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Nyheder2018september25

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The World Just Laughed at Donald Trump

Everyone’s got their own recurring nightmare—naked in class, teeth falling out, whatever. For Donald Trump, that nightmare is that the world is laughing at the United States, and on Tuesday at the United Nations General Assembly , the nightmare came true. The president’s public remarks are littered with warnings that America is, or might be, the butt of the globe’s jokes. “The world is laughing a

6h

Common weed killer linked to bee deaths

Honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. Scientists believe this is evidence that glyphosate might be contributing to the decline of honey bees and native bees around the world.

1d

Italienere vinder Odenses nye supersygehus

Med et tilbud, der var 308 mio. kr. billigere end et danskledet konsortium, vandt italienske CMB/Itinera opgaven.

11h

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LATEST

A British mathematician thinks he’s cracked a secret worth a million bucks

Science But proving the Riemann Hypothesis isn't that simple. Many mathematicians are wary of Atiyah’s proof for the infamous Riemann hypothesis—for multiple reasons.

17min

A new vaccine raises hopes of someday curbing the tuberculosis epidemic

A new vaccine for those infected, but not sick, with tuberculosis reduced new active cases by 54 percent, compared with those given a placebo.

34min

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Laugh and the World Laughs With You

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In his second address before the United Nations General Assembly, President Trump blasted “globalism” and instead underscored the importance of sovereignty . The audience laughed during Trump's speech. Trump dismissed Deborah Ramirez’s sexual-misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nomi

39min

3-D Printed Implant Gives Patches the Dachshund a New Skull

Canadian and American veterinarians removed about 70 percent of the dog’s skull to remove a tumor. The gap was so large that more common methods could not cover it.

39min

The best new camera and photography gear from Photokina 2018Panasonic Leica Sigma

Technology All the big camera manufacturers trot out their latest and greatest products. Cameras, lenses, lighting, and everything else from the world's largest photography trade show.

46min

Marc Kirschner (Harvard): Evolvability

https://www.ibiology.org/evolution/evolvability Evolvability is the capacity of an organism to generate novel, heritable, phenotypic changes. Marc Kirschner explains how evolvability happens and how we might better understand its role in biology. Talk Overview: Marc Kirschner begins his talk by defining evolvability as the capacity of an organism to generate phenotypic novelty, particularly novel

53min

With Instagram Cofounders Out, It’s Facebook All the Way Down

Instagram cofounders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger quit the social media company Monday amid reports of clashes with Mark Zuckerberg.

1h

Cody Wilson Leaves Defense Distributed, But 3-D Printed Guns Roll On

Even after the DIY gunsmith's arrest on sexual assault charges, the fight for and against 3-D printed guns still rages.

1h

More People But Less Hardship?

Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann talks about the just-issued Goalkeepers Report, tracking progress against poverty and disease even as the population keeps rising. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

How Twitter’s New Safety Policies Are CreatedTwitter New Dehumanizing

Del Harvey has spent a decade fighting abuse and harassment on Twitter. She spoke with WIRED about Trump, trolls, and the company’s new focus on safety.

1h

Study: Microbial dark matter dominates Earth's environments

Uncultured microbes–those whose characteristics have never been described because they have not yet been grown in a lab culture–could be dominating nearly all the environments on Earth except for the human body, according to a new study published in mSystems.

1h

Adoption of green stormwater infrastructure rises after floods

Residents and property owners are more likely to adopt some green stormwater infrastructure practices if they have experienced flooding or erosion on their property or in their neighborhoods, according to new research from the University of Vermont. As extreme weather events increase, more people may turn to ecologically friendly practices to manage stormwater.

1h

They Say Sexual Assault, Kavanaugh Says It Never Happened: Sifting Truth From Memory

How trauma and time alter the way we recollect significant events.

1h

Researchers find potent chemical agents that can thwart cancer metastasis

Recently, a research team led by Maurizio Pellecchia at the University of California, Riverside, discovered a way for chemotherapy drug paclitaxel to target migrating, or circulating, cancer cells, which are responsible for the development of tumor metastases.

1h

UC Riverside researchers find potent chemical agents that can thwart cancer metastasis

Scientists at the University of California, Riverside, have devised potent chemical agents 135H11 and 135H12 that can thwart cancer metastasis, bringing research closer to drug development.

1h

Researchers help to bridge the gap between psychology and gamification

A multi-disciplinary research team is bridging the gap between psychology and gamification that could significantly impact learning efforts in user experience design, healthcare, and government.

1h

Researchers help to bridge the gap between psychology and gamification

A multi-disciplinary research team is bridging the gap between psychology and gamification that could significantly impact learning efforts in user experience design, healthcare, and government.

2h

Syphilis Cases Surge Among US Newborns, Reaching 20-Year High

A resurgence of syphilis in the United States has led to a dramatic spike in cases of the disease among newborns, according to a new report.

2h

NTSB considering technology to avoid accidents, close calls

Safety regulators are recommending the use of technology to help avoid the kind of catastrophic collision that nearly occurred when an Air Canada jetliner zoomed over four taxiing planes full of passengers, coming within 10 to 20 feet of the first one.

2h

US unveils first step toward new online privacy rules

The US administration called Tuesday for public comments on a "new approach to consumer data privacy" that could trigger fresh regulations of internet companies.

2h

How reliable are turtles for measuring ocean trash and marine health?

When a sea turtle turns up dead on the beach, it often makes the news, especially if the death appears to result from plastic debris in the turtle's stomach. Scientists and the public in general are concerned about the increase in ocean trash and the effects of plastics on marine life. Many view the news reports as scientific updates and assume turtles are like canaries in coal mines when it comes

2h

No longer whistling in the dark: Scientists uncover source of perplexing waves

Magnetic reconnection, the snapping apart and violent reconnection of magnetic field lines in plasma—the state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei—occurs throughout the universe and can whip up space storms that disrupt cell phone service and knock out power grids. Now scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) and other labora

2h

Study shows location makes or breaks many forms of public housing

University of Texas at Arlington researchers determined in a new study that subsidized housing is not affordable in the Dallas-Fort Worth region because its location does not make it transportation friendly.

2h

Overweight women can safely restrict weight gain during pregnancy

Being obese or overweight while pregnant can pose serious health risks for both mother and baby. Now, researchers say that with proper nutrition guidance, restricting weight gain during pregnancy is both safe and feasible. In a new study, women who were obese or overweight gained five pounds less during their pregnancy than those in the control group—and their babies were born in the normal weigh

2h

Reports overlooked wealth gap as factor behind 1960s riots

Racial wealth inequality was an important factor contributing to the riots in many American cities in the 1960s, but a half-century later, the issue has gotten short shrift, researchers report. Meanwhile, the racial wealth gap that helped fuel the urban violence of the 1960s has only grown, according to a new study. “Los Angeles may be headed into a new round of problems given growing economic in

2h

Through the Eyes of Deaf Children

Like the narrative application of Occam’s Razor , sometimes the best way into a story is the simplest. A View from the Window , a new short documentary from co-directors Chris Filippone and Azar Kafaei, takes this approach. For a day, the filmmakers are flies on the wall in a third-grade class at the California School for the Deaf. Despite the fact that neither Filippone nor Kafaei understands Am

2h

How reliable are turtles for measuring ocean trash and marine health?

A meta-analysis of fifty years worth of sea turtle research reveals some important information about ocean trash, but important data is largely missing.

2h

No longer whistling in the dark: Scientists uncover source of perplexing waves

Using data from a NASA four-satellite mission that is studying reconnection, scientists have developed a method for identifying the source of waves that help satellites determine their location in space.

2h

Why industry influence on research agendas must be addressed

Call for better strategies to ensure independence of research, policy-making and public health solutions, as new research confirms corporate interests can impact the evidence available and public health solutions considered.

2h

Corporate sponsorship diverts research and distorts public policy, report finds

Coca-Cola cited for funding physical activity research to take focus off sugary drinks Corporate sponsorship of academic studies is diverting researchers away from important public health questions and potentially distorting government policy, a new study has found. The findings, published by University of Sydney researchers in the American Journal of Public Health on Wednesday, highlight the inf

2h

Study: Antibiotics destroy immune cells and worsen oral infection

A team of Case Western Reserve University researchers found that antibiotics actually kill the 'good' bacteria keeping infection and inflammation at bay.

2h

Funded by new tax credits, US carbon-capture network could double global CO2 headed underground

Researchers have proposed a US pipeline network that would capture, transport and store underground up to 30 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year — an amount equal to removing 6.5 million cars from the road. The authors found that the network infrastructure would only be possible if tax credits passed by Congress in 2018 to encourage investment in carbon capture-and-storage t

2h

The quality of protein supplements for athletes

Powdered protein supplements are one of the most commonly consumed nutritional supplements, whether by professional athletes or amateurs.

2h

UTA study shows location makes or breaks many forms of public housing

University of Texas at Arlington researchers determined in a new study that subsidized housing is not affordable in the Dallas-Fort Worth region because its location does not make it transportation friendly.

2h

How Hollywood Redeemed Mel Gibson

In 2016, Mel Gibson hit the publicity trail for his new movie, Hacksaw Ridge , a biographical war drama that was his first directorial effort in 10 years. The film was received warmly at the Venice Film Festival and got a November release date, indicating serious Oscar potential. But Gibson, one of the biggest actors in the 1990s, had been tainted by scandal. There was his 2006 drunk-driving arre

2h

The Journalistic Implications of Ian Buruma’s Resignation

Last week, Ian Buruma resigned his post as editor at The New York Review of Books amid controversy over an essay that he commissioned and ran. That essay, “ Reflections from a Hashtag ,” was a first person account by former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation host Jian Ghomeshi of being fired amid allegations of violent sexual misconduct, then acquitted of most criminal charges by a Canadian court.

2h

Midterm Time Capsule, 42 Days to Go: Fox News and The New Yorker

I have been off line, traveling for actual reporting, over the weekend, and re-appear to find… argh!!! There is no possible way to keep up. So as a brief time-capsule register of where things stand, six weeks before midterm election day, here are two markers of things that have changed in the past few days. (1) There is no longer “just one.” The most significant recent development in the Brett Ka

2h

These People Drank Their Own Blood — for Science!

These volunteers quaffed blood for a good cause.

2h

Food scientists profile microbes at a fermented vegetable facility

Food scientists have mapped and characterized microbial populations in a vegetable fermentation facility and report that its microbiome was distinct between production and fermentation areas and that the raw vegetables themselves — cabbages destined for sauerkraut — were the main source of fermentation-related microbes in production areas rather than handling or other environmental sources.

3h

Enzymes 'partner up' to accelerate cancer, aging diseases

Researchers have identified cellular processes that appear to supercharge both the growth and shrinkage of the chemical 'caps' on chromosomes associated with aging, called telomeres.

3h

Lung cancer drug could be repurposed to target 'zombie' proteins linked to leukemia

A new study highlights how a clinically approved lung cancer drug could potentially be 'repurposed' to design new treatments for future cancer therapies. The research focuses on a protein called TRIB2, which is linked to promoting survival and drug resistance in solid tumors and blood cancers and is therefore of particular interest as a therapeutic target.

3h

Transforming carbon dioxide

A new technique to increase the efficiency of carbon dioxide (CO2) electrolysis that may lead to the production of new chemicals and fuels.

3h

Multimodal imaging shows strain can drive chemistry in a photovoltaic material

A unique combination of imaging tools and atomic-level simulations has allowed a team to solve a longstanding debate about the properties of a promising material that can harvest energy from light.

3h

Seasonal reservoir filling in India deforms rock, may trigger earthquakes

The seasonal filling and emptying of reservoirs in India can cause measurable deformation of the surrounding rock, reducing the strength of nearby faults and potentially triggering earthquakes, according to two new articles.

3h

Weathering rates for mined lands exponentially higher than unmined sites

A new study found a dramatic increase in the chemical weathering rates of mined landscapes, which are melting away bedrock up to 45 times faster than unmined areas. The weathering has global consequences for the cycling of sulfur, a key nutrient for all life forms.

3h

The grim, final days of a mother octopus

A new study uses modern genetic sequencing tools to describe several distinct molecular signals produced by the optic gland after a female octopus reproduces. The research also details four separate phases of maternal behavior and links them to these signals, suggesting how the optic gland controls a mother octopus' demise.

3h

Molecular channel that regulates blood pressure described

New research for the first time reveals the three-dimensional structure of a membrane channel that's critical in controlling blood pressure. The findings represent the first time the human epithelial sodium channel has been shown so precisely since it was first isolated and described through expression cloning more than two decades ago.

3h

Diagnosing types of fear of falling in Parkinson's patients

Parkinson's disease causes one of the highest risks of falling among all neurological conditions. Due to this, many patients develop a fear of falling, even if they've never fallen. Researchers have discovered a way to diagnose subtypes of fear of falling in hopes of improving treatment and quality of life for patients.

3h

Hunt of Yellowstone Grizzly Bears Canceled as a Result of Judge’s Ruling

A federal court decision found that the United States Fish and Wildlife Service erred in stripping the grizzlies’ status as a threatened species.

3h

These lizards are the holy grail of herpetology—they're also targets in the illegal wildlife trade

Animals Excerpt—Poached: Inside the Dark World of Wildlife Trafficking The partially submerged creature had the elongated, snakelike body of a Chinese dragon, the facial features of a cartoon dinosaur, and the pronounced scales of a…

3h

Archaeologists Discover 'Huge' Ancient Building In Egypt

Experts say the ruins are part of a residential community in what was the ancient capital city of Memphis. They also found a Roman bath and an ornate basin perhaps used for religious rituals. (Image credit: Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities/AP)

3h

Pyramid-shaped particles may bridge nano-macro divide

Researchers have assembled complex macroscale superstructures from pyramid-shaped nanoparticle building blocks. The research offers a promising new way to bring the useful properties of nanoparticles to macroscale materials and devices. “There’s been a lot of research in making superstructures from spherical nanoparticles, but much less using tetrahedral building blocks,” says Ou Chen, an assista

3h

Insomnia symptoms, overall health improve with online insomnia program

Treating insomnia with digital programs can improve insomnia symptoms, daytime functioning and overall health, a new study has found. A major limitation of insomnia treatments is the lack of providers to deliver CBT, but this study used an online platform that made it easily accessible to users. It also automated and tailored the treatment based on the user's sleep patterns.

3h

Researchers seek vaccine for 'traveler's diarrhea'

Medical researchers have discovered how ETEC works to cause disease. They are using this information in an effort to develop a preventive vaccine for travelers.

3h

Once majestic Atlantic Forest 'empty' after 500 years of over-exploitation

New research finds that 500 years of over-exploitation has halved mammal populations in South America's once majestic Atlantic Forest. A new analysis of mammal populations reveals the devastating effects of human disturbance since the area was first colonized in the 1500s. They found that apex predators and large carnivores, such as jaguars and pumas, as well as large-bodied herbivores, such as ta

3h

Cocoa: a tasty source of vitamin D?

Many people do not get enough vitamin D. Brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases can be the result of a vitamin D deficiency. A German research group has now identified a previously unknown source of vitamin D2: cocoa and foods containing cocoa have significant amounts of this important nutrient. According to the researchers, cocoa butter and dark chocolate have the highest amo

3h

Amazon’s New Echo Show Hints at the Company’s Vision for TV

The 10-inch, $230 Echo Show works more like tiny TV than ever—and shows how Amazon thinks we’re going to interact with video content in the near future.

3h

Tool pulls apart complex data to pinpoint species variation

Researchers have developed a tool to help handle massive datasets of genetic information for Earth’s diverse species set. The ever-growing genomic encyclopedia has the capacity to reveal the forces shaping complex patterns of genetic variation between individuals, populations, and species—if scientists can only unlock its secrets. The method, called “conStruct,” allows researchers to analyze comp

3h

Automakers seek flexibility at hearing on mileage standards

Automakers sought flexibility while environmental groups blasted the Trump administration's proposal to roll back fuel economy standards at a public hearing on the plan in the industry's backyard.

3h

Climate change not main driver of amphibian decline

While a warming climate in recent decades may be a factor in the waning of some local populations of frogs, toads, newts and salamanders, it cannot explain the overall steep decline of amphibians, according to researchers.

3h

What do ducks hear?

One of the threats facing diving ducks are gill nets that fishermen use, which cause hundreds of thousands of inadvertent deaths to sea birds annually.

3h

3h

Twitter to ban 'dehumanizing' comments with user help

Twitter on Tuesday reached out to users for help crafting a ban on comments that dehumanize people and set the stage for real-world violence.

3h

Sparks Fly on F1 Racetracks

In 2015, a change in Formula One racing regulations brought titanium skid blocks back to the cars, in turn bringing about the return of the occasional bright rooster tail of sparks on the track. The rule was mostly changed for safety reasons, but also to reintroduce some visual aesthetics—the sparks can be beautiful. According to a story by the BBC, some drivers love the sparks not just for the s

3h

Climate change not main driver of amphibian decline

While a warming climate in recent decades may be a factor in the waning of some local populations of frogs, toads, newts and salamanders, it cannot explain the overall steep decline of amphibians, according to researchers.

3h

Qualcomm alleges Apple gave swiped chip secrets to IntelQualcomm Apple Intel

Qualcomm escalated a legal war with Apple, accusing the iPhone maker of stealing secrets and sharing them with mobile chip rival Intel, according to court documents.

