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Nyheder2018september26

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Reality show idea: Make Flat Earthers search for the world's edge

According to Flat Earthers, our planet is flat and space travel doesn't happen. People are calling for a reality show about Flat Earthers. Flat Earthers say a 150-foot ice wall surrounds the world. Amidst all the fake news, misinformation sponsored by governments, and the explosion of conspiracy theories that bombard us daily, it's no surprise that there seems to be a growing number of Flat Earth

22h

Sunflower pollen has medicinal, protective effects on bees

Bees fed a diet of sunflower pollen show dramatically lower rates of infection by two separate pathogens, suggesting medicinal and protective effects for pollinators in peril.

11h

Klimarådet: Giv danskerne tilskud til 100.000 nye elbiler

Regeringens klimarådgiver konstaterer, at den lavere registreringsafgift for elbiler favoriserer de dyreste biler og plugin-hybriderne uforholdsmæssigt meget. I stedet bør staten give tilskud til 100.000 elbiler og forbyde benzin- og dieselbiler fra 2030.

13h

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Alcohol use in patients with chronic liver disease

A review article published in the New England Journal of Medicine discusses the effects of alcohol use on various forms of liver disease, as well as the assessment and treatment of alcohol use in patients with chronic liver disease.

now

Wearable defibrillator lowers sudden cardiac death, but only when you wear it

An international clinical trial that studied wearable cardioverter defibrillators (WCDs) found that the devices did not significantly reduce sudden cardiac death — the primary goal of the device — among patients assigned to the device in the first 90 days after a heart attack, but did lower mortality among those who wore it as prescribed, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francis

now

WikiLeaks names one-time spokesman as editor-in-chief

WikiLeaks on Wednesday named one-time spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson as its new editor-in-chief. The ramifications of the move are unclear.

8min

World Bank bets big on batteries for solar energy boost

Solar energy could be a huge source of power in Africa, but its potential has been stymied by storage batteries that are too expensive and inadequate for use in poor countries.

8min

Apple-1 computer fetches $375,000 at auction

An Apple-1, a rare model of the first computer produced by the now-iconic tech firm, fetched $375,000 in an auction this week, according to Boston-based RR Auction.

8min

Plate tectonics may have been active on Earth since the very beginning

A new study suggests that plate tectonics—a scientific theory that divides the earth into large chunks of crust that move slowly over hot viscous mantle rock—could have been active from the planet's very beginning. The new findings defy previous beliefs that tectonic plates were developed over the course of billions of years.

14min

Leaders may create ineffective cultures because they are stuck in the past, study shows

Where does culture come from? This basic question is one of the toughest for both researchers and practitioners to answer because culture is deeply entrenched in people's minds and taken for granted.

14min

7 Parenting Tips to Protect Your Kid’s Supreme Court Nomination

The world is on fire. Fresh news is breaking every four seconds (approximately) in the ongoing Brett Kavanaugh Supreme Court confirmation saga. No prior nominee has had three women come forward with allegations of sexual assault—only to have them effectively dismissed by the President and Senate majority leader. Nor has any previous Senate majority leader characterized allegations of sexual assau

19min

Taking out the (life-threatening) garbage: Bacteria eject trash to survive

Scientists have known for decades that certain bacteria produce small spherical versions of themselves. Although they lack basic materials to reproduce or function like normal cells, recent interest in such "minicells" has spiked due to their proficiency as nano-sized delivery tools for drugs and vaccines to targeted cells and tissues.

20min

Tropical Depression 29W spins up in northwestern Pacific Ocean

The first warning issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center for Tropical Depression 29W was early on September 26 (0600 GMT). The second warning for this active tropical storm came out at (1500 GMT).

20min

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite gets an infrared view of Typhoon Trami

Typhoon Trami looked formidable in infrared imagery taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite as it moves to the southern Islands of Japan.

20min

Researchers evaluate controversial treatment for Parkinson's disease psychosis

In the wake of media and public reports about increased mortality linked to a new drug for treating Parkinson's disease psychosis, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine conducted a retrospective study of qualifying patients in the UC San Diego Health system concluding that the new drug, pimavanserin (marketed as Nuplazid), did not pose a statistically significant gre

22min

Your Facebook friends don't mean it, but they're likely hurting you daily: study

Social media sites often present users with social exclusion information that may actually inhibit intelligent thought, according to the co-author of a University at Buffalo study that takes a critical look not just at Facebook and other similar platforms, but at the peculiarities of the systems on which these sites operate.

26min

Facebook boosts 'stories' format, now open to ads

Facebook said Wednesday it now has 300 million daily users of "stories," a format inspired by Snapchat, and would now begin delivering ads with these visual messages.

26min

Cosmological constraints from the first-year Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam survey

The Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey collaboration team, including scientists from Princeton University, Japan and Taiwan, used tiny gravitational distortions of images of about 10 million galaxies to make a precise measurement of the lumpiness of matter in the universe.

36min

Plate tectonics may have been active on Earth since the very beginning

A new study suggests that plate tectonics — a scientific theory that divides the earth into large chunks of crust that move slowly over hot viscous mantle rock — could have been active from the planet's very beginning. The new findings defy previous beliefs that tectonic plates were developed over the course of billions of years.

36min

Inky Black, Polluted Rivers Seep into Ocean After Hurricane Florence in NASA Image

Hurricane Florence caused huge problems with pollution and runoff in rivers, which these stark NASA images reveal.

50min

Beluga Charms British With Impromptu Visit

People lined the River Thames east of London on Wednesday trying to catch a glimpse of a beluga whale swimming far out of its normal range. (Image credit: Barcroft/Getty)

53min

These brain cells keep us eating when we’re full

New research explores the mystery of why we keep eating when we’re full, at the most basic level in the brain. The study shows that two tiny clusters of cells battle for control of feeding behavior—and the one that drives eating overpowers the one that says to stop. It also shows that the brain’s own natural opioid system gets involved—and that blocking it with the drug naloxone stops overeating.

55min

Understanding antibiotic resistance in patients with cystic fibrosis

Patients with cystic fibrosis who carried antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their lungs had significantly lower microbial diversity and more aggressive disease, according to a small study published in Heliyon.

58min

Childhood poverty may have lasting effects on cognitive skills in old age

Children who grow up in poverty or who are otherwise socially and economically disadvantaged may be more likely in old age to score lower than others on tests of cognitive skills, according to a study published in the Sept. 26, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

58min

Was This Man a Bronze-Age Cyborg? His Metal Hand May Have Been a Prosthetic.

Treasure hunters in Switzerland have unearthed a hand-some artifact: a 3,500-year-old bronze hand outfitted with a gold cuff, Swiss archaeologists announced last week.

59min

Antibody Combo Knocks Down HIV in Clinical Trials

Some patients could suppress the virus without antiretroviral therapy for months after the drug infusions.

1h

The Chimp Who Believed She Was Human

In 1964, a psychotherapist and his wife adopted a two-day-old chimpanzee. They named her Lucy. For twelve years, Dr. Maurice Temerlin and his wife, Jane, would raise Lucy as if she were their human daughter. The chimp ate at the family dinner table, using silverware. She dressed herself. She served her parents tea. She even learned 140 signs in American Sign Language. When Lucy reached adolescenc

1h

The Always-On Police Camera

Last summer, Baltimore police officer Richard Pinheiro submitted body-camera footage as evidence in a drug bust. In Pinheiro’s video, filmed on an Axon Body 2 Camera, he wanders through a junky backyard for a few moments before spotting, among the detritus, a discarded soup can. He picks it up and pulls out a small baggie of white pills that he and the two other officers would later claim belonge

1h

More kids live in 3-generation homes than ever before

More children in the United States than ever before live in multigenerational households, according to a new study. In 1996, about 5.7 percent of kids, or roughly 4 million, lived in multigenerational families. Twenty years later, the numbers are 9.8 percent, or about 7 million children. “It’s important to understand family change because research shows strong links between children’s living arra

1h

Shock Waves from WWII Bombing Affected the Earth’s Ionosphere

Shock Waves from WWII Bombing Affected the Earth’s Ionosphere Scientists find the signatures of war on the edge of space. Dresdenafterbombing.jpg Dresden after the bombing Image credits: Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 DE Earth Wednesday, September 26, 2018 – 15:45 Joel Shurkin, Contributor (Inside Science) — Aerial bombing during World War II caused destruction and death on a

1h

In Rare Bipartisan Accord, House and Senate Reach Compromise on Opioid Bill

The legislation contains a mix of law enforcement and public health measures. Addiction experts say it will help — but not enough.

1h

There's No Precedent for What's Going on With Brett Kavanaugh

Brett Kavanaugh’s already troubled Supreme Court nomination was shaken further on Wednesday, as a third woman accused the federal judge of sexual misconduct on the eve of a pivotal Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Thursday. Courts revere precedent, but there is no model for Kavanaugh’s future. Seldom does a nomination reach this point without a clearer expectation of the result. Kavanaugh’s fat

1h

Leaders may create ineffective cultures because they are stuck in the past, study shows

The culture a leader experienced in the past shapes the culture of the group they go on to lead. As a result, the created culture may have little to do with group performance because culture is driven by the leader's past experience.

1h

Tropical Depression 29W spins up in northwestern Pacific Ocean

The first warning issued by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center for Tropical Depression 29W was early on September 26 (0600 GMT). The second warning for this active tropical storm came out at (1500 GMT).

1h

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite gets an infrared view of Typhoon Trami

Typhoon Trami looked formidable in infrared imagery taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite as it moves to the southern Islands of Japan.

1h

These Venomous Snakes Travel by Hitchhiking on Planes

The brown tree snake is a stealthy, international traveler.

1h

Paralyzed man can walk again thanks to a mind-controlled implant

Thanks to a groundbreaking surgery, a paralyzed man regained the ability to briefly walk for a short period of time. An electrode implanted into the epidural space of the spinal cord gave the patient limited function of his lower extremities. It's thought that the mechanism behind this could be reopening a line of communication between the nerves to the brain. It seems as if we've reached another

1h

36 Texas counties may be violating Voting Rights Act

Attorneys for the ACLU of Texas found that 36 counties failed to provide adequate, or any, voting information on in Spanish on their websites. Some counties' websites contained voting information that was misleading or poorly translated. The Hispanic vote could be key to Texas Democrats in upcoming elections. None The American Civil Liberties Union of Texas says 36 counties across Texas may be in

1h

Being raised religious can secure your mental health, Harvard study finds

New research from Harvard shows that teens that have a religious or spiritual practice are happier and healthier in their 20s. Those studied had fewer sexually transmitted diseases and smoked less often. Meditation and prayer appears to have similar positive effects. In a recent interview with Michelle LeClair, a former high-ranking Scientologist and author of the memoir Perfectly Clear: Escaping

1h

How inequality destroys the future by focusing on the past

Income inequality is dividing Americans. Wages haven't risen in 30 years, while prices for housing, schools, and basic goods has. Canny (and uncanny) politicians have learned how to milk the politics of fear by comparing the present to the past. None TIMOTHY SNYDER : So starting with the objective part, with the facts, the United States is a country which is among the least equal in the world. Ac

1h

Stor dag i morgen? Fem måder du kan forberede din krop

Du har måske hørt, at søvn og sund mad er vigtigt, men god planlægning kan også hjælpe dig med at præstere.

1h

Congress Challenges Google on China. Google Falls ShortGoogle China PD Senate

The company's chief privacy officer confirms that Project Dragonfly does in fact exist, but not much else.

1h

Being a heavyweight isn't enough to turn a brown dwarf into a star

Space Now astronomers want to know: what makes a star a star? Take a look up at the night sky. See all those stars? For every one of those bright points of light, there may be an object that failed to shine. But astronomers have…

1h

Common heart condition linked to sudden death

Researchers have found a link between sudden cardiac death (when the heart suddenly stops beating) and a common heart condition known as mitral valve prolapse that affects around 12 in every 1000 people worldwide.

1h

Newly discovered hummingbird species already critically endangered

In 2017, researchers working in the Ecuadorian Andes stumbled across a previously unknown species of hummingbird — but as documented in a new study, its small range, specialized habitat, and threats from human activity mean the newly described blue-throated hillstar is likely already critically endangered.

1h

More persistent weather patterns in US linked to Arctic warming

Persistent weather conditions, including dry and wet spells, generally have increased in the United States, perhaps due to rapid Arctic warming, according to a new study. Persistent weather conditions can lead to weather extremes such as drought, heat waves, prolonged cold and storms that can cost millions of dollars in damage and disrupt societies and ecosystems, the study says.

1h

Tracking hydrogen movement using subatomic particles

Scientists have developed a technique using a beam of subatomic particles called muons to track hydrogen movement in the solid magnesium hydride for the first time. The negative muon beam provided spectra that showed the local nuclear magnetic fields of hydrogens in magnesium hydride. This technique expands our ability to investigate hydrogen transfer in solid materials, which should help to facil

1h

The origins of the High Plains landscape at base of Rocky Mountains

A mantle wave passing beneath western North America over the last 20 million years is responsible for the formation of the High Plains landscape at the base of the Rocky Mountains. These plains provide vital habitat for millions of migratory birds and farmland essential to US agriculture.

1h

Is student debt keeping Americans away from marriage?

Having a student loan could influence whether America's young adults first union after college is marriage or cohabitation.

1h

Analysis of billions of Twitter words reveals how American English develops

New words in American English tend to develop in five regional linguistic 'hotspots' before spreading across the United States and beyond, a new study reveals.

1h

1h

Oculus’ $399 Quest to Take VR Mainstream

Facebook's Oculus division wants more people in VR. The Quest, its new high-powered stand-alone headset, takes a flying leap in that direction.

1h

Letters: ‘We Don’t Need a Misogynist on the Supreme Court. We Have One in the White House.’

Brett Kavanaugh and the Revealing Logic of ‘Boys Will Be Boys’ One defense of the Supreme Court nominee against sexual-assault allegations, Megan Garber wrote last week, has been the notion that the cruelties Christine Blasey Ford described are “simply part of the natural order of things.” The subtext of the vigorous dismissal of this woman’s charges isn’t just that we all committed regrettable a

1h

Kavanaugh Is a Test for the Conservative Legal Movement

Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination was secured by a conservative legal movement that takes a very particular form. It is strongly aligned with pro-life groups. Many of its leaders are Catholic. And, contrary to common stereotypes on the left, a significant number of its architects are women. As the Senate Judiciary Committee prepares to hear testimony on Thursday from Kavanaugh and Christ

1h

Why Some People Hate Being Hugged, According to Science

submitted by /u/120Years [link] [comments]

1h

Food Regulation: "Only The Brave Dare Eat The Fare"

Thanks to a group of men known as the Poison Squad, our food is a lot safer than it was a century ago. But how safe is it, really? (Image credit: Courtesy of Penguin Press)

1h

Health And Human Services Says It's Reviewing Use Of Fetal Tissue For Research

The audit has been called a political gesture to placate anti-abortion groups that oppose use of the tissue. Fetal tissue has played a part in developing vaccines and medical treatments. (Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

2h

Everyone Wants to Go to the Moon Again—Logic Be Damned

Space companies and national agencies are all gunning to visit the moon and kick off a bustling lunar economy, but the business case is shaky.

