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Nyheder2018september27

What Mark Judge’s Absence Reveals

The strongest evidence that Senate Republicans want to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the nation’s highest court, regardless of what he may have done, was the conspicuous absence of Mark Judge from the hearing they held on Thursday. Christine Blasey Ford, who testified under oath before the Senate on Thursday that Kavanaugh attempted to rape her while they were both teenagers, has identified Judge, a

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Read: Christine Blasey Ford opening statement to Senate

Both Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh and psychology professor Christine Blasey Ford, the accuser, are testifying right now before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill. Ford has accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were in high school. Her opening statement follows; watch the livestream below. Her opening statement, just completed: Christine Blasey Ford: Cha

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Her er elbilens danske CO2-forspring

Flere elbiler kan få CO2-udledningen til at stige på kort sigt og den ekstra strøm skal komme fra nye vindmøller og solceller. Til gengæld er de langsigtede CO2-gevinster ikke til at tage fejl af. Det er nogle af konklusionerne i de livscyklusanalyser, der ligger til grund for Klimarådets nye ana…

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LATEST

NASA satellite analyzes new Southern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at a new storm that formed in the southern Pacific Ocean called Liua and saw strongest storms off-center.

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Inside the Secret Conference Plotting to Launch Flying Cars

Over two days in Bentonville, Arkansas, the new aerial mobility nobility gathered away from the public eye to craft strategies for launching the next age of aviation.

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Lyft Will Pay You to Ditch Your Car. Will It Work?

The company’s new challenge is a PR stunt. It’s also a useful way to learn about the quirks of user behavior.

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3 questions flag older cancer patients with ‘financial toxicity’

Nearly one in five older patients with advanced cancer have financial problems that may cause them to delay treatment so they can pay for food and housing costs, which in turn leads to stress and poor quality of life, according to a new study. Researchers conducted the “financial toxicity” study at several cancer clinics across the country, involving 542 patients ages 70 to 96, says senior author

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Glaciers are no longer moving at glacial paces

Environment Is unprecedented movement from a High Arctic ice cap a sign of things to come, or just a weird event? The ice cap was practically galloping along: “surging” at a pace of 82 feet per day in 2015.

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Decades in the making — A breakthrough in the hunt for a vaccine against foal pneumonia

A vaccine against deadly foal pneumonia might finally be within reach, thanks to Morris Animal Foundation-funded research conducted at two major universities. The breakthrough could potentially save the lives of thousands of foals every year.

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When neglected children become adolescents

Many migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S. border, some of them very young, have landed in shelters where they often experience stress, neglect and minimal social and cognitive stimulation. The latest findings of the long-running Bucharest Early Intervention Project, involving children in Romanian orphanages, tells a cautionary tale about the psychiatric and social risks of lon

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Large stretches of coral reefs can be rehabilitated

Coral reefs can be rehabilitated over large scales using a relatively inexpensive technique, according to a study led by UC Davis in partnership with Mars Symbioscience.

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The brain diet

Scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) find that high levels of a hormone called FGF23 are linked to changes in brain structure. In results published in the journal PLoS ONE on September 7th, 2018, FGF23 was associated with structural changes in the brain's frontal lobes.

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Amazon mangrove forest stores twice as much carbon per acre as region's famous rainforest

Scientists have determined for the first time that Amazon's waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region's famous rainforest.

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Illinois research accurately predicts US end-of-season corn yield

Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a new method of predicting end-of-season corn yield that outperforms the USDA's estimations, in a scientifically rigorous and reproducible way.

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Congress Considers Endangered Species Act Amendments

Opponents of the proposal call the changes a "wildlife extinction package."

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Pollution threatens to wipe out half of all orca communities

Ten of the 19 orca populations in the oceans could vanish within a century because of the effects of reproduction-disrupting PCB chemicals

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E.P.A. to Eliminate Office That Advises Agency Chief on Science

It's the latest step by the Trump administration that appears to diminish the role of scientific research in policymaking.

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Trilobites: Hidden Kingdoms of the Ancient Maya Revealed in a 3-D Laser Map

Using technology known as lidar, a team of archaeologists found evidence beneath the jungle canopy in Guatemala of how the Mesoamerican civilization altered its landscape.

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Trilobites: Killer Whales Face Dire PCBs Threat

Concentrations of the toxins are very high, lingering in the orcas’ blubber, and are passed from mother to calf.

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Sparkling Cells in Cortex

What’s in a brain? So many cells; such great variety! When it comes to neurons, they can be broadly categorized as either Excitatory (E) or Inhibitory (I). There are far more E neurons than I ones. Most estimates put the cortical E:I ratio at 4:1. Leading the excitatory charge are Pyramidal cells. Their dendrites are covered in spiny protruded synapses, and their axons encourage post-synaptic par

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Instagram’s Founders Have Always Had Impeccable Timing

In early interviews, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger knew they were being acquired by Facebook at the right moment. Another well timed move: their exit from Instagram.

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My fiancee is gone but she’s still helping others fight cancer | Henry Scowcroft

Zarah’s donated samples were used by researchers – many others should have the chance to do the same Last week, sitting at my desk at work, I clicked on a newly arrived PDF with considerably more trepidation than usual. The draft expanded to fill my screen, and I nervously scrolled down past a list of authors’ names into a soup of acronyms and jargon. Is she in there? I wondered, my breath quicken

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Laser mapping shows the surprising complexity of the Maya civilization

A large-scale lidar survey of Guatemalan forests reveals evidence of ancient, interconnected Maya cities.

47min

Many People with Appendicitis Don't Need Surgery, Just Antibiotics

A new study suggests many people with appendicitis may not need to go under the knife.

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Christine Blasey Ford’s Testimony Is a Where-Were-You-When Moment

The scenes outside the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Thursday morning were as one might expect in the hours before a high-profile congressional hearing: dozens of protesters in costume, people lying next to posters on the sidewalk, a blur of T-shirts featuring political stances. Inside the building, though, the images were closer to that of the average American living room. Two best girlfrien

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Kemikalie truer med at udrydde halvdelen af verdens spækhuggere

Trods udfasning og forbud i årtier så er kemikaliet PCB stadig en trussel for dyr i toppen af fødekæden.

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WSU researchers develop sugar-powered sensor to detect, prevent disease

Researchers at Washington State University have developed an implantable, biofuel-powered sensor that runs on sugar and can monitor a body's biological signals to detect, prevent and diagnose diseases.

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'Cellular memory' of DNA damage in oocyte quality control

Females are born with a finite number of eggs that come from a much larger pool of millions of precursor cells. New research from UC Davis shows how cells that have experienced DNA damage are removed from this pool, so only the highest quality oocytes can become eggs.

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NASA's close up of Hurricane Rosa shows hint of an eye

NASA's Terra satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Hurricane Rosa that gave an indication an eye has formed. Rosa is expected to become a major hurricane by Friday, Sept. 27, 2018.

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Managing congenital adrenal hyperplasia requires shared decisions among patients, families, and heal

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline that offers best practices for healthcare providers on how to promptly diagnose, treat, and manage patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), an inherited endocrine disorder, throughout their entire lives.

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New study hints at potential antibiotic breakthrough

The rapid emergence and global spread of antibiotic resistance demands a new approach for developing novel ones. A study published in The FASEB Journal uncovers a novel approach to combating the fast spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria.

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Women much less likely to ask questions in academic seminars than men

A new study reveals a stark disparity between male and female participation in departmental seminars which helps to explain the 'leaky pipeline' of female representation in academic careers.The observational study of 250 events at 35 institutions found that women are 2.5 times less likely to ask a question in seminars than men.The researchers argue this reflects significant differences in self-rep

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New gene variants associated with chronic back pain

Chronic back pain is the number one cause of years lived with disability worldwide. In a new study, Pradeep Suri of the Department of Veterans Affairs in Seattle, Wash., and colleagues in the United States and Europe, in association with Dr. Frances Williams from King's College London's Department of Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology, identified three novel genetic variants associated with ch

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How a sleeping cancer awakens and metastasizes

Scientists at CSHL have determined one of the ways in which cancers in remission can spring back into action. This knowledge has inspired a new treatment idea designed to prevent cancer recurrence and metastasis.

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Scientists discover genetic basis for how harmful algal blooms become toxic

A team led by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) has uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by harmful algal blooms.

52min

What drove the unusually intense hurricane season in 2017?

The warming of the tropical Atlantic relative to the rest of the global ocean may have been a key factor driving the abnormally fierce Atlantic hurricane season during 2017, a new study suggests.

52min

Keeping things cool with a paint-like polymer

Paving the way to alternatives to high-energy modes of cooling, like air conditioners, researchers now present a polymer that can cool down surfaces by reflecting sunlight and heat back into the sky.

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Lidar survey 'compels' revaluation of aspects of ancient Maya society

An airborne laser mapping survey of over 2,000 square kilometers of northern Guatemala – the largest such survey to date of this region — 'compels' a revaluation of Maya demography, agriculture, and political economy, according to its authors.

52min

The persistent killer of killer whales

Despite their being banned for decades, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) threaten the long-term viability of more than 50 percent of the planet's killer whale population, reports a new model-based study.

52min

Lack of science support fails Brazil

Reflecting on Brazil's National Museum fire, scientists warn against lack of museum investment.

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New study probes the ancient past of a body plan code

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have opened a window on another piece of evolutionary biology. They have found that Hox genes, which are key regulators of the way the bodies of bilaterally symmetrical animals form, also play a role in controlling the radially symmetric body plan of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

52min

Polymer coating cools down buildings

Columbia Engineers have invented a high-performance exterior PDRC polymer coating with nano-to-microscale air voids that acts as a spontaneous air cooler and can be fabricated, dyed, and applied like paint on rooftops, buildings, water tanks, vehicles, even spacecraft — anything that can be painted. They used a solution-based phase-inversion technique that gives the polymer a porous foam-like str

52min

PCB pollution threatens to wipe out killer whales

More than 40 years after the first initiatives were taken to ban the use of PCBs, the chemical pollutants remain a deadly threat to animals at the top of the food chain. A new study, just published in the journal Science, shows that the current concentrations of PCBs can lead to the disappearance of half of the world's populations of killer whales from the most heavily contaminated areas within a

52min

NIST's electro-optic laser pulses 100 times faster than usual ultrafast light

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used common electronicsto build a laser that pulses 100 times more often than conventional ultrafast lasers. The advance couldextend the benefits of ultrafast science to new applications such as imaging of biological materials inreal time.

52min

Vampire bats found to carry infectious bacteria at high rates

A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Daniel Becker at Montana State University in Bozeman, found Bartonella infections in vampire bats are highly prevalent in Peru and Belize, and that Bartonella genotypes are distributed widely, rather than clustered geographically.

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Ancient lowland Maya complexity as revealed by airborne laser scanning of northern Guatemala

Lowland Maya civilization flourished in the tropical region of the Yucatan peninsula and environs for more than 2500 years (~1000 BCE to 1500 CE). Known for its sophistication in writing, art, architecture, astronomy, and mathematics, Maya civilization still poses questions about the nature of its cities and surrounding populations because of its location in an inaccessible forest. In 2016, an ae

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Response to Comment on "DNA damage is a pervasive cause of sequencing errors, directly confounding variant identification"

Following the Comment of Stewart et al ., we repeated our analysis on sequencing runs from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) using their suggested parameters. We found signs of oxidative damage in all sequence contexts and irrespective of the sequencing date, reaffirming that DNA damage affects mutation-calling pipelines in their ability to accurately identify somatic variations.

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Comment on "The plateau of human mortality: Demography of longevity pioneers"

Barbi et al . (Reports, 29 June 2018, p. 1459) reported that human mortality rate reached a "plateau" after the age of 105, suggesting there may be no limit to human longevity. We show, using their data, that potential lifespans cannot increase much beyond the current 122 years unless future biomedical advances alter the intrinsic rate of human aging.

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Crisis in Brazil

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News at a glance

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Bridging the gap

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No strand left behind

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Forces behind form

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Chromatin plasticity: A versatile landscape that underlies cell fate and identity

During development and throughout life, a variety of specialized cells must be generated to ensure the proper function of each tissue and organ. Chromatin plays a key role in determining cellular state, whether totipotent, pluripotent, multipotent, or differentiated. We highlight chromatin dynamics involved in the generation of pluripotent stem cells as well as their influence on cell fate decisi

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Dynamic DNA methylation: In the right place at the right time

The classical model of cytosine DNA methylation (the presence of 5-methylcytosine, 5mC) regulation depicts this covalent modification as a stable repressive regulator of promoter activity. However, whole-genome analysis of 5mC reveals widespread tissue- and cell type–specific patterns and pervasive dynamics during mammalian development. Here we review recent findings that delineate 5mC functions

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Developmental enhancers and chromosome topology

Developmental enhancers mediate on/off patterns of gene expression in specific cell types at particular stages during metazoan embryogenesis. They typically integrate multiple signals and regulatory determinants to achieve precise spatiotemporal expression. Such enhancers can map quite far—one megabase or more—from the genes they regulate. How remote enhancers relay regulatory information to thei

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RNA modifications modulate gene expression during development

RNA modifications have recently emerged as critical posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression programs. They affect diverse eukaryotic biological processes, and the correct deposition of many of these modifications is required for normal development. Messenger RNA (mRNA) modifications regulate various aspects of mRNA metabolism. For example, N 6 -methyladenosine (m 6 A) affects the transl

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PCB–still a problem

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Waking up in a trap

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Biosynthesis of the neurotoxin domoic acid in a bloom-forming diatom

Oceanic harmful algal blooms of Pseudo-nitzschia diatoms produce the potent mammalian neurotoxin domoic acid (DA). Despite decades of research, the molecular basis for its biosynthesis is not known. By using growth conditions known to induce DA production in Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries , we implemented transcriptome sequencing in order to identify DA biosynthesis genes that colocalize in a genom

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Ultrafast electro-optic light with subcycle control