3h

Blood test to determine whether you're a night owl or morning person

A new study introduces a new method for determining your personal circadian rhythm. This could have profound effects on combating cognitive disorders and helping patients understand when to take medicine. The blood test measures a person's biological clock to within 1.5 hours. None Though the light bulb isn't exactly a hot new piece of technology, at the time of initial dissemination it created a

3h

Gene Editing Treats Mitochondrial Disorders in Mice

Researchers used TALENs and zinc finger nucleases to correct disease-causing mutations.

3h

Food scientists profile microbes at a fermented vegetable facility

University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientists have mapped and characterized microbial populations in a vegetable fermentation facility and report that its microbiome was distinct between production and fermentation areas and that the raw vegetables themselves—cabbages destined for sauerkraut—were the main source of fermentation-related microbes in production areas rather than handling or oth

3h

Seasonal reservoir filling in India deforms rock, may trigger earthquakes

The seasonal filling and emptying of reservoirs in India can cause measurable deformation of the surrounding rock, reducing the strength of nearby faults and potentially triggering earthquakes, according to two new papers published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

3h

Once majestic Atlantic Forest 'empty' after 500 years of over-exploitation

Five centuries of over-exploitation has halved mammal populations in South America's Atlantic Forest—according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

3h

The grim, final days of a mother octopus

Octopuses are the undisputed darlings of the science internet, and for good reason. They're incredibly intelligent problem-solvers and devious escape artists with large, complex nervous systems. They have near-magical abilities to change colors, skin textures and shapes instantaneously, and they can regenerate missing arms at will.

3h

UK must be more proactive in tackling climate change

The UK is "unprepared" for climate change, an expert from the University of Surrey has concluded following an extensive study.

3h

Weathering rates for mined lands exponentially higher than unmined sites

Mountaintop removal, a coal-mining technique used in much of Central Appalachia, is an extreme form of surface mining, that excavates ridges as deep as 600 feet—twice the length of a football field—and buries adjacent valleys and streams in bedrock and coal residue. This mining activity has long been known to have negative impacts on water quality downstream.

3h

Team discovers molecular channel that regulates blood pressure

New research for the first time reveals the three-dimensional structure of a membrane channel that's critical in controlling blood pressure.

3h

Liquid metal discovery to make toxic water safe and drinkable

Researchers have discovered a revolutionary and cheap way to make filters that can turn water contaminated with heavy metals into safe drinking water in a matter of minutes.

4h

Sensitive babies become altruistic toddlers

Our responsiveness to seeing others in distress accounts for variability in helping behavior from early in development, according to a new study.

4h

Retracing Antarctica's glacial past

More than 26,000 years ago, sea level was much lower than it is today partly because the ice sheets that jut out from the continent of Antarctica were enormous and covered by grounded ice — ice that was fully attached to the seafloor. As the planet warmed, the ice sheets melted and contracted, and sea level began to rise. Researchers have discovered new information that illuminates how and when t

4h

Genetic testing: Not a one-and-done deal

A study that reviewed genetic testing results from 1.45 million individuals found that nearly 25 percent of 'variants of uncertain significance' were subsequently reclassified — sometimes as less likely to be associated with cancer, sometimes as more likely.

4h

Multimodal imaging shows strain can drive chemistry in a photovoltaic material

A unique combination of imaging tools and atomic-level simulations has allowed a team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to solve a longstanding debate about the properties of a promising material that can harvest energy from light.

4h

Study shows link between breastfeeding and infant health is not straight-forward

Results from new study suggest that the benefits of breastfeeding reported in the vast majority of prior research could be influenced by the mother's characteristics, such as what they know about health and nutrition. The findings could help guide policy makers and health care professionals when it comes to providing critical information to expectant mothers about feeding their newborns.

4h

During a hurricane, where does all the pig poop go? Into your water.

Environment The horrifying pig poop floods in North Carolina are not a one-time thing. Hurricane Florence inundated at least 54 lagoons full of pig excrement when it unloaded at least 8 trillion gallons of rainfall over North Carolina in less than a week.

4h

NASA gets a final look at Leslie as a subtropical storm

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central North Atlantic Ocean and analyzed Subtropical Storm Leslie in infrared light to determine what was happening within.

4h

Opportunity rover emerges in a dusty picture

NASA still hasn't heard from the Opportunity rover, but at least we can see it again.

4h

Photos: The Amazing Pyramids of Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan is believed by archeologists to be the first major city of the Americas.

4h

The Girls Who Live in an All-Boys World

Three years ago, I sat in a quiet library speaking with a young woman about her experience at the boarding school she attended. She was a senior and she was more than ready to graduate, she explained, because though the school had been coed for years, to her it still felt like the all-boys school it had been for most of its existence. “Why?” I asked. “Because it’s all about them. It’s like we’re

4h

This Is Not the End of the Cosby Story

In April, Bill Cosby stood trial: Andrea Constand, who had been one of Cosby’s mentees at Temple University, alleged that he had, during a visit she had made to his home in 2004, drugged her and then, while she was unable to fight back, raped her. Cosby was found guilty of three counts of aggravated indecent assault. It was a verdict that, after so long —after so many women spoke out , describing

4h

Just This One Time, Tech’s Not the Main Problem

In Indian state after Indian state, this spring and summer, the stories of communal violence bore an eerie similarity. There’d be a rumor, sent from phone to phone (perhaps accompanied by a video) about some strangers stealing children , or harvesting organs , or slaughtering cows . Then, someone unlucky enough to hand chocolate to some children or be passing through a village would draw the atte

4h

Questions Fox News Should Have Asked Brett Kavanaugh

Asked in his Fox News interview whether he’s ever enabled “a train of men” to “gang rape” women, Brett Kavanaugh calmly replied, “I’ve never done any such thing, known about any such thing.” It was a strangely clinical answer to such a gruesome question, which Kavanaugh might have scripted himself 20 years ago when, as the associate counsel on the Starr commission, he argued that President Bill C

4h

A Supreme Court Case Could Liberate Trump to Pardon His Associates

A key Republican senator has quietly weighed in on an upcoming Supreme Court case that could have important consequences for Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. The Utah lawmaker Orrin Hatch, who sits on the Senate Judiciary Committee, filed a 44-page amicus brief earlier this month in Gamble v. United States , a case that will consider whether the dual-sovereignty doctrine sho

4h

Donald Trump Issues a Scathing Rejection of ‘Globalism’

UNITED NATIONS —“We reject the ideology of globalism” in favor of the “ideology of patriotism.” So spoke the American president from the pulpit, in the high church of the first ideology, before a congregation nominally convened in a spirit of global cooperation. Ahead of his address at the annual gathering of the United Nations General Assembly, the buzz around the building was not about whether

4h

UMass Amherst food scientists profile microbes at a fermented vegetable facility

University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientists have mapped and characterized microbial populations in a vegetable fermentation facility and report that its microbiome was distinct between production and fermentation areas and that the raw vegetables themselves — cabbages destined for sauerkraut — were the main source of fermentation-related microbes in production areas rather than handling

4h

Insomnia symptoms, overall health improve with online insomnia program

Treating insomnia with digital programs can improve insomnia symptoms, daytime functioning and overall health, a new study from the University of Oxford and Northwestern Medicine has found. A major limitation of insomnia treatments is the lack of providers to deliver CBT, but this study used an online platform that made it easily accessible to users. It also automated and tailored the treatment ba

4h

Once majestic Atlantic Forest 'empty' after 500 years of over-exploitation

New research finds that 500 years of over-exploitation has halved mammal populations in South America's once majestic Atlantic Forest.A new analysis of mammal populations reveals the devastating effects of human disturbance since the area was first colonised in the 1500s.They found that apex predators and large carnivores, such as jaguars and pumas, as well as large-bodied herbivores, such as tapi

4h

Lung cancer drug could be repurposed to target 'zombie' proteins linked to leukemia

A new study by scientists at the University of Liverpool highlights how a clinically approved lung cancer drug could potentially be 'repurposed' to design new treatments for future cancer therapies.The research, published in Science Signaling, focuses on a protein called TRIB2, which is linked to promoting survival and drug resistance in solid tumors and blood cancers and is therefore of particula

4h

Sensitive babies become altruistic toddlers

Our responsiveness to seeing others in distress accounts for variability in helping behavior from early in development, according to a study published Sept. 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Tobias Grossmann of the University of Virginia, and colleagues.

4h

Unannounced assessments reveal variation, deficits, in quality of tuberculosis care in urban India

Private sector health care providers, the first point of contact for 50-70 percent of patients with tuberculosis (TB) symptoms in India, are delivering a wide range of largely inadequate care to these patients according to a study published this week in PLOS Medicine.

4h

Building A Better Mosquito Trap — One Scientist Thinks He's Done It

A researcher in Australia has invented a low-tech, insecticide-free trap that might be able to reduce bites from a particularly pesky mosquito in some neighborhoods. (Image credit: James Gathany/AP)

4h

MacOS Mojave just gave your Mac new features—here’s how to use them

Technology You should turn on Dark Mode right now. Highlights from the free software update to your Mac.

4h

The Not-So-Great Reason Why Divorce Rates Are Declining

In the past 10 years, the percentage of American marriages that end in divorce has fallen, and in a new paper , the University of Maryland sociologist Philip Cohen quantified the drop-off: Between 2008 and 2016, the divorce rate declined by 18 percent overall. After accounting for the rising average age of married Americans and other demographic shifts during that time, Cohen found “a less steep

4h

Bacteria's 'password' for sporulation hasn't changed in 2.7 billion years

When it comes to changing their passwords, bacteria are just as bad as you and me — maybe even worse. A research team has found that despite 2.7 billion years of evolution, bacteria are still using the same 'password' to initiate the process for making spores.

4h

Heterometallic copper-aluminum superatom discovered

On the outside, the cluster made of 55 copper and aluminum atoms looks like a crystal, but chemically it has the properties of an atom. The heterometallic superatom which chemists have created provides the prerequisites for developing new, more cost-effective catalysts.

4h

Tumor cell expansion challenges current physics

A malignant tumor is characterized by its ability to spread around its surroundings. To do so, tumor cells stick to the surrounding tissue (mainly collagen) and use forces to propel. New research reveals the forces these tumor cells use to spread. The relation between these forces and the cell movement goes beyond current physical laws, according to researchers.

4h

Link between hunger and mood explained

The study used rats to examine the impact on emotional behavior of a sudden drop in blood sugar. When the rats were given a glucose blocker, researchers found they had higher levels of cortisol. They also showed signs of stress and sluggish behavior similar to a poor mood. To prove the behavior wasn't just a lack of glucose to the muscles, researchers then gave them a common antidepressant and the

4h

Chemical engineers functionalize boron nitride with other nanosystems

Scientists report that treatment with a superacid causes boron nitride layers to separate into atomically thick sheets, while creating binding sites on the surface of these sheets that provide opportunities to interface with nanoparticles, molecules and other 2D nanomaterials, like graphene.

4h

New species of dazzling, neon-colored fish

Named for Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, a new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish from the twilight zone enchants scientists. It's only known home is the remote Brazilian archipelago of St. Paul's Rocks.

4h

Built-in sound amplifier helps male mosquitoes find females

The ears of male mosquitoes amplify the sound of an approaching female using a self-generated phantom tone that mimics the female's wingbeats, which increases the ear's acoustic input by a factor of up to 45,000, finds a new study.

4h

Racial and ethnic bias leads to lower well-being among adolescents

Racial and ethnic discrimination is problematic for all aspects of development — from mental and physical health to risky behaviors and academic success — particularly for Latinos, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin determined after analyzing findings from hundreds of previous studies on adolescents.

4h

Study finds that enzymes 'partner up' to accelerate cancer, aging diseases

Indiana University researchers have identified cellular processes that appear to supercharge both the growth and shrinkage of the chemical 'caps' on chromosomes associated with aging, called telomeres.

4h

UCalgary scientists discover a way to diagnose types of fear of falling in Parkinson's patients

Parkinson's disease causes one of the highest risks of falling among all neurological conditions. Due to this, many patients develop a fear of falling, even if they've never fallen. Researchers with the Cumming School of Medicine have discovered a way to diagnose subtypes of fear of falling in hopes of improving treatment and quality of life for patients.

4h

British study reveals fall in muscle strength of 10-year-olds

Children becoming physically weaker found team who measured handgrip, arm-hangs and sit-ups in Essex children Schoolchildren are becoming physically weaker, according to researchers who have studied how the muscle strength of 10-year-olds has changed over recent years. The team says 10-year-olds have become heavier and taller since 1998, meaning that on average their body mass index (BMI) has rem

4h

Your DNA Is Not Your Culture

Genetic-ancestry tests are having a moment. Look no further than Spotify: On Thursday, the music-streaming service—as in, the service used to fill tedious workdays and DJ parties— launched a collaboration with AncestryDNA. The partnership creates custom playlists for users based on DNA results they input: Oumou Sangaré for Mali, for example, and Ed Sheeran for England . And last May, after the U.

4h

Skin wounds in older mice are less likely to scar

Researchers have discovered a rare example in which the mammalian body functions better in old age. A team has found that, in skin wounds in mice, being older increased tissue regeneration and decreased scar formation. The same findings were confirmed in studies of human tissue.

5h

Study shows value of breast cancer patients seeking second opinions

In a recent study on the value of a second opinion for breast cancer patients, researchers concluded that a review by a tumor board at an NCI-Designated Cancer Center changed the diagnosis for 43 percent of the patients.

5h

Promising novel treatment against Alzheimer's disease

New research reveals that a novel drug reverses memory deficits and stops Alzheimer disease pathology (AD) in an animal model. Importantly, this drug has already proven to be non-toxic for humans in a clinical setting and could, therefore, be brought quickly to trials in humans against AD.

5h

Lifestyle intervention may mitigate weight gain due to ubiquitous contaminant

A new study finds that perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are associated with increases in weight, but exercise and diet may reduce the obesogenic effects of these environmental contaminants.

5h

Improved approach to bone marrow transplant

Two recent studies present a new approach for bone marrow donation and transplant that preclinical laboratory tests suggest could make the life-saving procedure safer and more effective for patients. Researchers report the studies demonstrate that use of an experimental drug called CASIN in laboratory mice results in higher efficiency when harvesting blood stem cells from donors and less toxicity

5h

Why Alibaba is betting big on AI chips and quantum computing

Meet the man behind Alibaba’s gamble on emerging tech.

5h

OHSU discovers molecular channel that regulates blood pressure

New research for the first time reveals the three-dimensional structure of a membrane channel that's critical in controlling blood pressure. The findings, published today in the open-access journal eLife, represent the first time the human epithelial sodium channel has been shown so precisely since it was first isolated and described through expression cloning more than two decades ago.

5h

Innovative study assessing SSI incidence represents the first of its kind

A recent study assessing the relationship between nursing specialty certification rates and surgical site infections (SSI) provides an innovative option for future research exploring relationships between nursing and hospital procedures and medical and/or surgical adverse events.

5h

Portrayals of female STEM characters in TV and film haven't improved in 10 years

The Lyda Hill Foundation, in partnership with Geena Davis's Institute on Gender in Media at Mount Saint Mary's University, released an extensive research report on the portrayals of female characters in science, technology, engineering and math in television and film. 'Portray Her: Representations of Women STEM Characters in Media' shows that entertainment media has a long way to go to improve ste

5h

The grim, final days of a mother octopus

A new study uses modern genetic sequencing tools to describe several distinct molecular signals produced by the optic gland after a female octopus reproduces. The research also details four separate phases of maternal behavior and links them to these signals, suggesting how the optic gland controls a mother octopus' demise.

5h

Odd infrared emission makes this neutron star special

An unusual infrared emission that the Hubble Space Telescope detected from a nearby neutron star could indicate that the pulsar has features never seen before, researchers report. The observation could help astronomers better understand the evolution of neutron stars—the incredibly dense remnants of massive stars after a supernova. A paper describing the research and two possible explanations for

5h

Patterns in STEM grades of girls versus boys

A new study has explored patterns in academic grades of 1.6 million students, showing that girls and boys perform very similarly in STEM – including at the top of the class.