2h

Cornell Food Researcher's Downfall Raises Larger Questions For Science

Brian Wansink made a name for himself producing pithy, palatable studies that connected people's eating habits with cues from their environment. His data manipulation now serves as a cautionary tale. (Image credit: Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

2h

Taking out the (life-threatening) garbage: Bacteria eject trash to survive

Scientists have known that bacteria produce small spherical versions of themselves. Lacking basic materials to reproduce or function like normal cells, the natural role of minicells — which protrude like budding balloons off the ends of bacteria — has remained a mystery. Now, researchers at UC San Diego have demonstrated for the first time that minicells play a key function in the survival of ba

2h

The Controversy Over Kavanaugh Won’t End With a Vote

Even if Senate Republicans “plow right through” the ever-expanding chaos surrounding Brett Kavanaugh, the battle over his Supreme Court nomination is unlikely to end soon. Despite the latest incendiary charges—from a client of the attorney Michael Avenatti who claims she was gang-raped at a party Kavanaugh attended in high school—the Senate Judiciary Committee hasn’t called off its hearing on Thu

2h

Different kind of insulin injection may treat chronic colitis

Insulin, long known to treat diabetes, also shows promise as a treatment for chronic colitis, according to a new study with mice. “Our new treatment with insulin on mice shows great potential against chronic bowel inflammation in humans like colitis ulcerosa, which causes a lot of people great discomfort,” says Jørgen Olsen, co-inventor of the treatment and a professor in the cellular and molecul

2h

The weirdest things we learned this week: holes in people (and cows), illegal cheese, and the world's worst dairy disaster

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s newest podcast.

2h

Fossil evidence of large flowering trees in N. America 15 millions years earlier

A newly discovered fossil suggests that large, flowering trees grew in North America by the Turonian age, showing that these large trees were part of the forest canopies there nearly 15 million years earlier than previously thought. Researchers found the fossil in the Mancos Shale Formation in Utah, in ancient delta deposits formed during a poorly understood interval in the North American fossil r

2h

Taller plants moving into Arctic because of climate change

The effects of climate change are behind an increase in plant height across the Arctic tundra over the past 30 years.

2h

How a tiny Curiosity motor identified a massive Martian dust storm

When dust filled the Martian atmosphere during the recent planet-wide dust storm, observations were plentiful — even from unlikely instruments.

2h

The notorious luminous blue variable star

Sparkling with an exceptional blue-toned brilliance and exhibiting wild variations in both brightness and spectrum, the luminous blue variable (LBV) is a relatively rare and still somewhat mysterious type of star.

2h

Trilobites: The Marvelous Filters in the Manta Ray’s Mouth

The car-sized, kite-shaped fishes don’t have to clear their throats because of their unique method of filtration that could be applied to preventing plastic pollution in the seas.

2h

Constance Sutton, Feminist Anthropologist, Is Dead at 92

Margaret Mead urged her to do field work, even though to do so as a married woman “was not heard of.” She became an expert on gender in the Caribbean.

2h

Scientists investigate how DEET confuses countless critters

DEET, a chemical in bug sprays, affects the behavior of highly diverse organisms — but how it works remains unclear. New research in C. elegans shows that the compound exploits unique receptors and neurons to interfere with the animals' response to odors.

2h

Powerful jet discovered coming from 'wrong' kind of star

Discovery of a jet of material launched by a highly magnetic neutron star forces rethinking a longstanding theory about the origin of such jets.

2h

Women in unions are more likely to take maternity leave

A new study finds that union-represented working mothers are at least 17 percent more likely to use paid maternity leave than comparable nonunion working mothers. But unions could do more to mitigate the wage penalties these workers experience afterwards. Facilitating working mothers’ use of paid maternity leave is a key issue for policymakers and workers in many countries. And the United States

2h

Psychologists define the 'dark core of personality'

Egoism, Machiavellianism, narcissism, psychopathy, sadism, spitefulness are all traits that stand for the malevolent dark sides of human personality. Results from a recent project show, these traits share a common 'dark core.' So, if you have one of these tendencies, you are also likely to have one or more of the others.

2h

Predictable, preventable and deadly: Carbon monoxide poisonings after storms

Severe weather events, such as summer hurricanes, tornadoes, and winter snow storms often result in widespread and prolonged power outages, interrupting essential household functions, including home heating. An emergency medicine physician addresses the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning associated with furnaces and generators used in such conditions.

2h

Your Facebook friends don't mean it, but they're likely hurting you daily

Social media sites often present users with social exclusion information that may actually inhibit intelligent thought, according to the co-author of a University at Buffalo study that takes a critical look not just at Facebook and other similar platforms, but at the peculiarities of the systems on which these sites operate.

2h

Fecal microbiota transplantation helps restore beneficial bacteria in cancer patients

NIAID-supported researchers have shown that autologous fecal microbiota transplantation (auto-FMT) is a safe, effective way to replenish beneficial gut bacteria in cancer patients requiring intense antibiotics during allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Auto-FMT resulted in the recovery of beneficial gut bacteria to near baseline levels within days, restoring digestive, immune and ot

2h

UMass Amherst neuroscientists see clues to brain maturation in adolescent rats

One of the outstanding questions in neurodevelopment research has been identifying how connections in the brain change to improve neural function during childhood and adolescence. Now, results from a study in rats just reported by neuroscientists Heather Richardson, Geng-Lin Li and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst suggest that as animals transition into adolescence, specific p

2h

Bariatric surgery linked to safer childbirth for the mother

Obese mothers who lose weight through bariatric surgery can have safer deliveries. The positive effects are many, including fewer caesarean sections, infections, tears and hemorrhages, and fewer cases of post-term delivery or uterine inertia. This according to an observational study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in PLOS Medicine.

2h

By Jove! Methane's effects on sunlight vary by region

Solar energy absorption by methane is 10 times stronger over desert regions such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula than elsewhere on Earth, and nearly three times more powerful in the presence of clouds.This result advances science beyond the existing 'global annual-mean estimate' of methane forcing by providing insights into its remarkable spatial variability. This research enabled the f

2h

Researchers add surprising finds to the fossil record

A newly discovered fossil suggests that large, flowering trees grew in North America by the Turonian age, showing that these large trees were part of the forest canopies there nearly 15 million years earlier than previously thought. Researchers from Adelphi University and the Burpee Museum of Natural History found the fossil in the Mancos Shale Formation in Utah, in ancient delta deposits formed d

2h

Stanford engineers study hovering bats and hummingbirds in Costa Rica

Engineers carted their extremely sensitive lab equipment to the forests of Costa Rica, where they teamed up with ecologists to meticulously record over 100 different bats and hummingbirds to learn more about hovering flight.

2h

Manta rays could teach us a thing or two about effective filtration

Manta rays feed with a unique filtration system that allows water to pass through while tiny particles of food — even those smaller than the organism's filter pore size — 'ricochet' away and are eaten. This filtration mechanism, since it repels rather than traps particles, resists clogging, making it promising for industrial applications like treating wastewater and reducing microplastic polluti

2h

Heavy metal acts as heavy artillery against bacterial infections

A new antibiotic treatment that contains the heavy metal gallium safely combated bacterial growth in mice and showed signs of efficacy in a preliminary phase 1 clinical trial of patients with cystic fibrosis or chronic lung infections.

2h

For CF lung infections, how well antibiotics work may be affected by pH, oxygen

In a study publishing Sept. 26 in Science Advances, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences report that tweaking factors in a cystic fibrosis lung model, such as pH balance and oxygen, helped eradicate pathogenic bacteria while minimizing risks of antibiotic resistance and overgrowth of other microorganisms.

2h

Researchers discover signatures predicting therapeutic applications, toxicity of chemicals

Researchers have developed a new method to assess the biological activities of chemicals. They found that disruption of different biological processes in human cells produced distinct patterns of perturbation in cell signaling. Moreover, chemicals disrupting the same bioprocess produced identical patterns, regardless of where and how they interfered. These 'invariant signatures' enabled accurate i

2h

Manta rays' food-capturing mechanism may hold key to better filtration systems

Manta rays strain their tiny food from mouthfuls of seawater in a novel way that could hold the key to better filtration in a variety of commercial applications, new research by Oregon State University shows.

2h

Hit 'em where they eat: Stealth drug fights resistant bacteria

Researchers have been on the hunt for new drugs to combat bacterial 'superbugs.' A new report describes success using gallium, a metal that bacteria confuse for iron, which they take up as a nutrient. Gallium, however, works as a Trojan horse, disrupting bacteria's ability to multiply. In mice, gallium cured lethal lung infections, and in a small test in humans with cystic fibrosis, gallium improv

2h

Manta rays have a special trick for filtering very tiny bits of food

Manta rays use a filter system to sieve food from the water, but the filter captures food particles so small they should pass through – and now we know how

3h

Neanderthals had dexterous hands that could have held tools like a pen

Our extinct Neanderthal cousins had big bulky hands that look clumsy, but their bones reveal that they could hold objects in the same way we hold pens

3h

A swarm of robots weaves giant cocoons using fibreglass thread

A new robot called Fiberbot wraps itself in a cocoon, creating towering fibreglass tubes that could be used for constructing buildings and bridges

3h

Manta rays have an unusual mouth filter that resists clogging

Manta rays filter feed differently than other ocean creatures.

3h

Manta Rays Filter Water in Way Never Previously Seen

Manta Rays Filter Water in Way Never Previously Seen Observation could improve filtration systems and boost conservation efforts. Ray_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Steve Kajiura Creature Wednesday, September 26, 2018 – 14:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Manta rays soaring through the oceans may capture prey using filters that repel food rather than entrap it. This newfound mec

3h

Fiberglass-spinning robots could be construction workers of the future

A team of fiberglass-spinning robots could create tubing to help build bridges, buildings or other structures.

3h

The notorious luminous blue variable star

Sparkling with an exceptional blue-toned brilliance and exhibiting wild variations in both brightness and spectrum, the luminous blue variable (LBV) is a relatively rare and still somewhat mysterious type of star.

3h

Researchers add surprising finds to the fossil record

A newly discovered fossil suggests that large, flowering trees grew in North America by the Turonian age, showing that these large trees were part of the forest canopies there nearly 15 million years earlier than previously thought. Researchers from Adelphi University and the Burpee Museum of Natural History found the fossil in the Mancos Shale Formation in Utah, in ancient delta deposits formed d

3h

By Jove! Methane's effects on sunlight vary by region

Scientists investigating how human-induced increases in atmospheric methane also increase the amount of solar energy absorbed by that gas in our climate system have discovered that this absorption is 10 times stronger over desert regions such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula than elsewhere on Earth, and nearly three times more powerful in the presence of clouds.

3h

Manta rays' food-capturing mechanism may hold key to better filtration systems

Manta rays strain their tiny food from mouthfuls of seawater in a novel way that could hold the key to better filtration in a variety of commercial applications, new research by Oregon State University shows.

3h

Why Your Vacuum Clogs But a Manta Ray Doesn’t

Many years ago, I was snorkeling in warm Pacific waters when I noticed what looked like a spreading ink stain in the water before me. It was faint at first, a barely perceptible sliver of black against the vast backdrop of blue. But it grew and darkened, until it finally resolved into the unmistakable shape of a manta ray. It was several meters wide, from one gracefully beating wing tip to the ne

3h

The Benefits of Trump’s Transactionalism

President Donald Trump’s remarks on Iran to the UN Security Council on Wednesday were, in many ways, predictable: He accused the Iranian regime of exporting “violence, terror, and turmoil,” and made the case for why the Islamic Republic should never obtain nuclear weapons. And then he said something that wasn’t so predictable. “With all of this said, I want to thank Iran, Russia, and Syria for, a

3h

One of the World's Rarest Tigers Was Just Killed by a Pig Trap

A trap laid to catch a pig killed a critically endangered Sumatran tiger.

3h

Your city and home may not be ready for you to get old

Technology To succeed, the “age in place” movement needs good design. Something as fundamental as crossing the street can be difficult for older people, kids, and others. But design can help.

3h

Bill Cosby Is Not a Political Prisoner

On Tuesday afternoon, the actor and comedian Bill Cosby was formally designated a sexually violent predator and sentenced to three to 10 years in prison for drugging and assaulting Andrea Constand in his home outside of Philadelphia in 2004. Cosby was denied bail and ordered to prison immediately. The man once known as “America’s Dad” left the Norristown, Pennsylvania, courtroom in handcuffs, mak

3h

College Humor Gives Subscription-Based Streaming a Try

Have you heard the one about the online comedy outlet trying to get a little less dependent on YouTube?

3h

New plants on the block: Taller species are taking over in a warming Arctic

The Arctic tundra has long been the domain of grasses and dwarf shrubs that grow only a few centimetres high. But taller plant species have been taking over this chilly neighbourhood, report an international group of 130 biologists led by scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and the German Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre in Nature. Thi

3h

Elusive stem cells could help repair damaged blood vessels

A unique source of stem cells in blood helps to build blood vessels in the growing embryo according to new research published in Nature and part-funded by the British Heart Foundation.

3h

Taller plants moving into Arctic because of climate change

The effects of climate change are behind an increase in plant height across the Arctic tundra over the past 30 years.

3h

Rare genetic disorders more complex than thought

Wellcome Sanger Institute scientists have found that the genetic causes of rare neurodevelopmental disorders vary more than previously thought. The study discovered that serious rare disorders can be affected by combinations of common genetic variants, rather than solely individual genes. The research in Nature will help understand how someone's whole genetic make-up can modify the effect of rare

3h

A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin

Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. In this study, they directly integrated a sensory device, called an organic electrochemical transistor — a type of electronic device that can be used to measure a variety of biological functions — into a flexible organic solar cell. Using it, they were then a

3h

Scientists unlock secret of how the brain encodes speech

People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain

3h

Neutron star jets shoot down theory

Astronomers have detected radio jets belonging to a neutron star with a strong magnetic field — something not predicted by current theory, according to a new study published in Nature today.The team, led by researchers at the University of Amsterdam, observed the object known as Swift J0243.6+6124 using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio telescope in New Mexico and NASA's Swift space teles

3h

VLA discovers powerful jet coming from 'wrong' kind of star

Discovery of a jet of material launched by a highly magnetic neutron star forces rethinking a longstanding theory about the origin of such jets.

3h

Scientists investigate how DEET confuses countless critters

DEET, a chemical in bug sprays, affects the behavior of highly diverse organisms — but how it works remains unclear. New research in C. elegans shows that the compound exploits unique receptors and neurons to interfere with the animals' response to odors.

3h

In clinical trials, new antibody therapy controls HIV for months after treatment

A new clinical trial shows that broadly neutralizing antibodies can suppress HIV for up to four months, far longer than currently available drugs.