Light sources that are ultrafast and ultrastable enable applications like timing with subfemtosecond precision and control of quantum and classical systems. Mode-locked lasers have often given access to this regime, by using their high pulse energies. We demonstrate an adaptable method for ultrastable control of low-energy femtosecond pulses based on common electro-optic modulation of a continuou

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Interrupted carbonyl-olefin metathesis via oxygen atom transfer

Some of the simplest and most powerful carbon-carbon bond forming strategies take advantage of readily accessible ubiquitous motifs: carbonyls and olefins. Here we report a fundamentally distinct mode of reactivity between carbonyls and olefins that differs from established acid-catalyzed carbonyl-ene, Prins, and carbonyl-olefin metathesis reaction paths. A range of epsilon, zeta-unsaturated keto

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Arylsulfonylacetamides as bifunctional reagents for alkene aminoarylation

Alkene aminoarylation with a single, bifunctional reagent is a concise synthetic strategy. We report a catalytic protocol for the addition of arylsulfonylacetamides across electron-rich alkenes with complete anti-Markovnikov regioselectivity and excellent diastereoselectivity to provide 2,2-diarylethylamines. In this process, single-electron alkene oxidation enables carbon-nitrogen bond formation

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Predicting global killer whale population collapse from PCB pollution

Killer whales ( Orcinus orca ) are among the most highly polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)–contaminated mammals in the world, raising concern about the health consequences of current PCB exposures. Using an individual-based model framework and globally available data on PCB concentrations in killer whale tissues, we show that PCB-mediated effects on reproduction and immune function threaten the long

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An axial Hox code controls tissue segmentation and body patterning in Nematostella vectensis

Hox genes encode conserved developmental transcription factors that govern anterior-posterior (A-P) pattering in diverse bilaterian animals, which display bilateral symmetry. Although Hox genes are also present within Cnidaria, these simple animals lack a definitive A-P axis, leaving it unclear how and when a functionally integrated Hox code arose during evolution. We used short hairpin RNA (shRN

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Joint profiling of chromatin accessibility and gene expression in thousands of single cells

Although we can increasingly measure transcription, chromatin, methylation, and other aspects of molecular biology at single-cell resolution, most assays survey only one aspect of cellular biology. Here we describe sci-CAR, a combinatorial indexing–based coassay that jointly profiles chromatin accessibility and mRNA (CAR) in each of thousands of single cells. As a proof of concept, we apply sci-C

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A mechanism for preventing asymmetric histone segregation onto replicating DNA strands

How parental histone (H3-H4) 2 tetramers, the primary carriers of epigenetic modifications, are transferred onto leading and lagging strands of DNA replication forks for epigenetic inheritance remains elusive. Here we show that parental (H3-H4) 2 tetramers are assembled into nucleosomes onto both leading and lagging strands, with a slight preference for lagging strands. The lagging-strand prefere

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MCM2 promotes symmetric inheritance of modified histones during DNA replication

During genome replication, parental histones are recycled to newly replicated DNA with their posttranslational modifications (PTMs). Whether sister chromatids inherit modified histones evenly remains unknown. We measured histone PTM partition to sister chromatids in embryonic stem cells. We found that parental histones H3-H4 segregate to both daughter DNA strands with a weak leading-strand bias,

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New Products

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Breaking the silence

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Allele-specific epigenome maps reveal sequence-dependent stochastic switching at regulatory loci

To assess the impact of genetic variation in regulatory loci on human health, we constructed a high-resolution map of allelic imbalances in DNA methylation, histone marks, and gene transcription in 71 epigenomes from 36 distinct cell and tissue types from 13 donors. Deep whole-genome bisulfite sequencing of 49 methylomes revealed sequence-dependent CpG methylation imbalances at thousands of heter

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Neutrophil extracellular traps produced during inflammation awaken dormant cancer cells in mice

Cancer cells from a primary tumor can disseminate to other tissues, remaining dormant and clinically undetectable for many years. Little is known about the cues that cause these dormant cells to awaken, resume proliferating, and develop into metastases. Studying mouse models, we found that sustained lung inflammation caused by tobacco smoke exposure or nasal instillation of lipopolysaccharide con

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Comment on "DNA damage is a pervasive cause of sequencing errors, directly confounding variant identification"

Chen et al . (Reports, 17 February 2017, p. 752) highlight an important problem of sequencing artifacts caused by DNA damage at the time of sample processing. However, their manuscript contains several errors that led the authors to incorrect conclusions. Moreover, the same sequencing artifacts were previously described and mitigated in The Cancer Genome Atlas and other published sequencing proje

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Stablecoins will help cryptocurrencies achieve world domination—if they actually work

Price-stable coins could spur the adoption of crypto payment applications, but the technology is largely unproven.

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Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions

Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions, study shows.

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Pollution threatens the future of killer whales

Chemical pollution threatens the long-term viability of the most exposed orca groups.

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Laser-Carrying Airplanes Uncover Massive, Sprawling Maya Cities

Using lidar, archaeologists have mapped the previously unseen ruins of entire Maya cities, revealing new details of their complex civilizations.

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The Lingering Curse That’s Killing Killer Whales

Two months ago, a female orca named Tahlequah captured the world’s attention by carrying the body of her dead calf for 17 days. Now, a second orca from the same group—a 3-year-old female named Scarlet—has also likely died; she was incredibly emaciated over the summer, and hasn’t been seen for three weeks . Her death means that this community of orcas, known as the southern residents, now includes

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Scenes From the World of Wearable Art Competition

For the past 30 years, the World of WearableArt (WOW) international design competition has been held in Wellington, New Zealand. The event has grown substantially, and now designers of diverse backgrounds from around the world come to New Zealand to showcase their creations before as many as 60,000 visitors. WOW 2018 opens today, and runs through October 14. Below, a sample of some of the amazing

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Chuck Grassley's Jarring Presence at the Kavanaugh-Ford Hearing

Updated on September 27 at 2:34 p.m. ET Wary of having a group of mostly older men interrogating Christine Blasey Ford, Republicans on the Senate Judiciary Committee opted to hire Rachel Mitchell , a sex-crimes prosecutor, to question the woman who has accused the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of attempting to rape her in high school. But the GOP plan had one hiccup: It still meant that o

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A Pediatrician Tells His Former Patient: ‘I Am Disappointed in Myself’

My Rapist Apologized “Like so many rape survivors in this country living through this particular moment in history,” Deborah Copaken wrote last week, “I have been so brought to my knees by this latest allegation that I, too, was inspired to speak out.” After Copaken described her experience, her former pediatrician got in touch with her, and shared his letter with The Atlantic . Dear Deborah, Hav

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Christine Blasey Ford Is Her Own Expert Witness

“How are you so sure that it was he?” Ever since Christine Blasey Ford, a 51-year-old psychology professor, alleged she was sexually assaulted by Brett Kavanaugh more than 30 years ago, people have, again and again, questioned how she could be sure of her memory. And today, she finally got to explain—with the precision of a scientist, with the authority of a professor. Because that is who she is.

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Polymer coating cools down buildings

With temperatures rising and heat-waves disrupting lives around the world, cooling solutions are becoming ever more essential. This is a critical issue especially in developing countries, where summer heat can be extreme and is projected to intensify. But common cooling methods such as air conditioners are expensive, consume significant amounts of energy, require ready access to electricity, and o

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NIST's electro-optic laser pulses 100 times faster than usual ultrafast light

Physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used common electronicsto build a laser that pulses 100 times more often than conventional ultrafast lasers. The advance couldextend the benefits of ultrafast science to new applications such as imaging of biological materials inreal time.

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Scientists discover genetic basis for how harmful algal blooms become toxic

A team led by scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) has uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by harmful algal blooms.

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Women much less likely to ask questions in academic seminars than men

A new study reveals a stark disparity between male and female participation in a key area of academic life and offers recommendations to ensure all voices are heard.

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PCB pollution threatens to wipe out killer whales

More than 40 years after the first initiatives were taken to ban the use of PCBs, the chemical pollutants remain a deadly threat to animals at the top of the food chain. A new study, just published in the journal Science, shows that the current concentrations of PCBs could lead to the disappearance of half of the world's populations of killer whales from the most heavily contaminated areas within

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New study probes the ancient past of a body plan code

Researchers from the Stowers Institute for Medical Research have opened a window on another piece of evolutionary biology. They have found that Hox genes, which are key regulators of the way the bodies of bilaterally symmetrical animals form, also play a role in controlling the radially symmetric body plan of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

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Need a philosophical pick me up? Why one French philosopher suggests a walk.

French philosopher Frederic Gros tells us that walking is a route to entirely being ourselves and experiencing the sublime. He has a bias towards the wondering hikes of Nietzsche and Kerouac but has a place for urban strollers too. His book reminds us that even something as mundane as walking can be a vital part of our lives when done for itself. Walking is surprisingly good for you. Regular walk

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Water Flea Giving Birth Makes a Big Splash in 'Small World' Videos

Magnified, microscopic wonders are astonishing when seen up close.

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Aphids use sight to avoid deadly bacteria, could lead to pest control

Pea aphids — a serious agricultural pest — have the ability to see and avoid a common, aphid-killing bacteria on plant leaves, according to a new Cornell study published Sept. 27 in Current Biology.

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NASA-NOAA satellite looks into Typhoon Trami's ragged eye

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of Typhoon Trami as it continued moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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The UE Megaboom 3 Bluetooth speaker got better because of a button

Gadgets You won't find Alexa or Google assistant inside this speaker and that's fine. This waterproof, Bluetooth speaker has a button for controlling your music.

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Here are the cases you should get for your new phone

Gadgets The best skins, shells, and armors to keep your devices safe. There are many types and styles of phone cases to choose from. Which one is right for you and your phone? Click here to find out.

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There Is a Rogue Group of Stars Behaving Very Suspiciously in the Milky Way's Disk

Six million stars in the Milky Way's disc are not behaving as they should be.

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Chats about relationships may be best between sisters

Older sisters can promote adolescent girls’ healthy romantic relationships based on their experiences through one-on-one conversations, a new study shows. The findings suggest that sisters might be more comfortable and honest in conversations about sex and dating than they are with parents, other adults, and even friends. “If parents want their daughters to have healthy relationships, they should

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Amazon opens new concept '4-star' retail store in New York

Amazon opened a new retail store in New York on Thursday selling a range of products that get top ratings from customers of the online colossus.

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Therapy applied directly inside the eye best for treating uveitic macular edema

Delivery of corticosteroids directly into the eye is more effective than injections adjacent to the eye, according to results from a comparative clinical trial of macular edema in patients with noninfectious uveitis.

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Study identifies most effective treatment approaches for uveitic macular edema

Results may lead to better management of complex eye condition.

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Close Encounters of the Robotic Kind: A Glimpse of Autonomy

Earlier this summer, people around the world were gripped by the story of the young boys from a Thai soccer team who had been trapped inside of a cave after a flood. We watched with fascination – and a healthy dose of apprehension – as plans were formulated to rescue the boys, whose situation was […]

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Above and Beyond: NASA’S Journey to Tomorrow

As NASA turns sixty, we look forward to seeing what the future holds on our planet and in space. What is the next step beyond Earth? Will it be a voyage to Mars, a return to the moon, or are astronauts and researchers looking even further into the beyond, exploring the very fabric of space and time? From Academy Award®-nominated and Emmy®-winning Rory Kennedy, Above and Beyond: NASA’S Journey to

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People Are Confused About the Usefulness of Buying Fancy Things

In 1899, a brilliant but stubborn economist named Thorstein Veblen coined a term that proved quite useful in the following century and beyond. His theory of “conspicuous consumption” —basically, purchasing certain goods in order to show off—introduced a way of thinking about why people buy things that are expensive and unnecessary. Veblen established the basics of the concept, but, even nearly 12

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Thought experiment paradox divides quantum experts

A new thought experiment may have exposed a paradox within the theory of quantum mechanics, according to new research. There is likely no other scientific theory that is as well supported as quantum mechanics. For nearly 100 years now, it has repeatedly been confirmed with highly precise experiments, yet physicists still aren’t entirely happy. Although quantum mechanics describes events at the mi

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Nobeltiden nærmer sig – her er årets favoritter

Løber mændene bag kvante­kryptering og lithium- ion-batterier med årets hæder, eller bliver det i år kvindernes tur?

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Uber, Cabify drivers protest in Madrid against rule changes

Hundreds of drivers for ride-hailing services Uber and Cabify marched down a central Madrid avenue on Thursday to protest plans by the Spanish government to tighten regulations in the sector.

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German cabin crew join Ryanair strike, nearly 250 flights cut

German cabin crew said they would join pilots in Europe-wide strikes against Ryanair on Friday, as the airline announced it would have to cancel nearly 250 flights.

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Experimental cosmologists use photonics to search Andromeda for signs of alien life

"Are we alone in the universe?" The question has fascinated, tantalized and even disconcerted humans for as long as we can remember.

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Damaged liver cells undergo reprogramming to regenerate

New research conducted by biochemists has determined how damaged liver cells repair and restore themselves through a signal to return to an early stage of postnatal organ development.

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Researchers find precipitation thresholds regulate carbon exchange

One of the major sources of uncertainty about the future climate is whether ecosystems will continue to take up carbon dioxide or release it to the atmosphere. Researchers confronted this problem using atmospheric measurements and satellite observations to test model simulations.

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Novel method produces highest-ever signals for human embryonic stem cell detection

Researchers have developed a way to achieve an ultra-high bioelectric signal from human embryonic stem cells. Using direct current-voltage methods and few-layered 2D molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) sheets, they produced cell signals two-orders of magnitude higher than previous electrical-based detection methods. This method can be combined with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor circuits to prod

2h

Ride-hailing increases vehicle miles traveled

Ride-hailing accounts for an 83 percent increase in the miles cars travel for ride-hailing passengers in Denver's metro area, according to a study published this week in the journal Transportation by researchers at the University of Colorado Denver.

