci. Pinpointing the relative contributions of biology and experience to sleep neurophysiology could inform therapies for numerous psychiatric disorders in which alterations in brain activity during sleep can be detected.

3h

Anonymity Is Having a Moment

Within newsrooms, the question of when it’s appropriate to use anonymous sources is frequently debated. It’s one of the many kinds of conversations—crucial and complicated—that’s not typically visible to the public. But recently, anonymity has bubbled over into national conversation, too, amplified by a president who frequently condemns it. There was the anonymous New York Times op-ed by a senior

3h

Technology and therapy help individuals with chronic spinal cord injuries take steps

Of four research participants living with traumatic, motor complete spinal cord injury, two are able to walk over ground with epidural stimulation following epidural stimulation paired with daily locomotor training. In addition, all four participants achieved independent standing and trunk stability when using the stimulation and maintaining their mental focus.

3h

Burst of morning gene activity tells plants when to flower

Researchers have discovered that the gene FT — the primary driver of the transition to flowering in plants each spring — does something unexpected in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown in natural environments, with implications for the artificial growing conditions scientists commonly used in the lab.

3h

In zebrafish, a way to find new cancer therapies, targeting tumor modulators

Fast-breeding zebrafish, combined with fluorescent tagging, could be a powerful way to find new cancer drugs. This study tested >3,800 drugs in high-throughput fashion and found that retinoic acid, best known as an acne treatment, may be effective for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

3h

DNA islands effective as 'anti-bacterial drones'

Genomic 'islands' that evolved from viruses can be converted into 'drones' that disable Staphylococcus aureus, bacteria that are often resistant to antibiotics, a new study finds.

3h

Expanding CEO-to-worker pay gap bad for business

Companies whose CEOs earn hundreds of times their average employee's pay are viewed as less desirable to work for, and to do business with, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study.

3h

Small modulator for big data

Lithium niobate modulators are the backbone of modern telecommunications, converting electronic data to optical information in fiber optic cables. However, conventional LN modulators are bulky, expensive and power hungry. Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a new method to fabricate and design integrated, on-chip modulators 100 tim

3h

Martian moon may have come from impact on home planet, new study suggests

Phobos, the larger of Mars' two tiny satellites, is the darkest moon in the solar system. This dark aspect inspired the hypothesis that the close-orbiting moon may be a captured asteroid, but its orbital dynamics seemed to disagree. A new study suggests Phobos' composition may be more like the volcanic crust of the Red Planet than it appears, consistent with an origin for the moon in an ancient, v

3h

Martian moon may have come from impact on home planet, new study suggests

The weird shapes and colors of the tiny Martian moons Phobos and Deimos have inspired a long-standing debate about their origins.

3h

Expanding CEO-to-worker pay gap bad for business

Companies whose CEOs earn hundreds of times their average employee's pay are viewed as less desirable to work for, and to do business with, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study.

3h

Impulsiv eller eftertænksom: Se hvordan I er i din landsdel

Københavnere kan ikke styre sig, og Sønderjyder følger ikke ordrer. Forskere, der vil kortlægge danskernes adfærd, er klar med de første observationer.

3h

The Flawed Logic of Blaming Iran for a Terrorist Attack Inside Iran

Gunmen opened fire during a military parade in Iran over the weekend, killing at least 25 people, including civilians. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attack Saturday in the southwestern city of Ahvaz, which came a year after it claimed a high-profile attack in Tehran . The Ahvaz National Resistance, an Arab nationalist group that opposes the Shia regime, also claimed responsibility. The four

4h

Genetic tool that wipes out malaria could save 500,000 lives each year

Malaria could be eliminated by a CRISPR 'gene drive' that wipes out the mosquitoes that spread it, transforming the lives of hundreds of millions of people for the better

4h

Why are data ethics so challenging in a changing world?

We now live largely in a data-driven world, and ethical oversight and constraints are needed to be sure that data ethics can reach an appropriate balance between the risks and benefits of data technology. The goal is to control the risk, but to allow enough risk to make it possible to take advantage of any potential benefits of data technologies now or in the future. A comprehensive perspective on

4h

Mosquitoes that can carry malaria eliminated in lab experiments

Researchers have eliminated caged mosquitoes using 'gene drive' technology to spread a genetic modification that blocks female reproduction.

4h

Spinal cord stimulation, physical therapy help paralyzed man stand, walk with assistance

Spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy have helped a man paralyzed since 2013 regain his ability to stand and walk with assistance.

4h

Quantum computing: A new way to count qubits

Researchers have developed a new technique for measuring the state of quantum bits, or qubits, in a quantum computer.

4h

Rice U. study sheds light on — and through — 2D materials

Rice University scientists use a computational method to calculate the optical properties of two-dimensional materials. Their work promises to simplify the process of identifying the right materials for next-generation optoelectronic devices.

4h

Why are data ethics so challenging in a changing world?

We now live largely in a data-driven world, and ethical oversight and constraints are needed to be sure that data ethics can reach an appropriate balance between the risks and benefits of data technology.

4h

How a molecular signal helps plant cells decide when to make oil

Scientists identify new details of how a sugar-signaling molecule helps regulate oil production in plant cells. The work could point to new ways to engineer plants to produce substantial amounts of oil for use as biofuels or in the production of other oil-based products.

4h

Study sheds light on—and through—2-D materials

The ability of metallic or semiconducting materials to absorb, reflect and act upon light is of primary importance to scientists developing optoelectronics—electronic devices that interact with light to perform tasks. Rice University scientists have now produced a method to determine the properties of atom-thin materials that promise to refine the modulation and manipulation of light.

4h

These MDMA octopuses show how much animals and humans have in common | Peter Godfrey-Smith

Our species might have diverged 500 million years ago, but octopuses on ecstasy behave just as people do in many ways The last week has been a notable one for our understanding of animal life, thanks to two very different research papers appearing within a couple of days of each other. One continued a tradition of surprises from the octopus – and generated headlines around the world. Scientists Er

4h

Trial by Fire: Critics Demand That a Huge Sepsis Study Be Stopped

A trial enrolling new patients resembles “an experiment that would be conducted on laboratory animals,” one advocacy group said.

4h

Q&A: Among Monarch Butterflies, a New Generation Gap Every Year

The monarchs that must trek southward skip reproduction and live far longer than their forebears.

4h

Common painkiller not effective for chronic pain after traumatic nerve injury

A new study out today in the Journal of Neurology finds that pregabalin is not effective in controlling the chronic pain that sometimes develops following traumatic nerve injury. The results of the international study, which was driven by an effort to identify effective non-opioid pain medications, did show potential in relieving in pain that sometimes lingers after surgery.

4h

Women with non-small cell lung cancers live longer than men, WCLC study shows

Women diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancers live longer than their male counterparts, according to results of a SWOG study presented today at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer's 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

4h

Made for Snow | Diesel Brothers: Forces of Nature

What does it take for a monster truck to plow through some of the snowiest or iciest places on earth? Watch the build out of monster trucks like the MegaRam, designed to handle on the most treacherous of frozen roads. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://ww

4h

Trump's Irresponsible Denial of Puerto Rico's Hurricane Deaths

Downplaying the casualties from natural disasters undermines future preparations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

After Years of Paralysis, A Man Walks the Length of a Football Field

An electrical stimulation device combined with intensive rehabilitation restores walking ability to a spinal cord injury patient — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

How a molecular signal helps plant cells decide when to make oil

A study at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory identifies new details of how a sugar-signaling molecule helps regulate oil production in plant cells. As described in a paper appearing in the journal The Plant Cell, the work could point to new ways to engineer plants to produce substantial amounts of oil for use as biofuels or in the production of other oil-based products

4h

What Rosenstein’s Exit Would Mean for Mueller's Russia Investigation

Updated at 1:10 p.m. ET Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s status within the Justice Department is unclear following an explosive report in The New York Times last week that claimed he’d once suggested secretly recording President Trump and discussed invoking the Twenty-Fifth Amendment. He is scheduled to meet with Trump later this week, according to the White House, and reportedly discusse

5h

Gene editing wipes out mosquitoes in the lab

Researchers have used gene editing to completely eliminate populations of mosquitoes in the lab.

5h

People are still ‘grossed out’ by GM food

A new paper looks into how ideas about “naturalness” play into opinions about genetically engineered food. “It’s an overview of where we are,” says Sydney Scott, assistant professor of marketing in the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis, who previously published research on the “moralization” of genetically modified foods and the role of consumer “disgust” in their consump

5h

A new way to count qubits

Researchers at Syracuse University, working with collaborators at the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison, have developed a new technique for measuring the state of quantum bits, or qubits, in a quantum computer.

5h

Mosquitoes that can carry malaria eliminated in lab experiments

The team from Imperial College London were able to crash caged populations of the malaria vector mosquito Anopheles gambiae in only 7-11 generations.

5h

A new way to count qubits

Researchers at Syracuse University, working with collaborators at the University of Wisconsin (UW)-Madison, have developed a new technique for measuring the state of quantum bits, or qubits, in a quantum computer.