3h

Elusive origin of stellar geysers revealed by 3D simulations

Astrophysicists finally have an explanation for the violent mood swings of some of the biggest, brightest and rarest stars in the universe. The stars, called luminous blue variables, periodically erupt in dazzling outbursts nicknamed 'stellar geysers.' These powerful eruptions launch entire planets' worth of material into space in a matter of days. New simulations suggest that the outbursts result

3h

Combination HIV antibody infusions safely maintain viral suppression in select individuals

A small group of people living with HIV sensitive to two potent anti-HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) — 3BNC117 and 10-1074 — tolerated multiple infusions of the antibodies and suppressed HIV for more than 15 weeks after stopping antiretroviral therapy (ART). The new findings, from a pilot clinical trial supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Bill & Melinda Gates Fo

3h

DEET scrambles worms' sense of smell

The roundworm C. elegans is sensitive to DEET's insect-repellent effects. The discovery opens up a new genetic toolbox that scientists can use to figure out how DEET works.

3h

Researchers connect lower antibiotic resistance with higher levels of bifidobacteria in infant gut

A study published this week in mSphere suggests that infants, who are vulnerable to an array of infectious diseases, may have a microbial ally in keeping antibiotic-resistant infections at bay. Researchers found that children with higher gut levels of Bifidobacterium, a common commensal, had reduced abundance and lower frequency of the genes associated with antimicrobial resistance (AMR).

3h

Conservative Women Thread a Needle on Brett Kavanaugh

By championing Brett Kavanaugh, President Donald Trump and the Senate GOP have successfully accelerated a female exodus to the Democratic party on the cusp of the first national elections of the #MeToo era. The latest Fox News poll, released on Sunday, says that burgeoning opposition to Kavanaugh is being driven by suburban women, who believe Christine Blasey Ford over Kavanaugh by a margin of 17

4h

Trump Calls Out Election Meddling—By China

NEW YORK —Donald Trump has repeatedly refrained from calling out Russia for interfering in the 2016 presidential election in his favor, even when standing beside Vladimir Putin in Helsinki. But on Wednesday, he didn’t hesitate to condemn China for, as he put it, “attempting to interfere in our upcoming 2018 election … against my administration.” With Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi sitting nearb

4h

Fat and proud: Why body-positive activists say obesity can be healthy

Growing calls for "fat acceptance" fly in the face of accepted medical advice, but studies show you can be overweight and healthy

4h

The 7 non-human mammals where females rule the roost

In the wild, males often dominate leadership roles, but not in seven species of mammals ranging from orcas and African elephants to spotted hyenas

4h

Google, Facebook agree EU 'fake news' code of conduct

Major tech companies including Facebook and Google agreed Wednesday on a code of conduct to combat online disinformation in the European Union, although critics said the commitments were too weak.

4h

Conservation biologist goes to ends of the earth to save little-known species

Colorado State University Professor Joel Berger chases winter, year-round. Unlike the surfers in the 1966 movie, "The Endless Summer," he isn't in pursuit of the perfect wave around the world. He's tracking disappearing species in remote and often icy locations.

4h

Scientists create immature human eggs from stem cells

Japanese scientists have successfully created immature human egg cells using stem cells. The discovery builds on years of research into the uses of stem cells. While the prospects for new fertility treatments are promising, the ethical questions raised by the procedure will have to be answered. Japanese scientists have changed blood cells into stem cells which were then used to create immature hu

4h

New Ken Burns documentary models what American healthcare could be

The 135-year-old hospital does things differently than the rest of the U. S. healthcare industry This documentary might reframe the national conversation about healthcare, which is the #1 issue for American voters in the mid-term elections. The Mayo Clinic: Faith, Hope, Science airs Tuesday, September 25 at 8 p.m. ET on PBS. The miracle in a cornfield Ever since The Civil War , the iconic nine-pa

4h

Alan Watts: 'Why modern education is a hoax'

Alan Watts was an instrumental figure in the 1960s counterculture revolution. He believed that we put too much of a focus on intangible goals for our educational and professional careers. Watts believed that the whole educational enterprise is a farce compared to how we should be truly living our lives. None A prolific orator, writer and philosopher, Alan Watts was one of the first contemporary f

4h

How Nature Defies Math in Keeping Ecosystems Stable

Behind the beautiful facade of a rainforest, a savanna or a placid lake is a world teeming with contests and partnerships. Species are competing for space, consuming one another for resources, taking advantage of one another’s talents, and brokering trades of nutrients. But there’s something funny about this picture. When ecologists try to model ecosystems using math, they tend to find that the m

4h

Regional seismic data help to locate September 2017 North Korean nuclear test

The epicenter of the 3 September 2017 nuclear test explosion in North Korea occurred about 3.6 kilometers northwest of the country's first nuclear test in October 2006, according to a new high-precision analysis of the explosion and its aftermath.

4h

Suomi NPP satellite sees Rosa intensifying into tenth Eastern Pacific hurricane

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean as Tropical Storm Rosa was strengthening into that ocean basin's tenth hurricane.

4h

How a tiny Curiosity motor identified a massive Martian dust storm

There is no shortage of eyeballs, human and robotic, pointed at Mars. Scientists are constantly exploring the Red Planet from telescopes on Earth, plus the six spacecraft circling the planet from its orbit, and two roving its surface. So when dust filled the atmosphere during the recent planet-wide dust storm, observations were plentiful.

4h

Lawnmower injuries are serious and costly

There are almost 6,400 lawnmower injuries a year in the United States, most requiring surgery and hospitalization that cost an average of nearly $37,000 a patient, according to a new study. “Despite consumer education programs and warning labels, lawnmower injuries in the United States remain a serious public health concern,” says Deborah Schwengel, assistant professor of anesthesiology and criti

4h

Trilobites: The Elephant Bird Regains Its Title as the Largest Bird That Ever Lived

A study seeks to restore the elephant bird’s heavyweight title, finding one member of a previously unidentified genus of the birds could have weighed more than 1,700 pounds.

4h

Bees' medicine chest should include sunflower pollen, UMass Amherst study suggests

A new study by Jonathan Giacomini and his former advisor, evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others, found that eating sunflower pollen dramatically and consistently reduced a protozoan pathogen infection in bumble bees and reduced a microsporidian pathogen of the European honey bee, raising the possibility that sunflowers may provide a simple soluti

4h

How a tiny Curiosity motor identified a massive Martian dust storm

When dust filled the Martian atmosphere during the recent planet-wide dust storm, observations were plentiful — even from unlikely instruments.

4h

Call to Stop Using the Term "Mesenchymal Stem Cell"

Critics say the misleading term actually refers to a heterogeneous population of cells, including possible tissue-specific progenitor cells and nonstem cells all lumped together.

4h

Seismic analysis identifies 2017 North Korean nuclear explosion, collapse, earthquakes

Careful analysis of data collected after the 3 September 2017 North Korean declared nuclear test explosion has allowed seismologists to distinguish the separate seismic signatures of the explosion, a collapse of the explosion cavity and even several small earthquakes that occurred after the collapse.

4h

Scientists investigate how DEET confuses countless critters

DEET, thought to be the most effective insect repellent available, may not be an insect repellent at all.

4h

Taller plants moving into Arctic because of climate change

Plants in the Arctic are growing taller because of climate change, according to new research from a global scientific collaboration led by the University of Edinburgh.

4h

Self-folding metamaterial

The more complex the object, the harder it is to fold up. Space satellites often need many small motors to fold up an instrument, and people have difficulty simply folding up a roadmap. Physicists from Leiden and Amsterdam have now designed a structure that folds itself up in several steps. The results from this research will be published in Nature on September 27, 2018.

4h

Neutron star jets shoot down theory

Astronomers have detected radio jets emitted by a neutron star with a strong magnetic field—something not predicted by current theory, according to a new study published in Nature today.

4h

A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin

Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. Previously, they developed a flexible photovoltaic cell that could be incorporated into textiles. In this study, they directly integrated a sensory device, called an organic electrochemical transistor—a type of electronic device that can be used to measure a va

4h

Elusive origin of stellar geysers revealed by 3-D simulations

Astrophysicists finally have an explanation for the violent mood swings of some of the biggest, brightest and rarest stars in the universe.

4h

Rutgers researchers discover possible cause for Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury

Rutgers researchers discover a possible cause for Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury, and the new mechanism may have also led to the discovery of an effective treatment.

4h

Suomi NPP satellite sees Rosa intensifying into tenth Eastern Pacific hurricane

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean as Tropical Storm Rosa was strengthening into that ocean basin's tenth hurricane.

4h

Regional seismic data help to locate September 2017 North Korean nuclear test

The epicenter of the Sept. 3, 2017, nuclear test explosion in North Korea occurred about 3.6 kilometers northwest of the country's first nuclear test in October 2006, according to a new high-precision analysis of the explosion and its aftermath.

4h

Seismic analysis identifies 2017 North Korean nuclear explosion, collapse, earthquakes

Careful analysis of data collected after the Sept. 3, 2017, North Korean declared nuclear test explosion has allowed seismologists to distinguish the separate seismic signatures of the explosion, a collapse of the explosion cavity and even several small earthquakes that occurred after the collapse.

4h

Suomi NPP satellite observes rebirth of Tropical Storm Kirk, warnings up

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kirk as it was regenerating in the Atlantic Ocean. Because Kirk regenerated east of the Caribbean Sea, warnings and watches were posted for the Lesser Antilles.

4h

World leaders gather to breathe new life into Paris accord

In a luxury New York hotel that almost ruined Donald Trump in the 1990s, world leaders gathered Wednesday to try to revive the Paris climate pact that the US president has pulled America from.

4h

Brett Kavanaugh’s Prepared Remarks to the Senate Judiciary Committee

On the eve of a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the sexual-assault allegations against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the panel released his opening remarks. Kavanaugh will say that he “categorically and unequivocally” denies the accusations made by Christine Blasey Ford, a California professor. Ford, who claims Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her while the two were in high school,

4h

When Conservationists Kill Lots (and Lots) of Animals

T he desert of south-central Australia is crenellated with sandstone hills in shades of ivory, crimson, and apricot. The ground is littered with dead trees and tree limbs, big hunks of transparent mica, dried cow dung, and thousands of stone spearheads and blades made by the Aboriginal people who lived here for tens of thousands of years—and live here still. Around the few water holes are the dog

4h

How NBA Moms Help Their Sons Deal With the Fame and Fortune

When the 21-year-old Georgetown University basketball star Roy Hibbert was drafted into the NBA by the Toronto Raptors in 2008, then traded immediately to the Indiana Pacers, it wasn’t only Hibbert who didn’t know what to expect. Neither did his mother. “It was my only child,” Paddy Hibbert told me. “It was hard for me to see him go out there and face that world of competitiveness, of traveling.”

4h

Report says fishing rule might put whales at greater risk

A report by federal scientists about a critically endangered whale says some regulations intended to protect them aren't working and might have unintended consequences for the animals.

4h

Uber pays $148 mn over data breach in latest image-boosting move

Uber agreed Wednesday to pay a $148 million penalty over a massive 2016 data breach which the company concealed for a year, in the latest effort by the global ridesharing giant to improve its image and move past its missteps from its early years.

4h

Shaking the swarm—researchers explore how bees collaborate to stabilize swarm clusters

If it's a bad idea to kick a hornet's nest, it's certainly a bad idea to shake a bee swarm. Unless, of course, it's for science.

4h

Europeans receptive to new welfare policy ideas

Using European Social Survey data collected in 23 countries during 2016/17, the authors established that people in Europe widely endorse national government responsibility to protect vulnerable people.

4h

New tools to boost access to NASA Earth science data

NASA has funded five new projects to develop tools and technology to make the agency's massive Earth science datasets more accessible and user-friendly.

4h

Researchers develop airborne radars to gauge US snowpack characteristics for water models

Next spring, researchers and students from the University of Kansas will participate in a project using a new ultra-wideband radar soaring on a plane above the Continental Divide to measure the depth and density of snowpack.

4h

Spheres can make concrete leaner, greener

Rice University scientists have developed micron-sized calcium silicate spheres that could lead to stronger and greener concrete, the world's most-used synthetic material.

4h

Suomi NPP satellite observes rebirth of Tropical Storm Kirk, warnings up

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kirk as it was regenerating in the Atlantic Ocean. Because Kirk regenerated east of the Caribbean Sea, warnings and watches were posted for the Lesser Antilles.

4h

Instrument boosts analysis of small, extremely dark materials

Researchers have developed a new instrument that can analyze light reflected from very small or extremely dark materials such as some meteorite samples and VANTABlack, the darkest manmade substance created. The instrument is already revealing new information about these and other difficult-to-analyze surfaces.

4h

How a Massive Wall in Antarctica Could Hold Back Sea-Level Rise

Scientists suggest holding back the glaciers to stop sea-level rise.

4h

The Field You Work in Could Predict Whether You're Doomed to Divorce

When there are more fish in the sea, is the fisherman more likely to get a divorce?

4h

Hay fever shot could halt seasonal allergies

Researchers have developed a vaccine that prevents the development of hay fever in mice. The researchers based the vaccine on specific sugar molecules that may increase the effect of treatments and reduce treatment times. “We believe the current form of vaccination can be optimized. Initially, our goal was to create an artificial production of the proteins on which allergy vaccines are based and

4h

Shaking the swarm

A team of Harvard University researchers spent months shaking and rattling swarms of thousands of honey bees to better understand how bees collectively collaborate to stabilize structures in the presence of external loads.

4h

Spheres can make concrete leaner, greener

Rice University scientists make micron-sized calcium silicate spheres that could lead to stronger and greener concrete, the world's most-used synthetic material.

4h

Europeans receptive to new welfare policy ideas

A new report explains European attitudes towards the welfare state, as measured in Round 8 (2016/17) of the European Social Survey.

4h

Millions of birds die in collisions each year, but lights could change that

Millions of birds die each year in collisions with planes. Airports have used everything from fireworks to herding dogs to scare them away, but these methods are useless after a plane takes off. Red and blue LED lights could be useful in deterring birds from objects that could kill them.

4h

Policy-makers cannot afford to ignore soil sustainability

Soils play a key role in climate regulation, nutritious diets, agricultural livelihoods, and biodiversity. But soils have dropped down the EU policy agenda, despite their importance for society and nature. There are many opportunities for policy to safeguard the future of Europe's soils and play its part in reversing global trends in soil degradation, says EASAC.

4h

Ötzi the Iceman's Tattoos May Have Been a Primitive Form of Acupuncture

Ötzi the iceman, the oldest preserved glacial mummy, may have been taking a primitive form of herbal medicine.

5h

Debate on banning organohalogen flame retardants heats up

Hundreds of everyday household items, from laptop computers to babies' high chairs, contain flame retardants to prevent the objects from catching fire. Recently, several groups petitioned a U.S. agency to ban flame retardants known as organohalogens, some of which can migrate out of household items. Others argue against blacklisting an entire class of compounds without further study, according to

5h

Hyper Suprime-Cam survey maps dark matter in the universe

Today, astronomers have released the deepest wide field map of the three-dimensional distribution of matter in the universe ever made and increased the precision of constraints for dark energy with the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey (HSC).

5h

New Army technology guides soldiers in complete darkness

Researchers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have developed a new type of thermal imaging camera that allows soldiers to see hidden objects that were previously undetectable.

