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Nyheder2018september28

 

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The first “social network” of brains lets three people transmit thoughts to each other’s heads

BrainNet allows collaborative problem-solving using direct brain-to-brain communication.

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Machine learning helps improving photonic applications

Photonic nanostructures can be used for many applications, not just in solar cells, but also in optical sensors for cancer markers or other biomolecules, for example. A team at HZB using computer simulations and machine learning has now shown how the design of such nanostructures can be selectively optimised. The results are published in Communications Physics.

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Scientists studied the influence of gravity on liquid evaporation characteristics

A team from Siberian Federal University (SFU) together with their colleagues from the Institute of Computational Modeling of SB RAS presented a calculation describing the structure of flows and evaporation processes in the two-layer system with liquid-gas vapor mixture.

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Perovskite solar cells leap toward commercialization

OIST scientists' research on perovskite solar cells indicates a promising future towards sustainability.

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Cosmetic surgeons offering incomplete information for breast augmentation customers

Brighton and Sussex Medical School study finds many cosmetic surgery websites fail to adequately inform potential breast augmentation clients about details of the procedure, potential complications and its' overall effectiveness.

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New approach offers high-resolution seismic monitoring of the shallow subsurface

High-resolution seismic monitoring of the shallow subsurface has remained challenging to achieve in practice. An article published in Geophysics details how, as part of an international collaboration, researchers from Kyushu University developed a spatially windowed surface-wave analysis method using data from a Canadian CO2-storage site. Using this approach permits accurate and high-resolution mo

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'Bin chicken' plays unique role in story of evolution

A University of Queensland researcher has uncovered how a French scientist and ibis researcher conducted the first test of evolution more than 50 years before Charles Darwin's Origin of the Species.UQ Centre for Policy Futures researcher Dr. Caitlin Curtis has found that the sacred ibis — a cousin of the Australian 'bin chicken' — became central to the history of evolution when several mummified

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Chinese researchers discover how bird feathers resist tearing

Researchers from the Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry recently made a deep observation of the 3D fine structures and the entire unzipping process of feathers by using microscopy with a micro/nano manipulating system and 3D X-ray microscopy. They discovered and characterized a sophisticated mechanism in bird feathers that enhances tear resistance, overturning a centuries-old explanation

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US, Japan and Australia challenge Huawei in Papua New Guinea

The United States, Japan and Australia are cooperating on a domestic internet cable proposal for Papua New Guinea as an alternative to an offer by Huawei, the Chinese telecommunications giant that the United States regards as a cybersecurity threat, a U.S. diplomat said Friday.

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How much fish do we consume? First global seafood consumption footprint published

The Joint Research Centre of the European Commission have examined the impact of seafood supply chains across national boundaries—the global seafood consumption footprint.

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Scientists created proteins controlled by light

Researchers developed fluorescent proteins that can be controlled by orange and green light. These proteins will help to study processes in living cells. The work was supported by Russian Science Foundation (RSF) grant, and the results were published in Nature Methods.

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New insights into the structure of a killer protein

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Tübingen have gained new insights into the structure of the killer protein Bax. The protein induces programmed cell death, the method by which the body disposes of cells that are no longer needed or have been pathologically altered. Since Bax is constantly changing its location in the cell, its structure is difficult to investigate.

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Red and blue LED lights may cut bird-plane collisions

Millions of birds die each year in collisions with planes and current solutions—such as fireworks and herding dogs—are useless once a plane takes off. Now there might be another way, researchers report. A new study shows that red and blue LED lights lead some birds in the opposite direction. Using lights to try to create “avoidance behavior” in birds isn’t new, but literature to support what kind

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Hitchhikers hinder medication shelf life

Why some biopharmaceuticals have a longer shelf life than others is a problem that has baffled scientists and manufacturers alike. Even the same medication, produced by different manufacturers, can vary in its storage life.

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Microbes catch a ride on fog, but change during the trip

Fog transports microbes over long distances and deposits them in new environments, according to a new study. The researchers compared fog microbial communities in two very different, fog-dominated ecosystems: Coastal Maine, whose geography is conducive to the creation of marine aerosols and frequent fog formation; and the Namib Desert, a hyperarid coastal fog desert on the west coast of southern

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Tænkeboks: Ugens løsning

Her er løsningen på opgaven fra uge 38

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This robot crawls over your body and scans your skin with a microscope

SkinBot is a palm-sized robot that crawls over your skin inspecting it with a microscope and sensors that detect electrical signals

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Ny professor håber at kunne udvikle genterapi til neurodegenerative sygdomme

Overlæge ved Rigshospitalet Jørgen E. Nielsen er nyudnævnt professor i klinisk neurologi med fokus på arvelige neurodegenerative sygdomme.

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The complicated balance of predators and prey

If you knew there was a grizzly bear sitting outside the door, you might wait a while before going to fill up your water bottle, or you might change the way you are communicating with their other people in the room based on your knowledge of the threat.

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How some algae may survive climate change

Green algae that evolved to tolerate hostile and fluctuating conditions in salt marshes and inland salt flats are expected to survive climate change, thanks to hardy genes they stole from bacteria.

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Skin is a battlefield for mutations

Normal skin contains a patchwork of mutated cells, yet very few go on to eventually form cancer and scientists have now uncovered the reason why. Researchers genetically engineered mice to show that mutant cells in skin tissue compete with each other, with only the fittest surviving. The results suggest that normal skin in humans is more resilient to cancer than previously thought.

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Why a 'cuckoo in the nest' can go undetected

Researchers have shed light on why some species cannot tell the difference between their own offspring and those of intruders that have been slipped into their nests.

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Image: Hubble's warped view of the universe

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image contains a veritable mix of different galaxies, some of which belong to the same larger structure: At the middle of the frame sits the galaxy cluster SDSS J1050+0017.

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How some algae may survive climate change

Green algae that evolved to tolerate hostile and fluctuating conditions in salt marshes and inland salt flats are expected to survive climate change, thanks to hardy genes they stole from bacteria, according to a Rutgers-led study.

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How Sacred Ibis mummies provided the first test of evolution

A debate over mummified birds brought to France after Napoleon's conquest of Egypt played a central role in delaying acceptance of evolutionary theory; an episode in the history of biology revealed in an Essay published September 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Caitlin Curtis of the University of Queensland in Brisbane, as well as Craig Millar, David Lambert.

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Engineering 3-D mesostructures with mechanically active materials

Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have expansive applications in biotechnology and advanced engineering with growing interest in materials science and engineering due to their potential in emerging systems. Existing techniques have enabled applications in cell mechanobiology, high-precision mass sensing, microfluidics and in energy harvesting. Projected technical implications broadly include c

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Czech vets order checks on pork from fever-hit countries

Czech vets have ordered checks on pork meat imported from countries hit by the African swine fever as of October 2, the State Veterinary Administration said Friday.

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Over 300 endangered turtles hatch in Singapore

More than 300 hawksbill turtles have hatched on beaches in Singapore this month and been released into the sea, authorities said Friday, in a boost for the critically endangered creatures.

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One black hole or two? Dust clouds can explain puzzling features of active galactic nuclei

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC), believe clouds of dust, rather than twin black holes, can explain the features found in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The team publish their results today (14 June) in a paper in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

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Innovative processing and packaging for safe, high-quality, organic berry products

Over the last two decades, there have been growing concerns about the adverse effects of conventionally grown produce on our health and the environment. As a result, more and more consumers are choosing to buy organic foods. However, organic fresh and processed berries and fruit are still only available in limited quantities and are also highly perishable, with one third to half of the produce bei

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Powerful quake rocks Indonesia, 'many' buildings collapse

Indonesia was rocked by a powerful 7.5 magnitude earthquake Friday, with the national disaster agency saying that "many" buildings had collapsed in the aftermath of the huge tremor.

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'The worst kind of pain you can imagine' – what it's like to be stung by a stinging tree

Stinging trees grow in rainforests throughout Queensland and northern NSW. The most commonly known (and most painful) species is Dendrocnide moroides (Family Urticaceae), first named "gympie bush" by gold miners near the town of Gympie in the 1860s.