2h

2018 Arctic summertime sea ice minimum extent tied for sixth lowest on record

Arctic sea ice likely reached its 2018 lowest extent on Sept. 19 and again on Sept. 23, according to NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. Analysis of satellite data by NSIDC and NASA showed that, at 1.77 million square miles (4.59 million square kilometers), 2018 effectively tied with 2008 and 2010 for the sixth lowest summert

2h

Hævnporno og fake news stiller nye krav til dannelsen

Nettet og de sociale medier har på rekordtid ændret rammerne for vores måde at kommunikere…

2h

2h

NASA satellite observes reviving Tropical Storm Kirk, approaching Lesser Antilles

As Tropical Storm Kirk came back to life, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed its rainfall. Kirk is headed toward the Lesser Antilles and Warnings are in effect.

2h

Why a 'cuckoo in the nest' can go undetected

Researchers at the Universities of Exeter and Cambridge have shed light on why some species cannot tell the difference between their own offspring and those of intruders that have been slipped into their nests.

2h

Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions

When a coastal tide rolls out, it can reveal beautiful ripples in the temporarily exposed sand. These same undulating patterns can also be seen in ancient, petrified seabeds that have been exposed in various parts of the world and preserved for millions or even billions of years.

2h

The Kavanaugh Prosecutor Is Asking a Baffling Line of Questions

Updated September 27, 2018 at 2:13 p.m. EST Technically, Christine Blasey Ford was not on trial on Thursday as she testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee that Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her some 35 years ago. But effectively, that’s what it was: Ford was questioned by sitting senators and an experienced prosecutor, Rachel Mitchell, who leads the special-victims division of the Ma

2h

Unusual case of father-to-son HIV transmission reported

Diagnosis of HIV-1 infection in the 4-year old child of an HIV-negative mother led to a forensic analysis to determine the source of the infection and try to date the transmission of the virus.

2h

Ride-hailing increases vehicle miles traveled

Ride-hailing accounts for an 83 percent increase in the miles cars travel for ride-hailing passengers in Denver's metro area, according to a new study, 'The impact of ride-hailing on vehicle miles traveled,' in the journal Transportation.CU Denver research found that for every 100 miles carrying passengers, Uber and Lyft drivers travel an additional 69 miles without a passenger.Conclusions: cities

2h

NASA satellite observes reviving Tropical Storm Kirk, approaching Lesser Antilles

As Tropical Storm Kirk came back to life, the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed its rainfall. Kirk is headed toward the Lesser Antilles and Warnings are in effect.

2h

2018 Arctic summertime sea ice minimum extent tied for sixth lowest on record

Arctic sea ice likely reached its 2018 lowest extent on Sept. 19 and again on Sept. 23, 2018, according to NASA and the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. Analysis of satellite data by NSIDC and NASA showed that, at 1.77 million square miles (4.59 million square kilometers), 2018 effectively tied with 2008 and 2010 for the sixth lowest s

2h

Will these bats hang around after HS2 construction?

HS2 is going to be built through these bats' habitat.

2h

Postnatal depression could be linked to fewer daylight hours during late pregnancy

Women in late pregnancy during darker months of the year may have a greater risk of developing postpartum depression once their babies are born. This is consistent with what is known about the relationship between exposure to natural light and depression among adults in the general population.

2h

Images: Decoding multiple frames from a single, scattered exposure

Engineers have developed a way to extract a sequence of images from light scattered through a mostly opaque material — or even off a wall — from one long photographic exposure. The technique has applications in a wide range of fields from security to healthcare to astronomy.

2h

Metal that withstands ultra-high temperature and pressure identified

Scientists have identified a metal able to stand up to constant forces in ultrahigh temperature, offering promising applications including in aircraft jet engines and gas turbines for electric power generation.

2h

Mitigating stress, PTSD risk in warfighters

Researchers have developed a technique that has the potential to provide measures that facilitate the development of procedures to mitigate stress and the onset of conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder in warfighters.

2h

Media violence, impulsivity and family conflict tied to aggressive behaviors in teenagers

Teenagers exposed to TV and film violence and high levels of household conflict are at risk of engaging in aggressive behaviors, according to a new study. Especially prone to aggressive tendencies are those who also have high levels of impulsivity. Parental involvement, however, can make a difference.

2h

Simulations uncover why some supernova explosions produce so much manganese and nickel

Researchers have found white dwarf stars with masses close to the maximum stable mass are likely to produce large amounts of manganese, iron, and nickel after it orbits another star and explodes.

2h

Tomatoes 'mixing chemical cocktails': Early detection of disease resistance in food crops

Bacterial wilt devastates food crops world-wide. It destroys major crop plants such as tomatoes, potatoes, bananas and ginger. So far farmers have had to plant and wait for mature plants to observe resistance. Now research shows a possible way of saving time and reducing risk significantly for farmers and plant breeders. A new approach promises to forecast cultivar resistance at seedling stage. Sc

2h

How Reliable Are the Memories of Sexual Assault Victims?

Here's the expert testimony excluded from the Kavanaugh hearing.

2h

Moon is Stepping Stone, Not Alternative to Mars, NASA Chief Says

The Red Planet remains the U.S. space agency’s ultimate goal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Donald Trump and the Art of the ‘Con’

In Donald Trump’s bizarre, meandering 81-minute press conference on Wednesday, he often returned to his favorite words, lexical touchstones that he looped back to again and again, providing a patina of coherence and structure to his stubbornly unstructured discourse. Twenty-two times he said believe , though frequently to state disbelief. (“Nobody in this room believes it.” “Honestly, nobody know

2h

Bombeangreb under Anden Verdenskrig kan give svar på GPS-problemer

Anden Verdenskrig gik også ud over atmosfæren. Den viden kan forskere bruge til at blive klogere på problemer med nutidens GPS'er.

2h

A protein prevents plants from premature flowering

The induction of flowering is of major importance from an ecological and agronomic point of view. Environmental factors regulate flowering time, the mechanisms of which have been the subject of many studies. A team has discovered that UV-B, a type of radiation that is a natural component of sunlight can be a powerful inducer of flowering, but that a protein called RUP2 blocks their action to preve

2h

Smart devices could soon tap their owners as a battery source

The world is edging closer to a reality where smart devices are able to use their owners as an energy resource, say experts.

2h

Method to determine oxidative age could show how aging affects nanomaterial's properties

New work looks to understand how iron oxide nanoparticles age, and how aging may change their functional or safety profiles. By combining lab-based Mössbauer spectroscopy with 'center of gravity' analysis, researchers can quantify the diffusive oxidation of magnetite into maghemite, and track the process. The work is poised to help understand the aging mechanisms in nanomaterials, and how these ef

2h

Well established theories on patterns in evolution might be wrong

How do the large-scale patterns we observe in evolution arise? A new article argues that many of them are a type of statistical artifact caused by our unavoidably recent viewpoint looking back into the past. As a result, it might not be possible to draw any conclusions about what caused the enormous changes in diversity we see through time.

2h

Can we teach heart cells to grow up?

Scientists have been trying to replace damaged heart tissue using lab-made heart-muscle cells, either injected or in patch form. But the resulting muscle doesn't work very well because the cells are stuck in an immature stage. Using a novel CRISPR/Cas9 technique, a new study finds a master gene, Srf, that's required for the cells to become fully fledged, contractile adult cells.

2h

Software finds the best way to stick a Mars landing

Researchers have developed a software tool for computer-aided discovery that could help mission planners make these decisions. It automatically produces maps of favorable landing sites, using the available data on Mars' geology and terrain, as well as a list of scientific priorities and engineering constraints that a user can specify.

2h

Narrowing sexual health equity gap for Puerto Rican adolescents

Persistent and significant health disparities related to sexual health, including a higher teen birth rate and HIV prevalence, exist among Puerto Rican adolescents compared to other racial and ethnic adolescents. The Internet is a major platform for the dissemination of health information and has the potential to decrease health disparities and provide quality, culturally sensitive health informat

2h

Research teams find widespread inflammation in the brains of fibromyalgia patients

A study by Massachusetts General Hospital researchers — collaborating with a team at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden — has documented for the first time widespread inflammation in the brains of patients with the poorly understood condition called fibromyalgia.

2h

Where are they?

'Are we alone in the universe?' The question has fascinated, tantalized and even disconcerted humans for as long as we can remember.

2h

The Facebook Effect Hits Oculus: In VR, Other People Are Everything

At Oculus' annual developer conference, everything from the demos to the keynote language reinforced how important VR is to Facebook's long-term efforts.

3h

DNA vaccine targets family of tumor antigens & shows promise for cancer immunotherapy

Wistar scientists have implemented a novel structurally designed synthetic DNA vaccine to simultaneously target multiple members of a family of proteins that are specifically overexpressed in several types of cancer.

3h

'Thunderclap at Dawn' Dino's Totally Metal Name Honors Colossal Size

If any rock bands are looking for a cool name, they might draw inspiration from a newly identified long-necked Jurassic giant whose moniker means "a giant thunderclap at dawn."

3h

Plasma thruster: New space debris removal technology

An research group has discovered new technology to remove space debris using a single propulsion system in a helicon plasma thruster.

3h

The warm glow of kindness is real, even when there's nothing in it for you

We feel the benefit of kind acts regardless of whether they are altruistic or strategically motivated.

3h

Genetically engineered viruses discern, destroy E. coli in drinking water

To rapidly detect the presence of E. coli in drinking water, food scientists now can employ a bacteriophage — a genetically engineered virus — in a test used in hard-to-reach areas around the world.

3h

Silver fox study reveals genetic clues to social behavior

After more than 50 generations of selective breeding, a new study compares gene expression of tame and aggressive silver foxes in two areas of the brain, shedding light on genes responsible for social behavior.

3h

Non-small cell lung cancer patients see improved survival with durvalumab

Non-small cell lung cancer patients survive longer when their treatment includes durvalumab following platinum-based chemoradiotherapy, according to research led by Moffitt Cancer Center. New clinical trial data published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine show durvalumab improved progression-free survival by 17.2 months compared to placebo.

3h

How swarms of nanomachines could improve the efficiency of any machine

The research team of Prof. Massimiliano Esposito of the University of Luxembourg studies the thermodynamics of small nanomachines only consisting of a few atoms. In a paper published in the prestigious scientific journal Physical Review X, they outline how these small machines behave in concert.

3h

Scientists propose a new model for the specialization of cells

Mathematicians at the Higher School of Economics have developed a model that explains how cell specialization arises in the context of resource constraints. The results are published in PLOS ONE journal.

3h

Fewer children in social care in Northern Ireland than rest of UK, according to new report

Thirty-five children out of every 10,000 are in social care, with the equivalent for England, Wales and Scotland being 52, 62 and 82.

3h

HPV vaccination can play critical role in global prevention of cervical and genital cancers

In low-resource countries without well-developed screening programs, expanding access to human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination is the best means of preventing cervical cancer and other diseases caused by HPV infection, according to an editorial in the October special issue of the Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease, official journal of ASCCP. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfol

3h

He’s Going to Get Reelected, Isn’t He?

On Wednesday afternoon, Donald Trump stood at a podium in New York, where he was attending the United Nations General Assembly, and gave something resembling a press conference. In a discursive 81 minutes, he called Democratic senators “con artists” for investigating allegations that the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted a girl when he was in high school. He insisted, in hi

3h

The Six Most Striking Moments From the Kavanaugh Hearing

During Thursday’s highly anticipated hearing on sexual-misconduct allegations against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, Christine Blasey Ford, a California professor who accused Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her while the two were in high school, told lawmakers that she decided to testify because she felt it was her “civic duty.” In an emotional testimony, Ford recalled the night she

3h

The False Binary of the ‘Choir Boy’ Defense of Brett Kavanaugh

“He’s trying to paint himself as some kind of choir boy,” Lynne Brookes, a former pharmaceutical executive who attended Yale, told The Washington Post on Tuesday of her onetime classmate Brett Kavanaugh. “You can’t lie your way onto the Supreme Court, and with that statement out, he’s gone too far.” Senator Dianne Feinstein cited Brookes’s quotation at Thursday’s hearing about sexual-assault alle

3h

Vatican-Based White Paper Presents Expert Consensus on Advancing Global Palliative Care

A new white paper, developed by the Vatican-based Pontifical Academy for Life (PAV), describes the broad-based, expert-led effort to develop recommendations for improving global palliative care.

3h

Genetic analyses hone risk prediction for coronary disease

Until recently, researchers thought that genetic analyses could add relatively little to predicting CAD risk for people with type 2 diabetes. But a study led by Joslin Diabetes Center scientists now has shown that adding genetic factors into the mix can help to further hone these risk assessments.

3h

Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions

Beach sand ripples can be fingerprints for ancient weather conditions, study shows.

3h

Why a 'cuckoo in the nest' can go undetected

Researchers at the Universities of Exeter and Cambridge have shed light on why some species cannot tell the difference between their own offspring and those of intruders that have been slipped into their nests.

3h

Vaccine, anti-PD1 drug show promise against incurable HPV-related cancers

A tumor-specific vaccine combined with an immune checkpoint inhibitor shrank tumors in one third of patients with incurable cancer related to the human papilloma virus (HPV) in a phase II clinical trial led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and reported in JAMA Oncology.

3h

Skin is a battlefield for mutations

Normal skin contains a patchwork of mutated cells, yet very few go on to eventually form cancer and scientists have now uncovered the reason why. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and MRC Cancer Unit, University of Cambridge genetically engineered mice to show that mutant cells in skin tissue compete with each other, with only the fittest surviving. The results suggest that normal skin

3h

Ledumahadi mafube — South Africa's new jurassic giant

A new species of a giant dinosaur has been found in South Africa's Free State Province. The plant-eating dinosaur, named Ledumahadi mafube, weighed 12 tonnes and stood about four metres high at the hips. Ledumahadi mafube was the largest land animal alive on Earth when it lived, nearly 200 million years ago. It was roughly double the size of a large African elephant.