5h

Senate panel opens hearing on crafting US privacy law

The Trump administration is hoping Congress can come up with a new set of national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data that finds a balance between "privacy and prosperity."

5h

21st Century Fox to sell its 39% stake in Sky to Comcast

Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox said Wednesday it had agreed to sell its 39 percent stake in Sky to Comcast, giving the US cable and media giant full control of the British television giant.

5h

Millions of birds die in collisions each year, but lights could change that

Millions of birds die each year in collisions with planes, and airports have used everything from fireworks to herding dogs to scare them away. Some methods have been relatively successful, but they're useless after the plane takes off. Researchers at Purdue University may have just found a solution.

5h

Interpreting new findings of methane on Mars

New data from the Mars Science Laboratory demonstrating the presence of methane presents novel challenges to explain how it was formed and what it suggests about the potential for life to exist or be supported on Mars. A comprehensive overview of these new findings, their implications, and recommendations for future studies to help interpret the data is published in Astrobiology.

5h

Olfactory cells may act as 'Trojan horse,' carry anticancer therapy to deadly brain tumors

Massachusetts General Hospital researchers have found that a special type of cell essential to the ability of olfactory neurons to regenerate may be genetically engineered to deliver anticancer therapy to the dangerous brain tumors called glioblastomas.

5h

Instrument boosts analysis of small, extremely dark materials

Researchers have developed a new instrument that can analyze light reflected from very small or extremely dark materials such as some meteorite samples and VANTABlack, the darkest manmade substance created.

5h

Beyond skin deep: understanding disparities in dermatology services

The odds of a black or Hispanic patient visiting an outpatient dermatologist are about half that of a white patient with the same skin condition, according to a new study in JAMA Dermatology. Patients most likely to receive outpatient dermatologic services in the study were white, educated women. The findings are among several that describe disparities in the use of outpatient dermatology services

5h

Is that selfie edited? Why it may matter for women viewers

There's a surprising upside to the fact that many people edit their selfies on Instagram and other social media sites to enhance their appearance. A new study found that when women believed that selfies of thin and sexualized women had been edited, viewing these images had less negative impact on one aspect of their mental health.

5h

Wright Brothers vs da Vinci: Aerobattle Extraordinaire

Humans have always loved the idea of flying! And who can blame them? Today’s airplanes may be filled with screaming children, stale crackers, and ever-shrinking leg room, but still… Taking to the skies is an awe-inspiring experience, and there’s something about looking out over a sea of clouds that can’t really be explained. Let’s a moment to celebrate 2 pioneers of flight – The Wright Brothers a

5h

Private Company Plans to Launch More Greenhouse Gas-Detecting Satellites

The detectors aim to help oil and gas companies pinpoint methane leaks in their operations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Inden dødsbrand: Plejehjem fik flere påbud om brandsikkerhed

Seks påbud gjorde på seks år Plejecenter Farsøhthus opmærksom på mangler i brandsikkerheden ved flugtveje. I august omkom tre beboere i en brand på plejehjemmet, hvor et spisekøkken indrettet i flugtvejen var med til at gøre branden voldsom.

5h

Analysis of billions of Twitter words reveals how American English develops

Linguists and geographers analysed 8.9 billion words contained within 980 million Tweets posted across the United States between 2013 and 2014 to identify the regions from which new words tend to originate.

5h

Study shows importance of personal social networks on neurological outcomes

BWH investigators find that the health habits of people in a patient's social network are tied to that person's level of reported neurological disability.

5h

Debate on banning organohalogen flame retardants heats up

Hundreds of everyday household items, from laptop computers to babies' high chairs, contain flame retardants to prevent the objects from catching fire. Recently, several groups petitioned a U.S. agency to ban flame retardants known as organohalogens, some of which can migrate out of household items. Others argue against blacklisting an entire class of compounds without further study, according to

5h

Explore climate change with new app

This year's long, hot summer led many of us to wonder if it was a sign of things to come and whether we could anticipate similar summer heat every year. Now, a scientist from the University of East Anglia (UEA) has used his expertise to develop one of the world's first apps that enables users to explore global climate change projections.

5h

'Paintable' chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice

Skin acts as the first line of defense against pathogens and other harmful material from outside the body. Yet this barrier also excludes some beneficial drugs that could treat skin diseases. Now, researchers have taken the first steps in developing a chemotherapy for melanoma that can be "painted" directly on the skin, rather than injected or taken orally. They report their results in ACS Nano.

5h

Researchers create smartphone system to test for lead in water

The discovery of lead in Flint, Michigan's drinking water drew renewed attention to the health risks posed by the metal. Now researchers at the University of Houston have created an inexpensive system using a smartphone and a lens made with an inkjet printer that can detect lead in tap water at levels commonly accepted as dangerous.

5h

Protecting probiotics from the stomach

The small intestine is a hotbed of microbial activity and a target of probiotic treatments for diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, among other conditions. To make it to the intestine, though, probiotics must first pass through the stomach, a hostile acidic environment that can kill these beneficial bacteria. Now, scientists report in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engin

5h

Both halves of NASA's Webb Telescope successfully communicate

For the first time, the two halves of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope—the spacecraft and the telescope—were connected together using temporary ground wiring that enabled them to "speak" to each other like they will in flight.

5h

How humans fit into Google's machine future

In 1998, Google began humbly, formally incorporated in a Menlo Park garage, providing search results from a server housed in Lego bricks. It had a straightforward goal: make the poorly indexed World Wide Web accessible to humans. Its success was based on an algorithm that analyzed the linking structure of the internet itself to evaluate what web pages are most reputable and useful. But founders Se

5h

Protecting vulnerable species

Sabah Wildlife Department (SWD) and Cardiff University's Danau Girang Field Centre (DGFC) have launched new state action plans to protect vulnerable and endangered species in Sabah, Borneo.

5h

Scientists have been drilling into the ocean floor for 50 years – here's what they've found so far

It's stunning but true that we know more about the surface of the moon than about the Earth's ocean floor. Much of what we do know has come from scientific ocean drilling – the systematic collection of core samples from the deep seabed. This revolutionary process began 50 years ago, when the drilling vessel Glomar Challenger sailed into the Gulf of Mexico on August 11, 1968 on the first expedition

5h

The dangers of biohacking 'experiments'– and how it could harm your health

Biohacking or "do it yourself" biology has been on the rise in recent years – it now even has various organised conferences. Following a recent VICE news documentary about a start-up company called Ascendance Biomedical – who are self-testing drugs – biohacking has had further exposure outside of its circle of devout followers.

5h

The Woman Bringing Civility to Open Source Projects

Coraline Ada Ehmke is the principal author of the Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct recently adopted by Linux.

5h

Omnivore sharks and cannibal hippos – the strange truth about dinnertime in the animal kingdom

Animals don't always stick to traditional menus, and they certainly don't read the descriptions of their diets we include in textbooks. When it recently emerged that a notorious carnivore (a shark) was actually selecting the vegetarian option, scientists were intrigued.

5h

Damaged liver cells undergo reprogramming to regenerate

In Greek mythology, Zeus punishes the trickster Prometheus by chaining him to a rock and sending an eagle to eat a portion of his liver every day, in perpetuity. It was the right organ to target – the liver has the ability to regenerate itself, though not overnight nor for eternity.

5h

Scientists crunch social media data to explain how communities affect friendships

Your chances of forming online friendships depend mainly on the number of groups and organizations you join, not their types, according to an analysis of six online social networks by Rice University data scientists.

5h

Interpreting new findings of methane on Mars

New data from the Mars Science Laboratory demonstrating the presence of methane presents novel challenges to explain how it was formed and what it suggests about the potential for life to exist or be supported on Mars.

5h

Both halves of NASA's Webb Telescope successfully communicate

For the first time, the two halves of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope — the spacecraft and the telescope — were connected together using temporary ground wiring that enabled them to 'speak' to each other like they will in flight.

5h

Study finds substantial variation in survival between EMS agencies treating out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

Emergency medical services (EMS) deliver essential initial care when patients in the community have cardiac arrest. How do patient outcomes differ between EMS agencies? This observational study suggests the odds of surviving to hospital discharge could differ more than 50 percent for any two otherwise similar patients treated by any two randomly selected EMS agencies for cardiac arrest that occurr

5h

Navigating our obsession with one-sided objects

Science Möbius strips still fascinate mathematicians. A Möbius strip can be created by taking a strip of paper, giving it an odd number of half-twists, then taping the ends back together to form a loop.

5h

Antibiotics destroy 'good bacteria' and worsen oral infection

Researchers found that antibiotics actually kill the 'good' bacteria keeping infection and inflammation at bay.

6h

6h

Why some TB bacteria can be deadly and others aren’t

Drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria may have figured out how to undermine the body’s ability to defend itself, according to a new study. People who get sick with drug-resistant TB face daunting odds. Only about two in three survive the illness, unlike people with drug-sensitive TB, who have a more than 90 percent survival rate. Part of the reason drug-resistant TB is so lethal is because some an

6h

Today’s News Crises Are Different, But Will Never Be Entirely New

The media has always been untrustworthy, frivolous, and immune to change. But inside these cycles of struggle are lessons about the real future of news.

6h

UVA discovers link between cold severity, bacteria living in your nose

The bacteria in study participants' noses fell into six different patterns of nasal microbiomes. The different patterns were associated with differences in symptom severity. The compositions also were found to correlate with viral load — the amount of cold virus inside the body.

6h

Study: Damaged liver cells undergo reprogramming to regenerate

New research conducted by biochemists at the University of Illinois has determined how damaged liver cells repair and restore themselves through a signal to return to an early stage of postnatal organ development.

6h

How to win friends online: It's not which groups you join, but how many

The chances that people will form new friendships primarily depends on the number rather than the types of organizations, groups and cliques they join, according to an analysis of six online social networks by Rice University data scientists.

6h

Protecting probiotics from the stomach

The small intestine is a hotbed of microbial activity and a target of probiotic treatments for diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, among other conditions. To make it to the intestine, though, probiotics must first pass through the stomach, a hostile acidic environment that can kill these beneficial bacteria. Now, scientists report in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engin

6h

Milk protein shown to alleviate chemotherapy side effects

Chemotherapy can wreak havoc on the taste buds and olfactory senses, depriving recipients of the intricate interplay between taste and smell that is critical to enjoying foods. Over time, taste and smell abnormalities can lead to a loss of appetite and anorexic behaviors, compromising patients' ability to recuperate. Virginia Tech researchers investigated the feasibility of lactoferrin, a highly b

6h

Researchers create smartphone system to test for lead in water

Researchers at the University of Houston have created an inexpensive system using a smartphone and a lens made with an inkjet printer that can detect lead in tap water at levels commonly accepted as dangerous.

6h

'Paintable' chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice

Skin acts as the first line of defense against pathogens and other harmful material from outside the body. Yet this barrier also excludes some beneficial drugs that could treat skin diseases. Now, researchers have taken the first steps in developing a chemotherapy for melanoma that can be 'painted' directly on the skin, rather than injected or taken orally. They report their results in ACS Nano.

6h

NIAID releases strategic plan to address tuberculosis research

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, killing roughly 1.6 million people in 2017. Recently, the global health community has strengthened its efforts and resolve to tackle this ancient disease. Writing in JAMA, NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., details the institute's new strategic plan for building on these current efforts by furthering the understanding of TB

6h

What happened when we tested thousands of abandoned rape kits in Detroit | Kym Worthy

In 2009, 11,341 untested rape kits — some dating back to the 1980s — were found in an abandoned warehouse once used by the the Detroit police to store evidence. When this scandal was uncovered, prosecutor Kym Worthy set a plan into action to get justice for the thousands of victims affected. In this powerful, eye-opening talk, Worthy explains how her office helped develop an innovative program t

6h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad får køkkenfilm til at klistre?

En læsers datter undrer sig over, hvad der får køkkenfilm til at klistre. Det har vores materialeforsker en god forklaring på.

6h

Unprecedented experiment with Canadian military provides new insights on right whales

North Atlantic right whales began making headlines the summer of 2017 when a record number of the whales died after getting tangled in fishing gear or hit by ships.

6h

VIDEO Programmør laver mikro-rumskib på en time

Super-programmør Mogens Hvidtfeldt har fået en minicomputer i hånden, der lige nu bruges til undervisning i 4. klasser. Det er blevet til starten af et asteroide-spil.

6h

Traditional methods of farming in a dry climate

Forest and brush fires, water shortages and crop failure – these have been the effects of summer 2018 in large parts of Europe. Climate scientists are calling for new agricultural policies, saying farmers need to prepare for greater extremes of temperature and weather. Researchers at the Tübingen collaborative research center (SFB) ResourceCultures are investigating how agrarian societies in the p

6h

Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model

Children with autism often find social interactions awkward, leaving them isolated. Now in a study appearing in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, scientists report that they have discovered a first-of-its-kind compound that promotes social interaction among laboratory mice that display autistic traits. The finding could lead to the development of drugs capable of improving social behaviors in t

6h

Hyper Suprime-Cam Survey reveals detailed dark matter map of the universe

Einstein's general theory of relativity has helped an international team of researchers measure the lumpiness of dark matter in our universe today by analyzing images of 10 million distant galaxies, and further use it to understand dark energy.

6h

Psychologists define the 'dark core of personality'

Egoism, Machiavellianism, narcissism, psychopathy, sadism, spitefulness are all traits that stand for the malevolent dark sides of human personality. Results from a recently published German-Danish research project show, these traits share a common 'dark core.' So, if you have one of these tendencies, you are also likely to have one or more of the others.

6h

Breastfeeding changes gene activity that may make babies less reactive to stress

It has long been known that there are many physical and mental health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies. But can these benefits be due to genetic changes induced by breastfeeding? New research suggests that connection.

6h

New protocol for measuring background levels of drugs in crime labs

When forensic chemists handle evidence that contains illegal drugs, trace amounts are inevitably released into the laboratory environment, which can cause detectable background levels of drugs in the lab. Why is this a problem?'If I run a sample and it has fentanyl, I want to be sure that fentanyl came from the sample and not from background levels in my lab,' said NIST research chemist Ed Sisco,

6h

Tiger mosquitoes are capable of transmitting yellow fever

Since December 2016, Brazil has been grappling with its worst yellow fever outbreak for several decades. Research by scientists at the Institut Pasteur and the Institut Oswaldo Cruz has demonstrated that the yellow fever virus can be transmitted via Aedes albopictus, the tiger mosquito. This opportunistic species is capable of colonizing both urban and forest areas.

6h

New allergy vaccine for hay fever shows promising results

Using sugar molecules researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a new vaccine for hay fever that may reduce treatment times and increase the effect of treatments. The vaccine, which is still at the earliest research stage, has been tested on mice. The method can potentially also be used to develop different forms of vaccines, for example vaccines for autoimmune disorders.