5h

Spinal cord stimulation, physical therapy help paralyzed man stand, walk with assistance

Spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy have helped a man paralyzed since 2013 regain his ability to stand and walk with assistance. The results, achieved in a research collaboration between Mayo Clinic and UCLA, are reported in Nature Medicine.

5h

Mosquitoes that can carry malaria eliminated in lab experiments

Researchers have eliminated caged mosquitoes using 'gene drive' technology to spread a genetic modification that blocks female reproduction.

5h

Optimizing dopaminergic treatment improves non-motor symptoms

Non-motor symptoms are common in late stage Parkinson's disease (PD) as the frequency and severity of most of these symptoms increase with advancing disease. Optimizing dopaminergic treatment in the most severe stages can affect non-motor symptoms and improve quality of life, report scientists in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease.

5h

Older adults with a 'fall prevention plan' less likely to end up in hospital

Older adults at risk for falls are less likely to suffer fall-related hospitalizations when they have a 'fall plan of care,' according to new research featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University at New York.

5h

Giving Malaria a Deadline

With a new genetic tool, scientists move a step closer to eradicating mosquitoes and the deadly diseases they carry.

5h

Japanese Mission Becomes first to Land Rovers on Asteroid

Twin probes from Hayabusa2 mission have sent back their first pictures from Ryugu’s surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

DNA islands effective as 'anti-bacterial drones'

Genomic "islands" that evolved from viruses can be converted into "drones" that disable Staphylococcus aureus, bacteria that are often resistant to antibiotics and pose a threat to safe hospital care, a new study finds.

5h

A new app pays you for product recommendations

Don't try to make money off my online behavior—unless, of course, I get a commission.

5h

In lab tests, this gene drive wiped out a population of mosquitoes

For the first time, a gene drive caused a population crash of mosquitoes in a small-scale test.

5h

Apple, Salesforce teaming up on mobile apps for business

Customer relations software company Salesforce says it will join with Apple to create new business apps exclusively for iPhone and iPad.

5h

Why it doesn't get dark when you blink

About every five seconds we close our eyes and blink to moisten them. During this brief moment no light falls on our retina yet it is not constantly dark and we continue to observe a stable picture of our environment. The brain seems to remember the percepts that have just happened. Scientists have now identified a brain area that plays a crucial role in perceptual memory.

5h

Ready-to-use recipe for turning plant waste into gasoline

Bioscience engineers already knew how to make gasoline in the laboratory from plant waste such as sawdust. Now researchers have developed a roadmap, as it were, for industrial cellulose gasoline.

5h

Eradicating Helicobacter pylori infections may be a key treatment for Parkinson's disease

While human genetic mutations are involved in a small number of Parkinson's disease (PD) cases, the vast majority of cases are of unknown environmental causes, prompting enormous interest in identifying environmental risk factors involved.

5h

Know someone sick? Your own smell might give it away

Odors surround us, providing cues about many aspects of personal identity, including health status. Now, research extends the scope and significance of personal odors as a source of information about an individual's health. A new paper reports that the bodily odors of otherwise healthy animals sharing an environment with sick animals become like the odors of the sick animals.

5h

Stepfathers' 'Cinderella effect' challenged by new study

Long-held assumptions that stepfathers are far more likely to be responsible for child deaths than genetic parents have now been challenged. Findings suggest that differences in rates of child homicides by stepfathers and genetic fathers are considerably smaller than previous researchers have claimed, and that the relative ages of fathers implicated in these crimes is more significant than whether

5h

Children whose mothers use marijuana are more likely to try it at younger age

When mothers use marijuana during the first 12 years of their child's life, their cannabis-using children are more likely to start at an earlier age than children of non-using mothers, according to a new study. This study is the first to establish a relationship between maternal cannabis use during a child's lifetime and earlier initiation in a nationally-representative, longitudinal cohort.

5h

Ready-to-use recipe for turning plant waste into gasoline

Bioscience engineers at KU Leuven, Belgium, already knew how to make gasoline in the laboratory from plant waste such as sawdust. Now the researchers have developed a roadmap, as it were, for industrial cellulose gasoline.

5h

DNA islands effective as 'anti-bacterial drones'

Genomic 'islands' that evolved from viruses can be converted into 'drones' that disable Staphylococcus aureus, bacteria that are often resistant to antibiotics, a new study finds.

5h

Technology and therapy help individuals with chronic spinal cord injuries take steps

Of four research participants living with traumatic, motor complete spinal cord injury, two are able to walk over ground with epidural stimulation following epidural stimulation paired with daily locomotor training. In addition, all four participants achieved independent standing and trunk stability when using the stimulation and maintaining their mental focus. The study was conducted at the Kentu

5h

Smaller, faster and more efficient modulator sets to revolutionize optoelectronic industry

A research team comprising members from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), Harvard University and renowned information technologies laboratory has successfully fabricated a tiny on-chip lithium niobate modulator, an essential component for the optoelectronic industry. The modulator is smaller, more efficient with faster data transmission and costs less than traditional ones. The technology is s

5h

Collection of JAMA articles focus on race, medicine and medical research

A collection of JAMA articles (an editorial and three Viewpoints) focuses on race, medicine and medical research.

5h

Mitochondrial diseases could be treated with gene therapy, study suggests

Researchers have developed a genome-editing tool for the potential treatment of mitochondrial diseases: serious and often fatal conditions which affect 1 in 5,000 people.

5h

Burst of morning gene activity tells plants when to flower

In a paper published Sept. 24 in the journal Nature Plants, an international team of researchers has discovered that the gene FT — the primary driver of the transition to flowering in plants each spring — does something unexpected in Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown in natural environments, with implications for the artificial growing conditions scientists commonly used in the lab.

5h

Research forecasts US among top nations to suffer economic damage from climate change

For the first time, researchers have developed a data set quantifying what the social cost of carbon — the measure of the economic harm from carbon dioxide emissions — will be for the globe's nearly 200 countries. Although much previous research has focused on how rich countries benefit from the fossil fuel economy, while damages accrue primarily to the developing world, the top three counties w

5h

Mental distress associated with nonconforming gender expression among high school students

Mental distress was associated with gender nonconformity among female and male high school students.

5h

How common are traumatic brain injuries in children?

An estimated 2.5 percent of US children have experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI) during their lifetime based on reports from parents in an analysis of national survey data.

5h

Why it doesn't get dark when you blink

Understanding how perception and memory interact.

5h

Mosquitoes Genetically Modified To Crash Species That Spreads Malaria

Scientists demonstrate that a "gene drive" can rapidly spread a genetic mutation through a species, perhaps providing a potent new weapon against malaria. But there are plenty of skeptics. (Image credit: Andrew Hammond)

5h

Why cauliflower is perfect for the keto diet

The cauliflower is a vegetable of choice if you're on the keto diet. The plant is low in carbs and can replace potatoes, rice and pasta. It can be eaten both raw and cooked for different benefits. Of all the ubiquitous diet trends, the keto diet is probably the one with the most current buzz. While the long-term health benefits of this low-carb approach are debatable , keto has thrust one vegetab

5h

The Republican Rush to Confirm Kavanaugh Backfired

The one overriding theme of Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court has been haste, and the three new allegations of sexual misconduct against him that surfaced in the past day—bringing the total to four—suggest a motivation for Republican hurry, as well as demonstrate its dangers. Sunday evening, The New Yorker reported on allegations by Deborah Ramirez, a woman who attended Yale with

5h

Donated organs rarely spread disease, thanks to these protocols

Health Here's how the screening process that prevents disease transmission in donated organs works. Four people in Europe developed cancer after receiving organ transplants from the same donor. Here's how the screening process that normally prevents that works.

5h

Take a step back from yourself to better realize the benefits of awe

Religion and nature can both lead to awe, and turning to one or the other is a common coping strategy for the stress. But an awe-inspiring experience can have negative consequences as well as benefits, according to a novel study that uses cardiovascular responses to stress to take a broad look at awe and the critical role perspective plays when considering the effects of encountering awe.

5h

Blowing the whistle on referee decisions

It's one of the hardest jobs in sport that every armchair fan thinks they can do better. But research has revealed the reasons how and why referees make decisions that can regularly enrage and frequently frustrate supporters.

5h

Weight loss can be boosted fivefold thanks to novel mental imagery technique

A new study has shown how overweight people lost an average of five times more weight using Functional Imagery Training (FIT) — a brief individual motivational intervention that teaches self-motivating skills using mental imagery — compared with talking therapy alone.

5h

A fracture anywhere reduces bone density everywhere

New studies are among the first to associate fractures with systemic bone loss. They also begin the path to finding treatments that preserve long-term skeletal health and reduce susceptibility to additional fractures and, potentially, osteoporosis.

5h

Blood test for drowsy driving

Scientists have developed a blood test to tell whether you have skipped a night's sleep, bringing us a step closer to developing a test for driver sleepiness. The breakthrough could help police identify suspected drowsy drivers in road traffic accidents, or assist employers in assessing fitness for duty, such as in the aviation sector.