3h

High-pressure oxygen therapy may be beneficial in treating sudden hearing loss

The addition of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (where patients receive pure oxygen in a pressurized chamber) to standard medical treatment was associated with an improved likelihood that patients who experience sudden deafness might recover all or some of their lost hearing. Sudden deafness, also known as sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), is hearing loss that happens within a few days and ofte

3h

Researchers find how Natural Killer cells regulate protective HIV antibodies

In the quest to develop a vaccine that triggers the immune system to prevent HIV infection, researchers have focused on identifying and eliciting a particular type of antibody that is capable of neutralizing the virus.

3h

Shake, rattle, and roll to high efficiency photovoltaics

New insight into how a certain class of photovoltaic materials allows efficient conversion of sunlight into electricity could set up these materials to replace traditional silicon solar cells.

3h

Newly described, giant relative of Brontosaurus roamed South Africa 200 million years ago

Researchers reporting in Current Biology on Sept. 27 have described a new species of sauropodomorph dinosaur named Ledumahadi mafube, which means 'a giant thunderclap at dawn' in the African language Sesotho. The researchers say that the Ledumahadi specimen unearthed in South Africa is a close relative of the famed sauropod Brontosaurus and walked predominantly on all fours, anticipating the style

3h

New bird flu viruses in ducks after vaccines largely prevented H7N9 in chickens

In response to bird flu pandemics starting in 2013, officials in China introduced a new vaccine for chickens in September 2017. Recent findings suggest that the vaccine largely worked but detected two new genetic variations of the H7N9 and H7N2 subtypes in unvaccinated ducks. These findings will be published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe on Sept. 27.

3h

Feeding ants dopamine might make them smarter foragers

In an ant colony, few tasks are as important as gathering food. But the desert heat can pose a challenge for an ant on foraging duty. Recent findings, publishing in the journal iScience on Sept. 27, show how dopamine may influence the behavior of ant foragers in the desert.

3h

Device that integrates solar cell and battery could store electricity outside the grid

Scientists in the United States and Saudi Arabia have harnessed the abilities of both a solar cell and a battery in one device — a 'solar flow battery' that soaks up sunlight and efficiently stores it as chemical energy for later on-demand use. Their research, published Sept. 27 in the journal Chem, could make electricity more accessible in remote regions of the world.

3h

Why the Gulf of St. Lawrence is losing oxygen

A new study links rapid deoxygenation in the Gulf of St. Lawrence to two powerful currents: the Gulf Stream and the Labrador Current. The broad, biologically rich waterway in Eastern Canada which drains North America’s Great Lakes and is popular with fishing boats, whales, and tourists has lost oxygen faster than almost anywhere else in the global oceans. The paper, which appears in Nature Climat

3h

How alcohol does—and doesn't—affect your memory

Health Blacking out isn't always a binary thing. Alcohol messes with every part of the brain, including the ability to create new memories. But you may still be able to remember what happens when intoxicated.

3h

Kavanaugh Confirmation Fight Has Consequences for Climate Law

The Supreme Court could hear cases related to the EPA’s climate obligations and other environmental issues — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

In China, a deadly strain of bird flu now easily infects ducks

H7N9 evolved the ability to infect ducks just as a vaccine for chickens came into use.

4h

Cities Are Teaming Up to Offer Broadband, and the FCC Is MadAjit Pai FCC iPhone XR US

By working collectively, an unlikely group in Southern California is defying the FCC and by building powerful (and affordable) internet infrastructure.

4h

Putting noise to work

Noise is often an undesirable phenomenon, for example a recorded conversation in a noisy room, astronomical observations with large background signals or in image processing. A research team from China, Spain, and Germany has demon-strated that noise can induce spatial and temporal order in nonlinear systems. This effect may be used in the future to identify signals that are hidden in a large amou

4h

Physical exercise improves the elimination of toxic proteins from muscles

A study by Brazilian researchers could contribute to the development of alternatives to treat muscle weakness and atrophy. An article in Scientific Reports describes how rats subjected to an aerobic exercise routine preserved their muscle's contractility properties and their autophagic system's memory even after having a sciatic nerve injury induced.

4h

Software finds the best way to stick a Mars landing

Researchers at MIT have developed a software tool for computer-aided discovery that could help mission planners make these decisions. It automatically produces maps of favorable landing sites, using the available data on Mars' geology and terrain, as well as a list of scientific priorities and engineering constraints that a user can specify.

4h

'It Is My Civic Duty': Christine Blasey Ford's Determined Defense

Updated on September 27 at 11:54 a.m. ET Shortly after 10 a.m. Eastern on Thursday morning, the American public got to put a face to the name, and a voice to the story, of Christine Blasey Ford. The California university professor brought her allegation of sexual assault against Brett Kavanaugh to a U.S. Senate hearing room, telling members of the Judiciary Committee—and a national television aud

4h

Ledumahadi mafube—South Africa's new jurassic giant

A new species of a giant dinosaur has been found in South Africa's Free State Province. The plant-eating dinosaur, named Ledumahadi mafube, weighed 12 tonnes and stood about four metres high at the hips. Ledumahadi mafube was the largest land animal alive on Earth when it lived, nearly 200 million years ago. It was roughly double the size of a large African elephant.

4h

Feeding ants dopamine might make them smarter foragers

In an ant colony, few tasks are as important as gathering food. But the desert heat can pose a challenge for an ant on foraging duty. Recent findings, publishing in the journal iScience on September 27, show how dopamine may influence the behavior of ant foragers in the desert.

4h

New bird flu viruses in ducks after vaccines largely prevented H7N9 in chickens

In response to bird flu pandemics starting in 2013, officials in China introduced a new vaccine for chickens in September 2017. Recent findings suggest that the vaccine largely worked but detected two new genetic variations of the H7N9 and H7N2 subtypes in unvaccinated ducks. These findings will be published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe on September 27.

4h

Shake, rattle, and roll to high efficiency photovoltaics

New insight into how a certain class of photovoltaic materials allows efficient conversion of sunlight into electricity could set up these materials to replace traditional silicon solar cells. A study by researchers at Penn State reveals the unique properties of these inexpensive and quick-to-produce halide perovskites, information that will guide the development of next generation solar cells. Th

4h

‘Traffic Jams’ of Cells Help to Sculpt Embryos

What do incipient organs, traffic jams and the frothy head of foam at the top of a beer glass have in common? Far more than expected, according to results published in Nature earlier this month. For the first time, using a series of clever, state-of-the-art techniques, scientists have uncovered the balance of physical forces that shapes tissues in developing embryos. And the process they’ve ident

4h

How to build a thriving music scene in your city | Elizabeth Cawein

How does a city become known as a "music city"? Publicist Elizabeth Cawein explains how thriving music scenes make cities healthier and happier and shares ideas for bolstering your local music scene — and showing off your city's talent to the world.

4h

Business this week

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KAL’s cartoon

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Politics this week

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4h

Decoding multiple frames from a single, scattered exposure

Engineers at Duke University have developed a way to extract a sequence of images from light scattered through a mostly opaque material—or even off a wall—from one long photographic exposure. The technique has applications in a wide range of fields from security to healthcare to astronomy.

4h

Cosmic 'dustpedias' could reveal new types of galaxy

Measuring the vast quantities of cosmic dust in interstellar space may be a key to unlocking various mysteries of the cosmos, including how the grains form and whether new types of galaxy are obscured by the particle clouds.

4h

Free Solo Is a Staggering Documentary About Extreme Climbing

Alex Honnold, the subject of Free Solo , is a man given to extreme focus, obsessive drive, and a highly spartan lifestyle, meaning he lives out of a van and mostly eats cans of beans warmed on a hot plate. His personality matches his ascetic lifestyle; Honnold doesn’t talk much and is prone to bluntness when he does speak. But though he might appear monklike, Honnold is quite the opposite. He’s a

4h

Combination antibody therapy results in long-term viral suppression in HIV infection

A new generation of broadly neutralizing antibodies provides a novel approach to treating HIV infection.

4h

Decoding multiple frames from a single, scattered exposure

Engineers at Duke University have developed a way to extract a sequence of images from light scattered through a mostly opaque material — or even off a wall — from one long photographic exposure. The technique has applications in a wide range of fields from security to healthcare to astronomy.

4h

Can we teach heart cells to grow up?

Scientists have been trying to replace damaged heart tissue using lab-made heart-muscle cells, either injected or in patch form. But the resulting muscle doesn't work very well because the cells are stuck in an immature stage. Using a novel CRISPR/Cas9 technique, a new study finds a master gene, Srf, that's required for the cells to become fully fledged, contractile adult cells.

4h

Online harassment a problem for many US teens: survey

A majority of US teenagers say they have been victims of online harassment or bullying, and that social media companies aren't doing enough to fight the problem, a survey showed Thursday.

4h

Plan to breastfeed benefits baby even if mom’s not able

There’s little question about the value of breast milk as a source of infant nutrition, but a new study adds critical nuance toward better understanding the association between breastfeeding and infant health in the first year of life. The researchers found that mothers who while pregnant said they intended to exclusively breastfeed, but then used formula once the baby was born, had children with

4h

Ny motorvej giver pendlerne mere plads ved Hillerød, men mere trængsel tæt på København

Bilister slipper for seks minutters morgenkø, når motortrafikvejen ved Hillerød udvides til en motorvej, men så vokser presset på de inderste dele af hovedstadens vejnet, vurderer ny VVM-undersøgelse.

4h

Method to determine oxidative age could show how aging affects nanomaterial's properties

Iron oxide nanoparticles are used in sentinel node detection, iron replacement therapy and other biomedical applications. New work looks to understand how these materials age, and how aging may change their functional or safety profiles.

4h

Viruses discern, destroy E. coli in drinking water

To rapidly detect the presence of E. coli in drinking water, Cornell University food scientists now can employ a bacteriophage—a genetically engineered virus—in a test used in hard-to-reach areas around the world.

4h

Peter Schwarz udnævnt til lærestolsprofessor

Peter Schwarz er tiltrådt et nyt lærestolsprofessorat for endokrinologien på Rigshospitalet.

4h

African swine fever: No known risk to consumers

The African swine fever (ASF) that is currently rife in Europe does not pose a health hazard to humans, according to new research.

4h

Well established theories on patterns in evolution might be wrong

How do the large-scale patterns we observe in evolution arise? A new paper in the journal Evolution by researchers at Uppsala University and University of Leeds argues that many of them are a type of statistical artefact caused by our unavoidably recent viewpoint looking back into the past. As a result, it might not be possible to draw any conclusions about what caused the enormous changes in dive

4h

Henry Ford Hospital patient is first in the US to receive angina device

Cardiologists at Henry Ford Hospital performed the first implantation in the United States of a device approved for use in Europe for hard-to-treat angina.The Neovasc Reducer was successfully implanted in a middle-aged, Detroit-area man on June 19 by Henry Ford Health System cardiologist Dr. Gerald Koenig. At a recent follow-up visit at Henry Ford Hospital, the patient reported significantly dimin

4h

Medical-records study links dementia-related brain changes to hospital stays for critical illness

Researchers at Johns Hopkins report that a novel analysis of more than a thousand patients adds to evidence that hospitalization, critical illness and major infection may diminish brain structures that are most commonly affected by Alzheimer's disease.

4h

Method to determine oxidative age could show how aging affects nanomaterial's properties

New work looks to understand how iron oxide nanoparticles age, and how aging may change their functional or safety profiles. By combining lab-based Mössbauer spectroscopy with 'center of gravity' analysis, researchers can quantify the diffusive oxidation of magnetite into maghemite, and track the process. In Applied Physics Letters, the work is poised to help understand the aging mechanisms in nan

4h

A simple measurement of abdominal obesity

In obesity research, the body mass index (BMI) has been traditionally used to determine if an individual is normal weight, underweight, overweight or obese. However, BMI does not differentiate between the types of the mass (fat or muscle) or body shapes.

4h

Antimicrobial resistance of uropathogenic Escherichia coli from elderly patients

Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. Escherichia coli is one of the bacterial agents with higher prevalence in community-acquired and health care associated urinary infections in elderly patients.

4h

Smart devices could soon tap their owners as a battery source

The world is edging closer to a reality where smart devices are able to use their owners as an energy resource, say experts from the University of Surrey.

4h

Laser beams have gravity and can warp the fabric of the universe

Even though laser beams have no mass, they do have a tiny amount of gravity, which allows them to drag and warp space and slow down time as they propagate

4h

Japanese space hoppers capture the sun moving across an asteroid sky

Japanese landers on the asteroid Ryugu have sent back more stunning images and video of the alien landscape

4h

We challenged MI5’s mass surveillance. Then they spied on us

States spying on the very organisations that challenge their surveillance power demonstrates how important such work is, says Privacy International’s Edin Omanovic

4h

The Kavanaugh-Ford Hearing Is About the Tyranny of Male Power

Tyranny is taught through a thousand lessons. For boys, the instincts of domination are first practiced against girls, through small violences and antagonism. The lessons often scale up to stolen kisses, small humiliations, fanned rumors, and then worse. Much of what many boys and young men are told is that masculinity has to do with projecting power, most often against the girls and women who ar

5h

Norge har netop opsendt sin første raket

En raket med hybridmotor er netop sendt op fra Nordnorge. Den skal danne grundlag for en serie af raketter, der kan opsende små satellitter fra Norge.

5h

New study examines 'strategic retention' of teachers by effective principals

Numerous studies have linked principal effectiveness to overall reduced teacher turnover. These studies, however, have not differentiated between turnover of high-performing and low-performing teachers. While lower average teacher turnover is associated with better student outcomes, turnover of lower performing teachers may be a good thing for a school and for students.

5h

Viruses discern, destroy E. coli in drinking water

To rapidly detect the presence of E. coli in drinking water, Cornell University food scientists now can employ a bacteriophage — a genetically engineered virus — in a test used in hard-to-reach areas around the world.