5h

Macrocycle ring deformation as the secondary design principle for light-harvesting complexes [Chemistry]

Natural light-harvesting is performed by pigment–protein complexes, which collect and funnel the solar energy at the start of photosynthesis. The identity and arrangement of pigments largely define the absorption spectrum of the antenna complex, which is further regulated by a palette of structural factors. Small alterations are induced by pigment–protein…

5h

Pendular alignment and strong chemical binding are induced in helium dimer molecules by intense laser fields [Chemistry]

Intense pulsed-laser fields have provided means to both induce spatial alignment of molecules and enhance strength of chemical bonds. The duration of the laser field typically ranges from hundreds of picoseconds to a few femtoseconds. Accordingly, the induced “laser-dressed” properties can be adiabatic, existing only during the pulse, or nonadiabatic,…

5h

The culture of social comparison [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Social comparison is one of the most ubiquitous features of human social life. This fundamental human tendency to look to others for information about how to think, feel, and behave has provided us with the ability to thrive in a highly complex and interconnected modern social world. Despite its prominent…

5h

Structure-specific DNA replication-fork recognition directs helicase and replication restart activities of the PriA helicase [Biochemistry]

DNA replication restart, the essential process that reinitiates prematurely terminated genome replication reactions, relies on exquisitely specific recognition of abandoned DNA replication-fork structures. The PriA DNA helicase mediates this process in bacteria through mechanisms that remain poorly defined. We report the crystal structure of a PriA/replication-fork complex, which resolves leading-

5h

Function and crystal structure of the dimeric P-loop ATPase CFD1 coordinating an exposed [4Fe-4S] cluster for transfer to apoproteins [Biochemistry]

Maturation of iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins in eukaryotes requires complex machineries in mitochondria and cytosol. Initially, Fe-S clusters are assembled on dedicated scaffold proteins and then are trafficked to target apoproteins. Within the cytosolic Fe-S protein assembly (CIA) machinery, the conserved P-loop nucleoside triphosphatase Nbp35 performs a scaffold function. In yeast,…

5h

Structural basis for activation of voltage sensor domains in an ion channel TPC1 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) couple changes in transmembrane electrical potential to conformational changes that regulate ion conductance through a central channel. Positively charged amino acids inside each sensor cooperatively respond to changes in voltage. Our previous structure of a TPC1 channel captured an example of a resting-state VSD in an intact…

5h

Autonomous conformational regulation of {beta}3 integrin and the conformation-dependent property of HPA-1a alloantibodies [Cell Biology]

Integrin α/β heterodimer adopts a compact bent conformation in the resting state, and upon activation undergoes a large-scale conformational rearrangement. During the inside-out activation, signals impinging on the cytoplasmic tail of β subunit induce the α/β separation at the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, leading to the extended conformation of the…

5h

LRRK2 and its substrate Rab GTPases are sequentially targeted onto stressed lysosomes and maintain their homeostasis [Cell Biology]

Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) has been associated with a variety of human diseases, including Parkinson’s disease and Crohn’s disease, whereas LRRK2 deficiency leads to accumulation of abnormal lysosomes in aged animals. However, the cellular roles and mechanisms of LRRK2-mediated lysosomal regulation have remained elusive. Here, we reveal a mechanism…

5h

Mutually inhibitory Ras-PI(3,4)P2 feedback loops mediate cell migration [Cell Biology]

Signal transduction and cytoskeleton networks in a wide variety of cells display excitability, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that during random migration and in response to chemoattractants, cells maintain complementary spatial and temporal distributions of Ras activity and phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate [PI(3,4)P2]. In addition, depletion of PI(3,4)P2…

5h

Bighead is a Wnt antagonist secreted by the Xenopus Spemann organizer that promotes Lrp6 endocytosis [Developmental Biology]

The Xenopus laevis embryo has been subjected to almost saturating screens for molecules specifically expressed in dorsal Spemann organizer tissue. In this study, we performed high-throughput RNA sequencing of ectodermal explants, called animal caps, which normally give rise to epidermis. We analyzed dissociated animal cap cells that, through sustained activation…

5h

Partial maintenance of organ-specific epigenetic marks during plant asexual reproduction leads to heritable phenotypic variation [Genetics]

Plants differ from animals in their capability to easily regenerate fertile adult individuals from terminally differentiated cells. This unique developmental plasticity is commonly observed in nature, where many species can reproduce asexually through the ectopic initiation of organogenic or embryogenic developmental programs. While organ-specific epigenetic marks are not passed on…

5h

mRNA vaccination with charge-altering releasable transporters elicits human T cell responses and cures established tumors in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]

In vivo delivery of antigen-encoding mRNA is a promising approach to personalized cancer treatment. The therapeutic efficacy of mRNA vaccines is contingent on safe and efficient gene delivery, biological stability of the mRNA, and the immunological properties of the vaccine. Here we describe the development and evaluation of a versatile…

5h

Interferon stimulation creates chromatin marks and establishes transcriptional memory [Immunology and Inflammation]

Epigenetic memory for signal-dependent transcription has remained elusive. So far, the concept of epigenetic memory has been largely limited to cell-autonomous, preprogrammed processes such as development and metabolism. Here we show that IFNβ stimulation creates transcriptional memory in fibroblasts, conferring faster and greater transcription upon restimulation. The memory was inherited…

5h

Deconvolution of pro- and antiviral genomic responses in Zika virus-infected and bystander macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]

Genome-wide investigations of host–pathogen interactions are often limited by analyses of mixed populations of infected and uninfected cells, which lower sensitivity and accuracy. To overcome these obstacles and identify key mechanisms by which Zika virus (ZIKV) manipulates host responses, we developed a system that enables simultaneous characterization of genome-wide transcriptional…

5h

Engineered DNA plasmid reduces immunity to dystrophin while improving muscle force in a model of gene therapy of Duchenne dystrophy [Medical Sciences]

In gene therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy there are two potential immunological obstacles. An individual with Duchenne muscular dystrophy has a genetic mutation in dystrophin, and therefore the wild-type protein is “foreign,” and thus potentially immunogenic. The adeno-associated virus serotype-6 (AAV6) vector for delivery of dystrophin is a viral-derived vector…

5h

Elevated A20 promotes TNF-induced and RIPK1-dependent intestinal epithelial cell death [Medical Sciences]

Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) death is a common feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that triggers inflammation by compromising barrier integrity. In many patients with IBD, epithelial damage and inflammation are TNF-dependent. Elevated TNF production in IBD is accompanied by increased expression of the TNFAIP3 gene, which encodes A20, a…

5h

Structural basis for murine norovirus engagement of bile acids and the CD300lf receptor [Microbiology]

Murine norovirus (MNoV) is closely related to human norovirus (HNoV), an infectious agent responsible for acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of the dimeric MNoV VP1 protruding (P) domain in complex with its cellular receptor CD300lf. CD300lf binds the P domain with a 2:2 stoichiometry, engaging…

5h

Homologous recombination is an intrinsic defense against antiviral RNA interference [Microbiology]

RNA interference (RNAi) is the major antiviral defense mechanism of plants and invertebrates, rendering the capacity to evade it a defining factor in shaping the viral landscape. Here we sought to determine whether different virus replication strategies provided any inherent capacity to evade RNAi in the absence of an antagonist….

5h

Cortical circuit activity underlying sleep slow oscillations and spindles [Neuroscience]

Slow oscillations and sleep spindles are hallmarks of the EEG during slow-wave sleep (SWS). Both oscillatory events, especially when co-occurring in the constellation of spindles nesting in the slow oscillation upstate, are considered to support memory formation and underlying synaptic plasticity. The regulatory mechanisms of this function at the circuit…

5h

Tissue plasminogen activator promotes white matter integrity and functional recovery in a murine model of traumatic brain injury [Neuroscience]

Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a Food and Drug Administration-approved thrombolytic treatment for ischemic stroke. tPA is also naturally expressed in glial and neuronal cells of the brain, where it promotes axon outgrowth and synaptic plasticity. However, there are conflicting reports of harmful versus neuroprotective effects of tPA in…

5h

AP2 transcription factor CBX1 with a specific function in symbiotic exchange of nutrients in mycorrhizal Lotus japonicus [Plant Biology]

The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, a widespread mutualistic association between land plants and fungi, depends on reciprocal exchange of phosphorus driven by proton-coupled phosphate uptake into host plants and carbon supplied to AM fungi by host-dependent sugar and lipid biosynthesis. The molecular mechanisms and cis-regulatory modules underlying the control of…

5h

Universal method for robust detection of circadian state from gene expression [Systems Biology]

Circadian clocks play a key role in regulating a vast array of biological processes, with significant implications for human health. Accurate assessment of physiological time using transcriptional biomarkers found in human blood can significantly improve diagnosis of circadian disorders and optimize the delivery time of therapeutic treatments. To be useful,…

5h

Correction for Sharp et al., Psychological targeting [Correction]

LETTER Correction for “Psychological targeting,” by Byron Sharp, Nick Danenberg, and Steven Bellman, which was first published August 3, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1810436115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E7890). The authors note that their conflict of interest statement was omitted during publication. The authors declare the following: B.S., N.D., and S.B. are…

5h

Correction for Pereyaslavets et al., On the importance of accounting for nuclear quantum effects in ab initio calibrated force fields in biological simulations [Correction]

CHEMISTRY, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “On the importance of accounting for nuclear quantum effects in ab initio calibrated force fields in biological simulations,” by Leonid Pereyaslavets, Igor Kurnikov, Ganesh Kamath, Oleg Butin, Alexey Illarionov, Igor Leontyev, Michael Olevanov, Michael Levitt, Roger D. Kornberg, and Boris Fain, which was…

5h

Correction for Schickinger et al., Tethered multifluorophore motion reveals equilibrium transition kinetics of single DNA double helices [Correction]

BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Tethered multifluorophore motion reveals equilibrium transition kinetics of single DNA double helices,” by Matthias Schickinger, Martin Zacharias, and Hendrik Dietz, which was first published July 23, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800585115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E7512–E7521). The authors note that, due to a printer’s error, some…

5h

Correction for Loyer et al., Drosophila E-cadherin is required for the maintenance of ring canals anchoring to mechanically withstand tissue growth [Correction]

DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Drosophila E-cadherin is required for the maintenance of ring canals anchoring to mechanically withstand tissue growth,” by Nicolas Loyer, Irina Kolotuev, Mathieu Pinot, and Roland Le Borgne, which was first published September 30, 2015; 10.1073/pnas.1504455112 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112:12717–12722). The authors note that Fig….

5h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

DNA vaccine may aid gene therapy for muscular dystrophy DNA vaccine could aid gene therapy for DMD. Image courtesy of iStock/Natali_Mis. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a potentially fatal, muscle-wasting disorder that afflicts one out of 5,000 male children and stems from genetic defects in the production of dystrophin, a…

5h

Pitfall of big databases [Biological Sciences]

Now, more and more studies use big databases, such as the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) (https://www.protectedplanet.net/), which is now a predominant source of information on world protected areas (PAs) (1–4). In PNAS, Elsen et al. (5) report that mountain ranges in Africa and Asia had the lowest elevational…

5h

Reply to You et al.: The World Database on Protected Areas is an invaluable resource for global conservation assessments and planning [Biological Sciences]

In their Letter, You et al. (1) raise concerns about the use of the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) (https://www.protectedplanet.net/) in conservation assessments and planning. Their concern arises from potential differences in protected area (PA) delineations and designations between the WDPA and alternate, national PA datasets, citing China’s National…

5h

Profile of Yuval Peres [Profiles]

Yuval Peres received an early introduction to mathematics and probability. His mother studied physics and specialized in statistics, and his father was a sociologist who specialized in opinion polls. “At the breakfast table, we had discussions of chi-square tests and reliability of sampling, and I would be fascinated by these…

5h

More security may actually make us feel less secure [Political Sciences]

Even as the federal government increasingly deposits its surplus military supplies with local police departments and as Americans are more exposed to militarized police forces, study of its historical political development (1) or examination of its effects for American communities has mostly escaped scholarly attention. No national data source across…

5h

Building immune tolerance through DNA vaccination [Medical Sciences]

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a progressive, devastating disease of skeletal and cardiac muscles caused by loss of expression of the dystrophin protein (1). While the dystrophin gene and protein were discovered more than 30 y ago (2, 3), an effective treatment that can be administered to every patient, irrespective…

5h

Ionic gating drives correlated insulator-metal transition [Applied Physical Sciences]

The transport of matter is central to modern condensed-matter physics. Electronic transport is vital, enabling computer communication and playing a key role in interrogating material responses. A primary classification of matter is into metals, semiconductors, and insulators, based on their electronic conductivity, and electronic considerations underpin much of the current…

5h

Death of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by l-arginine starvation [Microbiology]

Tuberculosis (TB) is currently the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent, resulting in more than 1.5 million deaths annually. In 2016, 10.4 million people developed the disease (1), of whom 490,000 had multidrug-resistant TB, defined as resistant to the two first-line drugs, isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin. Given…

5h

Topological localization in out-of-equilibrium dissipative systems [Applied Physical Sciences]

In this paper, we report that notions of topological protection can be applied to stationary configurations that are driven far from equilibrium by active, dissipative processes. We consider two physically disparate systems: stochastic networks governed by microscopic single-particle dynamics, and collections of driven interacting particles described by coarse-grained hydrodynamic theory….

5h

Membrane-wrapped nanoparticles probe divergent roles of GM3 and phosphatidylserine in lipid-mediated viral entry pathways [Chemistry]

Gold nanoparticles (NPs) wrapped in a membrane can be utilized as artificial virus nanoparticles (AVNs) that combine the large nonblinking or bleaching optical cross-section of the NP core with the biological surface properties and functionalities provided by a self-assembled lipid membrane. We used these hybrid nanomaterials to test the roles…

5h

Improving nanopore read accuracy with the R2C2 method enables the sequencing of highly multiplexed full-length single-cell cDNA [Applied Biological Sciences]

High-throughput short-read sequencing has revolutionized how transcriptomes are quantified and annotated. However, while Illumina short-read sequencers can be used to analyze entire transcriptomes down to the level of individual splicing events with great accuracy, they fall short of analyzing how these individual events are combined into complete RNA transcript isoforms….

5h

Gravitational allocation on the sphere [Applied Mathematics]

Given a collection L of n points on a sphere Sn2 of surface area n, a fair allocation is a partition of the sphere into n parts each of area 1, and each is associated with a distinct point of L. We show that, if the n points are chosen…

5h

Measurement invariance explains the universal law of generalization for psychological perception [Applied Mathematics]

The universal law of generalization describes how animals discriminate between alternative sensory stimuli. On an appropriate perceptual scale, the probability that an organism perceives two stimuli as similar typically declines exponentially with the difference on the perceptual scale. Exceptions often follow a Gaussian probability pattern rather than an exponential pattern….

5h

Strongly correlated perovskite lithium ion shuttles [Applied Physical Sciences]

Solid-state ion shuttles are of broad interest in electrochemical devices, nonvolatile memory, neuromorphic computing, and biomimicry utilizing synthetic membranes. Traditional design approaches are primarily based on substitutional doping of dissimilar valent cations in a solid lattice, which has inherent limits on dopant concentration and thereby ionic conductivity. Here, we demonstrate…

5h

Intermediate step of cohesin’s ATPase cycle allows cohesin to entrap DNA [Biochemistry]

Cohesin is a four-subunit ATPase in the family of structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC). Cohesin promotes sister chromatid cohesion, chromosome condensation, DNA repair, and transcription regulation. Cohesin performs these functions as a DNA tether and potentially a DNA-based motor. At least one of its DNA binding activities involves entrapment of…

5h

Structural conditions on complex networks for the Michaelis-Menten input-output response [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The Michaelis–Menten (MM) fundamental formula describes how the rate of enzyme catalysis depends on substrate concentration. The familiar hyperbolic relationship was derived by timescale separation for a network of three reactions. The same formula has subsequently been found to describe steady-state input–output responses in many biological contexts, including single-molecule enzyme…

5h

Systematic mapping of free energy landscapes of a growing filamin domain during biosynthesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cotranslational folding (CTF) is a fundamental molecular process that ensures efficient protein biosynthesis and minimizes the formation of misfolded states. However, the complexity of this process makes it extremely challenging to obtain structural characterizations of CTF pathways. Here, we correlate observations of translationally arrested nascent chains with those of a…

5h

CAMSAP3 maintains neuronal polarity through regulation of microtubule stability [Cell Biology]

The molecular mechanisms that guide each neuron to become polarized, forming a single axon and multiple dendrites, remain unknown. Here we show that CAMSAP3 (calmodulin-regulated spectrin-associated protein 3), a protein that regulates the minus-end dynamics of microtubules, plays a key role in maintaining neuronal polarity. In mouse hippocampal neurons, CAMSAP3…

5h

Describing strong correlation with fractional-spin correction in density functional theory [Chemistry]

An effective fractional-spin correction is developed to describe static/strong correlation in density functional theory. Combined with the fractional-charge correction from recently developed localized orbital scaling correction (LOSC), a functional, the fractional-spin LOSC (FSLOSC), is proposed. FSLOSC, a correction to commonly used functional approximations, introduces the explicit derivative d

5h

Opinion: Reconsidering bioenergy given the urgency of climate protection [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The use of bioenergy has grown rapidly in recent years, driven by policies partly premised on the belief that bioenergy can contribute to carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions mitigation. However, the experience with bioenergy production and the pressure it places on land, water, biodiversity, and other natural resources has raised questions…

5h

Deep learning to represent subgrid processes in climate models [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The representation of nonlinear subgrid processes, especially clouds, has been a major source of uncertainty in climate models for decades. Cloud-resolving models better represent many of these processes and can now be run globally but only for short-term simulations of at most a few years because of computational limitations. Here…

5h

Radioactive (90Y) upconversion nanoparticles conjugated with recombinant targeted toxin for synergistic nanotheranostics of cancer [Engineering]

We report combined therapy using upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP) coupled to two therapeutic agents: beta-emitting radionuclide yttrium-90 (90Y) fractionally substituting yttrium in UCNP, and a fragment of the exotoxin A derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa genetically fused with a targeting designed ankyrin repeat protein (DARPin) specific to HER2 receptors. The resultant hybrid…

5h

Cross-cultural invariances in the architecture of shame [Evolution]

Human foragers are obligately group-living, and their high dependence on mutual aid is believed to have characterized our species’ social evolution. It was therefore a central adaptive problem for our ancestors to avoid damaging the willingness of other group members to render them assistance. Cognitively, this requires a predictive map…