5h

National parks bear the brunt of climate change

Human-caused climate change has exposed US national parks to conditions hotter and drier than the rest of the nation, says a new study quantifying for the first time the magnitude of climate change on all 417 parks in the system. Without action to limit greenhouse gas emissions, many small mammals and plants may be brought to the brink of extinction by the end of the century, the study shows.

5h

Height may be risk factor for varicose veins

The taller you are, the more likely you are to develop varicose veins, according to a researchers who examined the genes of more than 400,000 people in search of clues to what causes this common but little understood condition.

5h

Breakthrough in blending metals

Researchers have found a way to create innovative materials by blending metals with precision control. Their approach, based on a concept called atom hybridization, opens up an unexplored area of chemistry that could lead to the development of advanced functional materials.

5h

Overweight pregnant women can safely cut calories, restrict weight gain

With proper nutrition guidance, it is safe and feasible to restrict weight gain in obese and overweight pregnant women, a new study shows.

5h

DMP 'type 1 diabetes': Institute recommends revision

New guidelines change the results of the final report versus the preliminary report: Stronger focus, among other things, on the avoidance of hypoglycaemia by means of modern Technologies.

5h

Screening for depression: benefit remains questionable

IQWiG still sees no basis for introducing a screening programme. There were neither comments on the preliminary report nor other new findings.

5h

Negative pressure wound therapy: violation of ethical and scientific standards

The treatment has been used in hospitals for over 20 years, and more than 100 studies have been completed worldwide. But manufacturers and researchers are concealing a large proportion of the results.

5h

Science Reveals How Fruit Keeps A Lid On Ripening Until The Time Is Right

Humans have harnessed the ripening power of the plant hormone ethylene for centuries, but a recent discovery of how a plant controls the hormone may lead to more precise human control of ripening. (Image credit: Arne Dedert/Getty Images)

5h

Revolutionary spinal cord implant helps paralysed patients walk again

Researchers implanted electrodes in the lower backs of five patients, all of whom regained some movement A small group of paraplegic patients have once again been able to take steps after researchers implanted a device to electrically stimulate their spinal cords. Two separate teams of scientists have revealed for the first time that the technique, together with physical training, has allowed thr

5h

Here's the Plan to End Malaria With Crispr-Edited Mosquitoes

Target Malaria hopes to eradicate Africa's malaria-carrying mosquitoes. But when manipulating the fate of a species, moving slowly is a virtue.

5h

Photos: ‘Bored Tourists’ Too Buried in Their Smartphones to Enjoy Vacation

The sites may be different but tourists are the same, suggests English photographer Laurence Stephens.

5h

A man with paralysis can walk again thanks to a nerve-boosting implant

Advances in implants that read signals from the brain and spine are helping people with paralysis to regain the use of their limbs

5h

Burst of morning gene activity tells plants when to flower

For angiosperms—or flowering plants—one of the most important decisions facing them each year is when to flower. It is no trivial undertaking. To flower, they must cease vegetative growth and commit to making those energetically expensive reproductive structures that will bring about the next generation.

5h

Research forecasts US among top nations to suffer economic damage from climate change

For the first time, researchers have developed a data set quantifying what the social cost of carbon—the measure of the economic harm from carbon dioxide emissions—will be for the globe's nearly 200 countries, and the results are surprising. Although much previous research has focused on how rich countries benefit from the fossil fuel economy, while damages accrue primarily to the developing world

5h

Smaller, faster and more efficient modulator sets to revolutionize optoelectronic industry

A research team comprising members from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), Harvard University and a renowned information technologies laboratory has successfully fabricated a tiny on-chip lithium niobate modulator, an essential component for the optoelectronic industry. The modulator is smaller, more efficient with faster data transmission, and costs less. The technology is set to revolutionise

5h

Study finds first evidence of climate change impacts on East Antarctic vegetation

A landmark 13-year study published in Nature Climate Change has provided the first evidence that climate change is affecting terrestrial ecosystems in East Antarctica.

5h

Saturday Night Live Needs to Break Its Stagnant Streak

When Alec Baldwin joined Saturday Night Live to play Donald Trump on a recurring basis almost two years ago, it invigorated a show that had started feeling stagnant. Suddenly, there was a political impression that felt like appointment television : Baldwin portrayed Trump as an aggressive ogre rather than as a preening egotist, a performance with an extremely blunt perspective on the candidate. T

6h

The simple genius of a good graphic | Tommy McCall

In a talk that's part history lesson, part love letter to graphics, information designer Tommy McCall traces the centuries-long evolution of charts and diagrams — and shows how complex data can be sculpted into beautiful shapes. "Graphics that help us think faster, or see a book's worth of information on a single page, are the key to unlocking new discoveries," McCall says.

6h

Eradicating Helicobacter pylori infections may be a key treatment for Parkinson's disease

While human genetic mutations are involved in a small number of Parkinson's disease (PD) cases, the vast majority of cases are of unknown environmental causes, prompting enormous interest in identifying environmental risk factors involved.

6h

Take a step back from yourself to better realize the benefits of awe

Religion and nature can both lead to awe, and turning to one or the other is a common coping strategy for the stress. But an awe-inspiring experience can have negative consequences as well as benefits, according to a novel UB-led study that uses cardiovascular responses to stress to take a broad look at awe and the critical role perspective plays when considering the effects of encountering awe.

6h

Study shows invasive lung cancer surgery can lead to long-term opioid use

Patients treated with more-invasive surgical techniques for a type of early-stage lung cancer are more likely to become chronic opioid users than patients treated with minimally invasive surgery.

6h

Her er listen over de bedste og værste investeringer i veje og jernbaner

Tænketanken Kraka har for Dansk Byggeri sammensat en liste over 78 infrastrukturprojekter og hvor godt de ville forrente investeringen, hvis de blev realiseret. Det udstiller, mener ophavsmanden, at samfundet langt fra sætter pengene i de mest rentable veje og jernbaner.

6h

Perovskite/CIGS tandem cell with record efficiency of 24.6 percent

Today at the EU PVSEC conference, imec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics, energy and digital technologies, presents a thin-film tandem solar cell consisting of a top perovskite cell developed by Imec within the partnerships of EnergyVille and Solliance, and a bottom CIGS cell from the Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research (ZSW, Stuttgart, Germany). The tande

6h

Lawnmower injuries a persistent source of serious injury and high costs, new study affirms

In what researchers call an unusually comprehensive analysis of nationwide data, they conclude that the rate of lawnmower injuries persists at close to 6,400 a year, most of them requiring surgery and hospitalization, and costing an average of $37,000 per patient.

6h

Ancient Mars had right conditions for underground life, new research suggests

A new study shows that the breakdown of water molecules trapped in ancient Martian rocks likely produced enough chemical energy to sustain microorganisms for hundreds of millions of years beneath the Red Planet's surface.

6h

Does our environment affect the genes in our brains?

Is there a link between differences in IQ test performance and the activity of certain genes? Researchers have shown that modifications in the structure of a specific gene have a negative impact on individual test performance. This suggests that environmentally-induced epigenetic changes to our genetic material have a greater impact on intelligence than previously thought.

6h

Charles Kao, Nobel-winning optical fiber pioneer, dies at 84

Charles K. Kao, who shared a 2009 Nobel Prize in physics for pioneering work in optical fiber technology that helped to lay the foundation for modern telecommunications, has died. He was 84.

6h

Ancient Mars had right conditions for underground life, new research suggests

A new study shows evidence that ancient Mars probably had an ample supply of chemical energy for microbes to thrive underground.

6h

Worried about AI taking over the world? You may be making some rather unscientific assumptions

,Should we be afraid of artificial intelligence? For me, this is a simple question with an even simpler, two letter answer: no. But not everyone agrees – many people, including the late physicist Stephen Hawking, have raised concerns that the rise of powerful AI systems could spell the end for humanity.

6h

Trump's EPA Made It Easier for Coal Plants to Pollute Waterways

Obama-era rules could have reduced the chances of spills like the one caused by Hurricane Florence’s floodwaters — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Eight of 10 people with cancer risk genes don't know it

Genomic screening shows that more than 80 percent of those who carry an identifiable genetic risk for breast, ovarian, prostate, and pancreatic cancer don't know it.

6h

New research reveals a mitochondrial gene that protects against Alzheimer's disease

A previously unknown genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias has been uncovered in a new study, which provides insights on how diseases of aging might one day be treated and prevented.

6h

Ancient Mars had right conditions for underground life, new research suggests

A new study shows that the breakdown of water molecules trapped in ancient Martian rocks likely produced enough chemical energy to sustain microorganisms for hundreds of millions of years beneath the Red Planet's surface.

6h

Clinical trial investigators violate EU regulations: Entries in EU Register are incomplete

Compliance of pharma companies is relatively good, but very poor for university research groups. Research funders should make allocation of further funding dependent on data transparency.

6h

Promising phase 1/2 results for entrectinib against ROS1+ non-small cell lung cancer

Results of phase 1 and phase 2 clinical trials of the drug entrectinib in ROS1-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) presented on the press program of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) 19th World Conference on Lung Cancer show a response rate of 77.4 percent for 53 patients evaluable for response, with median duration of response of 24.6 months.