5h

A protein prevents plants from premature flowering

The induction of flowering is of major importance from an ecological and agronomic point of view. Environmental factors regulate flowering time, the mechanisms of which have been the subject of many studies. A team from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) has discovered that UV-B, a type of radiation that is a natural component of sunlight can be a powerful inducer of flowering, but that a protein ca

5h

Exploration of microscopic structure of black holes from the viewpoint of thermodynamics

The microscopic structure of black holes remains a challenging subject. Based on the well-accepted fact that black holes can be mapped to thermodynamic systems, a recent study makes a preliminary exploration of the microscopic structure of the thermo-dynamically stable Schwarzschild anti-de-Sitter (SAdS) black hole completely from the viewpoint of thermodynamics.

5h

Silver fox study reveals genetic clues to social behavior

After more than 50 generations of selective breeding, a new Cornell University-led study compares gene expression of tame and aggressive silver foxes in two areas of the brain, shedding light on genes responsible for social behavior.

5h

The warm glow of kindness is real — Sussex study confirms

The 'warm glow' of kindness is real — even when there's nothing in it for you. We feel the benefit of kind acts regardless of whether they are altruistic or strategically motivated.

5h

Plasma thruster: New space debris removal technology

A Japanese and Australian research group has discovered new technology to remove space debris using a single propulsion system in a helicon plasma thruster.

5h

Forskere vil finde mekanismer bag udvikling af astma

Dansk-amerikansk forskningsprojekt får millionstøtte fra det amerikanske National Institute of Health.

5h

Virtual reality motion sickness may be predicted and counteracted

Researchers have made progress towards predicting who is likely to feel sick from virtual reality technology.

5h

Strategic plan to address tuberculosis research

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading infectious cause of death worldwide, killing roughly 1.6 million people in 2017. Recently, the global health community has strengthened its efforts and resolve to tackle this ancient disease. NIAID Director Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., details the institute's new strategic plan for building on these current efforts by furthering the understanding of TB and developing an

5h

Citizen scientists advance the knowledge of coastal seas

Scientists from the University of Portsmouth and local volunteers have taken part in the UK's largest ever citizen science project to understand how our coastline is changing in the face of climate change and species invasion.

5h

Postnatal depression could be linked to fewer daylight hours during late pregnancy

Women in late pregnancy during darker months of the year may have a greater risk of developing postpartum depression once their babies are born. This is consistent with what is known about the relationship between exposure to natural light and depression among adults in the general population.

5h

Composite significantly reduces electromagnetic pollution

How to reduce electromagnetic pollution? In a paper published in NANO, a group of researchers from Anhui University of Science and Technology have synthesized PANI/Zn ferrite composites which have shown excellent microwave absorption performance.

5h

Gestures are the best way to navigate your smartphone—here's how to start swiping

DIY Go beyond single-finger taps. To navigate your smartphone at top speed, single-finger tapping won't cut it. Here are the hand gestures to power through emails, notifications, maps, and more.

5h

Dew point may predict future energy demands

The power industry may be underestimating how much climate change will affect the long-term demand for electricity in the United States, according to a new study. The study describes the limitations of prediction models electricity providers and regulators use for medium- and long-term energy forecasting. And it outlines a new model that includes key climate predictors—mean dew point temperature

5h

After a fatal shark attack on Cape Cod, will the reaction be coexistence or culling?

Interactions between people and animals offer insights into human culture and societies' core values. This is especially true with respect to large predators – perhaps due to a collective memory of our evolutionary past as hunted prey.

5h

Why atheists are not as rational as some like to think

Many atheists think that their atheism is the product of rational thinking. They use arguments such as "I don't believe in God, I believe in science" to explain that evidence and logic, rather than supernatural belief and dogma, underpin their thinking. But just because you believe in evidence-based, scientific research – which is subject to strict checks and procedures – doesn't mean that your mi

5h

Donald Trump Takes the World Inside His ‘Very Large Brain’

NEW YORK —In a steamy hotel ballroom stuffed with reporters from all over the world, at the end of a contentious visit to the United Nations, Donald Trump delivered a globe-spanning seminar on his approach to high-stakes deal making—involving nothing less than the specter of nuclear war, the future of free trade, and the trajectory of relations between the world’s two superpowers. Wednesday’s pre

5h

Primate social lives are more complex than you might think

Researchers may be missing the more complex social interactions between primates like chimpanzees and macaques, according to a new study. “Our study confirms that the social relationships of nonhuman primates are extremely complicated, nuanced, and multi-faceted,” says Jake Funkhouser, lead author of the study and an anthropology doctoral student in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St.

5h

A protein prevents plants from premature flowering

The induction of flowering is of major importance from an ecological and agronomic point of view. Timely and synchronous flowering is essential to optimize pollination and allow seed production and maturation under favorable environmental conditions. Environmental factors, including light in particular, regulate flowering time, the mechanisms of which have been the subject of many studies. However

5h

Image: A shadowy selfie taken 280 million km from Earth

On 21 September 2018, 280 million km from Earth, a roughly 1.5 square-metre cube descended towards a primitive space rock. After years of planning and 4 years in flight, this tiny spacecraft captured this 'shadow selfie' as it closed in on asteroid Ryugu, just 80 metres from the remnant of our Solar System's formation, 4.6 billion years ago.

5h

Disordered skyrmion phase stabilized by magnetic frustration in a chiral magnet

In classical mechanics, particles are represented by point masses or rigid bodies, and in field theory by wave-like excitations or vibrations. Magnetic skyrmions are small, vortex-like spin textures of topological origin found in a variety of magnetic materials, and characterized by long lifetime. They were first discovered in 2009. In chiral magnets, skyrmions and skyrmion crystals (SkX) show uni

5h

Educating the next generation of medical professionals with machine learning is essential

Artificial intelligence (AI) driven by machine learning (ML) algorithms is a branch in the field of computer science that is rapidly gaining popularity within the healthcare sector. However, graduate medical education and other teaching programs within academic teaching hospitals across the US and around the world have not yet come to grips with educating students and trainees on this emerging tec

5h

Cold severity linked to bacteria living in your nose

The bacteria in study participants' noses fell into six different patterns of nasal microbiomes. The different patterns were associated with differences in symptom severity. The compositions also were found to correlate with viral load — the amount of cold virus inside the body.

5h

Forsker får 11 mio kr. til sit arbejde med virus

Hvidovre-forsker har fået 11 mio. kr. fra EU til sit arbejde i på sigt at kunne forstå bl.a. hepatitis C og give mulighed for at finde bedre behandling og måske en vaccine.

5h

Pop-up advarsel i medicinmodul skal hindre overdosering med methotrexat

Region Nordjylland indbygger advarsel mod mulig overdosering med methotrexat i medicinmodulet Columna Medicin i regionens elektroniske patientjournal.

5h

Nyt projekt vil gøre det nemmere for patienter at dele sundhedsdata

Nyt forskningsprojekt skal give patietnern bedre kontrol med deres sundhedsdata, og derved hjælpe til at sikre effektive og sammenhængende patientforløb.

5h

Per Jørgensen stopper som lægefaglig direktør i Psykiatri og Social

Lægefaglig direktør i Psykiatri og Social i Midtjylland Per Jørgensen stopper for i stedet at blive cheflæge med særligt ansvar for Human First, der er et forsknings- og uddannelsessamarbejde.

5h

Researchers identify a metal that withstands ultra-high temperature and pressure

Japanese scientists have identified a metal able to stand up to constant forces in ultrahigh temperature, offering promising applications including in aircraft jet engines and gas turbines for electric power generation.

5h

New study examines 'strategic retention' of teachers by effective principals

Numerous studies have linked principal effectiveness to overall reduced teacher turnover. These studies, however, have not differentiated between turnover of high-performing and low-performing teachers. While lower average teacher turnover is associated with better student outcomes, turnover of lower performing teachers may be a good thing for a school and for students.

5h

UBC study: Publicizing a firm's security levels may strengthen security over time

New research from the UBC Sauder School of Business has quantified the security levels of more than 1,200 Pan-Asian companies in order to determine whether increased awareness of one's security levels leads to improved defense levels against cybercrime.

5h

Otago discovery links DNA-packaging proteins and cancer development

University of Otago scientists have unravelled the 3D structure of two proteins, potentially providing answers as to why some people may be at risk of developing specific cancers.

5h

Did key building blocks for life come from deep space?

All living beings need cells and energy to replicate. Without these fundamental building blocks, living organisms could not exist.Little was known about a key element in the building blocks, phosphates, until now. University of Hawaii at Manoa researchers, in collaboration with colleagues in France and Taiwan, provide compelling new evidence that this component for life was generated in outer spac

5h

New way to control meandering electrons and generate extreme-ultraviolet emissions

A team at IBS the Center for Relativistic Laser Science has found a completely new way to generate extreme-ultraviolet emissions, that is light having a wavelength of 10 to 120 nanometers.

5h

Simulations uncover why some supernova explosions produce so much manganese and nickel

Researchers have found white dwarf stars with masses close to the maximum stable mass are likely to produce large amounts of manganese, iron, and nickel after it orbits another star and explodes.

5h

Media violence, impulsivity and family conflict tied to aggressive behaviors in teenagers

Teenagers exposed to TV and film violence and high levels of household conflict are at risk of engaging in aggressive behaviors, according to a new study by researchers at three US universities. Especially prone to aggressive tendencies are those who also have high levels of impulsivity. Parental involvement, however, can make a difference.

5h

Game-changing ivory ban takes effect but further efforts needed to ensure long-term gains

New research released today by WWF and TRAFFIC reveal that China's elephant ivory trade ban has had significantly positive effects since coming into force on 31 December 2017, but still requires further action to influence key segments of society.

5h

In the battle of cats vs. rats, the rats are winning

New research finds that contrary to popular opinion, cats are not good predators of rats. The study — the first to document interactions between feral cats and a wild rat colony — shows that rats actively avoid cats, and only recorded two rat kills in 79 days. The findings add to growing evidence that any benefit of using cats to control city rats is outweighed by the threat they pose to birds a

5h

Scientists show polar 'polynya' supported marine life during last Ice Age

An oasis in the hostile Arctic Ocean sustained marine life and ocean circulation during the last Ice Age, according to a new study.

5h

Tech billionaire buys Australia's most expensive home

Tech billionaire Mike Cannon-Brookes has bought a Sydney waterfront mansion for a reported Aus$100 million (US$72 million), media said Thursday, eclipsing the previous Australian purchase record set by his business partner.

6h

The Best Electric Cargo Bikes For a Family (2018): Tern, Yuba, and More

We’ve spent months riding and testing the best electric cargo bikes for every budget.

6h

Army scientists discover mathematics of brain waves

Army researchers have developed a technique that has the potential to provide measures that facilitate the development of procedures to mitigate stress and the onset of conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder in warfighters.

6h

Publicizing a firm's security levels may strengthen security over time, study finds

Cyberattacks grow in prominence each and every day; in fact, 2017 was the worst year to-date for data breaches, with the number of cyber incidents targeting businesses nearly doubling from 2016 to 2017.

6h

Extended emission filaments found in the galaxy Markarian 6

Russian astronomers have conducted a study of large-scale morphology and kinematics of the ionized gas in the galaxy Markarian 6. The research, in addition to mapping the ionized gas in the stellar disc, has identified a system of faint, extended emission filaments in the galaxy. The finding is detailed in a paper published September 16 on the arXiv pre-print server.

6h

Celebrating successes while examining failures

Editor in Chief Nancy Shute discusses this year's 10 scientists to watch and the ups and downs of the scientific endeavor.

6h

Readers contemplate water on Mars and more

Readers had questions about the significance of finding water on mars, air pollution from wildfires and spray-on sensors.

6h

Fødeafdeling sluger 87 sengestuer på Bispebjerg Hospital

Et nyt kvinde-barn-center vil lægge beslag på 87 ud af i alt 578 sengestuer, som er planlagt på det nye Bispebjerg Hospital. Da den samlede ramme for byggeriet er lagt fast, betyder det, at andre afdelinger må afgive plads til fødeafdelingen.

6h

Peter Gøtzsche: Cochrane kan ikke opsige mig

Det internationale Cochrane Center vil opsige Peter Gøtzsche som direktør i det nordiske Cochrane Center. Men det har de ikke beføjelser til, siger Peter Gøtzsche.

6h

Let's a not go! Nintendo wins Japan court battle over Mario street kartingNintendo Dragalia Lost

Nintendo said Thursday it has won a court battle against a popular go-kart operator that allows drivers to dress up as Super Mario and other game characters to zip through the streets of Japan.

6h

Lowlanders are no match for Nepal's Sherpa

The Sherpa people of the Himalayas have long been recognized for their unique ability to excel physically in the thin air of higher altitudes. But new research now suggests that their specially adapted muscles give them up to twice the resistance to muscle fatigue of lowlanders.

6h

Microplastics are being overlooked in river ecosystems, 50 percent of freshwater insects contaminated

Research led by Cardiff University's School of Biosciences has revealed that microplastics are widespread in insects from South Wales rivers.

6h

Researcher discusses cutting energy use in aluminum processing by 40%

Ms Bakartxo Egilegor is a senior researcher at IKERLAN and coordinator of the research project ETEKINA. She talks about how to reuse waste heat when producing aluminium components and how this could be a blueprint for all energy-intensive industries.

6h

Sisters are more comfortable and honest in conversations about dating and sex

Parents of teenage daughters might consider leaving the room to let their daughters talk about dating and sex.

6h

French government rules out selling Air France-KLM stake

French Finance Economy Bruno Le Maire on Thursday ruled out selling the government's minority stake in Air France-KLM, saying the priority was to turn around the troubled airline group.

6h

EU lawmakers push for cybersecurity, data audit of Facebook

European Union lawmakers appear set this month to demand audits of Facebook by Europe's cybersecurity agency and data protection authority in the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

6h

Growers are in a jam now, but strawberry sabotage may well end up helping the industry

Is it an act of malicious stupidity or evil genius? The strawberry sabotage crisis is no doubt hurting individual growers in the short term, but in the long term it may prove a huge win for the industry.