5h

Deceptive signals and behaviors of a cleptoparasitic beetle show local adaptation to different host bee species [Evolution]

Chemosensory signals play a key role in species recognition and mate location in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. Closely related species often produce similar but distinct signals by varying the ratios or components in pheromone blends to avoid interference in their communication channels and minimize cross-attraction among congeners. However, exploitation…

5h

Genetic divergence and the number of hybridizing species affect the path to homoploid hybrid speciation [Evolution]

Hybridization is often maladaptive and in some instances has led to the loss of biodiversity. However, hybridization can also promote speciation, such as during homoploid hybrid speciation, thereby generating biodiversity. Despite examples of homoploid hybrid species, the importance of hybridization as a speciation mechanism is still widely debated, and we…

5h

Cellular hysteresis as a principle to maximize the efficacy of antibiotic therapy [Evolution]

Antibiotic resistance has become one of the most dramatic threats to global health. While novel treatment options are urgently required, most attempts focus on finding new antibiotic substances. However, their development is costly, and their efficacy is often compromised within short time periods due to the enormous potential of microorganisms…

5h

Functional characterization of reappearing B cells after anti-CD20 treatment of CNS autoimmune disease [Immunology and Inflammation]

The anti-CD20 antibody ocrelizumab, approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, leads to rapid elimination of B cells from the blood. The extent of B cell depletion and kinetics of their recovery in different immune compartments is largely unknown. Here, we studied how anti-CD20 treatment influences B cells in bone marrow,…

5h

Arginine-deprivation-induced oxidative damage sterilizes Mycobacterium tuberculosis [Microbiology]

Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage have recently been recognized as contributing to the efficacy of most bactericidal antibiotics, irrespective of their primary macromolecular targets. Inhibitors of targets involved in both combating oxidative stress as well as being required for in vivo survival may exhibit powerful synergistic…

5h

A plant-responsive bacterial-signaling system senses an ethanolamine derivative [Microbiology]

Certain plant-associated Proteobacteria sense their host environment by detecting an unknown plant signal recognized by a member of a LuxR subfamily of transcription factors. This interkingdom communication is important for both mutualistic and pathogenic interactions. The Populus root endophyte Pseudomonas sp. GM79 possesses such a regulator, named PipR. In a…

5h

Cell-to-cell bacterial interactions promoted by drier conditions on soil surfaces [Microbiology]

Bacterial cell-to-cell interactions are in the core of evolutionary and ecological processes in soil and other environments. Under most conditions, natural soils are unsaturated where the fragmented aqueous habitats and thin liquid films confine bacterial cells within small volumes and close proximity for prolonged periods. We report effects of a…

5h

Superoxide dismutase activity confers (p)ppGpp-mediated antibiotic tolerance to stationary-phase Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Microbiology]

Metabolically quiescent bacteria represent a large proportion of those in natural and host environments, and they are often refractory to antibiotic treatment. Such drug tolerance is also observed in the laboratory during stationary phase, when bacteria face stress and starvation-induced growth arrest. Tolerance requires (p)ppGpp signaling, which mediates the stress…

5h

Predicting human behavior toward members of different social groups [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Disparities in outcomes across social groups pervade human societies and are of central interest to the social sciences. How people treat others is known to depend on a multitude of factors (e.g., others’ gender, ethnicity, appearance) even when these should be irrelevant. However, despite substantial progress, much remains unknown regarding…

5h

Language switching decomposed through MEG and evidence from bimodal bilinguals [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

A defining feature of human cognition is the ability to quickly and accurately alternate between complex behaviors. One striking example of such an ability is bilinguals’ capacity to rapidly switch between languages. This switching process minimally comprises disengagement from the previous language and engagement in a new language. Previous studies…

5h

Social learning and partisan bias in the interpretation of climate trends [Social Sciences]

Vital scientific communications are frequently misinterpreted by the lay public as a result of motivated reasoning, where people misconstrue data to fit their political and psychological biases. In the case of climate change, some people have been found to systematically misinterpret climate data in ways that conflict with the intended…

5h

High nitrous oxide fluxes from rice indicate the need to manage water for both long- and short-term climate impacts [Sustainability Science]

Global rice cultivation is estimated to account for 2.5% of current anthropogenic warming because of emissions of methane (CH4), a short-lived greenhouse gas. This estimate assumes a widespread prevalence of continuous flooding of most rice fields and hence does not include emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O), a long-lived greenhouse gas….

5h

DNA test beats microscopes for predicting cancer’s comeback

A DNA-based analysis of blood cells soon after a stem cell transplant can predict the likelihood of disease recurrence in people with a group of cancerous disorders related to dysfunctional blood cells, according to new research. Such a practice could help doctors identify patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) early after a transplant and help guide treatment decisions. “The way doctors us

5h

NASA gets a final look at Leslie as a subtropical storm

NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Central North Atlantic Ocean and analyzed Subtropical Storm Leslie in infrared light to determine what was happening within.

6h

Seasonal reservoir filling in India deforms rock, may trigger earthquakes

The seasonal filling and emptying of reservoirs in India can cause measurable deformation of the surrounding rock, reducing the strength of nearby faults and potentially triggering earthquakes, according to two new papers published in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America.

6h

Weathering rates for mined lands exponentially higher than unmined sites

A new study found a dramatic increase in the chemical weathering rates of mined landscapes, which are melting away bedrock up to 45 times faster than unmined areas. The weathering has global consequences for the cycling of sulfur, a key nutrient for all life forms.

6h

New study reveals potential therapeutic approach to enhance KC migration in wound healing

Researchers have identified a new mechanism involving ginsenoside Rb1, which has the ability to stimulate keratinocyte migration and promote cutaneous wound healing.

6h

Multimodal imaging shows strain can drive chemistry in a photovoltaic material

A unique combination of imaging tools and atomic-level simulations has allowed a team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory to solve a longstanding debate about the properties of a promising material that can harvest energy from light.

6h

Transforming carbon dioxide

A new technique to increase the efficiency of carbon dioxide (CO2) electrolysis that may lead to the production of new chemicals and fuels.

6h

Go home Bill Gates: De her danskere har haft kæmpe betydning for din computer

Nogle af de vigtigste programmeringssprog gennem tiden er opfundet af danskere.

6h

GE shares at 9-year low amid latest power woes

Shares of General Electric fell again on Tuesday, adding to losses following the company's latest woes in its slumping power division.

6h

Grizzlies get back US protections, Rockies hunts blocked

The first public grizzly bear hunts in the Northern Rockies in almost three decades have been blocked by a U.S. judge who rejected government claims that the fearsome predators had recovered from near-extermination.

6h

Transforming carbon dioxide—researchers develop novel two-step CO2 conversion technology

A team of researchers at the University of Delaware's Center for Catalytic Science and Technology (CCST) has discovered a novel two-step process to increase the efficiency of carbon dioxide (CO2) electrolysis, a chemical reaction driven by electrical currents that can aid in the production of valuable chemicals and fuels.

6h

Super Typhoon Trami's rainfall examined by NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite probed super typhoon Trami when it traveled above the northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided an analysis of heavy rainfall and cloud top heights.

6h

Full Transcript: Donald Trump at the United Nations General Assembly

Madam President, Mr. Secretary General, world leaders, ambassadors, and distinguished delegates: One year ago, I stood before you for the first time in this grand hall. I addressed the threats facing our world, and I presented a vision to achieve a brighter future for all of humanity. Today, I stand before the United Nations General Assembly to share the extraordinary progress we have made. In le

6h

The 150-Year Mission to Reforest Puerto Rico

RÍO PIEDRAS , Puerto Rico—There was a time when all the lushness around here did not exist. The University of Puerto Rico’s botanical garden is arrayed just south of the metropolitan core of San Juan, nestled between the city and a state forest. The variety of plants is stunning—but still far from complete. Just 80 years ago, a moment in the life of forests, only 6 percent of Puerto Rico was cove

6h

Are we really on the brink of a cure for Alzheimer’s? | Dean Burnett

The headlines claim treatment will be available within six years. The reality is a lot more complex A new study has inspired headlines claiming a cure for Alzheimer’s disease could be available within six years – but are we genuinely on the verge of an effective treatment? Given the physical, emotional and financial cost that Alzheimer’s and similar dementias inflict – something that’s only going

6h

Retracing Antarctica's glacial past

More than 26,000 years ago, sea level was much lower than it is today partly because the ice sheets that jut out from the continent of Antarctica were enormous and covered by grounded ice—ice that was fully attached to the seafloor. The ice sheets were as large as they could get and at the time, sea level was much lower because a lot of ice was sequestered on the continent. As the planet warmed, t

6h

Chemical engineers first to functionalize boron nitride with other nanosystems

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered a route to alter boron nitride, a layered 2-D material, so that it can bind to other materials, like those found in electronics, biosensors and airplanes, for example. Being able to better-incorporate boron nitride into these components could help dramatically improve their performance.

6h

NASA sees Eastern Pacific's newest tropical storm organizing

NASA provided an infrared look at newly developed Tropical Storm Rosa in the Eastern Pacific and found the storm was getting better organized.

6h

Common painkiller doesn’t ease chronic pain after injury

A common painkiller isn’t effective in controlling the chronic pain that sometimes develops following traumatic nerve injury—but shows promise in relieving pain that may linger after surgery, according to a new study. The FDA has approved pregabalin, which Pfizer markets under the name Lyrica, to treat chronic pain associated with shingles, spinal cord injury, fibromyalgia, and diabetic periphera

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Researchers seek vaccine for 'traveler's diarrhea'

A joint effort between the University of Georgia and the University of Texas at Austin has discovered how ETEC works to cause disease. They are using this information in an effort to develop a preventive vaccine for travelers.

6h

NASA sees Eastern Pacific's newest tropical storm organizing

NASA provided an infrared look at newly developed Tropical Storm Rosa in the Eastern Pacific and found the storm was getting better organized.

6h

Mesoblast heart failure cell therapy for children featured at symposium for congenital HD

Mesoblast's proprietary allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cell (MPC) heart failure product candidate MPC-150-IM for use in children with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) was featured at the First Cardiac Regenerative Symposium for Congenital Heart Disease in Baltimore. A randomized, placebo-controlled 24-patient trial is ongoing at Boston Children's Hospital and combines an injection of MPC-1

6h

Retracing Antarctica's glacial past

More than 26,000 years ago, sea level was much lower than it is today partly because the ice sheets that jut out from the continent of Antarctica were enormous and covered by grounded ice — ice that was fully attached to the seafloor. As the planet warmed, the ice sheets melted and contracted, and sea level began to rise. LSU Department of Geology & Geophysics Associate Professor Phil Bart and hi

6h

Genetic testing: Not a one-and-done deal

A study that reviewed genetic testing results from 1.45 million individuals found that nearly 25 percent of 'variants of uncertain significance' were subsequently reclassified — sometimes as less likely to be associated with cancer, sometimes as more likely.

6h

There Goes Hurricane Florence; Here Come the Disaster Myths

Contrary to what we’ve been led to believe, people tend not to panic during emergencies, and looting is rarely widespread — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

6h

Infectious bacteria hibernate to evade antibiotics

Researchers have discovered a surprising tactic of pathogenic bacteria when being attacked by antibiotics: hibernation.

6h

How leaves talk to roots

New findings show that a micro RNA from the shoot keeps legume roots susceptible to symbiotic infection by downregulating a gene that would otherwise hinder root responses to symbiotic bacteria. These findings help us understand what it takes to make nitrogen-fixing symbiosis efficient, and what we need to do to exploit it agronomically.

6h

Illegal ivory dealers starting to use similar code words to hide online sales

Ivory sellers in Europe using eBay are using the same code words across different languages to covertly advertise items for sale, potentially making it easier for law enforcement agencies to uncover such activities by reducing the number of phrases they have to track.

6h

Deciphering the link between skin allergies and the gut microbiota

Over the last few years, scientists have discovered connections between gut microbiota imbalances and various diseases. Now, in a study using mice, researchers have revealed a surprising relationship between a viral detection system, the composition of the gut microbiota, and the development of skin allergies. Their findings suggest potential new therapies.

6h

Super Typhoon Trami's rainfall examined by NASA/JAXA's GPM satellite

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core observatory satellite probed super typhoon Trami when it traveled above the northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided an analysis of heavy rainfall and cloud top heights.

6h

Extracellular RNA in urine may provide useful biomarkers for muscular dystrophy

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have found that extracellular RNA in urine may be a source of biomarkers for the two most common forms of muscular dystrophy, noninvasively providing information about whether therapeutic drugs are having the desired effects on a molecular level.

6h

UIC chemical engineers first to functionalize boron nitride with other nanosystems

Scientists report that treatment with a superacid causes boron nitride layers to separate into atomically thick sheets, while creating binding sites on the surface of these sheets that provide opportunities to interface with nanoparticles, molecules and other 2D nanomaterials, like graphene.

6h

Here’s why we care about attempts to prove the Riemann hypothesis

The Riemann hypothesis could hold the key to understanding prime numbers.

6h

Florence is nation's second wettest storm, behind Harvey

Hurricane Florence was the nation's second rainiest storm in 70 years, a top rainfall meteorologist calculated.

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6h

Indoor HEPA filters significantly reduce pollution indoors when outside air unhealthy, study finds

Outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to indoor air pollution — but high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the home significantly reduce fine-particulate matter in the air compared with non-HEPA air filters, according to a new study.

6h

Molecule capable of halting and reverting Parkinson's neurodegeneration identified

The small SynuClean-D molecule interrupts the formation of the alpha-synuclein amyloid fibres responsible for the onset of Parkinson's disease, and reverts the neurodegeneration caused by the disease.

6h

Funded by new tax credits, US carbon-capture network could double global CO2 headed underground

Princeton University researchers have proposed a US pipeline network that would capture, transport and store underground up to 30 million metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year — an amount equal to removing 6.5 million cars from the road. The authors found that the network infrastructure would only be possible if tax credits passed by Congress in 2018 to encourage investment in carbon

6h

Promising novel treatment against Alzheimer's disease

New research conducted at the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital reveals that a novel drug reverses memory deficits and stops Alzheimer's disease pathology (AD) in an animal model. Importantly, this drug has already proven to be non-toxic for humans in a clinical setting and could, therefore, be brought quickly to trials in humans against AD. These findings are published tod

6h

Researchers reveal link between hunger and mood, new study

The study used rats to examine the impact on emotional behavior of a sudden drop in blood sugar. When the rats were given a glucose blocker, researchers found they had higher levels of cortisol. They also showed signs of stress and sluggish behavior similar to a poor mood. To prove the behavior wasn't just a lack of glucose to the muscles, researchers then gave them a common antidepressant and the

6h

Oxygen vs. nanochip

For the first time ever, an international team of scientists from NUST MISIS, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the University of Namur (Belgium), and Korea Research Institute for Standards & Science has managed to trace in details the structural changes of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide under long-term environmental impact. The new data narrows the scope of its potential application in mic

6h

Experimental bone engineered by Lithuanian researchers can help osteoarthritis patients

Researchers from the Faculty of Chemical Technology, Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania, are developing an artificial bone, which can be used for treating one of the most common joint diseases — osteoarthritis. The bi-functional composite imitates the complex osteochondral structure of a joint, i.e. both cartilage and bone tissues.

6h

Tumor cell expansion challenges current physics

The journal Nature Physics published an article in which the researchers rebuild these laws and develop a new framework to contribute and predict conditions in which tumors start metastasis.

6h

Assessing the current and future impact of biologics on pediatric asthma

Researchers have performed a comprehensive review of the current state and future potential of using biologic medications to treat asthma in children.

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Funded by new tax credits, US carbon-capture network could double global CO2 headed underground

With the right public infrastructure investment, the United States could as much as double the amount of carbon dioxide emissions currently captured and stored worldwide within the next six years, according to an analysis by Princeton University researchers.

7h

EU urges member states to toughen swine fever controls

Europe's top agriculture official on Tuesday urged EU member states to prepare tougher measures to contain the spread of African swine fever after the latest outbreak in Belgium.

7h

Instagram departures add to woes for FacebookInstagram Facebook

The departure of Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger adds to the woes of parent firm Facebook as it tries to repair its image hurt by privacy scandals and curb manipulation and misinformation.

7h

Ryanair says cancelling 190 flights over Friday strike

Ryanair will cancel 190, or eight percent, of its flights due Friday when cabin crews strike across Europe, the Irish no-frills airline said Tuesday, attacking rivals for the disruption.

7h

Bacteria's password for sporulation hasn't changed in 2.7 billion years

When it comes to changing their passwords, bacteria are just as bad as you and me—maybe even worse. A Carnegie Mellon University research team has found that despite 2.7 billion years of evolution, bacteria are still using the same "password" to initiate the process for making spores. Their findings were published in the September issue of PLOS Genetics.

7h

Demands continue for a reality show where Flat Earthers search for the edge of the world

According to Flat Earthers, our planet is flat and space travel doesn't happen. People are calling for a reality show about Flat Earthers. The contestants would try to reach the end of the world, as they understand it. Amidst all the fake news, misinformation sponsored by governments, and the explosion of conspiracy theories that bombard us daily, it's no surprise that there seems to be a growing

7h

Navy Leaders Need to Better Prepare for Climate Change, Experts Say

Flooding from Florence, exacerbated by sea level rise, demonstrates the vulnerability of military infrastructure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Illegal ivory dealers starting to use similar code words to hide online sales

Ivory sellers in Europe are using the same code words in different languages to covertly advertise items for sale, potentially making it easier for law enforcement agencies to uncover such activities by reducing the number of phrases they have to track.