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Improved In vivo imaging of atherosclerotic plaque development

Researchers have developed a method for quantitatively assessing atherosclerotic plaque buildup in mice. They transplanted X-ray-irradiated low-density-lipoprotein-knockout mice with bone marrow cells expressing near-infrared fluorescent protein, which subsequently developed into fluorescent macrophages. These macrophages congregated specifically in atherosclerotic plaques that arose after feeding

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Observing the development of a deep-sea greenhouse gas filter

In a long-term study, marine scientists for the first time observed the colonization of a deep-sea mud volcano after its eruption. Only slowly, rich life develops around the crater. The first settlers are tiny organisms that eat methane escaping from the volcano. Thereby, they keep this greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere. The present study describes how the colonization of the mud volcano

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Neglected baby beetles evolve greater self-reliance

Zoologists exposed hundreds of burying beetles to two levels of parental care, for 13 generations. The researchers found that when parents fed meat to their babies' mouth-to-mouth, the larvae evolved relatively smaller mandibles. By contrast, when the parents were removed from their young and larvae were forced to self-feed, the larvae evolved significantly larger jaws to compensate for the lack o

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Feeding ants dopamine might make them smarter foragers

In an ant colony, few tasks are as important as gathering food. But the desert heat can pose a challenge for an ant on foraging duty. Recent findings show how dopamine may influence the behavior of ant foragers in the desert.

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Ancient past of a body plan code probed

Researchers have opened a window on another piece of evolutionary biology. They have found that Hox genes, which are key regulators of the way the bodies of bilaterally symmetrical animals form, also play a role in controlling the radially symmetric body plan of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

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Singling out 'rising stars' in companies could demotivate staff, research shows

Firms that fast-track individuals to leadership positions and identify "rising stars" risk demotivating their employees, a study shows.

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In Hong Kong, Hepatitis E Strain Jumps From Rats to Humans

Researchers stressed the seriousness of even one case of animal-to-human infection in densely populated areas.

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Klimarådet undervurderer elbilers klimabidrag

Genbrug af batterier og lave serviceomkostninger er nogle af de faktorer som Klimarådet undervurderer i deres seneste analyse “Flere elbiler på vejene”. Det siger eksperter som Ingeniøren har talt med.

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This reflective paint could keep sunbaked buildings cool

A new type of polymer coating that reflects sunlight to control heat could supplement or replace air conditioning systems.

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Digital IDs Are More Dangerous Than You Think

Opinion: Digital identification systems are meant to aid the marginalized. Actually, they're ripe for abuse.

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Say Goodbye to @sweden, the Last Good Thing on Twitter

After seven years, the country's grand experiment—turning its official Twitter account over to its citizens—comes to a close.

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Das Keyboard 5Q Review: Excellent for Typing, Not So Much for Notifications

An internet-enabled mechanical keyboard that brings web and device notifications to your fingertips.

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Child Mind Institute researchers, colleagues release non-human primate brain imaging data

An international team of researchers led by scientists at the Child Mind Institute has released the first open-source data sets of non-human primate brain imaging, which could help improve understanding of certain brain disorders.

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Shock Waves from World War II Bombs Felt at Edge of Space

Ripple effects from massive aerial raids include disturbances in Earth’s ionosphere — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Speaking out about sexual violence on social media may not challenge gendered power relations

Feminists are celebrating a new generation of women who fearlessly share their stories of sexual violence on social media and other digital platforms, confronting established limits on talking about rape.

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Killer whales: Why more than half world's orcas are threatened by leftover industrial chemicals

More than half of the world's killer whales are threatened by a group of toxic industrial chemicals that accumulate in their blubber and can be passed on from mother to calf. That's according to a new study led by scientists in Denmark and published in the journal Science. Killer whale populations found in the most polluted seas around Japan, Brazil, the UK or in the northeast Pacific, the authors

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New space instrument goes for a spin

Scientists and engineers at Los Alamos National Laboratory are using a unique centrifuge facility to evaluate a flight-ready telemetry system for evaluating a nuclear weapons test missile launch.

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"Chasms" | Asali DeVan Ecclesiastes

Writer and activist Asali DeVan Ecclesiastes lights up the stage with a powerful poem about hope, truth and the space between who we are and who we want to be.

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A decade of commercial space travel – what's next?

In many industries, a decade is barely enough time to cause dramatic change unless something disruptive comes along – a new technology, business model or service design. The space industry has recently been enjoying all three.

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A model that computes the fraction of the 'haystack' that SETI programs have collectively examined

Why haven't we found evidence of life anywhere but Earth? A trio of astrophysicists has revisited this question by taking a closer look at the "needle in a haystack" analogy. Their analysis involved creating a model to assess the amount of work that has been done searching for extraterrestrial life, the Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence (SETI) project, compared to how much is required befo

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Tiny vortices driven by magnetic fields might be able to move microscopic particles

In The Wizard of Oz, a tornado picks up Dorothy's house and moves it far away. A bit farfetched, right? But scientists at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory think that, on a much smaller scale, tiny vortices could one day be used to move microscopic particles.

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NPS to reestablish wolves on Isle Royale

Officials with the National Park Service in the U.S. have announced that NPS has plans to reestablish wolves on Isle Royale—an island in Lake Superior. They also told reporters that some wolves have already been captured and brought to the island and have been released into the wild.

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Has one of math's greatest mysteries, the Riemann hypothesis, finally been solved?

Over the past few days, the mathematics world has been abuzz over the news that Sir Michael Atiyah, the famous Fields Medalist and Abel Prize winner, claims to have solved the Riemann hypothesis.

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Perovskite solar cells leap toward commercialization

Solar energy has long been considered the most sustainable option for replacing our dependence on fossil fuels, but technologies for converting solar energy into electricity must be both efficient and inexpensive.

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New insights into the structure of a killer protein

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the University of Tübingen have gained new insights into the structure of the killer protein Bax. The protein induces programmed cell death, the method by which the body disposes of cells that are no longer needed or have been pathologically altered. Since Bax is constantly changing its location in the cell, its structure is difficult to investigate.

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For collecting weather data, tiny satellites measure up to billion-dollar cousins

Big storms are getting bigger. Typhoon Jebi became the strongest tropical cyclone to hit Japan in 25 years and killed at least 10 people this past summer. Hurricane Florence awed even veteran meteorologists with its powerful combination of high winds and extreme moisture when it made landfall in North Carolina on Sept. 14.

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The flipside of the Bitcoin: How blockchain could underpin sustainable energy

There's a lot of buzz about distributed ledger technology, commonly known as "blockchain", being the future of financial and legal transactions, but it also has the potential to help tackle a far trickier problem… climate change.

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Quantum mechanics work lets oil industry know promise of recovery experiments before they start

With their current approach, energy companies can extract about 35 percent of the oil in each well. Every 1 percent above that, compounded across thousands of wells, can mean billions of dollars in additional revenue for the companies and supply for consumers.

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Kvinder med epilepsi har fem gange højere risiko for at dø under graviditet

Danske kvinder med epilepsi har en markant forhøjet risiko for at dø under graviditeten, konkluderer forskere fra Aarhus Universitet. »Vi bør overveje, om vi kan følge kvinderne bedre end i dag,« lyder det fra studiets førsteforfatter.

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A Chinese search and AI giant says it could help Google make a comeback

The CEO of Sogou says his company could help Google navigate China’s regulations and censorship.

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Tiny spheres make concrete greener and stronger

New micron-sized calcium silicate spheres could lead to stronger and greener concrete, the world’s most-used synthetic material. To researchers, the spheres represent building blocks that can be made at low cost and promise to mitigate the energy-intensive cement-creation techniques. Cement is the most common binder in concrete. “Cement doesn’t have the nicest structure…” The researchers formed t

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Unprecedented study confirms massive scale of lowland Maya civilization

Tulane University researchers, documenting the discovery of dozens of ancient cities in northern Guatemala through the use of jungle-penetrating Lidar (light detection and ranging) technology, have published their results in the prestigious journal Science.

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New glue could make millions of medical procedures safer, less invasive for patients

More than 230 million invasive surgeries are performed worldwide each year – and nearly all of those procedures create additional tissue damage from stitches and staples. Researchers at Purdue University are hoping to significantly decrease that damage with a new surgical adhesive technology.

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Chlorate-rich soil may help us find liquid water on Mars

If liquid water exists on the surface of Mars, it is most likely in the form of a briny mixture with magnesium chlorate salts, according to new experiments based on discoveries previously made by NASA's Phoenix and Viking landers, as well as the Curiosity rover.