6h

The ‘Compliment Trump’ Doctrine

Updated on September 25 at 1:25 ET NEW YORK —When Moon Jae In and Donald Trump met at the United Nations on Monday, South Korea’s president hailed his American counterpart for helping guide nuclear talks to a point where “North Korea’s decision to relinquish its nuclear program has been officialized to a degree that not even those within North Korea can reverse.” “You are, indeed, the only person

6h

Painted tomb discovered in Cumae (Italy)—a banquet frozen in time

At the foot of the hill on which sits the ancient city of Cumae, in the region of Naples, Priscilla Munzi, CNRS researcher at the Jean Bérard Centre (CNRS-EFR), and Jean-Pierre Brun, professor at the Collège de France, are exploring a Roman-era necropolis. They now reveal the latest discovery to surface in the archaeological dig they have led since 2001: a painted tomb from the second century B.C.

6h

This Bizarre, Blind Swamp Eel Breathes Through Its Blood-Red Skin

A new species of swamp eel that tunnels through dirt will haunt your nightmares.

6h

More kids living in multigenerational families

More kids than ever before live with both their parents and grandparents in multigenerational households, according to new research from the University of Michigan.

6h

ESA technology making L.A. Metro a safer ride

Thousands of daily passengers on the Los Angeles Metro will ride more securely with the deployment of cutting-edge ESA-patented screening technology to detect concealed weapons or explosives.

6h

World's largest ever bird has been named: Vorombe titan

After decades of conflicting evidence and numerous publications, scientists have finally put the 'world's largest bird' debate to rest. Vorombe titan (meaning 'big bird' in Malagasy and Greek), has taken the title reaching weights of up to 800 kg and three meters tall, with the research also discovering unexpected diversity in these Madagascan creatures.

6h

Robots may need lizard-like tails for 'off-road' travel

Robots may one day tackle obstacles and traverse uneven terrains thanks to collaborative research analyzing the motion of lizards. The study used a slow motion camera to capture the nuanced movement of eight species of Australian agamid lizards that run on two legs — an action known as 'bipedal' movement.

6h

No longer whistling in the dark: Scientists uncover source of perplexing waves

Using data from a NASA four-satellite mission that is studying reconnection, scientists have developed a method for identifying the source of waves that help satellites determine their location in space.

6h

Microbial 'dark matter' dominates Earth's environments

Uncultured microbes — those whose characteristics have never been described because they have not yet been grown in a lab culture — could be dominating nearly all the environments on Earth except for the human body, according to a new study.

6h

Maniac Is a Strange, Hyperkinetic Ode to Connection

This article contains some spoilers through all 10 episodes of Maniac. It’s tempting to get distracted by the details in Maniac , which glimmer and sparkle and refract the eye’s focus. The Rubik’s Cube. The discarded paperback of Don Quixote . The Statue of Extra Liberty. Trudie Styler. The rainbows. The computer-generated graphics in a groundbreaking pharmaceutical trial that recall nothing so m

6h

Uterus transplantation — ethically just as problematic as altruistic surrogacy

In 2014, the first child to have been gestated in a donated uterus was born. Although research into uterus transplantation is still in an early phase, many see the donations as a success. Researchers at universities including Linköping University have studied ethical aspects of uterus transplantation. The results show that uterus transplantation with living donors is ethically just as problematic

7h

Analysis of billions of Twitter words reveals how American English develops

New words in American English tend to develop in five regional linguistic 'hotspots' before spreading across the United States and beyond, a new study reveals.

7h

A study using Drosophila sheds light on the metastatic behavior of human tumors

A study at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) using Drosophila melanogaster has demonstrated that chromosomal instability itself can induce invasive behavior in epithelial cells and has identified the underlying molecular mechanisms involved.

7h

Contactless water quality control with the use of spectroscopy

In cooperation with Dielectric Spectroscopy Lab (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Khamzin and Nasybullin perfected the phenomenological model of relaxation, which helped explain the non-Arrhenius behavior of the temperature dependence of the ice relaxation time at temperatures below 155 K.

7h

Baltimore liquor stores linked more to violent crime than bars and restaurants

A new study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY) found that alcohol outlets in Baltimore that sell alcohol for off-premise consumption (such as liquor stores and beer and wine stores) have a stronger association with incidences of violent crimes, including homicides, aggravated assaults, sexual assaults, and robbery, tha

7h

Novel method produces highest-ever signals for human embryonic stem cell detection

A new method developed by researchers at Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) can potentially ensure patient safety for future stem cell-based therapies by enhancing native stem cell bioelectric signals.

7h

The origins of the High Plains landscape

Starting at the eastern foot of the Rocky Mountains in the Midwest United States, the dramatic landscape of the High Plains stretches across several U.S. states. Dropping just a few hundred meters over a length of more than 500 kilometres, these plains have only a very gentle gradient and the nearly flat surfaces exhibit unique ecosystems, making them a geological and ecological anomaly.

7h

Efforts to make science relevant to diverse populations inadvertently create divisions, study finds

Around the turn of the 20th century, U.S. educators widely considered certain populations less educated, less healthy and unprepared to be true American citizens. If asked, most might argue those practices have disappeared as social norms have changed—particularly given that many reforms today focus on equity and diversity. A University of Kansas researcher has published a study showing how the ve

7h

Clementine Ford reveals the fragility behind 'toxic masculinity' in book

In Boys Will Be Boys, Australia's most prominent contemporary feminist, Clementine Ford, works toward dismantling the idea that feminism is harming men. Instead, she proposes—as feminists have consistently maintained—that a patriarchal society can be as harmful and destructive for individual men as it can be for women.

7h

ATLAS Experiment releases new study of ultra-rare B-meson decay

The study of hadrons—particles that combine quarks to form mesons or baryons—is a vital part of the physics programme by researchers of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN. Their analysis has not only perfected the understanding of the Standard Model, it has also provided excellent opportunities for discovery.

7h

A mechanism of color pattern formation in ladybird beetles

Many ladybirds have attractive color patterns consisting of black and red. This prominent color pattern is thought to function as a warning that indicates to predators that they are very bitter and unpalatable. A research team led by Professor Teruyuki Niimi at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan focused on the multicolored Asian ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (also known as the h

7h

Leica revives iconic Soviet Zenit camera

German camera manufacturer Leica is reviving the legendary Soviet Zenit camera more than 30 years after its mass production ended, with a new digital model unveiled on Wednesday.

7h

Science learns from its mistakes too

Scientific studies should always be published irrespective of their result. That is one of the conclusions of a research project conducted by the German Centre for the Protection of Laboratory Animals at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), the results of which have now been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

7h

10 mysteries of the universe: Why does anything exist at all?

Our best theories predict that all the matter in the universe should have been destroyed as soon as it existed. So how comes there’s something, not nothing?

7h

Tiny soft robot with multilegs paves way for drugs delivery in human body

A novel tiny, soft robot with caterpillar-like legs capable of carrying heavy loads and adaptable to adverse environment has just been developed. This mini delivery-robot could pave way for medical technology advancement such as drugs delivery in human body.

7h

Sunflower pollen has medicinal, protective effects on bees

Bees fed a diet of sunflower pollen show dramatically lower rates of infection by two separate pathogens, suggesting medicinal and protective effects for pollinators in peril.

7h

The necessity of finding, conserving crop wild relatives

An important part of plant genetic resources is crop wild relatives. These are closely related to crop species but have not been domesticated by humans. This plant genetic materials and those who care for them are vital for human survival.

7h

Impact of WWII bombing raids felt at edge of space

Bombing raids by Allied forces during the WWII not only caused devastation on the ground but also sent shockwaves through Earth's atmosphere which were detected at the edge of space. Researchers have revealed the shockwaves produced by huge bombs dropped by Allied planes on European cities were big enough to weaken the electrified upper atmosphere — the ionosphere — above the UK, 1,000 km away.

7h

Is student debt keeping Americans away from marriage?

Having a student loan could influence whether America's young adults first union after college is marriage or cohabitation. This is according to a study published in Springer's Journal of Family and Economic Issues. Lead author Fenaba Addo of the University of Wisconsin Madison in the US says the findings highlight how attitudes towards marriage, living together and the perceived shame of accumula

7h

Study demonstrates new mechanism for developing electronic devices

The prevalence of electronic devices has transformed life in the 21st century. At the heart of these devices is the movement of electrons across materials. Scientists today continue to discover new ways to manipulate and move electrons in a quest for making faster and better functioning devices.

7h

Zika and yellow fever—vaccines without eggs

A team led by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems in Magdeburg is developing methods with which viruses for vaccines can be replicated in significantly higher concentrations than before. The researchers produce the pathogens in cell cultures in small bioreactors. The production of vaccines currently requires about half a billion chicken eggs per annu

7h

Why trackless trams are ready to replace light rail

I began my life as an activist academic in 1979 when the Western Australian government closed the Fremantle railway, saying buses would be better. Patronage immediately fell by 30% and I ran a four-year campaign to save the railway. We won. I have been writing books and running campaigns ever since on why trains and trams are better than buses. But I have changed my mind. The technology has change

7h

Why climate change is making it harder to monitor marine pollution

Despite the dramatic news coverage of oil spills and other big pollution disasters in our seas and oceans, most environmental pollution is caused by much smaller incidents that are often invisible, persistent, and far more difficult to track.

7h

Universities are failing to deal with serial sexual predators on their staffs, according to new report

A new report, published today (26 September), examining staff sexual misconduct within the higher education sector reveals the difficult experiences that students have had when they try to report staff sexual misconduct to their university.

7h

Sculpture or Human Organ? These Photos Make It Hard to Tell

Photographer Chan Dick captured remarkable images of 50-year-old specimens at the University of Hong Kong’s anatomy museum.

7h

The Old Man & the Gun Is a Charming Swan Song for Robert Redford

The director Jean-Luc Godard once famously quipped that “all you need for a movie is a gun and a girl.” David Lowery’s new film, The Old Man & the Gun , keeps the weapon, which mostly sits unused in the protagonist’s jacket pocket, but, as the movie’s title suggests, subs in an old man (Robert Redford) for good measure. Now 82, Redford might be a little slower on his feet, but he’s a Hollywood ic

7h

Green mango peel—a slick solution for oil contaminated soils

Nanoparticles derived from green mango peel could be the key to remediating oil sludge in contaminated soil according to new research from the University of South Australia.

7h

Researchers discover molecule involved in the repair of liver wounds

A new study from researchers of CEDOC-NOVA Medical School|Faculdade de Ciências Médicas and Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, led by Maria Paula Macedo and Carlos Penha-Gonçalves, respectively, published in Hepatology Communications, showed that a molecule called CD26/DPP-4 is involved in the regeneration of acute liver wounds and is a promising biomarker for hepatic disease.

7h

African swine fever: No risk to consumers

The African swine fever (ASF) that is currently rife in Europe does not pose a health hazard to humans. 'The ASF pathogen cannot be transferred to humans,' explains Professor Dr. Andreas Hensel, President of the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). 'No risk to health is posed by direct contact with diseased animals or from eating food made from infected domestic pigs or wild boar.'

7h

Urine liquid biopsies could help monitor bladder cancer treatment

Scientists have shown for the first time that immune cells in the urine of bladder cancer patients accurately reflect those in the tumor environment. This suggests that urine could help to monitor response to immunotherapy.

7h

The People Who Could Have Done Science Didn't

Because they were women, and they were told, at every stage, that they weren’t good enough. It was a lie — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Supersygehus får fjernkøling fra Aalborg Portlands enorme kridtsø

Nyt Aalborg Universitetshospital ved Aalborg skal køles med koldt vand fra dyb og iskold kridtsø. Det vil give en stor elbesparelse og begrænse CO2-udledning spår leverandør.

7h

Another reason for the western swamp tortoise to smile

There were smiles all round, from people and tortoises alike, at the release of 12 western swamp tortoises into Ellenbrook Nature Reserve.

7h

Giddy up—help for plump ponies is fast on its way

QUT Professor Martin Sillence, from QUT's School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences, said a new veterinary drug related to one used to treat human metabolic syndrome has been found to prevent laminitis in ponies with the equine version of metabolic syndrome.

7h

Rare Sumatran tiger found dead in Indonesia

A critically endangered Sumatran tiger has died after being caught in a hunter's trap on the Indonesian island of Sumatra, an official said Wednesday.

7h

Is your refrigerator spying on you?

Millions of American homes contain devices connected to the internet that aren't computers. Yours is likely one of them.

7h

Researchers find precipitation thresholds regulate carbon exchange

One of the major sources of uncertainty about the future climate is whether ecosystems will continue to take up carbon dioxide or release it to the atmosphere. University of Montana researchers and co-authors confronted this problem using atmospheric measurements and satellite observations to test model simulations in a recent study published on Sept. 5 in Nature Communications.

7h

More persistent weather patterns in US linked to Arctic warming

Persistent weather conditions, including dry and wet spells, generally have increased in the United States, perhaps due to rapid Arctic warming, according to a Rutgers-led study.

7h

Peter Gøtzsche er ude af det internationale Cochrane

Cochranes internationale bestyrelse ekskluderer Peter Gøtzsche fra organisationen.

7h

A look back at the tiny cars that once ruled the road

Cars A timeline of micro cars. Cars are getting bigger, but back when fuel was scarce and safety wasn't a concern, tiny machines thrived.

7h

Photonic chips harness sound waves to speed up local networks

It used to be known as the information superhighway—the fibre-optic infrastructure on which our gigabytes and petabytes of data whizz around the world at (nearly) the speed of light.

7h

Zinc-air batteries provide power in remote areas

Remote villages in Africa and Asia are receiving electricity using a little-known type of technology: zinc-air batteries.

7h

Northern dialects can be closer to original English – despite what southerners might say

"Ey oop! Ey oop!", says comedian Michael McIntyre to his audience in Leeds. "That's supposed to be 'hello', according to you." He sticks with his Yorkshire theme for a couple of minutes, mocking nowt, summat and the – as in "T'Lion, t'Witch and t'Wardrobe" – at the show filmed in 2010. His audience laps up the ridicule, even though it comes from a posh-sounding southerner.

7h

One reason people install smart home tech is to show off to their friends

Ever wondered what all the fuss is about when it comes to smart homes? You're not alone.

7h

Species and age of trees affect carbon emissions

Climate change forecasts could improve by better understanding the variation in natural carbon emissions from different vegetation types.

7h

Science learns from its mistakes too

Scientific studies should always be published irrespective of their result. That is one of the conclusions of a research project conducted by the German Centre for the Protection of Laboratory Animals at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), the results of which have now been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

7h

A mechanism of color pattern formation in ladybird beetles

Many ladybirds have attractive color patterns consisting of black and red. A research team led by Professor Teruyuki Niimi at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan focused on the multicolored Asian ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (also known as the harlequin ladybird), which lives mainly in Siberia and East Asia, and shows >200 color patterns within a species. The team has identified

7h

AI could be used to predict outcomes for people at risk of psychosis and depression

Machine learning, also known as artificial intelligence, could be a useful tool for predicting how well people at high risk of psychosis or with recent onset depression will function socially in the future, an international research study has found.

7h

Connection between 'chalky teeth' in children and the uptake of Bisphenol A not likely

Medical associations are reporting increased occurrences of disturbed dental mineralization in children. The so-called 'chalky teeth' show discoloration and can be extremely sensitive to pain. Furthermore they tend to react sensitively to heat, cold and brushing.