6h

Technology and Addiction Take Center Stage at Neuroethics Meeting

Guest blog by Moheb Costandi . Rapid technological advances are improving not only our understanding of how the brain works, but also our ability to manipulate it and make inferences about peoples’ behavior. Such advances should ultimately be of huge benefit to society. They also raise various concerns, regarding privacy and identity in particular; and in a month’s time, some of the world’s leadi

6h

Fjernvarme Fyn: Varmepumper eller biomasse – vi kender ikke reglerne

Ejeren af det kulfyrede kraftværk på Fyn overvejer både kraftvarme produceret med biomasse og varmepumper til at komme af med fossilerne, men mener ikke, at energiforliget giver klarhed for nogen af løsningerne.

6h

Hvordan skal danske universitetsstuderende klædes på til rumerhvervets behov?

Debatoplæg I: Op til en konference 8. oktober om Danmarks rumstrategi efterlyser Uddannelses- og Forskningsministeriet input til, hvad Danmark skal fokusere på som rumnation. Giv dit besyv med her.

6h

Ministerium efterlyser råd fra Ingeniørens læsere: Hvordan skal vi markere os i rummet?

Op til en konference 8. oktober om Danmarks rumstrategi efterlyser Uddannelses- og Forskningsministeriet input til, hvad Danmark skal fokusere på som rumnation. Læs eksperternes visioner og giv dit eget besyv med her.

6h

New way to control meandering electrons and generate extreme-ultraviolet emissions

A team at the Center for Relativistic Laser Science, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), has found a completely new way to generate extreme-ultraviolet emissions; that is, light having a wavelength of 10 to 120 nanometers. Published in Nature Photonics, this method is expected to find applications in imaging with nanometer resolution, next-generation lithography for high precision circui

6h

Researchers measure how sweet the deal is for corporate political donors

Corporations making political contributions are not only more likely to be awarded a federal contract, but these contracts more often contain conditions uniquely advantageous to the firm, says a new study from Ball State University.

6h

Simulations uncover why some supernova explosions produce so much manganese and nickel

Researchers have found white dwarf stars with masses close to the maximum stable mass (called the Chandrasekhar mass) are likely to produce large amounts of manganese, iron, and nickel after they orbit another star and explode as Type Ia supernovae.

6h

Superconducting metamaterial traps quantum light

Conventional computers store information in a bit, a fundamental unit of logic that can take a value of 0 or 1. Quantum computers rely on quantum bits, also known as a "qubits," as their fundamental building blocks. Bits in traditional computers encode a single value, either a 0 or a 1. The state of a qubit, by contrast, can simultaneously have a value of both 0 and 1. This peculiar property, a co

6h

Image: California and Oregon fires still blazing

Smoke is still spewing from the Klondike and Natchez fires both of which began from lightning strikes on July 15, 2018 in Oregon and California. Over 1000 lightning strikes landed in southwest Oregon in the middle of July 2018. Initial attack resources caught 98 percent of the new starts. The Klondike fire was one that was not able to be caught. This fire, located nine miles northwest of Selma, OR

6h

Stopping fires before they start—how a salty solution is giving lithium metal batteries a safety check

Researchers have long considered lithium metal batteries to be the "holy grail" for energy storage. They have high energy density—how much energy a battery carries relative to its weight. This means they can be made smaller and lighter, while storing the same amount of energy as larger, heavier batteries made from other materials, or they can carry more energy in the same size battery.

7h

Successful development of intestinal epithelial cells derived from human iPS cells

FUJIFILM Corporation has successfully developed intestinal epithelial cells derived from human iPS cells for optimal use in assessing drug absorption in joint research conducted with Nagoya City University (Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Professor Tamihide Matsunaga). The cells have been confirmed to have high capabilities in activating enzymes involved with the metabolism of drugs as

7h

Devastating termite infestations threaten more damage in the wake of post-hurricane floods

Nexus Media News After the storm comes the swarm (of termites). While crews do their work to clean up the wreckage from Hurricane Florence, there is a little-talked about danger lurking in the aftermath of massive storms: termites.

7h

NASA is taking a new look at searching for life beyond Earth

Since the beginning of civilization, humanity has wondered whether we are alone in the universe. As NASA has explored our solar system and beyond, it has developed increasingly sophisticated tools to address this fundamental question. Within our solar system, NASA's missions have searched for signs of both ancient and current life, especially on Mars and soon, Jupiter's moon Europa. Beyond our sol

7h

Image of the Day: Sea Swirl

Manta rays have a unique filtration system that inspires the development of novel water filtering technology.

7h

Why Is Everyone So Unfair to Donald Trump?

“I was with Mike Pompeo before,” President Donald Trump said at his first press conference in 587 days on Thursday. “We were dealing at a very high level with Japan. I was saying things that nobody in the room even understood. And I said them a long time ago—and I was right. He said, ‘That’s not the Twenty-Fifth Amendment that I’m looking at.’ I think I can say that from Mike.” That bizarre anecd

7h

How Reliable Are the Memories of Sexual Assault Victims?

The expert testimony excluded from the Kavanaugh hearing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Delayed reporting of sexual assault is no reason to discredit the accuser

Recent years have seen an explosion of accusations from individuals who have experienced harassment in the workplace or sexual victimization in other settings. On many occasions, the disclosures concerned incidents that took place decades ago. These delays in reporting have raised doubts among some regarding the veracity of the claims. In some cases, political motivations have been alleged. Howeve

7h

New tool in the fight against grapevine trunk disease

Grapevine trunk disease is estimated to cost the Australian wine sector millions of dollars in lost production each year, but now grapegrowers have a new tool to better manage its impact.

7h

VA Adding Opioid Antidote To Defibrillator Cabinets For Quicker Overdose Response

The overdose antidote naloxone could soon be available in more public places. The Veterans Administration is adding it to its automated defibrillator cabinets. Other institutions are following suit. (Image credit: Jesse Costa/WBUR)

7h

Neanderthals were no brutes – research reveals they may have been precision workers

Neanderthals were until quite recently often seen as simple-minded savages – powerful hunters with a short attention span. But in the last few years, scientists have realised that they were a lot more refined than previously thought – capable of caring for the vulnerable, burying their dead and even adorning themselves with feathers and beads.

7h

We must strengthen environmental protections during drought – or face irreversible loss

Australian rural communities face hardships during extended drought, and it is generally appropriate that governments then provide special support for affected landholders and communities.

7h

Researchers discover signatures predicting therapeutic applications, toxicity of chemicals

To predict the effects of a compound on the human body, researchers assess its biological activity, which requires pinpointing the affected biological processes within cells. Considering that living cells comprise many biological processes, this is a daunting task. Researchers from Attagene and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have found a new, straightforward approach to the assessment of

7h

Did key building blocks for life come from deep space?

All living beings need cells and energy to replicate. Without these fundamental building blocks, living organisms on Earth would not be able to reproduce and would simply not exist.

7h

Monkeypox has reached the UK – here’s what you need to know

Three people in the UK have caught the tropical disease, a relative of smallpox, the first time there have been cases in this country. But the smallpox vaccine provides immunity.

7h

Italiensk katastrofebro: Ingen sikkerhedsvurdering, dårlig vedligholdelse og fatal fejlvurdering af stagene

Det private motorvejsselskab Autostrade per’l Italia, der var operatør på den kollapsede bro i Genova, får hård kritik i en rapport fra en kommission nedsat af landets transportministerium. Virksomheden afviser hvert et ord.

7h

Tomatoes 'mixing chemical cocktails': Early detection of disease resistance in food crops

Bacterial wilt devastates food crops all over the world. It destroys major crop plants such as tomatoes, potatoes, bananas, ginger and pepper. It occurs in many countries and attacks over 200 plant species. The bacterium which causes the disease lingers in soil, seeds and plant material for years. It can infect water and farming equipment, as well.

7h

Cats May Have Duped Us about Being Great Rat Catchers

Breweries, warehouses and waste facilities sometimes turn to cats for rat control—but do they really help? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

How Pfizer is supporting SDG #3: Good health and well-being

The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) are a set of 17 directives to be completed by a 2030 deadline, with the aim of significantly improving quality of life for all people on Earth. Pfizer's commitment to the UN's SDG #3, Good Health and Well-being, is exemplified by its mission to improve global health through a combination of local and global programs catalyzed by innovative he

7h

Study finds samples from opposite sides of the globe are surprisingly similar

The natural world is full of examples of what biologists call convergent evolution—instances where unrelated creatures developed similar traits in response to similar evolutionary pressures.

7h

An economic model to help policymakers understand willingness to deal with climate change efforts

Two economists, one with the London School of Economics and Political Science, the other with Princeton University, have created a model to assist policymakers in better understanding willingness issues related to climate change mitigation efforts. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Timothy Besley and Avinash Dixit describe how their model works and the wa

7h

Ten years catching rocket signals

As ESA celebrates the 100th launch of Ariane 5, the Agency's worldwide ground station network is also marking ten years of providing vital tracking services to launchers soaring out of Kourou.

7h

A Better Motor Is the First Step Towards Electric Planes

Magnix is testing a new motor designed specifically for aviation, which is lighter weight, and higher power.

8h

Cats Bad at Nabbing Rats But Feast on Other Beasts

Researchers wanted to know what cats would do with a large colony of rats in Brooklyn. The answer: Not much. But cats could still pose a huge threat to more vulnerable urban wildlife.

8h

We thought the Incas couldn’t write. These knots change everything

A lost language encoded in intricate cords is finally revealing its secrets – and it could upend what we know about Incan history and culture

8h

Death Comes for the Gruppenführer

“There’s something going on here,” said Lisa Jardine, the British historian, as she scrolled on a laptop through a digitized cache of letters, ochre with age. “The sheer volume. It’s rare to have so many, even between a husband and wife. Almost daily. Volume is often a form of concealment. It’s harder to make out what the writer is trying to hide.” The letters—many hundreds of them—had been writt

8h

Boys Don’t Read Enough

Developed countries like the United States have seen a remarkable transformation in education over the last century: Girls and young women—once subjected to discrimination in, and even exclusion from, schools and colleges—have “conquered” those very institutions, as a report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) put it . Today, for example, women comprise a growing

8h

The Moon Is Open for Business

For many years, launching things into space was the work of governments. Only national agencies had the money, the technology, and, when it was necessary, the political will to fly humans around Earth and send probes to explore other planets. That began to change in the past several years, as companies entered the scene with their own rocket technology. Today, the space shuttle no longer flies, b

8h

Viruses on a Plane: What Emirates Flight EK203 Teaches Us

We're good at responding to suspected disease outbreaks, but we’re in danger of letting down our guard — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

How to Search for Dead Cosmic Civilizations

If they’re short-lived, we might be able to detect the relics and artifacts they left behind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Hayabusa 2 rovers send new images from Ryugu surface

Japan has released new images from the robot rovers it has deployed to the surface of an asteroid.

8h

Quitting Junk Food May Trigger Withdrawal-Like Symptoms

Junk-food lovers who try to cut back on fries or chocolate may experience symptoms similar to drug withdrawal, a new study suggests.

8h

There's So Much Methane in This Arctic Lake That You Can Light the Air on Fire

This Arctic lake is releasing so much methane that the air above it is flammable.

8h

Watching a Friend Get Eaten Could Help Animals Learn to Stay Alive

“Predator boot camps” in Australia are teaching a group of native animals some hard lessons in coexistence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8h

Why a Seal Smacked Kayaker in the Face with an Octopus

A seal sent a dead octopus cartwheeling into the face of a kayaker off New Zealand's South Island. Here's why.

8h

Strange Blobs Beneath Earth Could Be Remnants of an Ancient Magma Ocean

Researchers probe a mystery deep in the Earth's mantle.

8h

Første teknologineutrale udbud: Nu starter dysten mellem sol og vind

Solceller og vindmøller skal dyste om sammenlagt 242 millioner støttekroner i første udbud, hvilket er langt fra tilstrækkeligt til at opretholde de seneste års udbygning med vindkraft.

8h

Inside Pfizer's Global Effort to Support UN SDG #3

SDG 3 drives Pfizer's business and societal mission. Creative partnerships support progress toward health and well-being targets. Quality healthcare access is essential to a more just, equitable world. Global Goal 3: Central to Pfizer's Mission For Pfizer, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 3: Good Health and Well-Being is more than just a target that aligns with our company's

9h

Take a look at Esieh Lake, the stuff of climate change nightmares

It's in a part of Alaska that's in the Arctic Circle. Each day the lake emits methane at a rate equivalent to about 6,000 cows. If more like it are found, it could be an ominous warning of things to come. Melting permafrost. "The lake, about 20 football fields in size, looked as if it was boiling. Its waters hissed, bubbled and popped as a powerful greenhouse gas escaped from the lake bed. Some b

9h

Police departments that give out more fines solve fewer violent crimes

Recent research uncovered that the more a city's police department collects fines and fees, the less effective they are at solving crimes. In cities where violent crimes are not solved, trust in the police goes down. As a result, citizens report fewer crimes to the police, causing a vicious cycle. To address this, cities need to focus less on fining those who break minor laws and focus more on vi

9h

Will hospital food ever get better?