6h

Lawnmower injuries a persistent source of serious injury and high costs, new study affirms

In what Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers call an unusually comprehensive analysis of nationwide data, they conclude that the rate of lawnmower injuries persists at close to 6,400 a year, most of them requiring surgery and hospitalization, and costing an average of $37,000 per patient.

6h

Dosimetry and toxicity studies of a sulfonamide derivative of Sulforhodamine 101

The SR101 N-(3-[18F]Fluoropropyl) sulfonamide ([18F]SRF101) is a Sulforhodamine 101 derivative that was previously synthesised by our group. The fluorescent dye SR101 has been reported as a marker of astroglia in the neocortex of rodents in vivo. The aim of this study was to perform a toxicological evaluation of [18F]SRF101 and to estimate human radiation dosimetry based on preclinical studies.

6h

The theranostic complex with two toxic modules shows great toxicity for tumour cells

Emerging cancer nanotechnology enables target-delivery of substantial payloads of drugs to cancer sites with concomitant reduction of side-effects due to the lesser accumulation in the critical organs. This prompts loading of nanocarriers with therapeutic cargo and contrast agents, allowing combined cancer therapy and tumour visualization, respectively. Researchers from Lobachevsky University of N

6h

Senior housing may keep older adults out of hospital

People who live in senior housing communities are less likely to face high levels of hospitalization over time, a new study shows. “Our findings suggest that the positive effects from the various support services available in the senior housing environment accrue over time in helping vulnerable elders better manage their health conditions,” says Sojung Park, assistant professor at the Brown Schoo

6h

A Star Trek-inspired handheld device for sophisticated medical diagnostics

A Star Trek-inspired handheld device based on a silicon chip could help make rapid, sophisticated medical diagnostics more accessible to people around the world, scientists say.

6h

Chip ramps up artificial intelligence systems' performance

Princeton researchers, in collaboration with Analog Devices Inc., have fabricated a chip that markedly boosts the performance and efficiency of neural networks—computer algorithms modeled on the workings of the human brain.

6h

Explainer: The US push to boost 'quantum computing'

A race by U.S. tech companies to build a new generation of powerful "quantum computers" could get a $1.3 billion boost from Congress, fueled in part by lawmakers' fear of growing competition from China.

6h

Japan lander to rovere på asteroide

De to første rovere fra det japanske rumfartøj Hayabusa2 har succesfuldt gennemført historisk landing på asteroiden Ryugu. Snart skal Hayabusa2 selv ned og tage prøver af støv og grus.

6h

Kammeradvokaten frikender Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds politianmeldelser

Kammeradvokaten konkluderer, at der ikke er grundlag for at kritisere Styrelsen for Patientsikkerheds politianmeldelser af ansatte i sundhedssektoren. Lægeformænd kritiserer undersøgelsens resultater og understreger, at der er behov for at evaluere hele styrelsens praksis.

6h

Scientists unravel the mysteries of the Salish Sea

By now, the millions of people around the world who followed the saga of a mother orca carrying her dead calf know the endangered southern-resident orca whales exclusively eat chinook salmon. But what do the chinook eat?

6h

How The Best Jumpers in the World Fly So Damn High

In 2016, Evan Ungar set the box jump world record at 63.5 inches. Here's how he does it—and how he could go higher.

6h

The Strange, Sad Case of Sunspot, the Empty Astronomy Town

New Mexico's Sunspot Observatory was evacuated over a child porn investigation. But that's just one of the forces clearing the place out.

6h

Riemann hypothesis likely remains unsolved despite claimed proof

Mathematician Michael Atiyah has presented his claimed proof of one of the most famous unsolved problems in maths, but others remain cautiously sceptical

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Piger vil også programmere – stik imod, hvad forældrene tror

Ni ud af 10 af landets 4. klasseelever er i dag begyndt på skoleprojektet ultra:bit.

6h

You’re too addicted to your phone to quit cold turkey—here’s what to do instead

DIY Trick your brain into putting down the device. Increasingly, our smartphones have become more like appendages we can’t live without. Here’s how to wean your brain off your pocket computer.

6h

Call for new approaches to fill significant gaps in understanding Parkinson's disease

New paper calls for the use of advances human-relevant methods to enable understanding of the initiation and progression of Parkinson's disease.

6h

Does our environment affect the genes in our brains?

Is there a link between differences in IQ test performance and the activity of certain genes? Researchers from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that modifications in the structure of a specific gene have a negative impact on individual test performance. This suggests that environmentally-induced epigenetic changes to our genetic material have a greater impact on intelligence than p

6h

Researchers explore how changes in diet alter microbiome in artificial intestine

Using an artificial intestine they created, researchers have shown that the microbiome can quickly adapt from the bacterial equivalent of a typical western diet to one composed exclusively of dietary fats.

6h

Boosting emotional intelligence in physicians can protect against burnout

An educational curriculum for resident physicians improves their emotional intelligence, which may help protect against burnout, according to a new study.

6h

400-year-old shipwreck found off Portugal coast

Archaeologists in Portugal say they have discovered off Lisbon a 400-year-old shipwreck they describe as the most important underwater find in the country for two decades.

6h

Amazon's digital ad business surpasses Microsoft, Yahoo, report says

Amazon.com's advertising business is likely to more than double its sales in the U.S. this year, a market researcher said Wednesday, which would place the company behind only Google and Facebook.

6h

Screen-printed, large-area nPERT solar cells surpass 23 percent efficiency

At today's EU PVSEC conference, imec—the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics, energy and digital technology and partner in EnergyVille—announced that its latest generation of large-area monofacial screen-printed rear-emitter nPERT cells feature a conversion efficiency of 23.03 percent, certified by Fraunhofer ISE CalLab. The nPERT (n-type Passivated Emitter and Rear Totall

6h

Japan has launched a miniature space elevator

The Japanese space agency just launched a prototype space elevator to the International Space Station to test motion along a taut cable in space.

7h

Ice volcano sheds light on Ceres’ missing mountains

Every year throughout its 4.5-billion-year life, ice volcanoes on the dwarf planet Ceres generate enough material to fill a movie theater—13,000 cubic yards, according to a new study. The study marks the first time researchers have calculated a rate of cryovolcanic activity from observations—and the findings help solve a mystery about Ceres’ missing mountains, researchers say. Discovered in 2015

7h

Reducing the conflict between energy retrofit and heritage character

Buildings represent the largest single source of greenhouse gas emissions from the developed world, and climate change probably the greatest threat to humanity.

7h

Deep-eutectic solvents replace polluting industrial solvents

Many polluting solvents used by the chemical industry can be replaced by an amazing new mixture of two powders: 'deep-eutectic solvents' (DES). This next generation of solvents are sustainable, much less flammable, not volatile and can draw contaminants from water beyond the capabilities of current solvents. On Tuesday, September 18 Dannie van Osch obtains his doctorate in this subject at Eindhove

7h

Artificial intelligence create more than 100,000 new tunes based on Irish and English folk tunes

At turns lively and yearning, the traditional folk musics of Ireland and Britain have made their mark around the world. Now these perennially popular forms of music are helping computers learn to become a new kind of partner in music creation.

7h

The weird world of one-sided objects

You have most likely encountered one-sided objects hundreds of times in your daily life – like the universal symbol for recycling, found printed on the backs of aluminum cans and plastic bottles.

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Secret messages for Alexa and Co

A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum has succeeded in integrating secret commands for the Kaldi speech recognition system – which is believed to be contained in Amazon's Alexa and many other systems – into audio files. These are not audible to the human ear, but Kaldi reacts to them. The researchers showed that they could hide any sentence they liked in different types of audio signals, such as spe

7h

SiriusXM buys Pandora to step up streaming music warsSiriusXM Pandora $3.5B

SiriusXM, which dominates satellite radio in the United States, announced Monday it is buying online rival Pandora for $3.5 billion, ramping up competition in the streaming music market dominated by Spotify and Apple.

7h

EU backs Belgium's pre-emptive swine fever slaughter

The European Union on Monday welcomed Belgium's decision to slaughter thousands of healthy pigs to isolate and eradicate an outbreak of swine fever.

7h

Paper: School shootings affect school quality, housing value

A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois scholar who studies urban economics says that home prices within a school district affected by a mass shooting episode in a school declined by 7.8 percent – more than $15,000 – over the course of at least three years after the incident.

7h

International effort to uncover properties of polymer nanoparticles

From photonics to pharmaceuticals, materials made with polymer nanoparticles hold promise for products of the future. However, there are still gaps in understanding the properties of these tiny plastic-like particles.

7h

Akutmodtagelser skal have fokus på speciallægekompetencer

Ny kortlægning af akutmodtagelserne viser, at der er færre unødige indlæggelser end for ti år siden. Dog har hospitalerne en udfordring i at sikre, at de rette lægefaglige kompetencer er til stede.