7h

Protestantism still matters when it comes to education, study shows

An 'enduring historical legacy' of Protestant religion is still having a significant, positive impact on secondary school enrolment rates around the world, according to the results of a new international study from a researcher at the University of Bath (UK).

7h

Termites: Advanced animal society can thrive without males

Termite colonies have been found to thrive and reproduce without males, new research reveals. The findings provide new evidence that males aren't required to maintain some advanced animal populations. They add momentum to questions about the impact and function of males in animal societies.

7h

Screening using body mass index alone may miss every second preschooler with excess stomach fat

When assessing whether preschoolers are overweight, health professionals should use other measures such as waist-to-height ratio in addition to the body mass index (BMI). A study shows that this is because measuring the BMI of younger children often fails to identify those with excess stomach fat and possible associated health problems.

7h

Cancer: Establishing metastasis

Scientists have discovered that a protein called VRK1 might help cancer to take root in new parts of the body. VRK1 was discovered to be necessary for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, which scientists suspect may be important for the establishment of metastasis.

7h

‘Quantum Atmospheres’ May Reveal Secrets of Matter

Over the past several years, some materials have proved to be a playground for physicists. These materials aren’t made of anything special — just normal particles such as protons, neutrons and electrons. But they are more than the sum of their parts. These materials boast a range of remarkable properties and phenomena and have even led physicists to new phases of matter — beyond the solid, gas an

7h

The gods of small things

On the outside, the cluster made of 55 copper and aluminum atoms looks like a crystal, but chemically it has the properties of an atom. The heterometallic superatom which chemists of the Technical University of Munich have created provides the prerequisites for developing new, more cost-effective catalysts.

7h

Bacteria's password for sporulation hasn't changed in 2.7 billion years

When it comes to changing their passwords, bacteria are just as bad as you and me — maybe even worse. A Carnegie Mellon University research team has found that despite 2.7 billion years of evolution, bacteria are still using the same 'password' to initiate the process for making spores. Their findings were published in the September issue of PLOS Genetics.

7h

Two studies describe improved approach to bone marrow transplant

Two recent studies in the journal Leukemia present a new approach for bone marrow donation and transplant that preclinical laboratory tests suggest could make the life-saving procedure safer and more effective for patients. Researchers report the studies demonstrate that use of an experimental drug called CASIN in laboratory mice results in higher efficiency when harvesting blood stem cells from d

7h

Study finds that a lifestyle intervention may mitigate PFAS-related weight gain

A new study finds that perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are associated with increases in weight, but exercise and diet may reduce the obesogenic effects of these environmental contaminants. The study, entitled Association of Perfluoroalkyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances with Adiposity, led by researchers from the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute and the Harvard T.H Chan S

7h

Identical driver gene mutations found in metastatic cancers

Driver genes in different metastases from the same patient are remarkably similar, providing optimism for the success of future targeted therapies, according to a published study by Science.

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Study shows value of breast cancer patients seeking second opinions

In a recent MUSC Hollings Cancer Center study on the value of a second opinion for breast cancer patients, researchers concluded that a review by a tumor board at an NCI-Designated Cancer Center changed the diagnosis for 43 percent of the patients.

7h

Diversity in the brain — how millions of neurons become unique

How is it possible that so many different and highly specific neurons arise in the brain? A mathematic model developed by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum demonstrates that different variants of genes enable such a random diversity. The scientists describe in Cell Reports that despite countless numbers of newly formed neurons, the genetic variants equip neurons individually an

7h

New way of determining treatment for staph infections cuts antibiotic use

Using a clinical checklist to identify eligible patients, doctors were able to shorten the antibiotic duration for patients with uncomplicated staphylococcal bloodstream infections by nearly two days, Duke Health researchers report.

7h

New Tourette disorder genes come to light

In the largest DNA sequencing study of Tourette Disorder (TD) to date, UC San Francisco researchers and their collaborators have unearthed new data suggesting a potential role for disruptions in cell polarity in the development of this condition.

7h

Sun exposure gets personal with wearable UV sensors

RMIT researchers have developed a UV active ink that changes color when exposed to different types of UV rays, providing personalized exposure readings based on skin type.

7h

Health data breaches on the rise

The ongoing transition to electronic health records may increase data breaches involving patient records. An analysis of reported breaches of health data from 2010 through 2017 found that except for 2015, the number of breach reports increased each year. During this time there were 2,149 breaches comprising a total of 176.4 million records. The most common entity breached was a health care provide

7h

What is long-term risk of appendicitis reoccurring in patients treated with antibiotics?

About 60 percent of patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis who were initially treated with antibiotics did not undergo appendectomy in five years in a follow-up to a randomized clinical trial. The clinical trial included 273 patients who had an appendectomy and 257 patients initially treated with antibiotics for uncomplicated acute appendicitis.

7h

Study reveals patterns in STEM grades of girls versus boys

A new study, led by UNSW Sydney PhD student Rose O’Dea, has explored patterns in academic grades of 1.6 million students, showing that girls and boys perform very similarly in STEM – including at the top of the class.

7h

Mass. General study analyzes numbers, trends in health care data breaches nationwide

Health plans — entities that cover the costs of medical care — accounted for the greatest number of patient records breached over the past seven years, according to an analysis of US health care data conducted by two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians.

7h

Immune cell pruning of dopamine receptors may modulate behavioral changes in adolescence

A study by MassGeneral Hospital for Children researchers finds that the immune cells of the brain called microglia play a crucial role in brain development during adolescence, but that role is different in males and females.

7h

Skin wounds in older mice are less likely to scar

Researchers have discovered a rare example in which the mammalian body functions better in old age. A team at the University of Pennsylvania found that, in skin wounds in mice, being older increased tissue regeneration and decreased scar formation. The same findings were confirmed in studies of human tissue. Their findings publish on Sept. 25 in the journal Cell Reports.

7h

It’s Trump vs. Everyone Else on Iran at the UN

President Donald Trump decried Tuesday what he called Iran’s “brutal” regime and said the multilateral nuclear agreement with the Islamic Republic provided its leaders with a “windfall” they’re using to “sow chaos, death, and disruption.” “We cannot allow the world’s leading sponsor of terrorism to possess the planet’s most dangerous weapons,” Trump told the United Nations General Assembly. “We c

7h

Giving Clinicians More Say in Court-Ordered Rehab Could Lead to Longer Jail Times

Dressed in jailhouse orange, with hands and feet shackled, Jimi Ray Haynes stood up in a Santa Cruz County courtroom and pleaded guilty to a felony weapons charge. Haynes, 32, had spent the previous two weeks in jail detoxing from methamphetamine and heroin. The judge told Haynes he could serve part of his yearlong jail sentence in a drug treatment program rather than locked in county jail. Eilee

7h

The ExoMars spacecraft measured radiation in deep space to help keep future astronauts safe

Space The news isn't great, but it's not a showstopper either. Based on how much radiation a European spacecraft picked up on its way to the Red Planet, NASA and the ESA could greenlight a Mars mission under current guidelines—but…

7h

Traces of an Ancient Virus in Our Genes May Play a Role in Addiction

Could targeting ancient viruses lead to better interventions?

7h

Built-in sound amplifier helps male mosquitoes find females

The ears of male mosquitoes amplify the sound of an approaching female using a self-generated phantom tone that mimics the female's wingbeats, which increases the ear's acoustic input by a factor of up to 45,000, finds a new UCL-led study.

7h

New wristband warns when you've been been in the sun too long

Paper bracelet printed with light sensitive ink signals UV exposure to wearer with smiley and frowny face symbols A simple paper sensor featuring smiley and frowny faces drawn in UV-sensitive ink has been produced by researchers in a bid to keep us safe in the sun. Scientists say the different expressions appear in sequence as UV exposure increases, offering a low-tech way for people to gauge whe

7h

Europe's Ariane-5 rocket primed for 100th flight

Europe's workhorse rocket reaches for a milestone as it battles American competition.

7h

Will It Ever Stop Raining?

For much of the United States, September played out as follows: Rain tonight, followed by more rain in the morning. Watch for occasional drizzle and downpours, which will be interspersed with rain. “It really worked out to be an odd September. It’s been a very wet month for two-thirds of the country,” says Jon Gottschalck , the chief of operations at the Climate Prediction Center in the National

7h

Even If Rod Rosenstein Stays, the Mueller Investigation Status Quo Won't Last

Much of the speculation around deputy attorney general Rod Rosenstein's fate misses how disruptive a post-midterms shake-up could be.

7h

10 mysteries of the universe: Is there life out there?

Given the vastness of the cosmos, it seems implausible we’re alone. And alien life could be closer than we think – but just don’t assume it looks like we expect

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Brigatinib becomes potential new first-line option for ALK-positive non-small lung cancer

'In 2017, alectinib, another next generation ALK-inhibitor, showed that it was superior to crizotinib in the first-line setting through the ALEX trial and now, in 2018, brigatinib is set to join alectinib as a 1st line option for ALK positive lung cancer,' said D. Ross Camidge, M.D., Ph.D., Joyce Zeff Chair in Lung Cancer Research at the University of Colorado Cancer Center and the lead author of

7h

The crazy dance of falling knots

Can the topology of microobjects influence the way they move in a fluid? Experiments and simulations of Polish and Swiss researchers published in the Physical Review Letters show that the dynamics of elastic chains settling in a fluid depends on the way they are knotted. The settling chains form flat, toroidal structures composed of several intertwined loops, which swirl around each other. The stu

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Screening using body mass index alone may miss every second preschooler with excess stomach fat

When assessing whether preschoolers are overweight, health professionals should use other measures such as waist-to-height ratio in addition to the body mass index (BMI). A study published in the Springer Nature-branded journal Pediatric Research shows that this is because measuring the BMI of younger children often fails to identify those with excess stomach fat and possible associated health pro

7h

Protestantism still matters when it comes to education, study shows

A new academic study, the first of its kind, reveals a significant and positive historical legacy of Protestant religion in education around the world.

7h

The quality of protein supplements for sportspeople

The results indicate that half the supplements analyzed contain more than 6 percent of blocked lysine, but only 9 percent had a content of more than 20 percent of blocked lysine.

7h

Study reveals patterns in STEM grades of girls versus boys

A new study, led by UNSW Sydney Ph.D. student Rose O'Dea, has explored patterns in academic grades of 1.6 million students, showing that girls and boys perform very similarly in STEM—including at the top of the class.

7h

Danmark vil bygge supercomputere med 21 andre EU-lande

Uddannelses- og forskningsminister Tommy Ahlers melder Danmark ind i det store europæiske High Perfomance Computing-samarbejde, der skal udvikle supercomputere i præ-exaskala – 100 millioner milliarder beregninger pr. sekund.

7h

How police and the public can create safer neighborhoods together | Tracie Keesee

We all want to be safe, and our safety is intertwined, says Tracie Keesee, cofounder of the Center for Policing Equity. Sharing lessons she's learned from 25 years as a police officer, Keesee reflects on the public safety challenges faced by both the police and local neighborhoods, especially in the African American community, as well as the opportunities we all have preserving dignity and guarant

7h

How leaves talk to roots

New findings show that a micro RNA from the shoot keeps legume roots susceptible to symbiotic infection by downregulating a gene that would otherwise hinder root responses to symbiotic bacteria. These findings help us understand what it takes to make nitrogen-fixing symbiosis efficient, and what we need to do to exploit it agronomically.

8h

Infectious bacteria hibernate to evade antibiotics

University of Copenhagen researchers have discovered a surprising tactic of pathogenic bacteria when being attacked by antibiotics: hibernation.

8h

Built-in sound amplifier helps male mosquitoes find females

The ears of male mosquitoes amplify the sound of an approaching female using a self-generated phantom tone that mimics the female's wingbeats, which increases the ear's acoustic input by a factor of up to 45,000, finds a new UCL-led study published in Nature Communications.

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This new fish species displays a splash of highlighter hues

Researchers stumbled upon a new species of coral reef fish with spectacular coloration and a unique habitat.

8h

Is being vegan better for the environment?

An increasing number of people are choosing the plant-based diet.

8h

Nordjyllandsværket i knibe: Håber på dispensation til store varmepumper

Værkets ejer, Aalborg Kommune, vil gerne skifte kulkraftvarmeværket ud med store varmepumper, men gældende lov forbyder det. Det haster med en afklaring, siger direktør for værket.

8h

Molecule capable of halting and reverting Parkinson's neurodegeneration identified

The small SynuClean-D molecule interrupts the formation of the alpha-synuclein amyloid fibres responsible for the onset of Parkinson's disease, and reverts the neurodegeneration caused by the disease. The study headed by Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona researchers was published in PNAS.

8h

Deciphering the link between skin allergies and the gut microbiota

Over the last few years, scientists have discovered connections between gut microbiota imbalances and various diseases. Now, in a study using mice, a team led by CNRS researchers have revealed a surprising relationship between a viral detection system, the composition of the gut microbiota, and the development of skin allergies. Their findings, published in PNAS suggest potential new therapies.

8h

Illegal ivory dealers starting to use similar code words to hide online sales

Ivory sellers in Europe using eBay are using the same code words across different languages to covertly advertise items for sale, potentially making it easier for law enforcement agencies to uncover such activities by reducing the number of phrases they have to track.

8h

Combo therapy of prostatectomy plus radiotherapy may improve survival in prostate cancer

A comparison of two of the most common combination therapies for locally advanced prostate cancer show the more aggressive option is linked with a higher rate of survival.

8h

California Academy of Sciences discovers new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish

Named for Aphrodite, Greek goddess of love and beauty, a new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish from the twilight zone enchants Academy scientists. It's only known home is the remote Brazilian archipelago of St. Paul's Rocks.

8h

CT technique expands possibilities of imaging ancient remains

Researchers in Sweden using computed tomography (CT) have successfully imaged the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian mummy's hand down to a microscopic level, according to a new study.

8h

Minimally invasive autopsy improves postmortem diagnoses

Minimally invasive autopsy with CT and MRI performs as well as conventional autopsy in detecting cause of death and has the advantage of yielding more diagnoses, according to a new study.

8h

How companies can plan for accidental discoveries

While accident implies a lack of planning, a University of Alberta business professor says organizations can be proactive in managing the serendipity that leads to accidental innovation.

8h

Silencing science tracker expanded to include state and local government actions

In January, Columbia's Sabin Center for Climate Change Law and the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund launched the Silencing Science Tracker (SST). As its name suggests, the SST records government attempts to prevent or restrict scientific research, education, or discussion since the November 2016 election. Initially, the SST only recorded anti-science behavior within the federal government, of wh

8h

Indoor HEPA filters significantly reduce pollution indoors when outside air unhealthy, study finds

Outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to indoor air pollution—but high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the home significantly reduce fine-particulate matter in the air compared with non-HEPA air filters, according to a new two-year study led by researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City.

8h

Protecting the power grid from cyber attacks

As the national power grid becomes increasingly dependent on computers and data sharing—providing significant benefits for utilities, customers, and communities—it has also become more vulnerable to both physical and cyber threats.

8h

Climate change calls for a fresh approach to water woes

The Everglades National Park, the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States, is home to 16 different species of wading birds and rare and endangered species like the manatee, the American crocodile and the Florida panther. But the area is also home to humans. The park is a portion of a larger wetland ecosystem, more than half of which has been converted into agricultural production or ur

8h

How friendships can push teens—especially girls—to delinquency

The friends that adolescents select, the influence they have on each other, and gender may all play a role in establishing friendships that can help, or possibly hurt, teens, according to new research. In a new study of adolescent friendship networks, researchers found that for both boys and girls, friend selection and friend influence guided the adoption of risky behaviors, says lead author Cass

8h

UN prioritizes tuberculosis prevention in high-risk occupations

This release is timed to coincide with the UN's first ever High-Level meeting on TB in the General Assembly where national leaders are embracing strategies to prevent TB with silica dust controls to protect the 230 million workers exposed to silica. See the link to Editorial published today in Lancet Global Health co-authored by the Dr. Eric Goosby, the United Nations Special Envoy for Tuberculosi

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Indoor HEPA filters significantly reduce pollution indoors when outside air unhealthy, study finds

Outdoor air pollution is a major contributor to indoor air pollution — but high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters used in the home significantly reduce fine-particulate matter in the air compared with non-HEPA air filters, according to a new study.

8h

Flummoxed by Force and Motion? Try This Physics Experiment

Physics class can get painfully abstract. But you can collect your own data to see Newton's second law in action.

8h

Ireland's plan for electric vehicles will reduce emissions, but may come at a cost

The level of emissions coming from Ireland's transport sector are undeniably high, which is of particular concern when considering the country's commitment to a future with lower levels of greenhouse gases, ratified by the 2015 Paris Agreement. The long-term solution to this problem is to shift people from buying heavily-polluting petrol and diesel cars over to more sustainable fuels, with a parti

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Team discovers new species of dazzling, neon-colored fish

On a recent expedition to the remote Brazilian archipelago of St. Paul's Rocks, a new species of reef fish—striped a vivid pink and yellow—enchanted its diving discoverers from the California Academy of Sciences. First spotted at a depth of 400 feet beneath the ocean's surface, this cryptic fish inhabits rocky crevices of twilight zone reefs and is found nowhere else in the world. Upon discovery,

8h

River dolphins in Peru satellite tagged for first time

Across their range in South America, the iconic pink river dolphin faces an increasingly uncertain future. Water pollution, dam construction, poaching and bycatch pose serious threats to these amazing creatures, which play a critical role in rivers they inhabit.