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Hiring female police officers helps women report violence, sexual assault, study finds

Increasing female representation in America's police forces can both increase reporting of violent crimes against women and decrease domestic violence, according to a new study from University of Virginia economics professor Amalia Miller.

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Hurricane Rosa could flood the parched Southwest next week

Environment Even small amounts of heavy rain can pose a problem in the desert. Rosa could pose a flooding threat to desert southwest and parts of the Rocky Mountains next week as the storm makes a sharp turn toward northwestern Mexico.

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San Francisco's Dream of 'Zero Waste' Lands in the Dumpster

The city has reduced its trash more than any other American metropolis. But eliminating all garbage, it turns out, is an impractical goal.

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From 'Forever' to 'Atlanta,' Do Standalone Episodes Hurt or Help Their Shows?

The phenomenon has become more frequent in recent years—but while they're always enjoyable, they may be undermining the shows they're part of.

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Image of the Day: Dopamine Made Them Do It

Levels of the neurotransmitter drive ant foraging behavior in the desert.

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Redesign dating apps to lessen racial bias, study recommends

Mobile dating apps that allow users to filter their searches by race – or rely on algorithms that pair up people of the same race – reinforce racial divisions and biases, according to a new paper by Cornell researchers.

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Take a Deep Breath and Say Hi to Your Exposome

Researchers begin to explore the unique cloud of airborne microbes and chemicals that surrounds each of us — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Using tree ring records to decode Earth's climate history

Ed Cook is one of the founding directors of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Tree-Ring Laboratory. During his 43 years at Lamont, Cook has used tree rings to decode past climate patterns and advance understanding of drought—research that has taken him almost everywhere on the planet there are trees, from the United States and Canada to much of Southeast Asia, Australia, and New Zealand.

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Will 2018 be the year of climate action? Victorian London's 'Great Stink' sewer crisis might tell us

In the late 19th century, the irrepressible Mark Twain is reputed to have said in a speech: "Everybody talks about the weather but nobody does anything about it."

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Lunar library to include photos, books stored in DNA

People who have submitted photos to the #MemoriesInDNA project have selected images of family members, favorite places and tasty food that will be preserved for years in the form of synthetic DNA. Now this collection—which currently contains more than 3,000 images and is still growing—will be headed to the final frontier: space.

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'Bin chicken' plays unique role in story of evolution

A University of Queensland researcher has uncovered how a French scientist and ibis researcher conducted the first test of evolution more than 50 years before Charles Darwin's Origin of the Species.

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The Effects Of Sexual Assault On The Brain

NPR's Rachel Martin talks with Jim Hopper, a teaching associate at Harvard Medical School, about sexual assault and its effects on the brain.

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Hacking nature’s coolest inventions to create the perfect metal

From bamboo stalks to mantis shrimp clubs to teeth, nature marries strength and toughness with spectacular effect. Copying its secrets could usher in a new age of metals

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Does more than 2 hours of screen time really harm children’s brains?

A study says that children do better academically if they limit screen time, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it is time to ban their phones

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First Man: Ryan Gosling and Damien Chazelle on faking the moon landing

We talk to the star and director of First Man, the new film about the Apollo 11 mission, and ask what it was like getting into the head of the famously enigmatic Neil Armstrong

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Why haven’t we heard from aliens? Because we’ve barely started looking

The search for alien life has found nothing so far. But the part of the galaxy we’ve searched is equivalent to just a bathtub of water in the world’s oceans

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Sengepladser til psykiatrien sender sundhedsministeren i samråd

Uklarhed omkring antallet af nye sengepladser til psykiatrien i regeringens psykiatriudspil har nu fået Enhedslistens Stine Brix til at kalde sundhedsministeren i samråd.

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Painted 'Comics' with 'Speech Bubbles' Found in Ancient Roman Tomb

A colorful mural depicts comics-style scenes from a Roman city thousands of year ago.

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Observing the development of a deep-sea greenhouse gas filter

In a long-term study, marine scientists from Bremen have for the first time observed the slow colonization of the crater around a deep-sea mud volcano after its eruption. The first settlers are tiny organisms that eat methane escaping from the volcano, preventing this greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere. The present study describes how the colonization of the mud volcano proceeds and how t

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Putting noise to work

Noise is often undesirable—for example, in a recorded conversation in a noisy room, in astronomical observations with large background signals, or in image processing. A research team from China, Spain and Germany has demonstrated that noise can induce spatial and temporal order in nonlinear systems. This effect may be used in the future to identify signals that are hidden in a large amount of noi

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Following the path of chemicals through the soil

Where do pesticides and their degradation products go once they enter the soil? And how long does it take them to get to groundwater or drainage systems? That depends on a number of factors, but researchers at Aarhus University have come a step closer to finding quick answers. For the first time ever, they have used visible/near-infrared spectroscopy to predict the transport of dissolved chemicals

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Scientists propose a new model for the specialization of cells

Mathematicians at the Higher School of Economics have developed a model that explains how cell specialization arises in the context of resource constraints. The results are published in PLOS ONE journal.

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How swarms of nanomachines could improve the efficiency of any machine

All machines convert one form of energy into another form—for example, a car engine turns the energy stored in fuel into kinetic energy. Those processes of energy conversion, described by thermodynamics, don't only take place on the macro-level of big machines, but also at the micro-level of molecular machines that drive muscles or metabolic processes and even on the atomic level. The research tea

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Well established theories on patterns in evolution might be wrong

How do the large-scale patterns observed in evolution arise? A new paper in the journal Evolution by researchers at Uppsala University and University of Leeds argues that many of them are a type of statistical artefact caused by our unavoidably recent viewpoint looking back into the past. As a result, it might not be possible to draw any conclusions about what caused the enormous changes in divers

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Exploring the microscopic structure of black holes from the viewpoint of thermodynamics

Since the first detection of gravitational waves by LIGO and VIRGO, black holes have aroused widespread discussion and interest. For scientists, black holes play a unique role in connecting quantum mechanics and general relativity. The microscopic structure of black holes has always been a huge problem for scientists. A recent study reveals the microscopic mystery of black holes from the viewpoint

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Researchers identify a metal that withstands ultra-high temperature and pressure

Japanese scientists have identified a metal that can stand up to constant forces in ultrahigh temperatures, offering promising applications including in aircraft jet engines and gas turbines for electric power generation.

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Plasma thruster: New space debris removal technology

The Earth is currently surrounded by debris launched into space over several decades. This space junk can collide with satellites, causing damage and creating more debris. To preserve a secure space environment, the active removal or de-orbiting of space debris is an emergent technological challenge. If remedial action is not taken in the near future, it will be difficult to sustain human space ac

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Composite significantly reduces electromagnetic pollution

In a paper published in Nano, a group of researchers from Anhui University of Science and Technology have synthesized PANI/Zn ferrite composites which have shown excellent microwave absorption performance. They could be used to reduce electromagnetic pollution.

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Before his early death, Riemann freed geometry from Euclidean prejudices

The originator of Riemann’s hypothesis died young, but he provided the geometry needed for modern view of spacetime.

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Darpa Goes Underground for Its Most Daring Robot Extravaganza Yet

Darpa is calling it the Subterranean Challenge, but you may as well call it the Death to All Robots Challenge.

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Why Silicon Valley Should Fear Europe's Competition Chief

In an interview with WIRED's editor in chief, Margrethe Vestager says Amazon, Apple, Google, and other tech giants can’t use their success to harm rivals.

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What Parents Know About Beach Week

This week, as the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh faces an array of accusations about actions from his youth, the country is discovering one long-standing tradition at his high school beloved by many of his fellow East Coasters: Beach Week. Just as school lets out for the summer, teens escape to beach houses up and down the mid-Atlantic to hang out and party before they part ways and depart

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Cats Are No Match for New York City’s Rats

In 2017, Michael H. Parsons finally secured a site to study rats in New York City. You would think that’s easy in Pizza Rat’s native land , but Parsons, a visiting researcher at Fordham University, says the process took “blood, sweat, and tears”: Since rats in New York invariably live on somebody’s property, that somebody has to let rats roam free for scientists to observe. Most people—if they’re

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A Populist Has Exposed a Sinkhole in Canada’s Democracy

When the history of Western populism is written, the tale of Canada’s Brothers Ford may constitute its most bizarre chapter. Hailing from suburban Toronto, the wealthy businessmen Rob and Doug Ford embarked on a populist campaign years before such endeavors became a repeated feature of 21st-century politics. Rob found global infamy as the Toronto mayor caught on camera during a crack-smoking bing

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The secret data collected by dockless bikes is helping cities map your movement

Lime and other companies are gathering masses of location-based information that some cities are leveraging to improve their streets.