7h

Is student debt keeping Americans away from marriage?

Having a student loan could influence whether America's young adults first union after college is marriage or cohabitation. This is according to a study published in Springer's Journal of Family and Economic Issues. Lead author Fenaba Addo of the University of Wisconsin Madison in the US says the findings highlight how attitudes towards marriage, living together and the perceived shame of accumula

7h

The origins of the High Plains landscape

A mantle wave passing beneath western North America over the last 20 million years is responsible for the formation of the High Plains landscape at the base of the Rocky Mountains. These plains provide vital habitat for millions of migratory birds and farmland essential to US agriculture. ETH geologist Sean Willett and his colleagues from the University of Nevada have been studying the origins of

7h

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS) put to the test

Per- and polyfluoralkyl substances (PFAS) are industrially manufactured substances which do not occur naturally. They are used in numerous industrial processes and consumer products due to their special technical properties. The various PFAS differ from one another in their carbon chain lengths and the functional groups that exist within the molecule. Because PFAS are difficult to degrade, they ar

7h

Study demonstrates new mechanism for developing electronic devices

OIST scientists have demonstrated a new mechanism that may help develop electronic devices differently.

7h

Tracking hydrogen movement using subatomic particles

A Japanese collaboration developed a technique using a beam of subatomic particles called muons to track hydrogen movement in the solid magnesium hydride for the first time. The negative muon beam provided spectra that showed the local nuclear magnetic fields of hydrogens in magnesium hydride. This technique expands our ability to investigate hydrogen transfer in solid materials, which should help

7h

Invasive snakes 'hitchhiking' on planes

A team of international scientists has discovered why brown tree snakes have become one of the most successful invasive species.

7h

Andrea Constand and the Burden of Being the Only Witness

On Monday morning, Bill Cosby, the 81-year-old comedian and former television giant, arrived at a courthouse in Norristown, Pennsylvania, to be sentenced for drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand, a 45-year-old former Temple University employee. At the sentencing, Constand addressed the judge briefly. “Your honor, I have testified. I have given you my victim-impact statement,” she said

7h

Nina Wright joins New Scientist as Chief Executive

New Scientist is pleased to announce Nina Wright has joined the company as Chief Executive. She previously worked as a Chief Commercial Officer for events company UBM

7h

Shockwaves from second world war bombs rattled the edge of space

Historic records reveal how shockwaves from massive bombs altered the ionosphere 1000 kilometres from Germany and 300 kilometres above Earth

7h

Researchers apply ion soft-landing technique for advances in materials synthesis

Today's demanding applications in chemical manufacturing, energy generation and storage, pollution abatement, and health care are driving development of new materials with catalytic and optoelectronic functionalities. However, to predict and control the properties of such materials, scientists have been studying their development process at a molecular level. Frequently, a detailed understanding i

7h

New protocol for measuring background levels of drugs in crime labs

When crime lab chemists handle evidence that contains illegal drugs, trace amounts of those drugs are inevitably released into the laboratory environment. When chemists scoop a bit of powder to test it, for instance, microscopic particles can become airborne and later settle on nearby surfaces. Particles can also be spread by touch. To some degree, this is an unavoidable byproduct of the testing p

7h

Tracking hydrogen movement using subatomic particles

A muon is an unstable subatomic particle similar to an electron but with much greater mass. The lifetime of a muon is only a couple of microseconds, but this is long compared with the lifetimes of many unstable subatomic particles. Because of their comparatively long lifetime, positive muons are often used to detect internal magnetic fields in solid materials. However, negative muons have seldom b

7h

How to make computers faster and climate friendly

Your smartphone is far more powerful than the NASA computers that put Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the moon in 1969, but it is also an energy hog. In computing, energy use is often considered a secondary problem to speed and storage, but with the rate and direction of technological advancement, it is becoming a growing environmental concern.

7h

What's behind the color and pattern of bird feathers?

While it may be true, as the old adage goes, that 'birds of a feather flock together,' what is less certain is how the feathers on those birds come to have their distinct patterns and colorations. Current data suggest that patterns of stripes and spots on animals' fur or feathers are formed through an open-ended or stochastic process during the embryonic formation of skin, at which time a dynamic—

7h

Microplastics found deep in sand where turtles nest

Microplastics have been found deep in the sand on beaches where sea turtles lay their eggs.

7h

Marker in brain associated with aggression in children identified

A research team has identified a brain-wave marker associated with aggression in young children. The finding could lead to earlier identification of toddlers with aggressive tendencies before the behavior becomes more ingrained in adolescence.

7h

Researchers map susceptibility to human-made earthquakes

Researchers have mapped local susceptibility to human-made earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas. The new model incorporates physical properties of the Earth's subsurface and forecasts a decline in potentially damaging shaking through 2020.

7h

Efficient generation of high-density plasma enabled by high magnetic field

Scientists have demonstrated that it is possible to efficiently heat plasma by focusing a relativistic electron beam (REB) accelerated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser with the application of a magnetic field of 600 tesla (T), about 600 times greater than the magnetic energy of a neodymium magnet (the strongest permanent magnet).

7h

Climate change not main driver of amphibian decline

While a warming climate in recent decades may be a factor in the waning of some local populations of frogs, toads, newts and salamanders, it cannot explain the overall steep decline of amphibians, according to researchers.

7h

Giddy up: help for plump ponies is fast on its way

Help is on the way for plump ponies at risk of the painful, often deadly, condition of founder or laminitis which is the second biggest killer of domestic horses.

7h

More persistent weather patterns in US linked to Arctic warming

Persistent weather conditions, including dry and wet spells, generally have increased in the United States, perhaps due to rapid Arctic warming, according to a Rutgers-led study. Persistent weather conditions can lead to weather extremes such as drought, heat waves, prolonged cold and storms that can cost millions of dollars in damage and disrupt societies and ecosystems, the study says.

7h

Dental research shows that smoking weakens immune systems

Researchers at the Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine found that smoking weakens the ability for pulp in teeth to fight illness and disease.

7h

Newly discovered hummingbird species already critically endangered

In 2017, researchers working in the Ecuadorian Andes stumbled across a previously unknown species of hummingbird — but as documented in a new study published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, its small range, specialized habitat, and threats from human activity mean the newly described blue-throated hillstar is likely already critically endangered.

7h

Common heart condition linked to sudden death

A University of Adelaide-led team of researchers has found a link between sudden cardiac death (when the heart suddenly stops beating) and a common heart condition known as mitral valve prolapse that affects around 12 in every 1000 people worldwide.

7h

New Zealand children's medicine prescriptions examined for first time

A study into the pharmaceutical use of 1.4 million New Zealand children has revealed some significant increases in the use of certain prescription medicines, as well as the positive impact of practitioner education.

7h

Novel method produces highest-ever signals for human embryonic stem cell detection

Researchers from Singapore have developed a way to achieve an ultra-high bioelectric signal from human embryonic stem cells. Using direct current-voltage methods and few-layered 2D molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) sheets, they produced cell signals two-orders of magnitude higher than previous electrical-based detection methods. This method can be combined with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor c

7h

To be or not to be a white blood cell, that is the question

Japanese scientists have revealed a biological 'switch' that influences whether an immature blood cell would develop into a red blood cell or a subtype of white blood cell called myeloid cells in response to infection or inflammation within the body.

7h

Invasive snakes 'hitchhiking' on planes

A team of international scientists has discovered why brown tree snakes have become one of the most successful invasive species.The research team, led by University of Queensland scientists, has been studying why a type of cat-eyed snake has been so effective at devastating native bird populations on the island of Guam.

7h

Svend Lings får 40 dages betinget fængsel

Svend Lings er ved retten i Svendborg kendt skyldig for for at vejlede personer til selvmord.

7h

Cosmic composers: how scientists helped reinvent Holst's Planets suite

Picnics on Mars, sunsets on Uranus, sculptures on Venus … 100 years after Holst unveiled his epic masterpiece, musicians are reimagining it using the latest scientific discoveries Composers have long been known to travel far and wide for inspiration. Mendelssohn headed to the remote Scottish isle of Staffa to write his Hebrides overture, while Messiaen found music in the mountains of Utah. Debora

7h

Breastfeeding and infant health link is not straight-forward

Results from new study suggest that the benefits of breastfeeding reported in the vast majority of prior research could be influenced by the mother's characteristics, such as what they know about health and nutrition. The findings could help guide policy makers and health care professionals when it comes to providing critical information to expectant mothers about feeding their newborns.

8h

Experimental engineered bone to help osteoarthritis patients

Researchers are developing an artificial bone, which can be used for treating one of the most common joint diseases — osteoarthritis. The bi-functional composite imitates the complex osteochondral structure of a joint, i.e. both cartilage and bone tissues.

8h

CT technique expands possibilities of imaging ancient remains

Researchers using computed tomography (CT) have successfully imaged the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian mummy's hand down to a microscopic level, according to a new study.

8h

Photosynthesis discovery could help next-gen biotechnologies

Researchers have purified and visualized the 'Cyclic Electron Flow' (CEF) supercomplex, a critical part of the photosynthetic machinery in all plants, in a discovery that could help guide the development of next-generation solar biotechnologies.

8h

Mediterranean diet 'may help prevent depression'

An expert urges more research to confirm a possible link between fruit, veg, nuts and grains and mood.

8h

Image: The sun—two wavelengths, two different images

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory views our sun in 10 different wavelengths because each wavelength reveals different solar features. This Sept. 21, 2018, view of the sun uses two selected images taken at virtually the same time but in different wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light.

8h

A Japanese Company Says It Will Use SpaceX Rockets to Land on the Moon

There won't be any people on the first two iSpace landers. But the company said its long term goal is human exploration of the lunar surface.

8h

Newly discovered hummingbird species already critically endangered

In 2017, researchers working in the Ecuadorian Andes stumbled across a previously unknown species of hummingbird—but as documented in a new study published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances, its small range, specialized habitat, and threats from human activity mean the newly described Blue-throated Hillstar is likely already critically endangered.

8h

As the Arctic Melts, the Fabled Northwest Passage Opens for Cargo Ships

More container ships on Arctic sea routes will also mean more black soot… and more melting.

8h

HP Envy x360 Review: Great Performance for a Low-Cost Touchscreen Convertible

HP adds a Ryzen processor and cuts some corners to deliver this low-cost 13-inch laptop.

8h

Lowlanders are no match for Nepal's Sherpa, says UBC Okanagan study

The Sherpa people of the Himalayas have long been recognized for their unique ability to excel physically in the thin air of higher altitudes. But new research from UBC's Okanagan campus, published last week in the Journal of Physiology, now suggests that their specially adapted muscles give them up to twice the resistance to muscle fatigue of lowlanders.

8h

Being older helps skin heal with less scarring, and now researchers know why

A compound secreted in the bloodstream could be the key factor that causes wounds in older people to heal with less scarring than in younger people.

8h

Photonic chips harness sound waves to speed up local networks

Technology to support financial markets, 5G networks and Internet-of-Things

8h

UM researchers find precipitation thresholds regulate carbon exchange

One of the major sources of uncertainty about the future climate is whether ecosystems will continue to take up carbon dioxide or release it to the atmosphere. University of Montana researchers and co-authors confronted this problem using atmospheric measurements and satellite observations to test model simulations in a recent study published on Sept. 5, 2018 in Nature Communications.

8h

Profiling a Conspiracy Theorist: Why Some People Believe

Some people are habitual conspiracy thinkers – there's a plan behind everything, and it's usually malevolent. One scientist set out to understand who is likely to ascribe to these theories.

8h

A new species of high-altitude hummingbird may already be in trouble

Researchers have discovered a new species of hummingbird high up in the Ecuadorian Andes.

8h

8h

Mobile Websites Can Tap Into Your Phone's Sensors Without Asking

Apps need your explicit permission to access your smartphone's motion and light sensors. Mobile websites? Not so much.

8h

Neutron star ‘nuclear pasta’ is the universe’s strongest stuff

Scientists have calculated the strength of the material deep inside the crust of neutron stars and found that it’s the strongest known material in the universe. The researchers successfully ran the largest computer simulations ever conducted of neutron star crusts, becoming the first to describe how they break. “The strength of the neutron star crust, especially the bottom of the crust, is releva

8h

Long lost Galileo letter found at Royal Society library

Nature journalist Alison Abbott has published a News and Comment piece in the journal detailing the finding of a letter in a Royal Society library purported to have been written by famed early scientist Galileo Galilei. The letter is significant because it offers proof of an attempt by the scientist to play down his arguments regarding controversial astronomy ideas.

8h

Researcher seeks to increase college enrollment, success among foster youth

Large percentages of foster youth have college aspirations, but estimates from research suggest that no more than 20 percent of that population are known to enroll and fewer than half of them actually graduate.

8h

New airborne campaigns to explore snowstorms, river deltas, climate

Five new NASA Earth science campaigns will take to the field starting in 2020 to investigate a range of pressing research questions, from what drives intense East Coast snowfall events to the impact of small-scale ocean currents on global climate.

8h

Medic becomes third person infected with monkeypox in England

Virus appeared for first time this month, with trio now being treated in isolation units A medical worker has become the third person diagnosed with monkeypox in England, less than a month after the infection first appeared in the country. The person had cared for a patient at Blackpool Victoria hospital who was subsequently diagnosed with monkeypox, according to Public Health England (PHE). It i

8h

NASA tests tiny satellites to track global storms

How many times have you stepped outside into a surprise rainstorm without an umbrella and wished that weather forecasts were more accurate?

8h

Ice age discovery may reveal early migration route of first Americans

A group of researchers have discovered the retreat of an ancient ice sheet from the western coast of Canada occurred earlier than previously thought.

8h

The SN 10: These scientists defy limits to tackle big problems

With a drive to understand how things work, these young researchers are making a mark in sustainable energy, medicine, astronomy and technology.

8h

Shahzeen Attari explores the psychology of saving the planet

Merging psychology with engineering, Shahzeen Attari probes how people think about conservation, energy use and climate change.

8h

Emily Balskus uses chemical logic to study the microbiome

Using chemistry to peer at the microbial world, Emily Balskus is revealing how microbes influence human health.

8h

Ibrahim Cissé unlocks cells’ secrets using physics

Biophysicist Ibrahim Cissé finds clues in raindrops and morning dew about how genes are activated.

8h

NASA study untangles smoke, pollution effects on clouds

A new NASA-led study helps answer decades-old questions about the role of smoke and human-caused air pollution on clouds and rainfall. Looking specifically at deep convective clouds—tall clouds like thunderclouds, formed by warm air rising—the study shows that smoky air makes it harder for these clouds to grow. Pollution, on the other hand, energizes their growth, but only if the pollution isn't h

8h

Study shows divorces rates rise when people have more potential mates to choose from

A pair of researchers at Stockholm University has found that people who have a lot of co-workers of the opposite gender might have a higher risk of divorce. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Caroline Uggla and Gunnar Andersson describe their study of heterosexual men and women living in Denmark over a 20-year period, and what they found.