8h

New cause of brain bleeds identified

Neurologists have provided, for the first time, evidence that blood deposits in the brain may not require a blood vessel tear. The researchers found that brain endothelial cells, the cells that line blood vessels of the brain, have the capacity for engulfing red blood cells and depositing them outside the blood vessels and into the substance of the brain, without requiring a disruption of the vasc

8h

Motor learning for precise motor execution

Scientists have identified acquisition of two types of internal models for motor control, which are likely to be stored in the cerebellum. They show that motor control in human hand reaching movement relies on two types of motor learning: (i) acquisition of explicit motor control and (ii) acquisition of implicit motor control.

8h

Hybrid operating room streamlines diagnosis, treatment of lung cancer

Representing a paradigm shift in thoracic surgery, the hybrid operating room combines three techniques into a single appointment eliminating multiple clinical visits for improved patient experience and outcomes.

8h

New report shows public universities fail to find, support and graduate black students

Public colleges and universities collectively enroll more than 900,000 black students. Yet a new report from the USC Race and Equity Center finds that when it comes to supporting those students from admission through graduation, very few schools can be held up as exemplars.

8h

Uncovering the secret winter life of lakes

While most of nature is peacefully asleep during rigid Canadian winters, lakes are more than awake under their thick, icy covers.

8h

How to pick an ant farm for grown-ups

Animals Let’s ants. Trust these teensy-weensy towns to ensure your ant experiment is an active success.

8h

Sygehuslæger går stuegang på akutpladser i Vejle Kommune

Vejle Sygehus afprøver en ny ordning, hvor læger går udgående stuegange hos patienter på kommunens akutpladser. Det skal nedbringe antallet af genindlæggelser og skabe større tryghed.

8h

Lægeetisk Nævn: Svend Lings har overtrådt lægeetiske principper

Lægeetisk Nævn vurderer, at Svend Lings i sit arbejde med aktiv dødshjælp har handlet i strid med de etiske principper for læger.

8h

8h

UCI researchers identify new cause of brain bleeds

A team of researchers including UCI project scientist Rachita Sumbria, Ph.D., and UCI neurologist Mark J. Fisher, M.D., have provided, for the first time, evidence that blood deposits in the brain may not require a blood vessel tear. The researchers found that brain endothelial cells, the cells that line blood vessels of the brain, have the capacity for engulfing red blood cells and depositing the

9h

Motor learning for precise motor execution

Scientists at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, RIKEN, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Nozomi Hospital and Tokyo Medical and Dental University have identified acquisition of two types of internal models for motor control, which are likely to be stored in the cerebellum. They show that motor control in human hand reaching movement relies on two types of motor learning: (

9h

Establishing metastasis

Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina have discovered that a protein called VRK1 might help cancer to take root in new parts of the body. In results published in the journal PLOS ONE on Sept. 4, 2018, VRK1 was discovered to be necessary for mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition, which scientists suspect may be important for the establishment of metastasis.

9h

Police on Twitter: Talking to the community, or just to themselves?Twitter New Dehumanizing

North American police departments have been using Twitter for operational and public relations purposes for more than a decade.

9h

Infrared camera to ensure high-quality 3-D reproducibility of parts

The addition of a new infrared camera at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source narrows the gap between basic and applied research in additive manufacturing.

9h

How can we limit climate change damage to the global economy?

The international community's ambition to fight against climate change comes at a cost: between US$50,000 billion and US$90,000 billion over the next 15 years according to the bottom-end estimates of economist Adair Turner, and the top-end figures from economists at the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate and its New Climate Economy project. By comparison, annual world GDP totals nearly U

9h

Novartis slashes thousands of jobs in Switzerland, UK

Pharmaceutical giant Novartis said Tuesday it will cut more than 2,000 jobs in Switzerland by 2022, while some 400 jobs could go in Britain as part of a global restructuring.

9h

Tracking the interstellar object 'Oumuamua to its home

A team of astronomers led by Coryn Bailer-Jones of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy has tracked the interstellar object 'Oumuamua to several possible home stars. The object was discovered in late 2017 – this was the first time astronomers have been able to observe an astronomical object from another star system visiting our own Solar System. Bailer-Jones and his colleagues used data from the

9h

Report outlines keys to election security

The most secure form of voting technology remains the familiar, durable innovation known as paper, according to a report authored by a group of election experts, including two prominent scholars from MIT.

9h

Negative perception of social housing is outdated, say researchers

Social housing has improved over time, and is not as negatively perceived by residents as is so often thought, a major review has revealed.

9h

Europe's Ariane 5 rocket set for 100th blast off

A European-made rocket will blast off Tuesday from French Guiana for the 100th time, in a symbolic landmark for its manufacturer as it comes under increasing pressure from Elon Musk's SpaceX programme.

9h

After years-long wait, Israelis board new fast train

Israelis climbed aboard the country's new high-speed train on Tuesday as it partially opened to whisk passengers from Jerusalem to Ben Gurion airport, a massive project years in the making.

9h

Scientists discover new mechanism for information storage in one atom

Scientists at Radboud University discovered a new mechanism for magnetic storage of information in the smallest unit of matter: a single atom. While the proof of principle was demonstrated at very low temperatures, this mechanism shows promise for room temperature operation. In this way, it will be possible to store a thousands of times more information than in current hard drives. Their findings

9h

New emissions tests push BMW into profit warning

German high-end carmaker BMW said Tuesday that new stricter emissions tests for cars as well as refits to older vehicles and global trade tensions would leave revenues and profits short of its full-year forecast.

9h

Archaeologists discover 'massive' ancient building in Egypt

Egypt says archaeologists have discovered a "massive" ancient building in the town of Mit Rahina, 20 kilometers, or 12 miles, south of Cairo.

9h

Growing Brains in Lab

Scientists create 3-dimensional brain spheroids—small, spherical, laboratory-grown human brain tissue — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

These changes could make U.S. home buyouts more equal

Key changes could make government home buyout programs for houses in areas at risk for flooding more just and more effective in response to climate change, according to new research. Imagine a major storm hits your neighborhood and the government offers to purchase homes with “a history of flood damage.” Your basement is completely flooded. Will you qualify for the buyout? What about your neighbo

9h

Crucial video evidence of war crimes is being deleted – how can it be saved?

From Syria to Myanmar and beyond, many of today's most intractable and brutal conflicts are being documented by everyday internet users equipped with smartphones. But even though they're documenting vital evidence that could one day help convict perpetrators of atrocities, their footage and photos are at risk from the very platforms that host them.

9h

Speech recognition technology for air traffic controllers

The popularity of air transport continues to grow, placing an even greater workload on air traffic controllers (ATCOs). Their predicament can be improved through an automatic speech recognition system closely integrated with an arrival manager developed by EU and SESAR funded researchers.

9h

A facade that is a power plant and a guarantee of wellbeing

Anyone who spends most of their day indoors knows the importance of a comfortable atmosphere to work and live in. Researchers from EPFL's Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory are searching for ways to maximize the energy gain from a building's envelope while also optimizing interior comfort in an environmentally friendly way. They are demonstrating how this can be done with "SolAce," the l

9h

Graphics—key to science and maths success in schools

Developing diagrams and visual representations can lead to huge improvements in student performance and engagement in STEM subjects. Deakin researchers are taking their findings to schools across the country.

9h

Culturally competent robots – the future in elderly care

Future robots will assist the elderly while adapting to the culture of the individual they are caring for. The first of this type of robots are now being tested in retirement homes within the scope of "Caresses," an interdisciplinary project where AI researchers from Örebro University are participating.

9h

Stemming the tide of beach litter

Over four fifths of the litter on European beaches is plastic, and over 50 percent is made of single-use plastic, according to a new scientific report.

9h

This plan could get the oil industry to cut carbon emissions

A new analysis proposes a model for how relatively small government payments could pave the way for oil reservoirs to stash away more CO 2 than their burned contents unleash. In February 2018, Donald Trump signed into law new tax credits that reward oil companies for capturing carbon dioxide and preventing it from entering the atmosphere—either by burying the gas underground or by pumping it into

9h

Highly efficient single-atom catalyst could help auto industry

A longer-lasting, higher-efficiency platinum catalyst has been developed by a Dalhousie University-led team, a result with major implications for the automobile industry.

9h

Bioplastics sourced from wood

The shift from fossil-based industries to a bioeconomy is creating a growing demand for biobased chemicals, materials and fuels as sustainable and renewable alternatives. One possible source is fructose from wood for use in the production of bioplastics.

9h

First monoploid reference sequence of sugarcane

Most species are diploids and have two sets of chromosomes, one from each parent. In contrast, many crops have multiple sets of chromosomes (they are "polyploid") and their complex genomes are more difficult to sequence and assemble, in turn limiting the use of modern, genomic breeding in these crops. For diploid species, sequencing programs generally focus on a genotype with two identical sets of

9h

Microsoft's Xbox Adaptive Controller Gives Disabled Gamers a Power-Up

Other game companies also are scrambling to introduce their own accessible hardware. But a customer base of more than 30 million gamers may give developers the push they need.

9h

Twitter Releases New Policy on 'Dehumanizing Speech'

The social network is also soliciting public feedback for the first time in updating its rules.

9h

Learn From These Bugs. Don't Let Social Media Zombify You

The idea of "zombie scrolling syndrome" has legs, after all. From worms to wasps, nature has figured out mind control—in ways that bring to mind social media.

9h

Hybrid operating room streamlines diagnosis, treatment of lung cancer

Representing a paradigm shift in thoracic surgery, the hybrid operating room combines three techniques into a single appointment eliminating multiple clinical visits for improved patient experience and outcomes.

9h

Examining gratitude in buyer-seller relationships

Research demonstrates that customer gratitude is linked to increases in share of wallet, sales revenue, sales growth and customer commitment. What about the role of salesperson gratitude in buyer-seller relationships? Does salesperson gratitude motivate behavior that is beneficial to firms? These questions are at the center of this new study.

9h

Researchers find ferrimagnets could be used to speed up spintronics devices

A team of researchers from MIT, the Max-Born-Institut, Technische Universität Berlin and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) has found that using ferrimagnets instead of ferromagnets could theoretically speed up spintronics devices. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the group describes their research and what they found.

9h

NIST details plans for reviewing the scientific foundations of forensic methods

NIST has published Draft NISTIR 8225, Scientific Foundation Reviews. This publication describes NIST's approach to conducting scientific foundation reviews, which seek to document and evaluate the body of scientific data underpinning forensic science methods. NIST requests that readers submit comments, which will be considered when producing a final version of the document.

9h

A unitary theory of metric analysis helps unveil structures within data

As the EU-funded MANET project worked with abstract geometric structures it was able to model a range of phenomena as integral curves of vector fields. This allowed the project to shed light on retinal vessels and cortical connectivity, as well as vehicle dynamics and traffic flow.

9h

New insights into the role of Coptic monasteries in the economy of late antique Egypt

Greater insight into the economy of late antique Egypt (fifth to eighth centuries AD) has been revealed by an EU project which examined the evidence of Coptic monastic sources from the Nile valley.

9h

What can fossil shellfish tell us about our environmental future? Plenty.

The Earth's climate is changing, and it's changed before. The world's oceans are warming, and they've warmed before.

9h

A quantum leap toward expanding the search for dark matter

Figuring out how to extend the search for dark matter particles – dark matter describes the stuff that makes up an estimated 85 percent of the total mass of the universe yet so far has only been measured by its gravitational effects – is a bit like building a better mousetrap… that is, a mousetrap for a mouse you've never seen, will never see directly, may be joined by an odd assortment of other m

9h

Solens rotationsmønster kan være årsag til solstorme

En undersøgelse af rotationshastigheden for 13 solstjerner giver måske en forklaring på, hvordan solstorme opstår.

9h

Researchers study presence of fluorinated chemicals in firefighter clothing

Scientists at the University of Notre Dame will begin an independent study of turnout gear worn by firefighters after initial samples tested positive for fluorine.

9h

Extreme weather events rarely occur in isolation

The end of the baking hot summer is a forceful reminder of what the climate could hold in store for us in the future. Between April and August of this year, rainfall in Eastern Switzerland was lower than has ever been recorded. And during the same period, temperatures were very high.

9h

Liquid climate archives: A study on tide levels in the straits

A new study published in Scientific Reports reports that tidal measurements reveal something about the masses of ocean water, and therefore the climate of the past, and act as "liquid climate archives."

9h

After the Storm: A Live Look at the Duke Marine Lab

Tune in Thursday to see the effects of Hurricane Florence on the Beaufort, NC facility.

9h

Syddanmark fastlægger regler for sponsorater af lægers efteruddannelse

Nye retningslinjer for samarbejde med lægemiddelindustrien slår fast, at virksomheder ikke kan sponsorere specifikke læger efteruddannelse.

9h

Professor i præcisionsmedicin bliver ny forskningsleder på Onkologisk Afdeling i Odense

Henrik Ditzel er tiltrådt som forskningsleder ved Onkologisk Afdeling på Odense Universitetshospital. Her skal han styrke kræftforskning og implementering af præcisionsmedicin i klinikken.

9h

Syddanmark får fælles it-løsning til billeddiagnostik

Carestream vinder udbud om fælles it-løsning til billeddiagnostik i Region Syddanmark. Regionens radiologiske afdelinger og klinikere får dermed en samlet løsning.

9h

Automated vehicles may encourage a new breed of distracted drivers

Few people pay close attention to the traffic situation unfolding around them when they're travelling as a passenger in a car, even if they're in the front seat. And that could make partially automated vehicles, which are operating on our roads right now, problematic.

10h

Some female termites can reproduce without males

Populations of the termite species Glyptotermes nakajimai can form successful, reproducing colonies in absence of males, according to a new study.

10h

Artificial intelligence to improve drug combination design and personalized medicine

A new auto-commentary looks at how an emerging area of artificial intelligence, specifically the analysis of small systems-of-interest specific datasets, can be used to improve drug development and personalized medicine.

10h

Exercise may delay cognitive decline in people with rare Alzheimer's disease

For individuals carrying a genetic mutation that causes Alzheimer's disease, engaging in at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week may have beneficial effects on markers of Alzheimer's disease brain changes and may delay cognitive decline, according to a new study.

10h

Lung inflammation from childhood asthma linked with later anxiety

Persistent lung inflammation may be one possible explanation for why having asthma during childhood increases your risk for developing anxiety later in life, according to researchers.

10h

Genome duplication drives evolution of species

Polyploid plants have a duplicate set of chromosomes. As a result, large-scale genetic changes are therefore possible in the new species, making it more adaptable in comparison with the parental species, as has now been demonstrated by researchers using rockcress.

10h

New drug blocks pancreatic cancer growth in mice, study finds

A newly developed drug can prevent the most common type of pancreatic cancer from growing and spreading in laboratory mice, according to a new study. The study also demonstrated in mice that the drug, Metavert, may prevent patients from developing a resistance to currently used pancreatic cancer chemotherapies.

10h

Genetic study of 15th century samples shows adaptive changes in bacteria that cause relapsing fever

A team of researchers with members from the University of Oslo and the Norwegian Institute for Cultural Heritage Research has conducted a genetic analysis of the bacteria that causes relapsing fever obtained from 15th century skeletons in Norway. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study and what they found when they compared their

10h

Save the Wolves, Control the Moose

Researchers plan to relocate mainland wolves to an island in Lake Superior in an effort to boost the near-extinct predator population and limit the growth of local moose herds.

10h

10h

The FDA just issued a warning for flea and tick medication that might cause seizures

Health Here's what you should know The FDA is warning vets and pet owners about a particular class of flea and tick products, but that doesn't mean your pup or cat should go without.

10h

10h

We Need to Talk About Amazon's Maya Rudolph and Fred Armisen Comedy *Forever*

But not too much. We don’t want to spoil the twist.

10h

Neato's Botvac D4 Connected Is Our New Midrange Fave

Neato's new midrange offering gives Roomba a run for its money.

10h

The Dad Joke Doctrine

Every time we drive through farm country in my dad’s home state of Indiana, we know it’s coming. As soon as he spots it in his peripheral vision from the driver’s seat, it’s like clockwork: “Hey, you know a guy died in there?” he says, feigning nonchalance as he points to the round barn just off the highway. There is silence, maybe a mutual here-we-go glance shared between the rest of us, as my d

10h

Humans Contribute to Earth's Wobble, Scientists Say

Droughts, melting ice and rising seas linked to anthropogenic climate change are altering the planet’s motions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Image of the Day: As Slippery As

A new species of swamp eel has been discovered in India.

10h

Pond dwellers called Euglena swim in polygons to avoid light

In any seemingly quiet pond the still waters actually teem with tiny pond dwellers called Euglena gracilis. Unseen to the naked eye, the single-celled organism spirals through the water, pulled along a relatively straight path by a whiplike appendage in search of just the right level of light.

10h

Hør elektronisk vrooom fra Tesla-lastbil

Lyder som en blanding af en scooter og en racerbil.