23 New York–area hospitals are attempting to redefine hospital food by making it healthier and more exciting to prepare. 20% of 208 hospital facilities surveyed featured McDonald's, Chick-fil-A, and Wendy's on their campuses. A 2017 report published in JAMA found that almost half of deaths caused heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and stroke can be attributed to poor diet. None Boston's Children Hos

9h

Japan has launched a miniature space elevator

It will be used to test the viability of a full-sized space elevator. Questions still remain about what materials could be used to build the elevator. If successful, a space elevator would be a cheaper way of reaching space. On September 22nd — after waiting out a delay imposed by Typhoon Mangkhut — a satellite launched containing a miniature space elevator designed by researchers at Shizuoka Uni

9h

The Fear Driving Conservative Support for Kavanaugh

It’s remarkable: The more women accuse of Brett Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct, the more committed to his confirmation conservatives become. On Monday, after Deborah Ramirez became the second woman to accuse Kavanaugh of wrongdoing, the New York Times columnist Ross Douthat noted that among conservatives, the belief that Kavanaugh is innocent “ actually gained momentum and support on the basis of

9h

President Trump’s Surreal News Conference Didn’t Do Kavanaugh Any Favors

In more than 80 surreal minutes of what seemed less like a news conference than a public free-association session on a therapist’s couch, the president of the United States dismissed accusations of sexual misconduct against Judge Brett Kavanaugh as “all false to me,” then insisted he wanted to hear Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony because “I can be convinced of anything. Maybe she will say somet

9h

Rosenstein’s Day of Reckoning With the President

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was reportedly convinced that he’d be fired following a bombshell New York Times report that described comments he apparently made about President Trump privately last year. But whether or not Rosenstein emerges from a meeting with Trump this week with his job intact, House Republicans are salivating at the thought of exploiting The Times’ story to tighten t

9h

A Non-scandalous, Non-ideological Case Against Brett Kavanaugh

The fight over Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination has lately been dominated by hotly contested allegations that he behaved badly toward women while drinking heavily in high school and college. On that controversy, I won’t comment prior to the upcoming hearings. Yet the sustained attention it has cast on the nominee’s unusually rarified educational background has left me increasingly avers

9h

Why This Weird Little Frog Should Care About Brett Kavanaugh

The battle over Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination engulfed the country this week, as politicians and the press mulled and bickered over allegations of sexual misbehavior and attempted rape against the federal judge. Yet one of the individuals whose life might soon be transformed by the would-be justice spent the week blissfully ignorant of the scandal. Fox News does not reach his home am

9h

Employers Are Looking for ‘Influencers’ Within Their Own Ranks

On August 19th, a video appeared on the Macy’s website. It opens with a light-flooded room, in which a young woman sits in front of a mirror. “Macy’s” is spelled out on the wall in gold, glittering cardboard letters attached to a string with clothespins, like decorations at a child’s birthday party. The woman—Isabel Campbell, a digital assistant in the petites department at Macy’s— introduces her

9h

Landmænd lader deres marker oversvømme

Holstebro Kommune forhandler aftale med landmænd om at oversvømme deres jord for 10.000 kroner pr. hektar.

9h

Nu skal Storåens vandmasser tæmmes

Holstebro Kommune vil investere 45 millioner kroner i sluser og dæmninger, der skal ruste byens centrum til hyppige oversvømmelser fra 2021.

9h

Ingeniørstudie i udlandet forhindrer fodbold-pokalhelt i at gentage bedriften

Troels Meldgaard, der læser til civilingeniør på den sydlige halvkugle langt væk fra Danmark, er en legende i amatørernes Danmarksserie-fodbold. Derfor har hans klub og sponsorer forsøgt for at bringe ham tilbage til en gentagelse af et opgør mod FCK.

9h

Cats are actually useless at catching rats – they prefer smaller prey

You might think your cat is working hard to keep your home rat-free, but actually the rodents are just hiding

9h

9h

This car-sized NASA spacecraft is hurtling closer to the sun than any mission before

At the center of the sun is a raging nuclear inferno that reaches temperatures well into the millions of degrees. The surface is cool by comparison, at 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit.

9h

Slut med masseopsendelser af balloner? EU skal diskutere forbud

DR-redaktør erkender, at man burde have tænkt mere på miljøet inden opsendelsen af balloner i forbindelse med skolearrangement i København. Netop den type opsendelser er forbudt andre steder i landet, hvis det er tale om kommunale institutioner. Og dansk EU-parlamentariker ønsker totalforbud.

9h

Bad air and inadequate data prove an unhealthy mix

Kira Hinslea wanted to play outside, but she knew she couldn't until her mom checked an air-quality app on her phone.

9h

Scientists show polar 'polynya' supported marine life during last Ice Age

An oasis in the hostile Arctic Ocean sustained marine life and ocean circulation during the last Ice Age, according to a new study.

9h

Educating the next generation of medical professionals with machine learning is essential

Artificial intelligence (AI) driven by machine learning (ML) algorithms is a branch in the field of computer science that is rapidly gaining popularity within the healthcare sector. However, graduate medical education and other teaching programs within academic teaching hospitals across the US and around the world have not yet come to grips with educating students and trainees on this emerging tec

9h

Enhanced rehab for stroke doubles movement recovery

A novel therapy technique invented by researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas has been shown in a pilot study to double the rate of upper limb recovery in stroke patients, a leap forward in treating the nearly 800,000 Americans who suffer strokes each year. The results of the study, funded by UT Dallas spinoff company MicroTransponder of Austin, Texas, were published Sept. 27 in the journ

9h

In the battle of cats vs. rats, the rats are winning

New research finds that contrary to popular opinion, cats are not good predators of rats. The study — the first to document interactions between feral cats and a wild rat colony — shows that rats actively avoid cats, and only recorded two rat kills in 79 days. The findings add to growing evidence that any benefit of using cats to control city rats is outweighed by the threat they pose to birds a

9h

The Ends of the World by Peter Brannen review – Earth under threat

Are we heading for a sixth mass extinction? This is a journey into the past to evaluate our future As science journalist Peter Brannen points out, life is extremely fragile, a “thin glaze of interesting chemistry on an otherwise unremarkable, cooling ball of stone”. So fragile, in fact, that in the planet’s history there have been five mass extinctions, when nearly all life has been wiped out. The

10h

World Leaders Pledge To Eradicate Tuberculosis

For the first time, the U.N. General Assembly is holding a high-level meeting focused on tuberculosis — which is now the most deadly infectious disease. The hope is to end the epidemic by 2030.

10h

In the battle of cats vs. rats, the rats are winning

The first study to document interactions between feral cats and a wild rat colony finds that contrary to popular opinion, cats are not good predators of rats. In a novel approach, researchers monitored the behavior and movement of microchipped rats in the presence of cats living in the same area. They show the rats actively avoided the cats, and only recorded two rat kills in 79 days. Published as

10h

Scientists show polar 'polynya' supported marine life during last Ice Age

However, there was a small ice-free 'polynya' between the frozen continents and the open ocean where microscopic marine life prevailed, which would have provided otherwise unavailable food for fish and mammals.

10h

Uber betaler historisk stor erstatning for datalæk

Kriminelle hackere stjal i 2016 data om 57 millioner kunder og chauffører fra kørselstjenesten, som nu har indvilliget i at betale knap en milliard kr. i erstatning.

10h

AT&T, Samsung team up to create 5G 'Innovation Zone' in Austin

Tech giants AT&T and Samsung announced Wednesday that they will create the country's first manufacturing-focused 5G "Innovation Zone" in Austin.

10h

People can die from giving up the fight

People can die simply because they've given up, life has beaten them and they feel defeat is inescapable, according to new research.

10h

The oil change revolution

Passenger car engines produce 6 billion litres of used oil globally every year. So a better, more sustainable way to reuse and recycle this product is needed, says Rachel Fort

10h

Delta to use facial recognition in Atlanta's international terminal

Delta Air Lines plans to launch what it calls the nation's first "biometric terminal" by deploying facial recognition at multiple points in the international terminal at Hartsfield-Jackson.

11h

Amazon, Apple, Google and other companies say they'd support privacy laws, but there's a catch

Representatives of six major technology and communications companies, including Google, Apple and AT&T, told lawmakers Wednesday that they support federal laws that would safeguard user privacy—if those laws aren't as stringent as rules recently introduced in Europe and California.

11h

Not a social media influencer? You can still get paid

Don't try to make money off my online behavior—unless, of course, I get a commission.

11h

Lockheed Martin hopes new lab inspires workforce, attracts future employees

Lockheed Martin pulled up the curtain on a new innovation lab Tuesday, showing off 3-D printers, virtual and augmented reality headsets and a robotics lab meant to encourage its employees to experiment.

11h

Facebook unveils upgraded wireless Oculus headset in VR push

Facebook on Wednesday unveiled an upgraded Oculus virtual reality headset with power to handle the intensive graphics of digital worlds in a wire-free experience.

11h

Wetlands disappearing three times faster than forests: study

Wetlands, among the world's most valuable and biodiverse ecosystems, are disappearing at alarming speed amid urbanisation and agriculture shifts, conservationists said Thursday, calling for urgent action to halt the erosion.

12h

It's not that bad! Science, tourism clash on Great Barrier Reef

A row is raging over Australia's warming-damaged Great Barrier Reef, with firms worried that scientists' apocalyptic warnings are scaring visitors out of the water.

12h

Engineers search for cause in cracked beam at transit hub

San Francisco officials struggled Wednesday to find the source of unusual cracking in support beams that shut down a just-opened, $2 billion transit center meant to serve as a bold architectural statement from a wealthy, high-tech city.

12h

Antibiotics' mode of action observed in the bacterial cell membrane

For the first time, researchers have been able to observe the mode of action of a promising class of alternative antibiotics directly in bacterial cellular membranes. Until now, such studies could only be done in less relevant media, such as organic solvents or micelles. The approach they developed could provide important cues to design drugs for combatting drug-resistant bacteria. Their findings

12h

Værktøjskasse: Sådan koder du en browser-udvidelse i en ruf

Browser-udvidelser kan tilføje ny funktionalitet til browser og websider, og så er der efterhånden en standard for teknologien.

13h

AAFP should publish research behind finding that functional medicine lacks evidence, contains harmful and dangerous practices

For the public's health and safety, the American Academy of Family Physicians should publish their research behind their claims that functional medicine lacks evidence, and contains harmful and dangerous practices.

14h

Plastikflasker, gummislanger og vand redder spædbørn i u-lande

Otte kroners-løsning kan potentielt redde op mod 600.000 børn fra dødelig lungebetændelse hvert år.

14h

Tomatoes 'mixing chemical cocktails': Early detection of disease resistance in food crops

Bacterial wilt devastates food crops world-wide. It destroys major crop plants such as tomatoes, potatoes, bananas and ginger. So far farmers have had to plant and wait for mature plants to observe resistance. Now research shows a possible way of saving time and reducing risk significantly for farmers and plant breeders. A new approach promises to forecast cultivar resistance at seedling stage. Sc

14h

New screening tool can improve the quality of life for epilepsy patients with sleep apnea

Rutgers researchers have developed a tool to help neurologists screen for obstructive sleep apnea in people with epilepsy whose seizures can be magnified by sleep disorders.

14h

Virtual reality motion sickness may be predicted and counteracted

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have made progress towards predicting who is likely to feel sick from virtual reality technology.

14h

Trial participation among factors influencing risk of relapse in AYA leukemia patients

Adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were significantly more likely to relapse than pediatric ALL patients, and factors including lower clinical trial enrollment and shorter duration of therapy were associated with relapse.

14h

Despite restaurant pledges, most kids receive unhealthy items with fast-food kids' meals

A new UConn Rudd Center study of parents' fast-food restaurant purchases for their children finds that 74 percent of kids still receive unhealthy drinks and/or side items with their kids' meals when visiting one of the four largest restaurant chains — McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's, and Subway — despite restaurants' commitments to offer healthier options with kids' meals. The study also found

14h

Eel-bot

University of California, San Diego, graduate student Caleb Christianson explains the development of his eel-inspired robot.

16h

Eel-bot

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16h

Federal Health Agency Revokes Contract with Fetal Tissue Supplier

Health and Human Services plans to review all research involving human fetal tissue.

16h

Modern Prosthesis

See amputee Amanda Kitts manipulate objects using nervous impulses to control an early prototype of her advanced artificial limb.

16h

Giddy up: Help for plump ponies is fast on its way

Help is on the way for plump ponies at risk of the painful, often deadly, condition of founder or laminitis which is the second biggest killer of domestic horses.

16h

Muscle Maven

Profilee Angela Dulhunty describes her research on the structure and function of proteins that make up skeletal and cardiac muscles.

16h

Muscle Maven

Profilee Angela Dulhunty describes her research on the structure and function of proteins that make up skeletal and cardiac muscles.

16h

A mechanism of color pattern formation in ladybird beetles

Many ladybirds have attractive color patterns consisting of black and red. A research team focused on the multicolored Asian ladybird beetle Harmonia axyridis (also known as the harlequin ladybird), which lives mainly in Siberia and East Asia, and shows >200 color patterns within a species. The team has identified a single gene that regulates such highly diverse ladybird color patterns.

16h

A study using Drosophila sheds light on the metastatic behavior of human tumors

A study using Drosophila melanogaster has demonstrated that chromosomal instability itself can induce invasive behavior in epithelial cells and has identified the underlying molecular mechanisms involved.

16h

Uterus transplantation — ethically just as problematic as altruistic surrogacy

In 2014, the first child to have been gestated in a donated uterus was born. Although research into uterus transplantation is still in an early phase, many see the donations as a success. Researchers have now studied ethical aspects of uterus transplantation. The results show that uterus transplantation with living donors is ethically just as problematic as altruistic surrogacy.

16h

New protocol for measuring background levels of drugs in crime labs

When forensic chemists handle evidence that contains illegal drugs, trace amounts are inevitably released into the laboratory environment, which can cause detectable background levels of drugs in the lab. Why is this a problem? 'If I run a sample and it has fentanyl, I want to be sure that fentanyl came from the sample and not from background levels in my lab,' said a researcher.

16h

Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model

Children with autism often find social interactions awkward, leaving them isolated. Now scientists report that they have discovered a first-of-its-kind compound that promotes social interaction among laboratory mice that display autistic traits. The finding could lead to the development of drugs capable of improving social behaviors in those who have autism.

16h

'Paintable' chemotherapy shrinks skin tumors in mice

Skin acts as the first line of defense against pathogens and other harmful material from outside the body. Yet this barrier also excludes some beneficial drugs that could treat skin diseases. Now, researchers have taken the first steps in developing a chemotherapy for melanoma that can be 'painted' directly on the skin, rather than injected or taken orally.

16h

Protecting probiotics from the stomach

The small intestine is a hotbed of microbial activity and a target of probiotic treatments for diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome, among other conditions. To make it to the intestine, though, probiotics must first pass through the stomach, a hostile acidic environment that can kill these beneficial bacteria. Now, scientists report the development of a protective gel

16h

Smartphone system to test for lead in water

Researchers have created an inexpensive system using a smartphone and a lens made with an inkjet printer that can detect lead in tap water at levels commonly accepted as dangerous.