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The Route of Parks

It connects 17 national parks and runs for 2,800km (1,740 miles) through sparsely populated land.

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Reality Check

An estimated 100 people have died in floods. Why does it keep happening?

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Going global

China's Beidou is being used in everything from ploughing to precision missiles, but can it go global?

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Renaissance Master Caravaggio Didn't Die of Syphilis, but of Sepsis

Famed Renaissance painter Caravaggio didn't die of syphilis, as some historians long thought.

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Nyt cybersituationscenter er åbnet hos Center for Cybersikkerhed

Forsvarets Efterretningstjenestes Center for Cybersikkerhed tager nu det første skridt i etableringen af et cybersituationscenter, som får til opgave at tilvejebringe et nationalt cybersituationsbillede. Først ved udgangen af 2020 er situationscenteret døgnbemandet.

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Apple-sårbarhed åbner for hacker-devices på firmanetværk

Apples Device Enrollment Program (DEP) i en MDM-løsning indeholder en sårbarhed.

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For the Third Autumn in a Row, a National Reckoning With Sexual Assault

Autumn is for school supplies. It’s for crunchy leaves, and pumpkin pie, and digging the cozy fleece sweater out from the bottom of the drawer. It is also, apparently, for messy public reckonings with sexual assault. For the past three years, around the time the trees turn yellow on the East Coast, an old assault allegation—or three , or 19 , or 219 —has surfaced in the news and commanded nationa

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Infamous Wreck of Ill-Fated Franklin Expedition Yields More Artifacts, But No Ship's Log

Harsh conditions and thick ice kept divers out of Franklin's cabin.

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In Photos: Artifacts Recovered from the HMS Erebus Exploration

Abandoned 170 years ago, the HMS Erebus was only rediscovered in the icy waters of the Canadian Arctic in 2014.

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Halvdelen af alle mobilspil i verden bruger danske Unity

Tusindevis af spilskabere verden over bruger danskernes software som grundlag for deres spil. Men hvad er det nu lige, virksomheden laver?

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Her kan de nye gigant-havmølleparker ligge

Finscreening af mulige sites til 800 MW havmølleparker er skudt igang. Tre parker skal snurre inden 2030.

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Ny rekord for kontrollerbare magnetfelter: 1.200 tesla

Japanske forskere sætter ny rekord for, hvor kraftige magnetfelter man kan generere indendørs under kontrollerbare forhold.

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Brett Kavanaugh Discovers the Unfairness of the World

Brett Kavanaugh came before the Senate angry. Photographs of the Supreme Court nominee from Thursday’s hearing show him almost snarling . He cut off Senator Dianne Feinstein mid-question and demanded to know whether Senator Amy Klobuchar, who had just described her own father’s struggle with alcoholism, had ever blacked out drunk. The contrast could not have been more stark between the judge’s te

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Don’t Pretend the Kavanaugh Facts are Unknowable

The strangest thing to me about Thursday’s Judiciary Committee hearing was that the veteran prosecutor Rachel Mitchell, retained by the Republicans to cross-examine Christine Blasey Ford, didn’t already have, and seemed uninterested in obtaining, a crucial piece of evidence that Ford referred to in her testimony. Ford does not recall precisely what date Brett Kavanaugh allegedly assaulted her, bu

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Kavanaugh’s Fate Will Have a Massive Ripple Effect

The paradox of Thursday’s Senate Judiciary Committee hearings is how little and how much change they wrought. How little, because there was no indication that the testimony from Christine Blasey Ford and Brett Kavanaugh had affected the course of Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court. How much, because the civic wounds of Thursday’s hearing seem likely to endure for years, if they ever heal

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Did George Washington ‘Have a Couple of Things in His Past’?

It’s not every day that George Washington trends on Twitter. Normally historians would rejoice at this, but the reason the first president was in the news was due to a curious, ungrounded claim by the current president. In defending his Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, against multiple accusations of sexual assault during a press conference Wednesday , Donald Trump maintained that the Demo

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The ‘Untrue’ Woman

A week after devouring Untrue , Wednesday Martin’s eminently readable treatise on the lies society has been fed about female sexuality, agency, and infidelity, I saw an ad for Brooklinen sheets on the New York City subway. Three sets of socked feet were sticking out from beneath these sheets—two male, one female. “For throuples,” it began. I squealed. I was immediately reminded of the eighth chap

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Consider the Hit Man

If Bill Hader’s recent Emmy-winning turn as the HBO hit man Barry was defined by reluctance, Scott Ryan’s Australian assassin, Ray, on the new FX series Mr. Inbetween, is blissfully untroubled by issues of ethical ambiguity. His code is simple. “How many people would you say you’ve assaulted?” an anger-management counselor asks him in the fourth episode. “Heaps,” Ray replies. How does he feel abo

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Sundhedsministeriet kræver redegørelse om Peter Gøtzsche

Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet har bedt om en redegørelse for konsekvenserne ved Cochranes beslutning om at ekskludere og ville opsige Peter Gøtzsche.

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Neil Armstrong Walked on the Moon. To These Boys, He Was Just Dad.

With an upcoming auction of the astronaut’s keepsakes, his sons reflect on an unusual childhood.

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Hør ugens podcast: Google og Facebook overvåger dig hos det offentlige

Sociale plugins på offentlige hjemmesider deler data med blandt andre Google og Facebook. Udbygningen af Ringsted Station er kørt af sporet. Hvem skal have årets Nobelpriser?

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How some algae may survive climate change

Green algae that evolved to tolerate hostile and fluctuating conditions in salt marshes and inland salt flats are expected to survive climate change, thanks to hardy genes they stole from bacteria, according to a Rutgers-led study.

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Diagnostic protocol effective in identifying ED patients with acute chest pain

A relatively new accelerated diagnostic protocol is effective in identifying emergency department patients with acute chest pain who can be safely sent home without being hospitalized or undergoing comprehensive cardiac testing, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.

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Improved In vivo imaging of atherosclerotic plaque development

University of Tsukuba researchers developed a method for quantitatively assessing atherosclerotic plaque buildup in mice. They transplanted X-ray-irradiated low-density-lipoprotein-knockout mice with bone marrow cells expressing near-infrared fluorescent protein, which subsequently developed into fluorescent macrophages. These macrophages congregated specifically in atherosclerotic plaques that ar

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Discovery paves way for improved ovarian cancer care

A new ovarian cancer study could help to better match patients with the appropriate therapy for their cancer. The research identified important epigenetic differences among ovarian cancer patients that could influence their response to treatment. There is no 'one size fits all' approach for treating ovarian cancer so being able to offer personalised care is crucial for patient survival rates which

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A role for Scn5a missplicing in cardiac arrhythmias in myotonic dystrophy

New evidence supports the hypothesis that alternative splicing of Scn5a is a contributing factor in the arrhythmias associated with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

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Neglected baby beetles evolve greater self-reliance

Cambridge zoologists exposed hundreds of burying beetles to two levels of parental care, for 13 generations. The researchers found that when parents fed meat to their babies' mouth-to-mouth, the larvae evolved relatively smaller mandibles. By contrast, when the parents were removed from their young and larvae were forced to self-feed, the larvae evolved significantly larger jaws to compensate for

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Overvågning hos kommunen: Det offentlige i kontroversielt samarbejde med it-giganter

Cambridge Analytica-skandalen og strammere persondatakrav har skabt debat om det offentliges samarbejde med it-giganter som Facebook. Men det er ikke nok, mener professor.

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Memory And Trauma

Thursday's testimony put a spotlight on trauma and memory. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Tracey Shors, a professor of neuroscience and psychology, who focuses on stress, sexual trauma and memory.

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Neglected baby beetles evolve greater self-reliance

In gardens, parks and woods across the UK, the Sexton burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides quietly buries dead mice and other small vertebrates to create edible nests for their young.

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Kræftforsker skal udvikle mere præcis strålebehandling

Per Rugaard Poulsen er blevet udnævnt til professor på Aarhus Universitet. Her skal han forske i, hvordan man giver den bedste strålebehandling med færrest mulige bivirkninger.