10h

Google’s New Tool to Fight Climate Change

In the next decade or so, more than 6,000 cities, states, and provinces around the world will try to do something that has eluded humanity for 25 years: reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, which warm the atmosphere and cause climate change. The city-level leaders overseeing this task won’t have the same tools available to their national peers. Most of them won’t have an Environmental Prot

10h

AI eavesdrops on Borneo’s rainforests to check on biodiversity

Solar-powered sensors are listening in to rainforests in Borneo to check on biodiversity. One plan is to use AI to identify different animal calls

10h

Adding Depth: 3-D Cell Culture

Download this eBook to learn about how the third dimension affects cell behavior, the similarities and differences between 2-D and 3-D culture, common 3-D culture models, and how to image and analyze 3-D culture models!

10h

Tre truede dyrearter der har fået comeback

Verdens truede dyr er under et stort pres. Men der er eksempler på, at udviklingen kan vendes.

11h

UK life expectancy improvement has stalled, figures show

Office for National Statistics says growth in life expectancy is lowest since records began Growth in life expectancy in the UK has come to a halt, and in some areas decreased, figures show . The statistics represent the lowest improvement in life expectancy since records began and puts the UK behind other leading economies. Continue reading…

11h

If Extra Dimensions Do Exist, They Must Be Really, Really Small

So far, gravitational waves have found no hints of extra dimensions, but there may still be some really tiny ones lurking out there.

11h

Pregnant Women May Now Have a New Way to Limit Unhealthy Weight Gain

A new study suggests that with the help of nutritional counseling and a smartphone app, pregnant women who are overweight or obese can safely restrict their weight gain.

11h

150 Years Ago, Mobius Discovered Weird One-Sided Objects. Here's Why They're So Cool.

The inventor of the brain-teasing Möbius strip died 150 years ago, but his creation continues to spawn new ideas in mathematics.

11h

Urea-absorbing ability of giant clams

NUS biologists have discovered that the fluted giant clam absorbs urea from its surroundings and the absorption rate is enhanced by exposure to light.

11h

As climate changes, plants might not suck carbon from the air fast enough

Current climate change models might be overestimating how much carbon dioxide plants can suck from the atmosphere.

11h

Amazon mangrove forest stores twice as much carbon per acre as region's famous rainforest

Scientists have determined for the first time that Amazon's waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region's famous rainforest.

11h

10 mysteries of the universe: What makes supermassive black holes?

Black holes billions of times the mass of the sun pose a huge challenge to cosmic theories: there hasn’t been enough time since the big bang for them to form

11h

Genome duplication drives evolution of species

Many wild and cultivated plants arise through the combination of two species. The genome of these so-called polyploid species often consists of a quadruple set of chromosomes—a double set for each parental species—and thus has about twice as many genes as the original species. About 50 years ago, evolutionary biologists postulated that this process drives evolution, leading to new species. Due to

11h

Oxide materials discovery may advance electronic device development

Materials scientists at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have made a breakthrough discovery in the study of oxide heterostructures, substances that have the potential to revolutionize advanced electronics, memory technologies and photovoltaics.

11h

Four extremely young asteroid families identified

Four families of extremely young asteroids have been identified by researchers affiliated with São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Guaratinguetá, Brazil. An article on the discovery has been published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

11h

Doubts and dialogue may alter public perceptions of science

Science projects within controversial fields such as synthetic biology could benefit from experimenting with communication settings in which experts share their thoughts and feelings with each other and the public. This allows for a more open and constructive dialogue with the public about research—and may even generate new research ideas, a new Ph.D. thesis shows.

11h

Ready-to-use recipe for turning plant waste into gasoline

Bioscience engineers at KU Leuven, Belgium, already knew how to make gasoline in the laboratory from plant waste such as sawdust. Now, the researchers have developed a road map, as it were, for industrial cellulose gasoline.

11h

Can Seeds in a Dead Person's Stomach Really Sprout into Trees?

A story of apparent tragedy and luck is making its way around the Internet, describing how a fig seed in a murdered man's stomach grew into a tree, which later helped authorities find his corpse almost 40 years later in a Cypriot cave.

11h

Safe spaces: Where should the line of censorship be drawn?

Why you should want your ideological opposites on campus Universities must be safe—but they cannot be censored Don't be afraid of being offended. Be afraid of never changing your mind.

11h

The Best-Ever Photos of an Asteroid’s Rugged Terrain

Over the weekend, a pair of robots, each about the size of a frying pan, tumbled out of a spacecraft and landed on the surface of another world. The robots are part of a Japanese mission to visit an asteroid, collect some of its rocky material, and then return it to Earth. In late 2014, Japan launched the Hayabusa2 spacecraft bound for Ryugu, a small asteroid that measures slightly more than half

11h

Hurricane Season Is Especially Hard for Farmworkers

Gloria Castillo Luna, a single mother of four living in Faison, North Carolina, evacuated her family from the home she rents to a shelter just before Hurricane Florence hit a little over a week ago. Luna and her kids had a terrible experience during a storm two years ago, so she knew the shelter was worth the trip. “After my experience with my children during Hurricane Matthew, which felt very da

11h

Should the Catholic Church Pay Reparations to Sex-Abuse Victims?

The Catholic Church’s sex-abuse scandal has reached such a fever pitch that its top officials are now compelled to act. Last week, Pope Francis expelled a priest and accepted the resignation of two bishops, all of whom were accused of abuse in Chile. U.S. bishops promised to set up a hotline to field complaints about abusive religious leaders. In Pennsylvania, where a grand-jury report recently a

11h

The Creepy-Cute Robot that Picks Peppers With its Face

Researchers have developed a robot that roams a greenhouse, eyeballing peppers to determine if they’re mature enough before sawing them off the plant.

11h

How to Use Apple’s Screen Time Controls on iOS 12

The latest update includes a report of the time spent on your iPhone, app time limits, and new parental controls.

11h

Astronomers may have spotted the birth of a neutron star

Scientists say they’ve witnessed a type of neutron star called a pulsar being born in the wake of a massive supernova for the first time.

11h

America's Health Care System Could Be So Much Better

But it would take a change of culture and investment to make that happen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Fastfrosset mobil-auktion: Socialdemokrat kræver forklaring

Den pludselige udskydelse af en længe ventet frekvensauktion får Socialdemokraterne til at undre sig.

11h

Bankchef: Hacking kan udløse næste finanskrise

Det er uhyggeligt at opleve de sikkerhedsbegivenheder, hvor teknologi bliver manipuleret udefra, lyder det fra topchef i norsk bank.

11h

Will L.A.'s Anti-Terrorist Subway Scanners Be Adopted Everywhere?

Terahertz millimeter-wave technology will screen passengers for bombs and suicide vests from 10 meters distance as they rush to make the next train — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

With Instagram’s Founders Out, Welcome to Facebook Inc.

The founders of Instagram, Mike Krieger and Kevin Systrom, plan to resign , The New York Times reported Monday. Their exit marks the fifth founder departure from Facebook’s high-profile acquisitions. WhatsApp’s Brian Acton and Jan Koum left in 2017 and 2018, respectively, leaving a reported $1.3 billion on the table . Palmer Luckey left Facebook’s $2 billion VR acquisition, Oculus, in 2017, too.

12h

Yale Law School’s Reckoning Over Brett Kavanaugh

NEW HAVEN , Conn.—On most Monday mornings, the main corridor at Yale Law School bustles with students. Thirty years ago, a young Brett Kavanaugh was one of them. On this Monday morning, as the Senate Judiciary Committee in Washington, D.C., wrestled with new allegations against Kavanaugh, everything here was still. More than 300 demonstrators dressed in black gathered at around 9:30 a.m. for a si

12h

Elizabeth Warren’s Ambitious Fix for America’s Housing Crisis

Ten years ago, the subprime-mortgage crisis stripped millions of Americans of their homes. Many haven’t gotten those homes back and now face skyrocketing rents. Ask an economist, or any recent graduate trying to afford rent, and they’ll tell you: America is still in a housing crisis. On Tuesday, Senator Elizabeth Warren introduced a bill tackling the issue head on, trying to lower the cost of hom

12h

The Abandoned World of 1982

W e are invited now to consider the late adolescence and early young manhood of Judge Brett Kavanaugh. It seems to be a trajectory that follows a classic pattern, familiar to us from literature as well as from its pale reflection, life. Call it a very modified version of the Prince Hal–to–Henry V flight plan: from wastrel youth with low companions to hero capable of leading men into battle. Call

12h

Home break-ins by black bears surge in Connecticut suburbs

Tom Bradley had grown accustomed to seeing black bears walk through his Connecticut neighborhood, but this month he was alarmed to find something trying to turn a doorknob to enter his house.

12h

Recharging soils with carbon could make farms more productive

Turning crop waste and discarded paper into a material called biochar could help to capture carbon from the atmosphere and store it in the soil while also helping to enrich farmland.

12h

Memory-jogging robot to keep people sharp in 'smart' retirement homes

A robot that reminds older people where they have put things and helps them exercise has been used by residents in three retirement homes in a trial to combat cognitive decline in later age.

12h

Eksperter jagter aflytningsudstyr i det norske Storting

Eksperter undersøger, om en spionsigtet russer har efterladt aflytningsudstyr i Norges folketing.

12h

Du skal kunne høre omdrejningerne på modeltoget

Men det kræver en decoder og en højttaler ombord.

12h

Take a Look at How Quickly a Forest Can Recover From Fire

Though it appears destructive, fire in the New Jersey Pinelands is a force of renewal.

13h

‘Highly Aggressive’ Green Crabs From Canada Menace Maine’s Coast

The crabs, which are known as the “cockroach of the sea,” eat oysters, can prey on lobsters in groups and have been known to turn on each other, experts said.

13h

Portugal shipwreck is 'discovery of a decade'

The wreckage of a boat that sank 400 years ago is found to contain currency used in the slave trade.

13h

Schoolyard tree cover predicts math performance in high-poverty urban schools

What if improving academic performance in some of the nation's most disadvantaged and lowest-achieving schools was as easy as planting trees in the schoolyard? It's not that simple, of course, but a new study from the University of Illinois suggests school greening could be part of the solution.

13h

Genome duplication drives evolution of species

Polyploid plants have a duplicate set of chromosomes. As a result, large-scale genetic changes are therefore possible in the new species, making it more adaptable in comparison with the parental species, as has now been proven by UZH researchers with rockcress.

13h

VW satser på elbiler med 16 nye fabrikker

Tidsfristen er 2022, og de fleste anlæg skal ligge i Europa. Men Kina har en særlig rolle.

13h

Space Mining — Learning How To Fuel An Interplanetary Gas Station

Real space travel will necessitate interplanetary gas stations on the moon, or on asteroids. A Colorado university has launched the first degree program in "space mining." (Image credit: Dan Boyce for NPR)

13h

Airports At Water's Edge Battle Rising Sea Levels

Many major airports are on low-lying coastal land where flooding is getting worse. They're building walls, berms and other barriers to try to keep planes and people moving. (Image credit: Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

13h

Schoolyard tree cover predicts math performance in high-poverty urban schools

What if improving academic performance in some of the nation's most disadvantaged and lowest-achieving schools was as easy as planting trees in the schoolyard? It's not that simple, of course, but a new study from the University of Illinois suggests school greening could be part of the solution.

13h

UK civil servants use Slack to chat about games, drinking and romance

A freedom of information request has revealed how UK civil servants use Slack, a popular chat service, to talk about everything from Pokémon Go to polyamory

13h

14h

Flu Shots: It’s That Time Again

Flu shots are safe and effective. They not only protect the recipient but others in the community who are more vulnerable. Get your flu shot!

15h

Dust storms on Titan spotted for the first time

Data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft has revealed what appear to be giant dust storms in equatorial regions of Saturn's moon Titan. The discovery, described in a paper published on Sept. 24 in Nature Geoscience, makes Titan the third Solar System body, in addition to Earth and Mars, where dust storms have been observed.

15h

New York seeks to claw back 'Big Oyster' past

One sunny morning in New York, a dozen biologists and volunteers stand in knee-deep water, chucking net sacks of oyster shells down a human chain, before planting them in containers on the riverbed.

15h

Japan preschools using tablets to prep tots for digital age

It's drawing time at this suburban nursery school in Japan, but instead of crayons, tiny fingers are tapping on colors on iPad screens and taking selfies. Digital schooling has arrived in this nation long known for its zealous commitment to "three R's" education.

16h

ScienceTake: In the Garden of Eels

Garden eels anchor themselves in the sand, which helps them feed on drifting plankton in strong currents.

16h

The Strange Life of Garden Eels

Garden eels use their mucus to anchor themselves to the ocean floor and contort into strange shapes and positions to catch plankton.

16h

Google tunes search for prescience and pictures

Google unveiled changes Monday aimed at making the leading search engine more visual and intuitive to the point that it can answer questions before being asked.

16h

Instagram co-founders resign from social media company

The co-founders of Instagram are resigning their positions with the social media company without explanation.

16h

Trump plan to rollback fuel standards to get second hearing

The Trump administration's proposal to roll back national fuel economy standards was headed for its second public hearing a day after California officials and scores of speakers blasted it as a danger to the environment and public health.

16h

Who believes in conspiracies? Research offers a theory

The Apollo moon landing was staged. The CIA killed JFK. 9/11 was a plot by the U.S. government to justify a war in the Middle East. President Barack Obama was not a natural born citizen. The massacre at Sandy Hook elementary school was staged as a pretense for increased gun control. The "deep state" is trying to destroy Donald Trump's presidency.

16h

Artificial intelligence to improve drug combination design and personalized medicine

A new auto-commentary published in SLAS Technology looks at how an emerging area of artificial intelligence, specifically the analysis of small systems-of-interest specific datasets, can be used to improve drug development and personalized medicine. The auto-commentary builds on a study recently published by the authors in Science Translational Medicine about an artificial intelligence (AI) platfo

16h

Artificial intelligence to improve drug combination design & personalized medicine

A new auto-commentary looks at how an emerging area of artificial intelligence, specifically the analysis of small systems-of-interest specific datasets, can be used to improve drug development and personalized medicine.

17h

The September Marathon is nigh!

But soft, what cell through yonder portal breaks? It is the marathon, and O, what fun! All right, that’s enough Shakespeare for heading back to school. You’ve got this, Eyewirers. Starting at 8 PM EDT on 9/26 you’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete 1-2 cells! Bonus points and cell naming guidelines are detailed in your competition notification on eyewire.org. If the first cell finishes before t

17h

#Verdensmål: Ny kampagne skal ruste unge til at redde verden

Unge danskere vil gerne leve mere bæredygtigt, men ved ikke hvordan. Det skal ny kampagne på de sociale medier hjælpe med.

18h

Who believes in conspiracies? New research offers a theory

Conspiracy theories have been cooked up throughout history, but they are increasingly visible lately.So what draws people to them?New research by Josh Hart, associate professor of psychology, suggests that people with certain personality traits and cognitive styles are more likely to believe in conspiracy theories. The research was recently published in the Journal of Individual Differences.

18h

New drug blocks pancreatic cancer growth in mice, study finds

A newly developed drug can prevent the most common type of pancreatic cancer from growing and spreading in laboratory mice, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai. The study also demonstrated in mice that the drug, Metavert, may prevent patients from developing a resistance to currently used pancreatic cancer chemotherapies.

18h

Lung inflammation from childhood asthma linked with later anxiety

Persistent lung inflammation may be one possible explanation for why having asthma during childhood increases your risk for developing anxiety later in life, according to Penn State researchers.

18h

Comparable risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism between patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism and patients with cancer

Patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) carry a high risk of recurrence. Accordingly, a 16-year Danish prospective cohort study of nearly 74,000 patients with incident VTE concluded that the risk of recurrence is substantial. Furthermore, the scientists found that the recurrence risk is similar for patients with cancer and patients with unprovoked VTE, reports The American Journal of Medicine.

18h

Study: Exercise may delay cognitive decline in people with rare Alzheimer's disease

For individuals carrying a genetic mutation that causes Alzheimer's disease, engaging in at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week may have beneficial effects on markers of Alzheimer's disease brain changes and may delay cognitive decline, according to a new study.

18h

KU går glip af besparelser efter kuldsejlet it-projekt: Humper videre på ældgammel it

Københavns Universitet vil stadigvæk ikke oplyse, hvorfor man har droppet stort it-projekt efter fem år – og hvad det har kostet. Aktindsigt viser, at Universitet går glip af basale HR-funktioner.

18h

Smitsomme bakterier går i dvale og vågner på ny

Danske forskere har opdaget, hvordan et enzym får farlige bakterier til at overleve antibiotika uden at være resistente.