8h

Christopher Hamilton explores the architecture of other worlds

Planetary scientist Christopher Hamilton uses Earth’s volcanic structures are a blueprint for how lava shapes other worlds.

8h

Paula Jofré makes stellar connections

Astrophysicist Paula Jofré is a galactic archaeologist, mapping out generations of stars.

8h

Lisa Manning describes the physics of how cells move

Physicist Lisa Manning probes how physical forces influence cell behavior in asthma and other conditions.

8h

Joaquín Rodríguez-López designs batteries for a sustainable energy future

Electrochemist Joaquín Rodríguez-López is finding better ways to store wind and solar power.

8h

Anshumali Shrivastava uses AI to wrangle torrents of data

Computer scientist Anshumali Shrivastava is designing programs that can handle torrents of information quickly and efficiently.

8h

Douglas Stanford probes the chaos inside black holes

Theoretical physicist Douglas Stanford is linking some of the most massive objects known to the quantum realm.

8h

Jenny Tung wants to know how social stresses mess with genes

Evolutionary anthropologist Jenny Tung is untangling the many health effects of life as a social animal.

8h

Avoiding 'adverse impacts' of groundwater pumping on surface waters

New report informs local agencies on how to avoid inadvertent threats to surface water as defined by new California groundwater law.

8h

National parks are getting hotter and drier. What's the outlook for 2100?

America's national parks are warming up and drying out faster than other U.S. landscapes, threatening iconic ecosystems from the Everglades in Florida to Joshua Tree in California to Denali in Alaska.

8h

Bill Gates has added a geothermal startup to his clean energy fund’s first bets

The $1 billion Breakthrough Energy Ventures fund is also pouring money into geothermal, grid storage, biofuels and more.

8h

Are Emotional Support Animals Necessary or Just Glorified Pets?

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen explains what exactly emotional support animals are, and whether or not you really have to sit next to one at your favorite restaurant — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Skeptisk minister: Giver milliard-tilskud til elbiler mening?

Energiministeren afviser forslag fra klimarådet om at give direkte tilskud til elbiler og om en udløbsdato for nye diesel- og benzinbiler.

8h

Efficient generation of high-density plasma enabled by high magnetic field

An international joint research group led by Osaka University demonstrated that it was possible to efficiently heat plasma by focusing a relativistic electron beam (REB) accelerated by a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with the application of a magnetic field of 600 tesla (T), about 600 times greater than the magnetic energy of a neodymium magnet (the strongest permanent magnet). Their research

8h

India's billion-strong biometric database

More than a billion Indians have uploaded their biometric details to a national database in exchange for a unique 12-digit ID that authorities say will transform how citizens interact with government and propel the world's second-most populous country into the digital age.

8h

Flere patienter med type 2-diabetes skal med i national biobank

Diabetesforskere indgår samarbejde med regionerne, der skal sikre, at data fra flere patienter med type 2-diabetes bliver en del af biobank. Praktiserende læger får bedre mulighed for at deltage i projektet.

8h

Professor vil bruge legat til forskning i understøttende behandling til kræftpatienter

Professor Jørn Herrstedt modtager 100.000 kr., som skal bruges til forskning i understøttende behandling på Onkologisk Afdeling på Sjællands Universitetshospital.

8h

1.000 brobygger­sygeplejersker skal guide patienter i sundhedsvæsenet

En personlig brobyggersygeplejersker skal sikre sammenhæng, overblik og tryghed for patient og pårørende i sundhedsvæsenet, lyder et forslag fra Danske Regioner.

8h

Reclassification recommendations for drug in 'magic mushrooms'

In an evaluation of the safety and abuse research on the drug in hallucinogenic mushrooms, Johns Hopkins researchers suggest that if it clears phase III clinical trials, psilocybin should be re-categorized from a schedule I drug — one with no known medical potential — to a schedule IV drug such as prescription sleep aids, but with tighter control.

9h

This ocean 'invisibility cloak' makes waves bigger and better

Science It could expand our options for wave-energy harvesters. Borrowing from the field of optics, two researchers have designed a device that makes waves taller, and more energetic.

9h

New computer model designs a drug delivery strategy to fight cancer

Stanford researchers have created a computer simulation, validated by experimental results, to help design drug-delivery nanoparticles that carry cancer-fighting medicines directly to tumors, while minimizing the potential side-effects on healthy cells.

9h

Rally Talk | Shifting Gears with Aaron Kaufman

Rally is a whole other language, and Aaron Kaufman is about to get schooled. Stream Full Episodes of Shifting Gears: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shifting-gears/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel From: Disc

9h

Three Earth Explorer ideas selected

As part of ESA's continuing commitment to realise cutting-edge satellite missions to advance scientific understanding of our planet and to show how new technologies can be used in space, three new ideas have been chosen to compete as the tenth Earth Explorer mission.

9h

Scientists show the vulnerability of a promising two-dimensional semiconductor to air, and discover new catalyst

For the first time ever, an international team of scientists from NUST MISIS, the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the University of Namur (Belgium), and Korea Research Institute for Standards & Science has detailed the structural changes of two-dimensional molybdenum disulfide under long-term environmental impact. The new data narrow the scope of its potential application in microelectronics and at

9h

Tumor cell expansion challenges current physics

A malignant tumor is characterized by the ability to spread. To do so, tumor cells stick to the surrounding tissue (mainly collagen) and use physical forces to propel themselves. A study published in Nature Physics by a team led by Xavier Trepat, lecturer at the Department of Biomedicine, University of Barcelona (UB), and Jaume Casademunt, professor of Physics at the UB, reveals the forces these t

9h

Software finds the best way to stick a Mars landing

Selecting a landing site for a rover headed to Mars is a lengthy process that normally involves large committees of scientists and engineers. These committees typically spend several years weighing a mission's science objectives against a vehicle's engineering constraints, to identify sites that are both scientifically interesting and safe to land on.

9h

Herbicide May Harm Microbiome of Bees

Glyphosate perturbs the balance of gut bacteria in honey bees and increases the insects' susceptibility to lethal infection.

9h

A Nuanced View on Breast vs Formula

While there is strong evidence that breast is best, a new study suggests that the benefits have been overstated, and may be mostly due to non-specific factors such as better education and overall health care.

9h

New approach to spatial noise filtering that boosts development of ultra-sensitive quantum sensors

While quantum technologies have great long-term potential in computing applications, they are closer to practical use in sensing devices that will open new vistas in metrology, biology, neuroscience, and many other fields by enabling measurement of structures as small as individual photons, particles, and neurons.

9h

Developing new ways to advance copper production

MIT associate professor of metallurgy Antoine Allanore has received a $1.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) to run larger scale tests of a new way to produce copper using electricity to separate copper from melted sulfur-based minerals, which are the main sources of copper.

9h

Gratitude in buyer-seller relationships

Emotions are contagious. They are experienced by and affect the actions of both parties in buyer-seller exchanges. As a result, one emotion in particular, gratitude, elicits perceptions of an undeserved or unearned positive personal outcome as being due to the actions of someone else, the second most common positive emotion that individuals experience. Gratitude has immense value to firms as custo

9h

Satellites safeguard Europe's potato industry

The drought that swept through Europe this year has hit European farmers hard. Sustained high temperatures and the lack of rain have badly affected the agrofood industry, including the important potato sector.

9h

Image of the Day: Parasite Stopped in Its Tracks

Suppression of a signaling pathway in Toxoplasma gondii prevents the parasite from replicating in host cells.

9h

Is the Ketamine Boom Getting out of Hand?

The anesthetic and party drug offers depression patients new hope, but some clinics may stray from science — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9h

Scientists Find Source of Bizarre Space Object 'Oumuamua

Ever since astronomers first spotted their first-ever object from beyond our solar system, it has offered more questions than answers — what is it? Where did it come from? Why is it so darn weird?

9h

Primeval Black Holes Could Reveal How the Universe Formed

Very close to the very beginning, scientists think, there were black holes. And now they know how to find them.

9h

WWII Bombs Had Rippling Effect on the Edge of Space

The shock waves from Allied bombing raids during World War II briefly weakened the ionosphere.

9h

World War II bombs 'felt in space'

Bombs dropped in World War II were so strong they were felt in the Earth's upper atmosphere

9h

Mind-reading devices can now access your thoughts and dreams using AI

We can now decode dreams and recreate images of faces people have seen, and everyone from Facebook to Elon Musk wants a piece of this mind reading reality

9h

Canadian clinics are marketing unproven stem cell treatments

Future Science Group today announces the publication of a new peer-reviewed study that surveys the Canadian direct-to-consumer marketplace of companies advertising putative stem cell treatments for various clinical indications.

9h

The periodic motion of flexible knots, and the connection to DNA

Can the topology of microobjects influence the way they move in a fluid? Experiments and simulations of Polish and Swiss researchers published in the Physical Review Letters show that the dynamics of elastic chains settling in a fluid depends on the way they are knotted. The settling chains form flat, toroidal structures composed of several intertwined loops, which swirl around each other. The stu

10h

10h

Robot Lawnmowers Are Killing Hedgehogs

With grass-cutting robots growing increasingly popular in Europe, hedgehogs are more often getting trapped under their blades.

10h

How to Build a Floating Bridge in 12 Minutes

When war and natural disasters like Hurricane Florence call for a quick crossing, military engineers hop to with one of their favorite tools—the improved ribbon bridge.

10h

Michigan State’s Untouchable Board of Trustees

Since sexual-assault allegations against the sports doctor Larry Nassar became public, top administrators at Michigan State University have claimed they didn’t know—and could not have been reasonably expected to know—about the systematic abuse that took place on their campus for more than two decades. But according to a new lawsuit , in 1992, 24 years before Nassar was fired from the university,

10h

No, Science Communicators Are Not Undermining Public Trust

Thinking outside the box is a requirement in this attention economy if we want science to reach mass audiences — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Heterometallic copper-aluminum super atom discovered

On the outside, a cluster of 55 copper and aluminum atoms looks like a crystal, but chemically, it has the properties of an atom. The heterometallic superatom, which chemists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now created, provides the prerequisites for developing new, more cost-effective catalysts.

10h

How leaves talk to roots

New findings show that a micro RNA from the shoot keeps legume roots susceptible to symbiotic infection by downregulating a gene that would otherwise hinder root responses to symbiotic bacteria. These findings reveal what it takes to make nitrogen-fixing symbiosis efficient, and how to exploit it agronomically.

10h

Refining intergalactic measurements could alter our whole understanding of physics

New efforts to figure out just how fast the universe has expanded since the Big Bang, a speed known as the Hubble constant, could upend current theories of physics, according to some scientists.

10h

Startups shook up the sleepy razor market. What's next?

What do you hate shopping for? Toothpaste? Diaper rash cream? Sunscreen? The guys who founded Harry's shaving club spend a lot time thinking about this question.

10h

Sunflower pollen has medicinal, protective effects on bees

With bee populations in decline, a new study offers hope for a relatively simple mechanism to promote bee health and well-being: providing bees access to sunflowers.

10h

Researchers map susceptibility to man-made earthquakes

Earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas had been on the rise due to injection of wastewater—a byproduct of oil and gas operations—before regulations started limiting injections. Now a new model developed by Stanford University researchers incorporates earthquake physics and the Earth's hydrogeologic response to wastewater injection to forecast a decrease in man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas t

10h

Airlines angry over 'risky' Brexit deadlock

The impasse between Britain and the EU in Brexit negotiations is "crazy" and "risky" for airlines with time running out to ensure cross-Channel flights can continue unimpeded, the world's airline body has warned.

10h

Concerns grow for Arctic beluga whale in Thames estuary

Concerns were growing Wednesday for a beluga whale spotted in the River Thames estuary outside London, thousands of kilometres (miles) from the cherished white species' natural home in Arctic waters.

10h

Daimler CEO Dieter Zetsche to leave in 2019

German high-end carmaker Daimler said Wednesday that it plans to replace long-serving chief executive Dieter Zetsche next year, setting up a Swedish successor to take the helm of the Mercedes-Benz parent company.

10h

Japan firm signs with SpaceX for lunar missions

A Japanese start-up is to send spacecraft to the moon in a deal signed with Elon Musk's SpaceX, the Tokyo-based firm said Wednesday.

10h

How to shop for an electric car

Even though electric vehicles account for just a fraction of overall car sales, they are slowly gaining favor with buyers, particularly as second cars for daily commuting.

10h

Klædt på til technofest: Ny neonfarvet fisk opdaget i dybet

Forskere har fundet noget så sjældent som en ny farvestrålende fiskeart, der lever i koralrev på dybt vand.

10h

Oil Drillers' Attempts to Avoid Earthquakes May Make Them Worse

Shallow wastewater injections—supposedly safer—can cause big, far-flung quakes, study says — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

In Paris, Airbnb blamed for all kinds of ills

The first paying guests to the ground-floor studio flat newly posted on Airbnb were innocuous enough: A family, come to experience the joys of Paris, like many millions of others.

10h

Mobile phone ban for Dutch cyclists

The sight of cyclists hurtling along while glued to their smartphones is a common one in the bike-mad Netherlands, but it will soon be illegal.

10h

Studie: Ny allergivaccine mod høfeber viser lovende resultater

Ved hjælp af sukkermolekyler har forskere fra Københavns Universitet udviklet en ny vaccine…

10h

Lægeforeningen: Medfinansiering straffer kommuner med de største udfordringer

Lægeforeningen kritiserer, at regler for kommunal medfinansiering giver kommuner incitament til at holde patienterne væk fra sygehusene. Lollands borgmester overvejer at ansætte for at mindske indlæggelser.

10h

Biased News Media or Biased Readers? An Experiment on Trust

Those who are most distrustful of the news media, and those with more extreme political views, tend to be the most biased readers, research shows.

11h

Midterm Time Capsule, 41 Days to Go: Laughter at the UN

American presidents usually address the United Nations General Assembly in the fall—as you can see here , and as Donald Trump did on Tuesday. Sometimes they also do so in the spring *, or on other occasions as the need arises. American presidents usually receive a respectful hearing at the UN. – Sometimes it is more than just respectful, as when John Kennedy made his speech in 1961 calling for a

11h

What We Knew About Date Rape Then, and What We Know Now

President Donald Trump is among those who believe that if Christine Blasey Ford was sexually assaulted by the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh in the early 1980s, and if the attack was “as bad as she says,” she would have told someone and a police report would have been filed. This view may seem intuitively correct to some, but the data—and there’s a lot of it—suggest otherwise. Widespread p

11h

Boom Town Explodes the Notion of ‘Flyover’ Territory

It has long been a common refrain among American writers out West that New York publishers are impervious to anything outside New York. The acclaimed Nebraska author Mari Sandoz, for example, whose book Old Jules won The Atlantic ’s nonfiction book prize in 1935, frequently bemoaned what she called the “intellectual and cultural dictatorship … foisted upon us the day the first malcontent crossed

11h

Rapport: Apple kommer til at lukke varm luft ud

Overskudsvarme fra Apples datacenter bliver ikke en rentabel løsning for Viborgs fjernvarme, vurderer ny rapport udarbejdet for selskabet.