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Sociologer sporer stofsalget på de sociale medier

Flere unge kan blive eksponerede for køb og salg af stoffer på sociale medier, og det ser…

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Lægeflugt truer psykiatrien

Mere end hver tredje psykiater forventer ikke at arbejde i regionspsykiatrien om tre år, viser en ny undersøgelse fra Yngre Læger. – Nedslående og bekymrende, siger formand for psykiatriudvalget i Danske Regioner, Sophie Hæstorp Andersen (S).

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Skrædderen fra Helvede

Hvis man skal måle et rigt land på, hvor godt man behandler sine psykisk syge, så ser Danmark fortsat fattigt ud.

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»Psykiatri er det fedeste speciale, men…«

Konst. overlæge Ida Schoubye Poulsen og hoveduddannelseslæge Rasmus Handest er to af de mange læger, som overvejer at forlade den regionale psykiatri. De er begejstrede for specialet, men er bekymrede for at blive udbrændte eller kyniske, fordi tid til patienterne er en alvorlig mangelvare i psykiatrien.

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Reporting on the edge: Authority, dog whistles, and the politics of the unknown

Beatrice Golomb, MD, has appeared in the news arguing "mysterious symptoms" experienced by Cuban diplomats are due to electromagnetic radiation. Though quoted by The New York Times and published in a peer-reviewed journal, are her opinions credible?

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Tesla without Musk at the wheel? It's what the SEC now wants

Tesla without Elon Musk at the wheel? To many of the electric car maker's customers and investors that would be unthinkable. But that's what government securities regulators now want to see.

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Making head or tail of a galactic landscape

Astronomers have used data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory to capture a dramatic image of an enormous tail of hot gas stretching for more than a million light years behind a group of galaxies that is falling into the depths of an even-larger cluster of galaxies. Discoveries like this help astronomers learn about the environment and conditions under which the Universe's biggest structures evo

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Jeff Bezos space project lands big rocket partnership

Jeff Bezos backed Blue Origin space exploration project on Thursday landed a major deal to provide engines for a next-generation rocket being built by a major US launch services contractor.

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Journalists slam pending Bangladesh digital security law

Journalists and human rights groups are demanding major amendments to a bill recently passed in Bangladesh's Parliament, saying it will further choke constitutionally protected freedom of speech.

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Photos from Japanese space rovers show asteroid is … rocky

New photos taken on the surface of an asteroid show that it is (drumroll, please) … rocky.

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Blank page for Nobel Literature Prize in 2018 awards season

An amputated 2018 Nobel season opens next week in Stockholm, without a Literature Prize for the first time in 70 years due to a #MeToo scandal.

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Renewable energy on rise in resource-poor Jordan

Set atop a mosque in the south of Jordan's capital, dozens of shimmering solar panels reflect a growing trend in the resource-poor desert kingdom as it tries combat its heavy reliance on imported energy.

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Conflict and drought ravage Iraq's prized date palms

Sweet Iraqi dates adorn tables in homes across the country, but the fruit tree and national symbol has come under threat from conflict and crippling drought.

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1,001 ways to lose a Nobel Prize

It's easier to lose a Nobel Prize than to win one.

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Honda recalls Accord, Insight vehicles for software problem

Honda is recalling about 232,000 2018 Accord vehicles and 2019 Insight hybrid cars in the U.S. for malfunctioning software for the rear camera display.

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Google CEO to meet with US lawmakers after previous snub

Google CEO Sundar Pichai is scheduled to meet privately with members of Congress Friday after he and his boss, Google co-founder Larry Page, stood up lawmakers at a public hearing earlier this month.

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Ryanair faces fresh strike in Europe

Ryanair braced Friday for what unions warn will be the biggest strike in the airline's history—although the carrier played down fears of disruption for travellers.

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Programs to reduce absenteeism more successful for youth with more absences

Students who are chronically absent from school often perform poorly academically, and are more likely to be delinquent, drop out, or engage in other high-risk behaviors. New research identified a common way to define absenteeism and classified youth's absenteeism based on degree. The study found that interventions for youth with the highest rates of absenteeism were more successful than those for

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Bioengineering grad student makes waves in MR research with a 3-D printed phantom head

Phantoms are not just ghostly figures of our imagination, they are also numerical or physical models that represent human characteristics and provide an inexpensive way to test electromagnetic applications. Sossena Wood, a bioengineering Ph.D. candidate at the University of Pittsburgh, has developed a realistic phantom head for magnetic resonance research in the Swanson School of Engineering.

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Every man in Spain was wiped out 4500 years ago by hostile invaders

When a new group of people arrived on the Iberian peninsula 4500 years ago, local males stopped passing on their genes – suggesting they were supplanted or killed

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How Our Ears Make Sense of Sound.

submitted by /u/dezignguy [link] [comments]

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Trouble in the Skies Over Europe

PARIS —Gustavo Silva, 32, is a flight attendant for Ryanair, the Dublin-based airline whose low-cost service has revolutionized travel across Europe. Silva lives in Tenerife, the largest and most populous of Spain’s Canary Islands, and works out of the bustling Tenerife South Airport. He has been an employee of Ryanair, Europe’s second-largest airline in terms of passengers, for more than seven y

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Er jorden flad? Din personlighed kan afsløre, om du tror på konspirationsteorier

Ny amerikansk forskning viser, at det hovedsageligt er mennesker med bestemte personlighedstræk, der tror på konspirationsteorier.

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Observing the development of a deep-sea greenhouse gas filter

In a long-term study, marine scientists from Bremen for the first time observed the colonization of a deep-sea mud volcano after its eruption. Only slowly, rich life develops around the crater. The first settlers are tiny organisms that eat methane escaping from the volcano. Thereby, they keep this greenhouse gas from reaching the atmosphere. The present study describes how the colonization of the

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Kidney disease biomarker may also be a marker for COPD

A commonly used biomarker of kidney disease may also indicate lung problems, particularly COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Programs to reduce absenteeism more successful for youth with more absences

The study found that interventions for youth with the highest rates of absenteeism were more successful than those for youth with fewer absences.

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Plate tectonics may have been active on Earth since the very beginning

A new study suggests that plate tectonics — a scientific theory that divides the earth into large chunks of crust that move slowly over hot viscous mantle rock — could have been active from the planet's very beginning. The new findings defy previous beliefs that tectonic plates were developed over the course of billions of years.

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Childhood poverty may have lasting effects on cognitive skills in old age

Children who grow up in poverty or who are otherwise socially and economically disadvantaged may be more likely in old age to score lower than others on tests of cognitive skills, according to a new study.

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Understanding antibiotic resistance in patients with cystic fibrosis

Patients with cystic fibrosis who carried antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their lungs had significantly lower microbial diversity and more aggressive disease, according to a small study.

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Fecal microbiota transplantation helps restore beneficial bacteria in cancer patients

Researchers have shown that autologous fecal microbiota transplantation (auto-FMT) is a safe, effective way to replenish beneficial gut bacteria in cancer patients requiring intense antibiotics during allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

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Japanese rovers send back first video from asteroid 280 million km away

Rovers deployed by the unmanned Hayabusa2 spacecraft capture a 15-frame clip of the asteroid Ryugu Two Japanese robots have sent back their first video images from the surface of a moving asteroid as part of an unprecedented mission aimed at shedding light on the origins of the solar system. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Jaxa) released the 15-frame clip along with new photographs days a

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Limiting children's recreational screen time to less than two hours a day linked to better cognition, study finds

Limiting recreational screen time to less than two hours a day, and having sufficient sleep and physical activity is associated with improved cognition, compared with not meeting any recommendations, according to an observational study of more than 4,500 US children aged 8-11 years old.

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Brexit will affect the UK's ability to tackle illicit drugs trade, warn experts

Exclusion from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction (EMCDDA) because of Brexit will have serious consequences for public health in the UK, warn experts.

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Newer contraceptive pills linked to reduced ovarian cancer risk in young women

New types of combined oral contraceptives (containing both lower doses of estrogens and newer progestogens) are associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer, in young women, finds a large study.

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Big increase in economic costs if cuts in greenhouse gas emissions are delayed

Stronger efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions should be undertaken to avoid global warming of more than 1.5 degrees Celsius — without relying on potentially more expensive or risky technologies to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere or reduce the amount of sunlight reaching Earth's surface.

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Despite restaurant pledges, most kids receive unhealthy items with fast-food kids' meals, study finds

A new study of parents' fast-food restaurant purchases for their children finds that 74 percent of kids still receive unhealthy drinks and/or side items with their kids' meals when visiting America's largest restaurant chains.