7h

Results from the COAPT trial reported at TCT 2018 and published simultaneously in NEJM

Data presented today from the randomized COAPT trial, which have the potential to significantly change current clinical practice, found that patients with heart failure and secondary mitral regurgitation (MR) who remained symptomatic despite maximally tolerated medical therapy demonstrated reduced rates of hospitalizations and death, as well as improved quality-of-life and functional capacity afte

7h

Blowing the whistle on referee decisions

It's one of the hardest jobs in sport that every armchair fan thinks they can do better.But QUT research has revealed the reasons how and why referees make decisions that can regularly enrage and frequently frustrate supporters.Football referee and QUT researcher Scotty Russell has investigated why referees make the calls they do and what they want to achieve from the matches they officiate.

7h

Trump Signals an Openness to Talks With Iran

President Donald Trump apparently believes he can make the United Nations great again. “The United Nations has tremendous potential, but it has not lived up to that potential,” he said in a video message posted to his Twitter account over the weekend. He’ll attend a session Monday on combatting illicit drugs, address the General Assembly on Tuesday, and chair a meeting of the Security Council on

7h

Image: Hubble's galaxies with knots, bursts

In the northern constellation of Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair) lies the impressive Coma Cluster— a structure of over a thousand galaxies bound together by gravity. Many of these galaxies are elliptical types, as is the brighter of the two galaxies dominating this image: NGC 4860 (center). However, the outskirts of the cluster also host younger spiral galaxies that proudly display their swirling

7h

From Echo Auto to Alexa: Hits and misses from Amazon's new product reveal

The Echo speakers got the most attention. And pundits had fun with a talking Alexa microwave and clock.

7h

Results from the ReCre8 trial reported at TCT 2018

The first large, randomized trial comparing a novel polymer-free amphilimus-eluting stent to the latest-generation permanent polymer drug-eluting stent found that the polymer-free stent was clinically safe and effective.

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Novel drug-eluting stent with improved radiographic visibility found to be safe and effective

This first randomized clinical study of a polymer-coated zotarolimus-eluting stent (Resolute Onyx) that utilizes a novel thin-strutted metallic platform allowing for better x-ray visibility was shown to be non-inferior to an ultrathin-strutted bioresorbable polymer-coated sirolimus-eluting stent (Orsiro) that uses a cobalt-chromium strut platform.

7h

A fracture anywhere reduces bone density everywhere

New studies from UC Davis Health are among the first to associate fractures with systemic bone loss. They also begin the path to finding treatments that preserve long-term skeletal health and reduce susceptibility to additional fractures and, potentially, osteoporosis.

7h

Asian-Americans more likely to be hired to lead troubled companies

Asian-Americans are more than twice as likely to be hired as CEOs when a company is struggling, possibly setting them up for failure, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

7h

Preventing underage drinking among youths on rural reservations

A recent study by the Prevention Research Center of the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, the Scripps Research Institute, and the Southern California Tribal Health Center, evaluated the effects of combined individual- and community-level interventions to reduce underage drinking by American Indian/Alaska Native youths on rural California Indian reservations.

7h

Results from the SOLVE-TAVI trial reported at TCT 2018

The first randomized study to compare general versus local anesthesia during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in patients with intermediate to high surgical risk found local anesthesia to be both safe and effective. In addition, the study found that a current generation balloon-expandable valve had similar outcomes to a current generation self-expanding one.

7h

Image: Herschel's view of the galactic centre

An odd-shaped formation of gas and dust at the centre of the Milky Way, captured by the far-infrared cameras on board ESA's Herschel space observatory. The nearly continuous strip of dense and cold clumps of material forms an infinity symbol, or sideways 8, that is a few hundred light years across. In this image, the strip twists around an invisible axis running roughly from the top left to the bo

7h

U.S. undocumented immigrant population roughly double current estimate

The number of undocumented immigrants in the United States is roughly twice as high as commonly believed, according to new research from MIT Sloan and Yale professors.

7h

Engineers add sense of touch to prosthetic hand

Engineers at Johns Hopkins University have created an electronic skin, which when added to a prosthetic hand allows the user to feel objects as if through their own hand, including feeling pain when touching a sharp object.

7h

OPEC: Olieforbrug slår alle rekorder de næste fem år

Transportsektoren sluger olie. Og selv om elbiler vinde frem, er det hovedsageligt i de rigeste lande.

7h

Material made from single molecule self-forms into a lattice that can self-heal, store gases

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has developed a material made from just a single molecule that self-forms into a lattice that can self-heal and store gases. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes synthesizing the aromatic molecule, which bears a symmetrical outer shell.

7h

Evacuation decision-making: How people make choices in disasters

After hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded research to investigate the broad impacts of these disasters. A year later, some of the researchers funded by awards from the agency's Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Directorate are reporting results produced to date. This is the fourth article in the series. Roxane Cohen Silver, professor of psychological sc

7h

Researchers study a neutral hydrogen supershell in the Milky Way

A duo of researchers from the Czech Republic has performed a study of the neutral hydrogen supershell known as GS242-03+37, a large structure in the Milky Way galaxy. The research, presented in a paper published September 11 on arXiv.org, provides insights into the nature of this supershell and into its interactions with surroundings.

7h

Ecologist suggests wild approach to selling threatened plants

Selling plants could save them from extinction. The key is growing them in their natural habitats, not on private properties or nurseries, according to FIU conservation ecologist Hong Liu.

7h

Quicker and simpler test to detect infectious disease in dogs

A team of researchers have proposed a new test that rapidly examines dogs for exposure to a parasite transmitted by sand flies. The test could be used in monitoring the effectiveness of sand fly control efforts.

7h

Regionsdirektør får gyldent håndtryk på næsten fem mio. kr.

Fratrædelsesomkostningerne i forbindelse med Jacob Steengaard Madsens afskedigelse som Midtjyllands regionsdirektør ender på næsten fem mio. kr.

7h

Spray-on antennas unlock communication of the future

Hear the word "antenna" and you might think about rabbit ears on the top of an old TV or the wire that picks up radio signals for a car. But an antenna can be much smaller – even invisible. No matter its shape or size, an antenna is crucial for communication, transmitting and receiving radio signals between devices. As portable electronics become increasingly common, antennas must, too.

7h

Catalogue of planetary maps highlights the evolving view of the solar system

A catalogue that provides an overview of over 2,200 planetary maps produced worldwide between 1600 and 2018 has been presented today at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) 2018 in Berlin. The catalogue has been produced by Henrik Hargitai, from Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest (Hungary), and Mateusz Pitura, from the University of Wroclaw (Poland).

7h

Neurobehavioral symptoms predictive of employment outcome after traumatic brain injury

'Our results indicate that frontal neurobehavioral symptoms may be predictive of the ability to achieve and maintain employment after TBI,' said Dr. Weber, lead author, and a research scientist at Kessler Foundation. 'Developing rehabilitative strategies that address these behaviors could improve employment outcomes,' she noted, 'and reduce the burden of care on caregivers and society.'

7h

Roku Premiere and Premiere+(2018): Price, Details, Release Date

The streaming video hardware company refreshes its players, adding Google-powered voice control and making it easier to find free movies and shows.

7h

Star Wars News: Is There a Resistance Inside the First Order?

A new rumor suggests one of Kylo Ren's employees might be a traitor.

7h

Custom circuits for living cells

A team of Caltech researchers has developed a biological toolkit of proteins that can be assembled together in different ways, like Legos, to program new behaviors in cells. As a proof-of-concept, they designed and constructed a circuit that can be added to human cells growing in a laboratory dish, detect if a cancer-causing gene is activated in the cells, and if so, cause the cells to self-destru

7h

Asian-Americans more likely to be hired to lead troubled companies

Asian-Americans are more than twice as likely to be hired as CEOs when a company is struggling, possibly setting them up for failure, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

7h

Ancient mice discovered by climate cavers

The fossils of two extinct mice species have been discovered in caves in tropical Queensland by University of Queensland scientists tracking environment changes.

7h

MAVEN selfie marks four years in orbit around Mars

Today, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) spacecraft celebrates four years in orbit studying the upper atmosphere of the Red Planet and how it interacts with the sun and the solar wind. To mark the occasion, the MAVEN team has released a selfie image of the spacecraft at Mars.

8h

After the Big One: Understanding aftershock risk

In early September 2018, a powerful earthquake on the island of Hokkaido in northern Japan triggered landslides, toppled buildings, cut power, halted industry, killed more than 40 people and injured hundreds. The national meteorological agency warned that aftershocks could strike for up to a week following the main event.

8h

Blowing the whistle on referee decisions

It's one of the hardest jobs in sport that every armchair fan thinks they can do better.

8h

A new classification scheme for exoplanet sizes

There are about 4433 exoplanets in the latest catalogs. Their radii have generally been measured by knowing the radius of their host star and then closely fitting the lightcurves as the planet transits across the face of the star. The radius of the host star is thus a key parameter and latest data release of the Gaia mission has enabled astronomers to improve the accuracy of stellar properties in

8h

Neither smooth nor rough: Novel bio-inspired surfaces make insects slip

Insects are able to climb almost any type of surface using their specialised adhesive organs. So far, most technical solutions to control insect pests involve toxic or sticky components, which need to be frequently renewed. Scientist at the Biomimetics-Innovation-Centre Bremen and Kiel University have now developed and tested a new bio-inspired repellent technology without toxic or sticky componen

8h

Does being a parent make you more conservative?