19h

Bad moon rising: is there a link between lunar phases and crime? | Wayne Petherick

Researchers say that the intensity of moonlight can contribute to an escalation in criminal activity It’s a full moon on 25 September. If past months have been anything to go by, this will be accompanied by a round of public chat about how this affects human behaviour – from claims of more hospital admissions and arrests to crazy antics in children. Continue reading…

19h

Politics this week

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19h

Judge Restores Grizzly Bears' Protections As Endangered Species

The ruling blocks planned hunting of grizzlies. Judge Dana Christensen said the federal government didn't use the best available science when it took them off the threatened-species list last year. (Image credit: Jim Urquhart/AP)

20h

Brett Kavanaugh's Unprecedented Fox News Interview

With his Supreme Court nomination in the balance, Judge Brett Kavanaugh appeared on Fox News, alongside his wife, Ashley, in an aggressive interview Monday night . Not that the questions were combative. Martha MacCallum asked straightforward, but never especially challenging, questions. And the answers Kavanaugh gave weren’t all that truculent. What was aggressive was Kavanaugh’s presence on Fox

20h

Scale Can Measure Medicine—and Play a Scale, Too

Researchers have designed a musical instrument that can detect counterfeit drugs by the pitch of its notes. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

20h

Sony's aibo robotic dog can sit, fetch and learn what its owner likes

Aibo, a $2,899 robotic dog from Sony, just might scamper its way onto some wish lists this holiday season.

21h

Quiz: Test your knowledge of evolution

There are many myths and misunderstandings about evolution – how much do you know?

21h

India's solar power ambitions

India has big solar ambitions, but could recent policy uncertainties cast a shadow on its plans?

21h

Welcome West Fallows

For my wife, Deb, and me in recent years, a big theme has been the renewal of America at the local level. Here’s the latest proof: It comes with the arrival late Friday night of young West Fallows, shown above. She made her appearance just before midnight on September 21 — officially, the last hour of summer — weighing in at 6 pounds and 7 ounces, in Santa Barbara, California. Her parents, our so

21h

Climate change kills Antarctica's ancient moss beds

Climate change is killing Antarctic's mosses, hardy plants growing at the bottom of the planet for centuries.

22h

Advanced animal society thrives without males

Termite colonies have been found to thrive and reproduce without males, new research from the University of Sydney reveals. The findings provide new evidence that males aren't required to maintain some advanced animal populations. They add momentum to questions about the impact and function of males in animal societies.

22h

Some female termites can reproduce without males

Populations of the termite species Glyptotermes nakajimai can form successful, reproducing colonies in absence of males, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Biology.

22h

Some female termites can reproduce without males

Populations of the termite species Glyptotermes nakajimai can form successful, reproducing colonies in absence of males, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Biology.

22h

Google Is Getting a Lot More Visual to Keep You on Its Site

Google announces changes to visual searches, aimed partly at Instagram.

22h

22h

ICoast eyes better online access with satellite broadband

Abu Dhabi's Yahsat on Monday launched its satellite broadband service in Ivory Coast in a bid to boost internet access in this west African nation where only 27 percent of the population is online.

23h

Leaders back climate change urgency in New York

Heads of state and government on Monday kicked off "Climate Week," held every year on the margins of the UN General Assembly, by urging world leaders to act urgently to reduce global warming.

23h

DNA tests bring together French son of GI and US half-brother

A Frenchman who spent his whole adult life searching for his American father, a soldier who fought in Europe during World War Two, said he was "bowled over" after coming face-to-face with a previously unknown half-brother on Monday thanks to a chance DNA breakthrough.

23h

The Atlantic Daily: An Eerie Symmetry

What We’re Following Tales of Uncertainty: Several new allegations of sexual misconduct have emerged against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The GOP’s apparent haste to confirm Kavanaugh is tearing an already ugly confirmation process apart at the seams. Meanwhile, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who as of Monday evening is still holding on to his job , will meet with President

23h

Ford executive says may boost production in China to avoid tariffs

Ford is looking at speeding up plans to build more Lincoln models in Chinese plants amid the growing trade war with the United States that has made US exports less attractive, a senior executive said Monday.

23h

California urges Trump to drop plan for weaker fuel standard

California officials demanded Monday that the Trump administration back off a plan to weaken national fuel economy standards aimed at reducing car emissions and saving people money at the pump, saying the proposed rollback would damage people's health and exacerbate climate change.

23h

What Brexit could mean for your ferret

Britain laid out Monday the potential impact of Brexit for ferrets in case no deal is reached with the EU, along with warnings on air travel, freight transport and copyrights.

23h

Judge restores protections for grizzly bears, blocking hunts

A U.S. judge has restored federal protections to grizzly bears in the Northern Rocky Mountains and blocked the first hunts planned for the animals in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades.

23h

Ancient mice discovered by climate cavers

The fossils of two extinct mice species have been discovered in caves in tropical Queensland by scientists tracking environment changes.

23h

Doubts and dialogue may alter public perceptions of science

Science projects within controversial fields such as synthetic biology could benefit from experimenting with communication settings in which experts share their thoughts and feelings with each other and the public. This allows for a more open and constructive dialogue with the public about research – and may even generate new research ideas, new research suggests.

23h

Organs are not just bystanders, may be active participants in fighting autoimmune disease

Findings from mouse study suggest organs affected by autoimmune disease suppress immune cells using methods similar to those used by cancer cells to evade detection.

23h

A biomarker in the brain's circulation system may be Alzheimer's earliest warning

Leaks in the blood-brain barrier can provide early detection for Alzheimer's and diseases.

23h

How a molecular signal helps plant cells decide when to make oil

Scientists identify new details of how a sugar-signaling molecule helps regulate oil production in plant cells. The work could point to new ways to engineer plants to produce substantial amounts of oil for use as biofuels or in the production of other oil-based products.

23h

Photosynthesis discovery could help next-gen biotechnologies

Researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ) and the University of Münster (WWU) have purified and visualized the 'Cyclic Electron Flow' (CEF) supercomplex, a critical part of the photosynthetic machinery in all plants, in a discovery that could help guide the development of next-generation solar biotechnologies.

23h

How fruits got their eye-catching colors

Red plums. Green melons. Purple figs. Ripe fruits come in an array of greens, yellows, oranges, browns, reds and purples. Scientists say they have new evidence that plants owe their rainbow of fruit colors to the different animals that eat them.

23h

Letters: ‘Forgive and Forget, Why Don’t You?’

I Believe Her When Caitlin Flanagan was in high school, she faced her own Brett Kavanaugh . If Christine Blasey Ford’s story is true, Flanagan wrote last week, “we’ll have to decide whether you get to attack a girl, show no remorse, and eventually become a Supreme Court justice. My own inclination is: No.” Caitlin Flanagan’s story resonates so strongly with my own high-school experience that I fe

23h

Parasite makes quick exit when researchers remove the handbrake

Melbourne researchers have discovered a way to halt the invasion of the toxoplasmosis-causing parasite into cells, depriving the parasite of a key factor necessary for its growth.

23h

Astronomers use Earth's natural history as guide to spot vegetation on new worlds

By looking at Earth's full natural history and evolution, astronomers may have found a template for vegetation fingerprints—borrowing from epochs of changing flora—to determine the age of habitable exoplanets.

23h

Satellite sees short-lived Tropical Cyclone Kirk

Tropical Storm Kirk formed on Saturday, Sept. 22. By Monday, Sept. 24, Kirk lacked the closed circulation that is a prerequisite for tropical cyclone status. The NOAA-20 satellite provided a visible image of the storm at its peak.

23h

How will climate change stress the power grid? Hint: Look at dew point temperatures

A new study suggests the power industry is underestimating how climate change could affect the long-term demand for electricity in the United States.

23h

Team finds Wigner crystal—not Mott insulator—in 'magic-angle' graphene

Recently, a team of scientists led by Pablo Jarillo-Herrero at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) created a huge stir in the field of condensed matter physics when they showed that two sheets of graphene twisted at specific angles—dubbed "magic-angle" graphene—display two emergent phases of matter not observed in single sheets of graphene. Graphene is a honeycomb lattice of carbon ato

23h

North Korea's 2017 bomb test set off later earthquakes, new analysis finds

Using newly refined analysis methods, scientists have discovered that a North Korean nuclear bomb test last fall set off aftershocks over a period of eight months. The shocks, which occurred on a previously unmapped nearby fault, are a window into both the physics of nuclear explosions, and how natural earthquakes can be triggered. The findings are described in two papers just published online in

23h

Addictive behavior could trace back to an ancient retrovirus in our DNA

Health Understanding why some struggle more than others could help us find solutions. Human endogenous retroviruses are ancient retrovirus DNA that hangs around in our genes, passed from generation to generation as part of our genetic code.

23h

Renewed project could protect environment for millennia

A team that has included more than 85 researchers from three South Carolina universities is receiving $2 million to continue investigating how buried nuclear waste would react with soil and groundwater if it were to leak into the environment

1d

'Ground coffee' with soil perks in Brazil

Coffee is one of Brazil's biggest crops. Brazil's favorable climate helps coffee beans ripen and be ready for picking during a concentrated period of weeks. This makes mechanical harvesting an economically reasonable choice.

1d

Unprecedented study finds US ranks 27th among nations investing in education, health care

The United States ranks 27th in the world for its investments in education and health care as measurements of its commitment to economic growth, according to the first-ever scientific study ranking countries for their levels of human capital.The nation placed just behind Australia (ranked 26th) and just ahead of Czech Republic (ranked 28th). In contrast, China's ranking of 44th in 2016 represents

1d

The first rovers to explore an asteroid just sent photos home

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft has deployed a pair of rovers to the surface of asteroid Ryugu.

1d

Scientists search for coral's new home

Coral reefs have long faced problems like overfishing, global warming and pollution—but they're also threatened by how slow they regenerate.

1d

Violence in pre-Columbian Panama exaggerated, new study shows

Buried alive. Butchered. Decapitated. Hacked. Mutilated. Killed. Archaeologist Samuel K. Lothrop did not obfuscate when describing what he thought had happened to the 220 bodies his expedition excavated from Panama's Playa Venado site in 1951. The only problem is that Lothrop likely got it wrong. A new evaluation of the site's remains by Smithsonian archaeologists revealed no signs of trauma at or

1d

NASA's Terra Satellite finds Subtropical Storm Leslie drifting in Central Atlantic

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Subtropical Storm Leslie as it was meandering around the North Central Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 24, 2018.

1d

NASA's Terra Satellite glares at the 37-mile wide eye of Super Typhoon Trami

NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Super Typhoon Trami as it continued moving in a northwesterly direction in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. Terra provided an amazing image of the large eye.

1d

Cryo-EM reveals structure of protein responsible for regulating body temperature

A team led by Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists has revealed for the first time the atomic-level structure of TRPM2, a protein that may be a promising drug target for conditions such as Alzheimer's disease and bipolar disorder.

1d

Astronomers use Earth's natural history as guide to spot vegetation on new worlds

By looking at Earth's full natural history and evolution, astronomers may have found a template for vegetation fingerprints — borrowing from epochs of changing flora — to determine the age of habitable exoplanets.

1d

iPhone XS camera review: Complicated tech for simpler photography

Technology Every time you take a picture with the new iPhone, you're triggering trillions of operations. The magic photography gnomes inside the new iPhone camera are working overtime.

1d

Study finds US ranks 27th among nations investing in education, health care

The United States ranks 27th in the world for its investments in education and health care as measurements of its commitment to economic growth, according to the first-ever scientific study ranking countries for their levels of human capital.

1d

Drivers for Uber, Lyft see incomes fall as participation jumps

Drivers for Uber, Lyft and other US ridesharing services have seen their incomes fall by half in recent years as more people get behind the wheel, according to a study released Monday.

1d

Birds' voiceboxes are odd ducks

Birds' voiceboxes are in their chests instead of their throats like mammals and reptiles. Scientists aren't sure how or why birds evolved these unique voiceboxes, but a new study sheds some light on how they came about. Similarities in the windpipes of birds, crocodiles, cats, mice, and salamanders suggest that birds' weird voiceboxes might have arisen from a windpipe reinforcement. From this, sci

1d

Evidence that addictive behaviors have strong links with ancient retroviral infection

New research shows that an ancient retrovirus — HK2 — is more frequently found in drug addicts and thus is significantly associated with addiction.

1d

New earthquake risk model could better inform disaster planning

Researchers have developed a new way to model seismic risk, which they hope will better inform disaster risk reduction planning in earthquake-prone areas.

1d

Wigner crystal — not Mott insulator — in 'magic-angle' graphene

Recently, scientists created a stir in the field of condensed matter physics when they showed that two sheets of graphene twisted at specific angles display two emergent phases of matter. After a careful review of the experimental data researchers say that the insulating behavior of the "magic-angle" graphene is not Mott insulation, but something even more profound — a Wigner crystal.

1d

How fruits got their eye-catching colors

New evidence supports the idea that plants owe their rainbow of fruit colors to the different animals that eat them. Researchers first had to get past the fact that most animals don't see colors quite the way humans do.

1d

Research forecasts US among top nations to suffer economic damage from climate change

For the first time, researchers have developed a data set quantifying what the social cost of carbon — the measure of the economic harm from carbon dioxide emissions — will be for the globe's nearly 200 countries. Although much previous research has focused on how rich countries benefit from the fossil fuel economy, while damages accrue primarily to the developing world, the top three counties w

1d

The Two Reasons Rod Rosenstein's Fate Is So Uncertain

Are Rod Rosenstein’s days numbered? On Monday the internet went through several news cycles in a few hours. Social media was convinced that the deputy attorney general had been fired, or resigned, or that his dismissal or resignation were imminent, unless, of course, they weren’t. A fact and a theory help explain the fog obscuring Rosenstein’s status. Fact first: Despite his “You’re fired” TV cat

1d

Violence in pre-Columbian Panama exaggerated, new study shows

An oft-cited publication said a pre-Colombian archaeological site in Panama showed signs of extreme violence. A new review of the evidence strongly suggests that the interpretation was wrong.

1d

Aaron Goes Rally Driving | Shifting Gears with Aaron Kaufman

Catch the New Season of SHIFTING GEARS Monday 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Shifting Gears: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shifting-gears/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Discovery

1d

This Super-Strong Magnet Literally Blew the Doors Off a Tokyo Laboratory

There's a magnet in a secure room in Tokyo. The last time its designers switched it on, it blew open the heavy doors designed to keep it contained.

1d

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Acts of Rod

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In a letter to the Senate Judiciary Committee, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh said he will not withdraw his nomination and called the sexual-misconduct allegations against him “smears” and part of a “grotesque and obvious character assassination.” Fox will air an interview with Kavana

1d

Environmentalists Concerned That More Coal Ash Ponds Will Spill Into Rivers

Environmental groups are closely watching coal ash storage ponds in North and South Carolina as rivers swollen by rain from Hurricane Florence continue to rise.

1d

What Artists Would Do if They Could Fly to the Moon

A Japanese billionaire, Yusaku Maezawa, wants artists to join him on a pioneering spaceflight. We asked some leading candidates about the idea.

1d

Sex robot brothel in Texas sparks controversy and ethical questions

A Toronto-based sex robot brothel plans to open another location in Houston. Some critics argue that the proliferation of sex robots would lead to increases in prostitution and sex trafficking. Others say that such technology could help some people find a degree of much-needed companionship. None There are currently no laws against opening a sex robot brothel in Houston, though recently announced

1d

Found: second draft of Galileo's argument for a heliocentric model

The letter suggests Galileo censored himself a bit in order to fly more under the radar. It didn't work, though. The Royal Society Journal will publish the variants of the letters shortly, and scholars will begin to analyze the results. The letter was in obscurity for hundreds of years in Royal Society Library in London. The idea that the planets, including Earth, revolved around the Sun was firs

1d

Why the world needs death to prosper

Researchers have found new ways on how decomposing plants and animals contribute to the life cycle. After a freak mass herd death of 300 reindeer, scientists were able to study a wide range of the decomposition processes. Promoting the necrobiome research will open up new areas of inquiry and even commerce. The biosphere and its many ecosystems rely on more than just life processes to subsist and

1d

Why birds fly south for the winter—and more about bird migration

A total of eight billion birds migrate across the U.S. in the fall. The birds who migrate to the tropics fair better than the birds who winter in the U.S. Conservationists can arguably use these numbers to encourage the development of better habitats in the U.S., especially if temperatures begin to vary in the south. None The migration of birds — and we didn't even used to know that birds migrate

1d

Scientists sequence the genome of this threatened species

A team at UMass Amherst recently sequenced the genome of the Canadian lynx. It's part of a project intending to sequence the genome of every vertebrate in the world. Conservationists interested in the Canadian lynx have a new tool to work with. None If you want to know what makes a Canadian lynx a Canadian lynx, I can now—as of this month— point you directly to the DNA of a Canadian lynx , and sa

1d

Fake Apple products: Here's how to avoid being fooled—and endangered—by counterfeits

Counterfeit Apple power adapters and charging cables may look like the real thing, but they have differences that can cause injuries to you or damage your device.

1d

Violence in pre-Columbian Panama exaggerated, new study shows

An oft-cited publication said a pre-Colombian archaeological site in Panama showed signs of extreme violence. A new review of the evidence strongly suggests that the interpretation was wrong.

1d

A Small Google Chrome Change Stirs a Big Privacy Controversy

The latest update to Google's browser has riled privacy advocates by appearing to log people in without their explicit permission.

1d

Results from the OAC-ALONE trial reported at TCT 2018 and published in Circulation

The first randomized trial of its kind was unable to establish non-inferiority of oral anticoagulation (OAC) alone to combined OAC and a single antiplatelet agent (APT) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and stable coronary artery disease beyond one year after stent implantation.

1d

Astronomers use Earth's natural history as guide to spot vegetation on new worlds

By looking at Earth's full natural history and evolution, astronomers may have found a template for vegetation fingerprints — borrowing from epochs of changing flora — to determine the age of habitable exoplanets.

1d

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