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Offentlige hjemmesider sladrer til Google og Facebook

Kommuner, styrelser og ministerier deler oplysninger om borgeres besøg på offentlige hjemmesider med globale it-giganter. I strid med EU’s regler, siger jurist.

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Breakthrough in the hunt for a vaccine against foal pneumonia

A vaccine against deadly foal pneumonia might finally be within reach, thanks to new research. The breakthrough could potentially save the lives of thousands of foals every year.

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Publicizing a firm's security levels may strengthen security over time, study finds

New research has quantified the security levels of more than 1,200 Pan-Asian companies in order to determine whether increased awareness of one's security levels leads to improved defense levels against cybercrime.

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Regional seismic data help locate September 2017 North Korean nuclear test

The epicenter of the Sept. 3, 2017, nuclear test explosion in North Korea occurred about 3.6 kilometers northwest of the country's first nuclear test in October 2006, according to a new high-precision analysis of the explosion and its aftermath.

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Senate Republicans Are More Emboldened Than Ever to Confirm Kavanaugh

For President Trump and his top aides, Thursday began on Air Force One en route from New York to Washington. According to a source with direct knowledge, those aides sat clustered in front of televisions, watching Christine Blasey Ford testify about the day she alleges Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her. They were mostly silent, the source says, save for a half-hearted mumble here and there t

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Polymer coating cools down buildings

Engineers have invented a high-performance exterior PDRC polymer coating with nano-to-microscale air voids that acts as a spontaneous air cooler and can be fabricated, dyed, and applied like paint on rooftops, buildings, water tanks, vehicles, even spacecraft — anything that can be painted. They used a solution-based phase-inversion technique that gives the polymer a porous foam-like structure.

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Vampire bats found to carry infectious bacteria at high rates

A study found Bartonella infections in vampire bats are highly prevalent in Peru and Belize, and that Bartonella genotypes are distributed widely, rather than clustered geographically.

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Device that integrates solar cell and battery could store electricity outside the grid

Scientists have harnessed the abilities of both a solar cell and a battery in one device — a 'solar flow battery' that soaks up sunlight and efficiently stores it as chemical energy for later on-demand use. Their research could make electricity more accessible in remote regions of the world.

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New bird flu viruses in ducks after vaccines largely prevented H7N9 in chickens

In response to bird flu pandemics starting in 2013, officials in China introduced a new vaccine for chickens in September 2017. Recent findings suggest that the vaccine largely worked but detected two new genetic variations of the H7N9 and H7N2 subtypes in unvaccinated ducks.

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You've Been To Mars And A Comet; Japan's Space Agency Invites You To An Asteroid

Two Japanese rovers touring an asteroid have sent home photos and a video, which were published by JAXA on Thursday. (Image credit: JAXA)

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Hospital privacy curtains may harbor dangerous germs

Without timely intervention, privacy curtains in hospitals can become breeding grounds for resistant bacteria, posing a threat to patient safety, according to new research.

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Following the path of chemicals through the soil

A new and quick way to predict the transport of chemicals through the soil has been developed.

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Deaths of despair: The opioid epidemic is just part of the problem

Opioid-related deaths contributed to more than 60,000 U.S. lives lost in 2016 but absolute declines in life expectancy relative to other countries and in various measures of psychosocial well-being have been observed starting as early as 1980. Researchers provide an overview of trends toward both increasing despair and declining health observed among many groups of people in the United States.

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Hawai'i land impacted by sea level rise may be double previous estimates

By including models of dynamical physical processes such as erosion and wave run-up, a team of researchers has determined that land area in Hawai'i vulnerable to future sea level rise may be double previous estimates.

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Ride-hailing increases vehicle miles traveled

Ride-hailing accounts for an 83 percent increase in the miles cars travel for ride-hailing passengers in Denver's metro area.

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Enhanced rehab for stroke doubles movement recovery

A novel therapy technique has been shown in a pilot study to double the rate of upper limb recovery in stroke patients, a leap forward in treating the nearly 800,000 Americans who suffer strokes each year.

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New invasive bryozoan arrives in Alaskan waters

Alaska has a near-pristine marine ecosystem–it has fewer invasive species in its waters than almost any other state in the U.S. But that could be changing. With help from local volunteers, biologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) and Temple University have reported a new invasive species in the Ketchikan region, the invertebrate filter-feeder Bugula neritina, and documen

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Brett Kavanaugh’s Gale-Force Partisan Defense

He bobbed, he weaved, he ducked, he evaded, declining to answer directly whether he viewed his accuser as part of a political conspiracy against him, or whether he personally believed that reopening the FBI’s background investigation into his nomination would be the best way to clear his name. At one moment, Senator Dick Durbin’s relentless questioning on that last point seemed to render him spee

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Stroke incidence rising in Taiwan contrary to falls in Western countries

The incidence of stroke is rising in Taiwan contrary to falls in Western countries, according to a nationwide study presented at the ASEAN Federation of Cardiology Congress 2018 (AFCC 2018).

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Tawny owl decline: Public urged to record 'twit-twoos'

Volunteers are urged to make a weekly record of the Tawny owl's distinctive hoot, as numbers fall.

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September Marathon: Results!

Congratulations, Eyewirers! You completed this 1657-cube cell in 25 hours 9 minutes. Be proud! We are always amazed by your achievements. And also be sure to join us next week after Happy Hour, when we will rename the cell according to your votes! Players qualified to nominate a name or vote will receive e-mail(s) between now and Monday. Yay!

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The Blasey Ford-Kavanaugh Hearings Through the Lens of One Woman

When Christine Blasey Ford spoke to the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday morning, Erin Schaff was one of the few photographers in the room

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Washington Rolls Back Safety Rules Inspired by Deepwater Horizon Disaster

New rules will no longer require oil companies to design gear for “most extreme” conditions, such as violent weather or heavy pressure within undersea wells — a key factor in the deadly 2010 blowout.

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Boostet immunforsvar før operation skal reducere tilbagefald

Patienters eget immunforsvar kan få en afgørende rolle i behandlingen af kræft, siger kirurger og onkologer fra Sjællands Universitetshospital. En ny tilgang til hele kræftbehandlingen har som mål at reducere risikoen for, at patienter får tilbagefald efter operation. Det kræver en gentænkning af hele det perioperative forløb.

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Tarteletten er hospitalets konge

Hospitalernes senge er fyldt med patienter af vidt forskellig oprindelse, aldre og sygdomme, men når det kommer til maden, er én ting fælles: Traditionel, dansk mad er et hit. Det viser Dagens Medicins rundspørge til landets sygehuskøkkener.

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Bispebjerg sætter kulør på maden

Mexicanske fajitas og indisk dal-suppe er kommet på menuen på et københavnerhospital med mange patienter af anden etnisk herkomst. Samtidig har den traditionelle danske mad fået et tvist og er populær blandt både unge og gamle – godt hjulpet af eksterne kendiskokke

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Blasey Ford–Kavanaugh Testimony Tells a Tale of Two Internets

As Christine Blasey Ford and Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh stood before Congress in turn, filter bubbles on the left and the right saw very different pictures.

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Pollution threatens future of killer whales

Orcas are in deep trouble because of persistent chemical pollution in the environment, researchers say.

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The Atlantic Daily: Confirmation Hearings, or a Trial?

What We’re Following Confirmation Hearings: The American public met Dr. Christine Blasey Ford on Thursday, as she faced an odd line of questioning from a GOP-hired sex-crimes prosecutor. “And hours later, the public saw an entirely new Brett Kavanaugh,” who was defiant, tearful, and angry, calling the confirmation process a “national disgrace.” Catch up here on the most striking moments from the

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Populær blodtryksmedicin øger også risiko for sjældne former for hudkræft

Nyt studie viser, at det aktive stof hydrochlorothiazid i flere blodtryksmidler øger risikoen for at få Merkelcelle karcinom, som er en UV-lysfølsom form for hudkræft. Det falder i tråd med tidligere studier, der viser øget risiko for at udvikle en række andre UV-lysfølsomme hudkræfttyper.

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Forskerne har koordineret deres pressestrategi med Lægemiddelstyrelsen

Allerede efter det første studie tog lektor Anton Pottegård og hans kolleger kontakt til Lægemiddelstyrelsen for at orientere dem om udfaldet. Det førte til en tæt dialog om fortolkningen af data såvel som afstemte pressestrategier.