Parents may display more conservative attitudes, according to new research. Parental advice like “Look both ways before you cross the street,” or “Don’t run with scissors,” can be considered examples of a certain perspective that portrays the world as a dangerous place—a perspective parents might use to instill caution in their children. Some evidence supports the idea that socially and morally c

8h

10 mysteries of the universe: Is our solar system normal?

Puffball planets the density of polystyrene are just some of the oddities we’ve spied in other solar systems – is our own backyard the exception, not the rule?

8h

Newly discovered magnetic state could lead to green IT solutions

Magnetic skyrmions are magnetic swirls that may lead to new solutions combining low-energy consumption with high-speed computational power and high-density data storage, revolutionizing information technology. A team from Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with the University of Groningen and Hiroshima University, has discovered a new, unexpected magnetic state, which is related to t

8h

Silver fox study reveals genetic clues to social behavior

In 1959, Russian scientists began an experiment to breed a population of silver foxes, selecting and breeding foxes that exhibited friendliness toward people. They wanted to know if they could repeat the adaptations for tameness that must have occurred in domestic dogs. Subsequently they also bred another population of foxes for more aggressive behavior.

8h

Scouts Healthy Brain Initiative: Order Your Patches!

Girl Scout Troop #72, Nashville, Tennessee, 2018 Are you involved with the Girl Scouts or Boy Scouts of America? If so, the order form for the Scouts Healthy Brain Initiative Fun Patch is now available! Scout leaders within the United States and Canada can now order up to 50 patches for their troops. The Scouts Healthy Brain Initiative aims to bring the topics of neuroscience and brain health int

8h

No One Knows Exactly What Would Happen If Mosquitoes Were to Disappear

When Delphine Thizy talks to people about eliminating malaria by targeting mosquitos, the one question she says everyone asks—“whether you’re talking to someone in a village in Africa who has never studied biology or an ecologist or a UN ambassador”—is this: What are the consequences? It’s a good question. To humans, mosquitoes are at best annoying and at worst deadly, but to dozens of other spec

8h

Americans have more faith in legislatures where women are equally represented

The presence of women in a decision-making body increases the public's perception of that body's legitimacy, especially when that group makes decisions that impact women. This is one of the key findings of "All Male Panels? Representation and Democratic Legitimacy," by Amanda Clayton, assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University, and her co-investigators, Jennifer Piscopo, ass

8h

How microvilli form

The gut is lined by cells containing brush borders, which are composed of arrays of microvillar protrusions that help in nutrient absorption and provide a barrier against pathogens and toxins. Microbes such as E. coli can destroy microvilli with potentially life-threatening results. But how microvilli form has not been well understood.

8h

Praksislæger slipper for at tilbagebetale penge for overflødige blodprøver

Selvom et stort antal praktiserende læger ifølge Region Syddanmark har taget blodprøver uden faglig begrundelse, vil lægerne ikke blive mødt med et tilbagebetalingskrav.

8h

'Maniac' Is the Most Netflix-y Netflix Show Yet. In a Bad Way

This is what happens when a prestige- and pedigree-obsessed creative strategy overrides all functionality.

8h

Canon PowerShot G7 X Mark II Review: Our Favorite Point-and-Shoot

Pocketable and powerful, this compact Canon is mightier than it may seem.

8h

Democrats Are Busting Their 2016 Mobile Canvassing Records

With six weeks to go until Election Day, more volunteers have already logged on to the party’s canvassing app than in any other election.

8h

Image of the Day: Handle with Care

Olympic National Park is relocating its mountain goats.

9h

Hurricane Florence helped spin up new storms in the Atlantic

Environment Flo isn't rising from the dead, but it's still influencing our weather. Hurricane Florence'sv remnant energy and moisture are partially responsible for two tropical systems in the Atlantic Ocean right now.

9h

Breakthrough in blending metals—precise control of multimetallic one-nanometer cluster formation achieved

Researchers in Japan have found a way to create innovative materials by blending metals with precision control. Their approach, based on a concept called atom hybridization, opens up an unexplored area of chemistry that could lead to the development of advanced functional materials.

9h

Light pollution makes fish more courageous

Artificial light at night makes guppies more courageous during the day, according to a behavioural study led by researchers from the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development. Exposing fish to artificial light at night made fish more active during the night, and also made them emerge quicker from hiding places during the d

9h

Researchers control the drying patterns formed during salt recrystallization

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered a new way of controlling the drying patterns formed by re-crystallizing salt. They found that the coffee ring effect can be used to pin the edge of drying droplets, creating a range of geometric patterns. The same principles may be applied to understand and improve the adhesion of printer ink to surfaces and the manufacture of film-bas

9h

Glowing Blue Clouds Ripple at Edge of Earth's Atmosphere (Video)

The clouds' rippling and flow reflect the movement of air in the upper atmosphere resulting from a phenomenon called atmospheric gravity waves.

9h

The first predators and their self-repairing teeth

The earliest predators appeared on Earth 480 million years ago—and they even had teeth capable of repairing themselves. A team of palaeontologists led by Bryan Shirley and Madleen Grohganz from the Chair for Palaeoenviromental Research at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have discovered more about how these organisms were able to grow and regenerate their teeth. The results

9h

Spray-coated tactile sensor on a 3-D surface for robotic skin

Robots will be able to conduct a wide variety of tasks as well as humans if they can be given tactile sensing capabilities.

9h

Planet Earth Wobbles As It Spins, and Now Scientists Know Why

Turns out, humans are shifting the planet's spin.

9h

Galileo Toned Down His Heretical Words, Long-Lost Letter Proves (But the Church Persecuted Him Anyway)

A long-lost letter provides answers about Galileo's defense of science against the Catholic Church.

9h

Wriggling, Googly-Eyed Mass Astonishes Deep-Sea Researchers

In a strange, underwater video, a black mass drifts toward the camera. It's made up of a dark, spherical blob up front and a long, thin tail in the back. And it wriggles.

9h

Dear Therapist: I Love My Best Friend Like a Brother. My Wife Hates Him.

Dear Therapist, One of my best friends—I’ve known him since I was fourteen—is a bit of an inadvertent asshole. He can sometimes come off as incredibly insensitive, rude, and show-offy, and, for some reason, he competes with me in life. I am aware of these qualities, but I attribute them to his very difficult past and upbringing. I believe these experiences have given him a complex and some rough

9h

The Myth of Authoritarian Competence

For nearly six months, one of the world’s top economies has been gripped by crisis, sparking fears of wider financial contagion. Since the spring, the Turkish currency has cratered while inflation has soared, rattling other emerging markets from Argentina to Indonesia. Yet the most important warning to draw from Turkey’s recent convulsions is less economic than political: namely, the danger of be

9h

Udskudt uden forklaring: Branche undrer sig over mobil-auktion

Kun Energistyrelsen lader til at kende årsagen til en pludselig udskydelse af en frekvensauktion, der skulle begynde i morgen.

9h

How inequality destroys the future by focusing on the past

Income inequality is dividing Americans. Wages haven't risen in 30 years, while prices for housing, schools, and basic goods has. Canny (and uncanny) politicians have learned how to milk the politics of fear by comparing the present to the past.

9h

Six disastrous encounters with the world’s most hostile uncontacted tribe

Many have tried to contact the Sentinelese, to write about them, or otherwise. But the inhabitants of the 23 square mile island in the Bay of Bengal don't want anything to do with the outside world. Their numbers are unknown, but either 40 or 500 remain. None Between waves of refugees, armed conflicts, and bickering over oil reserves, the world feels like it's become a rather small place. The wor

9h

Finally, a world map that's all about oceans

Athelstan Spilhaus designed an oceanic thermometer to fight the Nazis, and the weather balloon that got mistaken for a UFO in Roswell. In 1942, he produced a world map with a unique perspective, presenting the world's oceans as one body of water. The Spilhaus Projection could be just what the oceans need to get the attention their problems deserve. This is a world map unlike any other. Uniquely,

9h

Major study: Drug overdoses over a 38-year period reveal hidden trends

It appears that overdoses are increasing exponentially, no matter the drug itself If the study bears out, it means that even reducing opiates will not slow the trajectory. The causes of these trends remain obscure, but near the end of the write-up about the study, a hint might be apparent None A new study has just been published in Science.Org magazine detailing the progression of addiction in th

9h

10 books that will make you a better designer

Like chess, Formula 1, and making ravioli… design has rules. The rules are flexible. But the main point of these rules is to avoid bad design. The best part? It's achievable. Design is all around us in a myriad of forms. From the screen interfaces on your phones and devices to the handles on your shower faucets. We often know instinctively what constitutes great design, there's an almost epheme

9h

'Netflix for Open Source' Wants Developers to Get Paid

Startup Tidelift hopes payments will let coders keep projects patched and up to date.

9h

The Series 5 YubiKey Will Help Kill the Password

The latest batch of hardware-based tokens from Yubico will eventually let you skip the password altogether.

9h

This MIT spinout could finally clean up steel, one of the globe’s biggest climate polluters

Boston Metal has developed technology to electrify steelmaking, and a pending funding round will kickstart a large demonstration project.