16h

Muscle Maven

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16h

In clinical trials, new antibody therapy controls HIV for months after treatment

A new clinical trial shows that broadly neutralizing antibodies can suppress HIV for up to four months, far longer than currently available drugs.

16h

Tiger mosquitoes are capable of transmitting yellow fever

Since December 2016, Brazil has been grappling with its worst yellow fever outbreak for several decades. Research has now demonstrated that the yellow fever virus can be transmitted via Aedes albopictus, the tiger mosquito. This opportunistic species is capable of colonizing both urban and forest areas.

16h

Milk protein shown to alleviate chemotherapy side effects

Chemotherapy can wreak havoc on the taste buds and olfactory senses, depriving recipients of the intricate interplay between taste and smell that is critical to enjoying foods. Over time, taste and smell abnormalities can lead to a loss of appetite and anorexic behaviors, compromising patients' ability to recuperate. Researchers investigated the feasibility of lactoferrin, a highly bioactive prote

16h

To be or not to be a white blood cell, that is the question

Japanese scientists have revealed a biological 'switch' that influences whether an immature blood cell would develop into a red blood cell or a subtype of white blood cell called myeloid cells in response to infection or inflammation within the body.

16h

How to win friends online: It's not which groups you join, but how many

The chances that people will form new friendships primarily depends on the number rather than the types of organizations, groups and cliques they join, according to an analysis of six online social networks by data scientists.

16h

Adoption of green stormwater infrastructure rises after floods

Residents and property owners are more likely to adopt some green stormwater infrastructure practices if they have experienced flooding or erosion on their property or in their neighborhoods, according to new research. As extreme weather events increase, more people may turn to ecologically friendly practices to manage stormwater.

16h

Location makes or breaks many forms of public housing

Researchers determined in a new study that subsidized housing is not affordable in the Dallas-Fort Worth region because its location does not make it transportation friendly.

16h

Unlocking the secret of how the brain encodes speech

People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain

17h

Rare genetic disorders more complex than thought

Genetic causes of rare neurodevelopmental disorders vary more than previously thought, a new study finds. Researchers discovered that serious rare disorders can be affected by combinations of common genetic variants, rather than solely individual genes.

17h

Baltimore liquor stores linked more to violent crime than bars and restaurants

Alcohol outlets in Baltimore that sell alcohol for off-premise consumption have a stronger association with incidences of violent crimes, including homicides, aggravated assaults, sexual assaults, and robbery, than alcohol outlets in Baltimore where alcohol is bought and consumed on-site, such as bars and restaurants, a new study finds.

17h

Millions of birds die in collisions each year, but lights could change that

Millions of birds die each year in collisions with planes. Airports have used everything from fireworks to herding dogs to scare them away, but these methods are useless after a plane takes off. Red and blue LED lights could be useful in deterring birds from objects that could kill them.

17h

By Jove! Methane's effects on sunlight vary by region

Solar energy absorption by methane is 10 times stronger over desert regions such as the Sahara Desert and Arabian Peninsula than elsewhere on Earth, and nearly three times more powerful in the presence of clouds. Researchers came to this conclusion after evaluating observations of Jupiter and Saturn's moon Titan.

17h

Bariatric surgery linked to safer childbirth for the mother

Obese mothers who lose weight through bariatric surgery can have safer deliveries, according to an observational study. Positive effects include fewer caesarean sections, infections, tears and hemorrhages, and fewer cases of post-term delivery or uterine inertia.

17h

Study shows importance of personal social networks on neurological outcomes

The health habits of people in a patient's social network are tied to that person's level of reported neurological disability, researchers find.

17h

Is that selfie edited? Why it may matter for women viewers

There's a surprising upside to the fact that many people edit their selfies on Instagram and other social media sites to enhance their appearance. A new study found that when women believed that selfies of thin and sexualized women had been edited, viewing these images had less negative impact on one aspect of their mental health.

17h

Beyond skin deep: Understanding disparities in dermatology services

The odds of a black or Hispanic patient visiting an outpatient dermatologist are about half that of a white patient with the same skin condition, according to a new study. Patients most likely to receive outpatient dermatologic services in the study were white, educated women.

17h

Instrument boosts analysis of small, extremely dark materials

Researchers have developed a new instrument that can analyze light reflected from very small or extremely dark materials such as some meteorite samples and VANTABlack, the darkest human-made substance created.

17h

Bizarre Particles Keep Flying Out of Antarctica's Ice, and They Might Shatter Modern Physics

There's something out there that physicists have never seen before, and it's coming up from the bottom of the Earth. Scientists think it's a brand-new particle.

18h

Olfactory cells may act as 'Trojan horse,' carry anticancer therapy to deadly brain tumors

Researchers have found that a special type of cell essential to the ability of olfactory neurons to regenerate may be genetically engineered to deliver anticancer therapy to the dangerous brain tumors called glioblastomas.

18h

Spheres can make concrete leaner, greener

Scientists have made micron-sized calcium silicate spheres that could lead to stronger and greener concrete, the world's most-used synthetic material.

18h

Shaking the swarm

Researchers spent months shaking and rattling swarms of thousands of honey bees to better understand how bees collectively collaborate to stabilize structures in the presence of external loads.

18h

Possible cause for Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury discovered

A newly identified mechanism explaining the possible cause for Alzheimer's and traumatic brain injury may have also led to the discovery of an effective treatment.

18h

Science learns from its mistakes too

A mathematical model shows that even seemingly inconclusive studies speed up the gain in knowledge.

18h

The Atlantic Daily: Trump Defends His Supreme Court Nominee—And Himself

What We’re Following No Precedent: New sexual-misconduct accusations have surfaced against Brett Kavanaugh just before he’s expected to take the witness stand at Thursday’s hearings, following his first accuser Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony. Kavanaugh’s and Ford’s prepared statements are available here and here. From another angle: a brief list of parenting tips “to protect your kid’s Supreme

18h

Hyderabad homes and pavements made from used plastic bags

Businesses in India may have found a way to turn plastic rubbish into a golden business opportunity.

18h

How reliable are turtles for measuring ocean trash and marine health?

A meta-analysis of fifty years worth of sea turtle research reveals some important information about ocean trash, but important data is largely missing.

19h

Bridging the gap between psychology and gamification

A multi-disciplinary research team is bridging the gap between psychology and gamification that could significantly impact learning efforts in user experience design, healthcare, and government.

19h

Potent chemical agents can thwart cancer metastasis

Scientists have devised potent chemical agents 135H11 and 135H12 that can thwart cancer metastasis, bringing research closer to drug development.

19h

Taller plants moving into warmer Arctic

The profile of Arctic shrubs and grasses is changing as temperatures rise in the far north.

19h

19h

Trump Disses Trudeau on the World Stage

In what may have been the frostiest moment for U.S.-Canada relations in months, President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he’d rejected a request to meet with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the United Nations. Earlier, Trudeau also reportedly got a chilly reception from Trump when he approached the leader for a handshake. Speaking at a press conference on the sidelines of the General

19h

Big increase in economic costs if cuts in greenhouse gas emissions are delayed

Stronger efforts to cut emissions of greenhouse gases should be undertaken if global warming of more than 1.5 Celsius degrees is to be avoided without relying on potentially more expensive or risky technologies to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the Earth's surface. New research warns that the target of limiting global warming to 1.5 Celsius degr

19h

The 10 Most Astonishing Moments in Trump’s Press Conference

In an unwieldy press conference, President Trump declined to say whether he believes Brett Kavanaugh's accusers, and called allegations against his Supreme Court nominee part of a “con job.” Trump also went on to suggest that George Washington had a “bad past.” It was the president's first conference in 587 days. Below are some of the most noteworthy moments from the conference. 1. Trump Calls Ka

20h

Big increase in economic costs if cuts in greenhouse gas emissions are delayed

Stronger efforts to cut emissions of greenhouse gases should be undertaken if global warming of more than 1.5 Celsius degrees is to be avoided without relying on potentially more expensive or risky technologies to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the Earth's surface, a comprehensive new analysis has concluded.

20h

The whole day matters for cognitive development in children

In a new study, researchers at the CHEO Research Institute have found that children aged nine and 10 who meet recommendations in the Canadian 24-hour Movement Guidelines for physical activity, screen time and sleep time have superior global cognition. The results were published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal.

20h

Limiting children's recreational screen time to less than 2 hours a day linked to better cognition

Only one in 20 US children in the study met the full recommended guidelines on recreational screen time, physical activity and sleep.

20h

New allergy vaccine for hay fever shows promising results

Using sugar molecules researchers have developed a new vaccine for hay fever that may reduce treatment times and increase the effect of treatments. The vaccine, which is still at the earliest research stage, has been tested on mice. The method can potentially also be used to develop different forms of vaccines, for example vaccines for autoimmune disorders.

20h

Survey raises worries about how screen time affects kids’ brains

A large study of U.S. children ties lots of screen time to lower thinking skills, but the relationship between the two is still unclear.

20h

Donald Trump's Mind-Boggling Marathon Press Conference

Updated on September 26 at 6:30 p.m. ET At a rambling, often self-contradictory press conference Tuesday afternoon, President Donald Trump baselessly claimed a vast conspiracy to concoct sexual-misconduct charges against him and offered a surprisingly weak defense of Judge Brett Kavanaugh, the Supreme Court nominee who has been accused by three women of sexual misconduct. “I’ve had numerous accus

20h

Contraceptive pill linked with reduced risk of ovarian cancer

Researchers not sure apparent protective effect extends to progestin only products such as mini pill and implants Women who use modern forms of the combined pill are at a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer than women who don’t take hormonal contraception, research suggests. The study backs up previous findings for older forms of the combined pill – an oral contraceptive that contains artific

20h

Rat Poison-Laced Synthetic Pot Made People Bleed. Here's How Doctors Treated Them.

More than 250 people across the U.S. have developed severe bleeding problems tied to an outbreak of synthetic pot laced with rat poison, with cases continuing to pop up.

20h

I attended an Oculus conference in virtual reality, and all I got was eyestrain

Facebook’s VR unit revealed the new Quest headset at its conference for developers, but I couldn’t try it from my couch.

20h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Trump Calls Kavanaugh Allegations A ‘Big, Fat Con Job’

Written by Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ) and Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ) Today in 5 Lines In a rare press conference, President Trump refused to say whether he believes Brett Kavanaugh’s accusers are lying, but called allegations against the Supreme Court nominee part of a “con job.” Asked whether he would ask Kavanaugh to withdraw his nomination, Trump said, “If I thought he was

20h

MEGAPIXELS: For a technicolor nightmare, see this fish in high definition

Animals New imaging techniques straight out of a horror movie. Announcing all-new, high definition nightmares, brought to you by researchers at the University of Kansas.

20h

Erasing a memory with light

Memories make you who you are! Your memories give you a personal narrative, an ability to recall the past, and ultimately, lay the foundation for your thoughts, joys, fears, opinions, and skills. The ability to form, store, and recall memories is one of the most remarkable phenomena, and puzzling mysteries, of the brain. How does a piece of biological tissue , the brain, store so much information

21h

To Break a Hate-Speech Detection Algorithm, Try 'Love'

Companies like Facebook use artificial intelligence to try to detect hate speech, but new research proves it’s a daunting task.

21h

Christine Blasey Ford’s Opening Statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee

On Thursday, the California professor Christine Blasey Ford will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the sexual-assault allegations she’s leveled against the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Ford’s claim, that Kavanaugh assaulted her at a party while the two were in high school, became public on September 16, though she’d sent a confidential letter detailing the alleged inciden

21h

A.I. with human-level intelligence will emerge in 5 to 10 years, say experts

Human-like AI, or artificial general intelligence (AGI), would occur when a machine can perform any cognitive task that a human can. Although computers can outperform us in some narrow tasks, no one AI can outperform humans on a wide variety of general cognitive tasks. Not all experts believe we're close to AGI. But most agree the field has been making significant progress, especially in recent y

21h

Birds have plastic in their bellies via plastic-eating mosquito larvae

A new study suggests that insect larvae that begin life in freshwater could be eating microplastics and retaining them as they mature. It comes at a time when public awareness of microplastics in the environment is increasing. The discovery suggests that the problem of microplastics in the environment could be worse than we thought. The problem of microplastics in aquatic environments is increasi

21h

Three women now accuse Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault

On Wednesday, a third woman came forward to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual assault. The Senate Judiciary Committee has hired a female outside counsel to question Ford on behalf of GOP senators on Thursday. The accusations could possibly derail the confirmation of Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court in the vote that's currently scheduled for Friday. None Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford, a woman w

21h

How evolution made our brains lazy

A new study shows that the brain prefers to expend as little energy as possible. Putting forth less effort had advantages for our ancestors. Being inactive is not beneficial in modern life and needs addressing. None Why is it often so hard to get off the couch and go to the gym? While you can certainly point to your lack of will power for the inaction, you can also blame evolution for this predic

21h

All the gear you need to totally dominate the local mini golf course

Technology Ditch the loaner club and upgrade your putt-putt game. The tacky surroundingsd don't mean you can't go all Jack Nicklaus and totally freakin' dominate those baby greens.

21h

Breastfeeding changes gene activity that may make babies less reactive to stress

It has long been known that there are many physical and mental health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies. But can these benefits be due to genetic changes induced by breastfeeding? New research suggests that connection.

21h

Invasive snakes 'hitchhiking' on planes

Scientists have discovered why brown tree snakes have become one of the most successful invasive species. The research team has been studying why a type of cat-eyed snake has been so effective at devastating native bird populations on the island of Guam.

21h

Reclassification recommendations for drug in 'magic mushrooms'

In an evaluation of the safety and abuse research on the drug in hallucinogenic mushrooms, researchers suggest that if it clears phase III clinical trials, psilocybin should be re-categorized from a schedule I drug — one with no known medical potential — to a schedule IV drug such as prescription sleep aids, but with tighter control.

21h

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