11h

Interesseret i Windows 10? Så får du tvangssoftware med i installationen

Du skal være tålmodig for at slippe af med bloatware som følger med installation af Windows 10

11h

Nyt diabetescenter på vej i København

Nyt Center for Diabetes i Københavns Kommune skal hjælpe 2000 patietnerom året og samtidig være et videncenter for kommunal diabetesrehabilitering.

11h

11h

Topmatematiker 'beviser' verdens sværeste hypotese og mødes med hovedrysten

Anerkendt matematiker hævder både at have fundet forklaringen på fysikkens finstrukturkonstant og bevist Riemann-hypoteen – i et hug.

11h

Tiny soft robot with multilegs paves way for drugs delivery in human body

A novel tiny, soft robot with caterpillar-like legs capable of carrying heavy loads and adaptable to adverse environment was developed from a research led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU). This mini delivery-robot could pave way for medical technology advancement such as drugs delivery in human body.

11h

Efficient generation of high-density plasma enabled by high magnetic field

An international joint research group led by Osaka University demonstrated that it was possible to efficiently heat plasma by focusing a relativistic electron beam (REB) accelerated by a high-intensity short-pulse laser with the application of a magnetic field of 600 tesla (T), about 600 times greater than the magnetic energy of a neodymium magnet (the strongest permanent magnet).

11h

Researchers map susceptibility to man-made earthquakes

Stanford researchers have mapped local susceptibility to man-made earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas. The new model incorporates physical properties of the Earth's subsurface and forecasts a decline in potentially damaging shaking through 2020.

11h

Falck sælger alle sine lægeklinikker

Tidligere Falck-direktør Thomas Helt køber alle Falcks 12 lægeklinikker. Han har ambitioner om at udvide antallet af lægeklinikker og skabe attraktive arbejdspladser for læger og andre medarbejdere.

11h

Fuel Efficiency And Smog In Arizona

The EPA is holding hearings on a proposal to relax fuel efficiency standards. Arizona has come out in opposition — the state has a bad smog problem and was counting on the fuel rules to help fix it.

12h

Not the Booker: Three Dreams in the Key of G by Marc Nash review – curiously impressive

This fiendishly complicated story is made even tougher by its tricksy prose, but it’s not hard to admire its daring Help us judge this year’s Not the Booker prize Hold tight. Because I’m now going to try to explain what I think is happening in Three Dreams in the Key of G . As the title hints, there are three narrative strands, although they are not particularly dreamy. The first contains the jou

12h

It’s a Very Awkward Time to Be a British Lawmaker in Europe

LIVERPOOL —Brexit negotiations between the United Kingdom and the European Union may have entered their final stage, but plenty of uncertainties remain. No one knows, for example, whether both sides will be able to negotiate a final deal by November. No one knows what negotiators will do to prevent a border on the island of Ireland. And no one knows if the U.K. will ultimately leave with a deal,

12h

Trump’s Mystifying Victory Lap at the UN

After 614 nights with Donald Trump in office, we know quite a lot about the president’s foreign policy. He has visceral beliefs about America’s role in the world that date back 30 years, most notably skepticism of alliances, opposition to free trade, and support for authoritarian strongmen. Many of his administration’s senior officials do not share his views and fight against them, with varying d

12h

Ny model skal forudsige oversvømmelser

Nye byområder ændrer vandstrømme både over og under jorden. Men effekten er svær at forudse i dag. Nyt samarbejdsværktøj skal vise, hvilke løsninger der fungerer på langt sigt.

12h

DSAM har valgt repræsentantskab

Det nye repræsentantskab i Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin er på plads efter et elektronisk valg.

12h

12h

Senate panel to hear from internet execs on privacy policies

The Trump administration is hoping Congress can come up with a new set of national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data that finds a balance between "privacy and prosperity."

13h

The forensic pathologist who got PTSD: ‘Cutting up 23,000 dead bodies is not normal’

Richard Shepherd’s career saw him work on some of the most high-profile cases of the past 30 years, such as Harold Shipman and Stephen Lawrence. But it came at a terrible personal cost, he says When Richard Shepherd was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder in 2016, the mental health nurse told him he was really worried. “Most people say they’re going to commit suicide,” the nurse said, “

14h

Europe's Ariane 5 rocket blasts off for 100th time

A European-made rocket has blasted off from French Guiana for the 100th time, in a symbolic landmark for its manufacturer as it comes under increasing pressure from Elon Musk's SpaceX programme.

14h

Big changes about small fish are in store for fishermen

Fisheries managers are adopting a host of potentially major changes for Atlantic herring, an economically important fish that serves as a key part of the ocean ecosystem in New England.

14h

Fair-trade deals provide safety net for Ivorian cocoa producers

In Ivory Coast, cocoa once guaranteed farmers a sweet life.

14h

Earthquake fear ends Dutch gas boom

The Dutch are proud of the way they have created a country by fighting back the ocean—but when they started making their own earthquakes it proved a step too far.

14h

Nike touts edgy ads but shares fall on mixed earnings

Nike's CEO said Tuesday a controversial ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick was connecting with consumers worldwide but shares fell after the sports giant reported slowing growth in China.

14h

EU launches Asia strategy to rival China's 'new Silk Road'

As doubts grow over China's vast "Belt and Road" trade infrastructure project, the EU is launching an alternative plan for Asia that it says will not saddle countries with debt they cannot repay.

14h

Fad for 'lucky' tail hair threatens Vietnam elephants

In a village in Vietnam's "elephant kingdom", a vendor holds up a severed, dried tail dotted with coarse hairs she promises will bring good luck -– a grim new trade that is endangering the country's few remaining elephants.

14h

Into the fold? What's next for Instagram as founders leave

When Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger sold Instagram to Facebook in 2012, the photo-sharing startup's fiercely loyal fans worried about what would happen to their beloved app under the social media giant's wings.

14h

Microbial dark matter dominates Earth's environments

Uncultured microbes—those whose characteristics have never been described because they have not yet been grown in a lab culture—could be dominating nearly all the environments on Earth except for the human body, according to a new study published in mSystems.

14h

Plant genetic resources ensure ag's future

Imagine a gardener, plant explorer, geneticist, and computer specialist all rolled into one job. You might call that person a steward of plant genetic resources.

14h

Adoption of green stormwater infrastructure rises after floods

Residents and property owners are more likely to adopt some green stormwater infrastructure practices if they have experienced flooding or erosion on their property or in their neighborhoods, according to new research from the University of Vermont.

14h

Microplastics found deep in sand where turtles nest

Microplastics have been found deep in the sand on beaches where sea turtles lay their eggs.

14h

Hyper Suprime-Cam survey maps dark matter in the universe

Today, an international group of researchers, including Carnegie Mellon University's Rachel Mandelbaum, released the deepest wide field map of the three-dimensional distribution of matter in the universe ever made and increased the precision of constraints for dark energy with the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey (HSC).

14h

China coal power building boom sparks climate warning

Concerns over CO2 emissions as development restarts at hundreds of coal-fired power stations in China.

15h

Kan enhver også sende mails på vegne af direktøren i din organisation?

DMARC kan sætte en stopper for de mest luskede svindelmails, men mange har ikke implementeret teknologien, der i princippet ikke koster noget.

15h

While economic growth continues we’ll never kick our fossil fuels habit | George Monbiot

There may be more bicycles but there will also be more planes. We’re still in denial about the scale of the threat to the planet We’re getting there, aren’t we? We’re making the transition towards an all-electric future. We can now leave fossil fuels in the ground and thwart climate breakdown. Or so you might imagine, if you follow the technology news. So how come oil production, for the first ti

16h

Kina lukker 4.000 hjemmesider med "upassende værdier"

Mere kontrol af internettet. Og sociale medier skal promovere "positiv energi", mener Kinas nye leder for internetcensur.

16h

Clear the air

University of Utah engineers have studied the effects of controlling heating and air conditioning systems based on a home's indoor air quality and have discovered that programming your air conditioner and furnace to turn on and off based on the indoor air quality as well as the temperature doesn't waste a lot of additional energy but keeps the air much cleaner.

16h

Plant genetic resources ensure ag's future

An important part of plant genetic resources is crop wild relatives. These are closely related to crop species but have not been domesticated by humans. This plant genetic materials and those who care for them are vital for human survival.

16h

Microplastics found deep in sand where turtles nest

Microplastics have been found deep in the sand on beaches where sea turtles lay their eggs.

16h

Researchers identify marker in brain associated with aggression in children

A University of Iowa-led research team has identified a brain-wave marker associated with aggression in young children. The finding could lead to earlier identification of toddlers with aggressive tendencies before the behavior becomes more ingrained in adolescence. Results published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

16h

LabQuiz: Following the Guidelines – How the West(ern) Was Won

Does your brain turn to refried beans when trying to make sense of Western blot publication guidelines? Rest easy, pioneer, for there’s gold in them thar guidelines, and this quiz will help steer you to complete comprehension.

17h

Derfor åbner Ringstedbanen med kun to tog i timen

Kapaciteten stiger, når Ringsted Station er færdigombygget, men først når det nye digitale signalsystem er udrullet i 2024, opnår banen sin fulde kapacitet.

17h

Antifreeze Surface Fights Ice with Ice

Patterning a surface with tiny stripes of ice prevents frost formation on the rest of the surface—a technique that could keep planes or roads frost-free. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

18h

Cancer Center Switches Focus on Fund-Raising as Problems Mount

The change highlights the challenges facing Memorial Sloan Kettering, one of the nation’s most prestigious cancer centers, amid a widening crisis.

20h

Hyper Suprime-Cam survey maps dark matter in the universe

Today, an international group of researchers, including Carnegie Mellon University's Rachel Mandelbaum, released the deepest wide field map of the three-dimensional distribution of matter in the universe ever made and increased the precision of constraints for dark energy with the Hyper Suprime-Cam survey (HSC).

20h

Study: Roundup Weed Killer Could Be Linked To Widespread Bee Deaths

Scientists at the University of Texas at Austin posit that glyphosate destroys specialized gut bacteria in bees, leaving them more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. (Image credit: Vivian Abagiu/College of Natural Sciences at University of Texas in Austin)

21h

The Atlantic Daily: Statute of Limitations

What We’re Following Celebrity Rise and Fall: Bill Cosby has been sentenced to up to 10 years in prison for the rape of Andrea Constand—an “end” to the Cosby story, news reports declared. Megan Garber reminds us that many Cosby accusers never got their day in court, and that “whatever happens to Cosby, the stories of those on the receiving end of his predations will carry on.” Elsewhere: Mel Gibs

21h

ZSL names world's largest ever bird — Vorombe titan

After decades of conflicting evidence and numerous publications, scientists at international conservation charity ZSL's Institute of Zoology, have finally put the 'world's largest bird' debate to rest. Published today in Royal Society Open Science — Vorombe titan (meaning 'big bird' in Malagasy and Greek), has taken the title reaching weights of up to 800 kg and three meters tall, with the resear

22h

Evidence that increased BMI causes lower mental wellbeing

There is an increasing need to prevent obesity because of the consequences for mental as well as physical health, new research by academics at the University of Bristol has found.

22h

The soothing effects of strangers

Pain-relieving interventions trigger a learning effect in the brain which reduces pain. A new study shows that pain relief is more effective when it is provided by a stranger.

22h

Robots may need lizard-like tails for 'off-road' travel

Robots may one day tackle obstacles and traverse uneven terrains thanks to collaborative research analyzing the motion of lizards.The study, which featured a University of Queensland researcher, used a slow motion camera to capture the nuanced movement of eight species of Australian agamid lizards that run on two legs — an action known as 'bipedal' movement.

22h

Impact of WWII bombing raids felt at edge of space

Bombing raids by Allied forces during the WWII not only caused devastation on the ground but also sent shockwaves through Earth's atmosphere which were detected at the edge of space. University of Reading researchers have revealed the shockwaves produced by huge bombs dropped by Allied planes on European cities were big enough to weaken the electrified upper atmosphere — the ionosphere — above t

22h

New developments in EEG brain scans could help spot mental disorders early

Patients suffering from mental and neurological disorders, including autism, ADHD and dementia, could benefit from new developments in brain scanning technology, according to a new study published in The Neurodiagnostic Journal.

22h

This Was the World's Largest Bird. It Weighed As Much As a Dinosaur.

The world's largest bird — a newly identified species of elephant bird — weighed as much as a dinosaur when it strutted around Madagascar more than 1,000 years ago, a new study finds.

22h

Impact of WWII bombing raids felt at edge of space

Bombing raids by Allied forces during the Second World War not only caused devastation on the ground but also sent shockwaves through Earth's atmosphere which were detected at the edge of space, according to new research. University of Reading researchers have revealed the shockwaves produced by huge bombs dropped by Allied planes on European cities were big enough to weaken the electrified upper

22h

Eating junk food raises risk of depression, says multi-country study

Analysis of 41 studies leads to calls for GPs to give dietary advice as part of treatment Eating junk food increases the risk of becoming depressed, a study has found, prompting calls for doctors to routinely give dietary advice to patients as part of their treatment for depression. In contrast, those who follow a traditional Mediterranean diet are much less likely to develop depression because t

22h

Team names world's largest ever bird—Vorombe titan

After decades of conflicting evidence and numerous publications, scientists at international conservation charity ZSL's (Zoological Society of London) Institute of Zoology, have finally put the 'world's largest bird' debate to rest. Published today (26 September 2018) in Royal Society Open Science—Vorombe titan (meaning 'big bird' in Malagasy and Greek), has taken the title reaching weights of up

22h

Female flies evolved serrated genitals that get in the way during sex

Spotted-wing drosophila have evolved a special organ for laying their eggs in fruit, but it makes it difficult for males to hold on when they mate

22h

What's Left for Congress to Ask Big Tech Firms? A Lot

Executives from Amazon, Twitter, Google, and other tech companies head to Washington for another hearing on privacy, but this time the threat of regulation carries new weight.

22h

#ReadingMyAtlantic is Back!

(Emily Jan / Gabriela Fernandez / The Atlantic) We’re bringing back our #ReadingMyAtlantic Instagram contest and we’re so excited. The first iteration of this contest launched last year, and in the months since, we have been blown away by the creativity of our readers . We’ve loved seeing where you took your magazine with your babies and furry friends . We’ve watched you take us around the world

22h

New Ken Burns documentary models what American healthcare could be

This documentary might reframe the national conversation about healthcare, which is the #1 issue for American voters in the mid-term elections. The Mayo Clinic: Faith, Hope, Science airs Tuesday, September 26 at 8 p.m. ET on PBS. The miracle in a cornfield Ever since The Civil War , the iconic nine-part documentary series that featured such greats as Southern historian Shelby Foote, filmmaker Ken

22h

Healthcare should be a basic human right in America, says Ban Ki-moon

Ki-moon served as secretary general for the United Nations from 2007 to the end of 2016. He said special interests are blocking the American government from pursuing universal healthcare. 30 million Americans are not covered by insurance. A 2018 poll shows that more than half of Americans would support a single-payer healthcare plan. None The U.S. healthcare system is politically and morally wron

22h

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