9h

Prickly but Unprotected: 18 Percent of Cactus Species at Risk

A new study—the first of its kind—finds the world’s conservation areas fail to protect hundreds of rare cactus species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

A Warming Climate Could Make Pigs Produce Less Meat

Farm animals raised in hotter conditions do not generate as much protein, which could make pork more expensive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Styrelse om massiv budgetoverskridelse for Ringsted Station: »Selvfølgelig ikke godt nok«

Regningen for at bygge Ringsted Station sammen med den nye Ringstedbane er mere end fordoblet. Banedanmarks budget »skulle aldrig have fået lov til at ligge til grund for projektet,« siger økonomidirektør.

10h

Letbaneåbning til Grenaa forsinket … igen igen igen

Strækningen Aarhus-Grenaa åbner først i slutningen af marts 2019. Samlet forsinkelse: Et år og fem måneder.

10h

Charles Kao, Nobel Laureate Who Revolutionized Fiber Optics, Dies at 84

In the 1960s, Dr. Kao outlined the potential capacity of fiber optic cables for storing information, laying the technical groundwork for modern communications.

10h

DNA-teknologi fanger afrikanske elfenbens-smuglere

Forskere kortlægger smuglerkarteller i Afrika, der hvert år dræber tusindvis af elefanter.

10h

People are more clued up about science than you might think

Fake news isn't making us wilfully ignorant. Our survey suggests that people are better informed and more discerning than we give them credit for

10h

Weight loss can be boosted fivefold thanks to novel mental imagery technique

A new study has shown how overweight people lost an average of five times more weight using Functional Imagery Training (FIT) — a brief individual motivational intervention that teaches self-motivating skills using mental imagery — compared with talking therapy alone. The study was led by the University of Plymouth and Queensland University.

10h

Techtopia #71: Intelligente høreapparater

Høreapparater er gået fra at være en kikset brun banan bag onkels øre til at være hip hightech.

10h

Vi forsvarer ikke Sundhedsplatformen ukritisk

Men vi tror, at det kommer til at fungere ligesom det gør i Cambridge, hvor Epic blev kraftigt modarbejdet af læger, men hvor destruktion er blevet til optimisme.

10h

Breakthrough in blending metals

Researchers in Japan have found a way to create innovative materials by blending metals with precision control. Their approach, based on a concept called atom hybridization, opens up an unexplored area of chemistry that could lead to the development of advanced functional materials.

11h

Cancer cells evade immunotherapy by hiding telltale marker, suggesting how to stop relapse

Harnessing the immune system to treat cancer shows great promise in some patients, but for many, the response does not last long-term. In an effort to find out why, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center scientists are using a new technology to look at how cancer cells change under the pressure of immunotherapy treatments.

11h

Know someone sick? Your own smell might give it away

Odors surround us, providing cues about many aspects of personal identity, including health status. Now, research from the Monell Center extends the scope and significance of personal odors as a source of information about an individual's health. A new paper reports that the bodily odors of otherwise healthy animals sharing an environment with sick animals become like the odors of the sick animals

11h

Height may be risk factor for varicose veins, Stanford-led study finds

The taller you are, the more likely you are to develop varicose veins, according to a study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers that examined the genes of more than 400,000 people in search of clues to what causes this common but little understood condition.

11h

The taller you are, the more likely you may develop varicose veins

A person's height may be a risk factor for varicose veins, which can be associated with other health risks. Genes that predict a person's height may be at the root of this association between height and varicose veins and may provide clues for treating the condition.

11h

Tiger population nearly doubles in Nepal

Nepal's wild tiger population has nearly doubled over the last nine years, officials said Monday, in a victory for the impoverished country's drive to save the endangered big cats.

11h

Regeringen vil digitalisere sundheds- og kørekort

Danskerne skal kunne samle digitale ID-beviser på deres smartphone. Første skridt bliver kørekortet, der ligger på mobiltelefonen.

11h

Forlad Tesla-standeren: Dyrt at blive holdende efter fuld opladning

Tesla lukker dig ude, hvis ikke du som kunde betaler din gæld.

11h

Nepal reinstates $2.5bn hydropower deal with Chinese firm

Nepal has reinstated a deal with a Chinese state-owned company to build a $2.5 billion hydroelectric plant scrapped by the previous government, officials confirmed Monday, as the new pro-Beijing administration seeks massive infrastructure investment.

11h

Conservationists slam Australia shark policy as more killed

Conservationists on Monday slammed the baiting and killing of sharks at a popular Great Barrier Reef tourist spot after two swimmers were attacked, saying the policy was brutal and indiscriminate.

11h

Sky shares soar on Comcast takeover victory

Shares in British broadcaster Sky soared Monday after US cable giant Comcast outgunned Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox in a dramatic auction for the pan-European television operator.

11h

Can't Get Comfortable In Your Chair? Here's What You Can Do

Chair design shifted dramatically about a hundred years ago, and it hasn't been good for our backs. Our daily lives are filled with chairs that make our posture worse. Luckily, we've got hacks. (Image credit: Erin Brethauer for NPR)

11h

The New Health Care: Congratulations. Your Study Went Nowhere.

Researchers should embrace negative results instead of accentuating the positive, which is one of several biases that can lead to bad science.

11h

National parks bear the brunt of climate change

Human-caused climate change has exposed US national parks to conditions hotter and drier than the rest of the nation, says a new UC Berkeley and University of Wisconsin-Madison study quantifying for the first time the magnitude of climate change on all 417 parks in the system. Without action to limit greenhouse gas emissions, many small mammals and plants may be brought to the brink of extinction

12h

Computere på størrelse med en tændstikæske skal lære børn at kode

Landets 4. klasser er med i et projekt, som skal gøre danske børn bedre til at forstå teknologi.

12h

National parks bear the brunt of climate change

Human-caused climate change has exposed U.S. national parks to conditions hotter and drier than the rest of the nation, says a new UC Berkeley and University of Wisconsin-Madison study that quantifies for the first time the magnitude of climate change on all 417 parks in the system.

12h

Japanese space hoppers reveal glorious sci-fi vision of asteroid Ryugu

Japan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft has released its two small MINERVA-II rovers on to the surface of the asteroid Ryugu, and the pair have sent back some amazing images

13h

Drivers see red over Oslo's green 'war on cars'

Determined to go green, Oslo is slowly but surely ridding its city centre of motorists, angering some who say the "war on cars" is putting the brakes on individual freedoms.

13h

EU palm oil ban sows bitter seeds for Southeast Asian farmers

Indonesian palm oil farmer Kawal Surbakti says his livelihood is under attack, but the threat is not from insects or hungry orangutans eating his prized crop.

13h

Sexual Harassment Allegations Wipe a Name Off the Map

The geologist David Marchant was so renowned he had an Antarctic glacier named after him. The honor was stripped away after he was accused of sexual harassment in the field.

13h

Rough waters for California's not so public beaches

The sandy cove along California's picturesque coast beckons visitors to what is supposed to be a public beach. But the imposing gate, the security guard and the annual $100 access fee tell a different story.

13h

South African villagers tap into trend for 'superfood' baobab

From before dawn, 54-year-old grandmother Annah Muvhali weaves between baobab trees that loom over her rural South African home, collecting fruit that enthusiasts worldwide hail as a "superfood".

13h

The FTC cracks down on iV Bars for false advertising claims about its “intravenous micronutrient therapy”

One of the most popular forms of quackery sold by alternative medicine practitioners such as naturopaths is intravenous vitamin therapy, sometimes also called "intravenous micronutrient therapy" (IVMT). Most are variants of a concoction known as "Myers cocktail," and there is no good evidence that IVMT is efficacious for any of the indications for which quacks use it. Last week, the FTC issued a p

13h

Singapore watchdog fines Grab, Uber $9.5 mn over merger

Singapore on Monday fined ride-hailing firms Grab and Uber $9.5 million for breaking competition rules when they merged, saying the deal had increased fares and thrown up roadblocks for competitors.

13h

Fall of top US scientists points to ethics gap in research

Three prominent US scientists have been pushed to resign over the past 10 days after damning revelations about their methods, a sign of greater vigilance and decreasing tolerance for misconduct within the research community.

13h

Orangutans saved as Malaysia foils high-seas smuggling bid

A pair of young orangutans, baby crocodiles and rare birds were among over 400 animals rescued from a boat off Malaysia as they were being smuggled from neighbouring Indonesia, officials said Monday.

13h

What ignited many of California's worst wildfires a mystery

California officials quickly determined an arsonist started last month's huge wildfire southeast of Los Angeles, and that two weeks earlier sparks from a vehicle produced a deadly wildfire in the far northern part of the state.