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Strøm slår huller i kræftcellen

Elektrokemoterapi og calciumelektroporation har givet lovende resultater i flere forsøg, og elektrokemoterapi er standardbehandling ved metastaser i huden. Planen er at udvide den til så mange kræftformer som muligt, lyder det fra professor Julie Gehl, der har været med helt fra begyndelsen.

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Giv os kirurgiprojektet tilbage

Kirurgiprojektet under ledelse af professor Henrik Kehlet var billigt og kan udbredes til andre specialer.

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Klinisk basisbog

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Praktisk oftalmologi

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Der lurer en angst

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Klæbehjerne

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First-born children more likely to learn about sex from parents

Birth order may play a significant role in how children learn about sex, especially for boys, according to a new study published in the journal Sex Education.

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Vitamin D supplements may promote weight loss in obese children

Vitamin D supplements may promote weight loss and reduce risk factors for future heart and metabolic disease in overweight and obese children, according to research presented today at the 57th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. These findings indicate that simple vitamin D supplementation may be part of an effective strategy to tackle childhood obesity and reduce the ris

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Expecting Women to Describe How Sexual Assault Affected Them Creates Barriers to Reporting It

The idea that one needs to articulate the personal effects of sexual assault as clearly as Christine Blasey Ford keeps many victims from reporting what happened to them.

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SEC Sues Elon Musk for Fraud Over Twitter Statements About Tesla

The charges stem from statements Musk made on Aug. 7 indicating that he planned to take his publicly traded electric-car company, Tesla, private, according to the lawsuit, which was filed today (Sept. 27) in New York.

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Huge numbers of stillborn babies 'may have been missed'

Hundreds of thousands of deaths a year are not being recognised in international estimates, research suggests Hundreds of thousands of babies who died in the womb could have been missed out of international estimates on stillbirths, research suggests. According to figures for 2015 , an estimated 2.6 million babies a year worldwide are stillborn – dying at a point in pregnancy when most babies wou

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Historic Hearing

Written by Olivia Paschal ( @oliviacpaschal ), Madeleine Carlisle ( @maddiecarlisle2 ), and Priscilla Alvarez (@priscialva) Today in 5 Lines During a tense hearing on sexual-misconduct allegations against Brett Kavanaugh, Christine Blasey Ford, a California professor, delivered an emotional testimony detailing the night she says she was sexually assaulted by the Supreme Court nominee. Ford fielde

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Stillbirth reduction strategy remains unproven, study finds

A care package aimed at reducing the risk of babies being stillborn may offer marginal benefit, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests. Findings from a major study were inconclusive and experts stress that advice for pregnant women remains the same — women who notice a change in their baby's movements should seek medical advice.

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True burden of stillbirths in Europe vastly underestimated

Around one in three stillbirths occur before 28 weeks of pregnancy but are not officially recognised.

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The SEC Is Suing Elon Musk (It's the Tweets)

The Tesla CEO is being charged with "making false and misleading statements."

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Have you seen the new Big Think?

Big Think has a brand-new look! Our new site makes it easier to stream knowledge from the palm of your hand. Get a tour of our HD video playlists and see how Big Think's world-class experts could shape up your organization. Bigthink.com has relaunched! The biggest ideas of the 21st century are looking better than ever. We took it apart, threw out the rusty bits, added shiny new features, then put

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Many folks with appendicitis could skip surgery

Health A new study suggests a cocktail of antibiotics can work just as well. Nearly one in 20 Americans will get appendicitis at some point in their lives, leading to 300,000 appendectomies performed every year.

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Perovski-what? Nine Nobel Prize Predictions

Perovski-what? Nine Nobel Prize Predictions These significant advancements could win the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Physics, and Chemistry. nobel2018_listicle.jpg Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics Culture Thursday, September 27, 2018 – 16:45 Inside Science Staff (Inside Science) — Every year, the Nobel Prizes

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Uber drivers are earning 53% less than they did in 2013

A new report suggests earnings have been steadily falling for drivers with companies like Uber and Lyft Uber suggests the results are misleading because they don't examine hourly earnings However, other reports suggest that even hourly earnings for ride-sharing drivers are often comparable to minimum wage Drivers for apps like Uber and Lyft are, as a whole, earning significantly less money compar

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Need a philosophical pick me up? Why one French philosopher suggests a walk.

French philosopher Frederic Gros tells us that walking is a route to entirely being ourselves and experiencing the sublime. He has a bias towards the wondering hikes of Nietzsche and Kerouac but has a place for urban strollers too. His book reminds us that even something as mundane as walking can be a vital part of our lives when done for itself. Walking is good for you. Regular walks can improve

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Lindsey Graham’s Furious Defense of Brett Kavanaugh

Senator Lindsey Graham angrily lashed out at Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee late Thursday afternoon, calling the Supreme Court confirmation process for Brett Kavanaugh “the most unethical sham since I’ve been in politics.” Turning to committee Democrats, with his voice shaking, Graham said: If you wanted an FBI investigation, you could have come to us! What you want to do is destroy

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Photography That Turns Architecture into Abstract Art.

Cities like you've never seen them.

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Ford celebrates century of production at storied Rouge plant

Ford Motor Co.'s historic Rouge factory complex will continue well into its second century of production with the announcement Thursday that it will make at least one version of the next-generation F-150 pickup truck.

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NASA Hosts Conference All About Looking For Signs Of Civilization Beyond Earth

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with astrophysicist Adam Frank, who is attending a NASA conference in Houston that's exploring how to discover intelligent life beyond earth.

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NASA-NOAA satellite looks into Typhoon Trami's ragged eye

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the eye of Typhoon Trami as it continued moving through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.

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NASA's close up of Hurricane Rosa shows hint of an eye

On Sept. 26 at 4:30 p.m. EDT (1630 UTC), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Hurricane Rosa. Credit: NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS)

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UC political scientist reveals surprising answers about religious freedom

At a moment when boundaries of religious rights are in conflict and prominent in American conversation, Andrew Lewis looks at perspectives often unconsidered.

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New invasive bryozoan arrives in Alaskan waters

Alaska has a near-pristine marine ecosystem—it has fewer invasive species in its waters than almost any other state in the U.S. But that could be changing. With help from local volunteers, biologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) and Temple University have reported a new invasive species in the Ketchikan region, the invertebrate filter-feeder Bugula neritina, and document

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Large stretches of coral reefs can be rehabilitated

Even after being severely damaged by blast fishing and coral mining, coral reefs can be rehabilitated over large scales using a relatively inexpensive technique, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis, in partnership with Mars Symbioscience.

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Scanning Ancient Civilizations from the Skies

An aerial laser scan of more than 800 square miles of Guatemalan jungle revealed Maya buildings, canals, roads and bridges. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Oculus Quest's new feature is a crucial step for mainstream VR

Technology Facebook announced the device on Wednesday. The new headset uses sensors on the device to track the environment around you.

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Aphids use sight to avoid deadly bacteria, could lead to pest control

Pea aphids—a serious agricultural pest—have the ability to see and avoid a common, aphid-killing bacteria on plant leaves, according to a new Cornell University study published in Current Biology.

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Research accurately predicts US end-of-season corn yield

Crop yield predictions are a key driver of regional economy and financial markets, impacting nearly the entire agricultural supply chain. That's why economists, agricultural researchers, government agencies, and private companies are working to improve the accuracy of these predictions.

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Hawai'i land impacted by sea level rise may be double previous estimates

By including models of dynamical physical processes such as erosion and wave run-up, a team of researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) and the Hawai'i Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) determined that land area in Hawai'i vulnerable to future sea level rise may be double previous estimates. The study was published today in the Nature journal, Scientific Reports

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Warm waters boosted 2017's major hurricane tally, study says

The Atlantic's warmer waters triggered the unusual number of major hurricanes last year, according to a new study that predicts the region could see a couple of extra whopper storms each year by the end of the century.

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NASA satellite analyzes new Southern Pacific Ocean tropical cyclone

NASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared look at a new storm that formed in the southern Pacific Ocean called Liua and saw strongest storms off-center.

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US regulators charge Tesla CEO Elon Musk with fraud

The US Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday charged Tesla CEO Elon Musk with securities fraud, alleging he misled investors last month in tweets about taking the company private.