13h

Deeply Dippy: How Britons flock to see the dinosaur on tour

One of the largest creatures ever to stalk the Natural History Museum, Dippy the diplodocus is now drawing crowds around the country. But what if anyone finds out his terrible secret? Name: Dippy the dinosaur. Age: 152m years. Continue reading…

14h

Sundhedsstyrelsen anbefaler KU-udviklet stress-behandling

KU-forskernes stressbehandling hjælper danskere tilbage til hverdagen – så effektivt,…

14h

Can you solve it? The language of the lake puzzle

A challenge for cunning linguists UPDATE: Solution is now posted here Hi guzzlers, Today’s puzzle concerns the South American language Aymara. It’s testing you on the sort of linguistics skills that might help you get you a job at Google, according today’s article in which a Google exec says that an understanding of language is the key to the next giant leap in technology . Continue reading…

14h

Ombygning af Ringsted Station voldsomt underbudgetteret: Fordyret med 118 procent

Togene på den nye linje mellem København og Ringsted kommer ikke til at køre 180 km/t som planlagt. Og stationen bliver en skrabet model.

15h

Nyt landspatientregister: Kæmperegning på vej for integration med Sundhedsplatformen

Alle de danske regioner skal i de første måneder af 2019 have implementeret det nye landspatientregister i deres EPJ-systemer. Det bliver dyrt – særligt for de regioner, der bruger Sundhedsplatformen.

16h

Kæmpe mur under vandet kan forhindre havet i at stige

Ny forskning foreslår, at gigantiske mure under vandet kan bremse gletschere i at smelte – og dermed forhindre havet i at oversvømme os.

16h

Stepfathers' 'Cinderella effect' challenged by new study

Long-held assumptions that stepfathers are far more likely to be responsible for child deaths than genetic parents have been challenged by researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA).Findings suggest that differences in rates of child homicides by stepfathers and genetic fathers are considerably smaller than previous researchers have claimed, and that the relative ages of fathers implicated

16h

Alarmingly low awareness of urology across Europe

Results of a new international survey of more than 2,500 responders from five countries show that women know more about men's health issues than men do, men have poor knowledge of key urological symptoms and don't take early signs of potentially life-threatening urological conditions seriously.The low level of awareness indicated by the survey is of particular concern as urological conditions are

16h

Overweight pregnant women can safely cut calories, restrict weight gain

Obstetricians are often reluctant to recommend restricted weight gain for pregnant women due to safety concerns for the baby and lack of time and tools to safely guide women in their weight control efforts. A new Northwestern Medicine study shows with proper nutrition guidance it is safe and feasible to restrict weight gain in obese and overweight pregnant women. Women in the study gained five pou

16h

Children whose mothers use marijuana are more likely to try it at younger age

When mothers use marijuana during the first 12 years of their child's life, their cannabis-using children are more likely to start at an earlier age than children of non-using mothers, according to a new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. This study is the first to establish a relationship between maternal cannabis use during a child's lifetime and earlier initiation in a na

16h

Children whose mothers use marijuana may try it at a younger age

Children whose mothers use marijuana are more likely to start their own marijuana use an average of two years earlier than children whose mothers don't use the drug, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

16h

Gender and race may shape how minority women address barriers to breast cancer screening

Black women are more likely to be diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer partly due to barriers to timely screening mammography. port for their health needs.

16h

Online diabetes prevention programs are as effective as in-person programs for weight loss

An intensive, multifaceted online diabetes prevention program is as effective as in-person programs and can make prevention programs more accessible to those at risk for developing diabetes. Weight loss for online participants was at least comparable to what it was for in-person program participants. In addition, the researchers found that the online program had significantly better participation

16h

Where people live before hospitalization important for discharge planning, reducing readmissions

Forty per cent of older adults who leave hospital are discharged to home care or a long-term care facility, which, combined with where they lived before hospitalization, affects their risk of readmission, found a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

16h

Dimensions of consciousness and the psychedelic state

submitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]

16h

Scientists discover 20 new gnat species in Brazil

Scientists from Estonia, Finland and Brazil have found 20 new species of gnat in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

17h

Checklist helps assess early feeding skills in premature infants

Infants born prematurely face challenges in developing the complex, interrelated skills needed for effective feeding. An assessment called the Early Feeding Skills (EFS) checklist is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating the emergence of feeding skills in preterm infants, reports a new study.

17h

It's not just for kids — even adults appear to benefit from a regular bedtime

Researchers found people with irregular sleep patterns weighed more, had higher blood sugar, higher blood pressure, and a higher projected risk of having a heart attack or stroke within 10 years than those who slept and woke at the same times every day.

17h

What's eating these endangered orchids?

A species of seed-feeding fly is critically damaging the seed production of multiple orchid species, as revealed by a group of Japanese researchers. If the damage caused by this fly is occurring long-term and across Japan, these already-endangered orchid species could become unable to reproduce using seeds, and their dwindling numbers will take a large hit.

17h

Cancer immunotherapy might benefit from previously overlooked immune players

Using a bioinformatics approach, researchers found that CD4+ T cell's binding partner, a molecule called MHC-II, may have even more influence on emerging tumors than MHC-I, the better known partner of CD8+ T cells. The finding may help researchers improve cancer immunotherapies and predict which patients will respond best.

17h

What can salad dressing tell us about cancer? Think oil and vinegar

Scientists have identified another way the process that causes oil to form droplets in water may contribute to solid tumors, such as prostate and breast cancer. Researchers found evidence that mutations in the tumor suppressor gene SPOP contribute to cancer by disrupting a process called liquid-liquid phase separation. Liquid-liquid phase separation is seen often in nature and is the reason why oi

17h

New robot picks a peck of peppers and more

SWEEPER is designed to operate in a single stem row cropping system, with non-clustered fruits and little leaf occlusion. The team spearheaded efforts to improve the robot's ability to detect ripe produce using computer vision, and has played a role in defining the specifications of the robot's hardware and software interfaces, focusing on supervisory control activities.

17h

Study of protein 'trafficker' provides insight into autism and other brain disorders

Researchers have discovered that the protein ASTN2 shuttles receptors away from the surface of neurons, a process that facilitates efficient brain activity.

17h

'Pinning down' how salty droplets dry

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered a new way of controlling the drying patterns formed by re-crystallizing salt. They found that the coffee ring effect can be used to pin the edge of drying droplets, creating a range of different geometric patterns. The same principles may be applied to understand and improve the adhesion of printer ink to surfaces and the manufacture o

17h

Breast milk may be best for premature babies' brain development

Babies born before their due date show better brain development when fed breast milk rather than formula.

17h

New research heralds a blood test for drowsy driving

Scientists have developed a blood test to tell whether you have skipped a night's sleep, bringing us a step closer to developing a test for driver sleepiness. The breakthrough could help police identify suspected drowsy drivers in road traffic accidents, or assist employers in assessing fitness for duty, such as in the aviation sector.

21h

Obesity to eclipse smoking as biggest cause of cancer in UK women by 2043

Experts want action to tackle ‘huge public health threat’ after new projections Obesity is on track to overtake smoking as the single biggest cause of preventable cancer in British women within 25 years, according to a Cancer Research UK report. The charity expects that within 17 years around 23,000 cases of cancers in women (9% of the total) could be caused by excess weight and about 25,000 (10%

21h

3-year-old girl has all-new genetic syndrome

Researchers have identified a new genetic syndrome in a 3-year-old girl who, for more than two years, has gone without diagnosis. The discovery is the first to link a particular gene, known as ODC1, or ornithine decarboxylase, to developmental problems in a human, something that up until now, has been only seen in mice. The findings, which appear in the American Journal of Medical Genetics , coul

21h

A controversial theory claims past, present, and future exist at the same time

Time may not be passing at all, says the Block Universe Theory. Time travel may be possible. Your perception of time is likely relative to you and limited. We seem to perceive time as passing in one direction. After all, we can't just just forward to the future or revisit our past if we felt like it. Every minute of every day appears to move us ahead, pulling us through our lives towards an inexo

21h

Gaps between political parties may worsen voter discrimination

A vastly expanding gap in age, gender, and diversity is creating an even deeper divide between the Republican and Democratic parties, according to a new paper by an expert on the 26th Amendment. Jenny Diamond Cheng, a lecturer in law at Vanderbilt University, also argues that this chasm between the nation’s largest generation—millennials—and baby boomers is exacerbating voter discrimination. “The

22h

Too many people missing out on health benefits of golf, says expert panel

Too many people are missing out on the health benefits of golf, says a panel of international experts in a consensus statement, which aims to widen participation in the sport.The evidence suggests it may not only be good for mind and body, but also for a long life, says the statement, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

22h

Six disastrous encounters with the world’s most hostile uncontacted tribe

Many have tried to contact the Sentinelese, to write about them, or otherwise. But the inhabitants of the 23 square mile island in the Bay of Bengal don't want anything to do with the outside world. Their numbers are unknown, but either 40 or 500 remain. None Between waves of refugees, armed conflicts, and bickering over oil reserves, the world feels like it's become a rather small place. The wor

22h

Finally, a world map that's all about oceans

Athelstan Spilhaus designed an oceanic thermometer to fight the Nazis, and the weather balloon that got mistaken for a UFO in Roswell In 1942, he produced a world map with a unique perspective, presenting the world's oceans as one body of water The Spilhaus Projection could be just what the oceans need to get the attention their problems deserve This is a world map unlike any other. Uniquely, it

22h

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