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Certain reflux and ulcer medications linked with bone fractures in dialysis patients

Among patients with kidney failure on dialysis, use of proton pump inhibitors was associated with a 19 percent higher risk of hip fracture. The association remained within subgroups of low, moderate, and high use, yielding of 16 percent, 21 percent, and 19 percent greater risks, respectively. Histamine-2 receptor antagonists were not associated with hip fracture events.

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How (Not) to Win a Nobel Prize in Physics

How (Not) to Win a Nobel Prize in Physics Certain types of research and people have been historically underrepresented in the ranks of Nobel winners. physics-chalkboard_cropped.jpg Image credits: I000s_pixels/ Shutterstock Physics Thursday, September 27, 2018 – 16:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) – On Oct. 2, we will find out who will win this year’s Nobel Prize in physics. If you’ve pu

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'Cellular memory' of DNA damage in oocyte quality control

Females are born with a finite number of eggs that come from a much larger pool of millions of precursor cells. New research shows how cells that have experienced DNA damage are removed from this pool, so only the highest quality oocytes can become eggs.

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Hospital privacy curtains may harbor dangerous germs: New study

Without timely intervention, privacy curtains in hospitals can become breeding grounds for resistant bacteria, posing a threat to patient safety, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

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Russia’s Elite Fancy Bear Hackers Have a Clever New Trick

For the first time, a so-called UEFI rootkit has been spotted in the wild. And it appears to come from Russia.

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No, Tiffany Haddish Was Never Married to Will Smith

But she does wish she could wed Will *and* Jada.

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Tool screens for sleep apnea in people with epilepsy

A new tool will help screen for obstructive sleep apnea in people with epilepsy whose seizures the disorder can magnify, researchers say. Although detection and treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can improve seizure control in some patients, providers have not regularly assessed them for risk factors. The new electronic health record alert will help neurologists evaluate a patient’s need

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The Science Is Clear: Dirty Farm Water Is Making Us Sick

Lettuce contaminated with pathogens have sickened and killed people. But the FDA has shelved Obama-era plans to test the culprit: farms’ irrigation water.

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New gene variants associated with chronic back pain

Chronic back pain is the number one cause of years lived with disability worldwide. Medical researchers have now identified three novel genetic variants associated with chronic back pain.

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Watch a movie made by a robot—on the surface of an asteroid

Space Hayabusa-2's rovers are still hopping around Ryugu. In 15 frames, the bright flare of the sun moves across a pitch-black sky, arcing above a rocky boulder-strewn surface.

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New invasive bryozoan arrives in Alaskan waters

Alaska has a near-pristine marine ecosystem–it has fewer invasive species in its waters than almost any other state in the U.S. But that could be changing. With help from local volunteers, biologists at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center (SERC) and Temple University have reported a new invasive species in the Ketchikan region, the invertebrate filter-feeder Bugula neritina, and documen

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What's in It for Christine Blasey Ford?

Until the moment this morning when Dr. Christine Blasey Ford finally surfaced in the flesh, steeling herself for the onerous task of exposing her pain to 11 Republican men, she often seemed less than real, less a person than a symbol, a face concealed by sunglasses in an undated photo. Her searing memories about Brett Kavanaugh, mere words on a computer screen, were shared in the press and parsed

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Fire Ecologists Say More Fires Should Be Left To Burn. So Why Aren't They?

Fire ecologists are urging forest managers to allow more wildfires to burn on the landscape to help thin overgrown forests. Many challenges stand in the way. (Image credit: Nathan Rott/NPR)

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Nyudnævnt professor vil identificere risikogener for lungesygdomme

Morten Dahl er udnævnt til professor i klinisk biokemi ved Sjællands Universitetshosiptal Køge. Han vil i sit nye professorat forbedre diagnosticering af lungesygdomme.

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Home remedies 'no deterrent' against slugs and snails

Traditional remedies used by gardeners to deter slugs and snails appear to have no scientific merit.

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Feral cats appear to be pathetic at controlling New York City’s rats

When cats are on the prowl, rats may become harder to see, but roaming cats actually killed only a few.

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Hawai'i land impacted by sea level rise may be double previous estimates

By including models of dynamical physical processes such as erosion and wave run-up, a team of researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) and the Hawai'i Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR) determined that land area in Hawai'i vulnerable to future sea level rise may be double previous estimates. The study was published today in the Nature journal, Scientific Reports

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Kavanaugh Goes Nuclear

A furious Brett Kavanaugh denied Christine Blasey Ford’s allegations against him and attacked Democrats during his opening statement at Thursday’s Senate hearing, vacillating between shouting and tears as he fought, he said, to save his reputation. In a defiant statement not seen since Clarence Thomas’s confirmation hearings in 1991, President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee savaged the Sena

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Read Brett Kavanaugh’s Defiant Statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee

On Thursday, the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, at times choking back tears, delivered a fiery opening statement to the Senate Judiciary Committee, denying the sexual-assault allegations against him and calling the confirmation process a “national disgrace.” On the eve of the hearing, the panel released Kavanaugh’s written testimony. Thursday’s statement diverted from those remarks. Below

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How to avoid the downsides of awe-inspiring moments

Awe-inspiring experiences can have negative consequences as well as benefits, according to a new study. The study uses cardiovascular responses to stress to take a broad look at awe and the critical role perspective plays when considering the effects of encountering it. “We found that spontaneous self-distancing predicted whether awe benefited or had a negative effect on people,” explains Mark Se

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A Drifting Weedkiller Puts Prized Trees At Risk

The EPA is deciding whether to let farmers keep using an herbicide called dicamba. The chemical is controversial because it can damage nearby crops. What's less well-known: It's hurting wildlife, too. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

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How #HimToo Became the Anti #MeToo of the Kavanaugh Hearings

HimToo has meant many things over the last three years. The latest is a hashtag hijacking, like #AllLivesMatter, spawned as a sexist rebuttal to Christine Blasey Ford.

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The Particular Genius of a Taco

When filmmaker David Gorvy moved to Austin, he didn’t know a single soul. On his first night, he wandered the streets of downtown aimlessly. “I turn the corner and see this food truck on 2nd and Congress that was just one of the weirdest things I’d ever seen,” Gorvy told The Atlantic . “It was a hole in the wall, except in the form of a food truck.” The truck was selling tuna tacos. For lack of s

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Deaths of despair in the era of Donald Trump: The opioid epidemic is just part of the problem

Opioid-related deaths contributed to more than 60 000 U.S. lives lost in 2016 but absolute declines in life expectancy relative to other countries and in various measures of psychosocial well-being have been observed starting as early as 1980. Researchers provide an overview of trends toward both increasing despair and declining health observed among many groups of people in the United States.

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Following the path of chemicals through the soil

A new and quick way to predict the transport of chemicals through the soil has been developed by researchers at Aarhus University.

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Psykiatere ser mangler i ny vejledning for behandling af børn og unge

Formand for Børne- og Ungdomspsykiatrisk Selskab er positiv over for ændringer i vejledning for behandling af børn og unge med psykiske lidelser, men hun mener også, at vejledningen forsømmer enkelte punkter.

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The CDC says 80,000 people died from the flu last year

The 2017-2018 flu season was one of the deadliest on record for the United States.

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A Twice-Retracted Paper on Sex Differences Ignites Debate

Controversy surrounding a mathematical model to explain the so-called "greater variability of males" hypothesis fells two versions of a paper–but critics of the work wish it were still published.

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Large stretches of coral reefs can be rehabilitated

Coral reefs can be rehabilitated over large scales using a relatively inexpensive technique.

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Apples Or Fries With That? When It Comes To Kids' Meals, Fries Are Hard To Beat

Even though many fast-food chain restaurants are offering healthier sides, a new report says parents choose them only about half the time, and restaurants aren't consistent in how they offer them. (Image credit: Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

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PCB pollution threatens to wipe out killer whales

More than 40 years after the first initiatives were taken to ban the use of PCBs, the chemical pollutants remain a deadly threat to animals at the top of the food chain. A new study shows that the current concentrations of PCBs can lead to the disappearance of half of the world's populations of killer whales from the most heavily contaminated areas within a period of just 30-50 years.

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Aphids use sight to avoid deadly bacteria, could lead to pest control

Pea aphids — a serious agricultural pest — have the ability to see and avoid a common, aphid-killing bacteria on plant leaves, according to a new study.

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Where are they? Cosmologists search Andromeda for signs of alien life

'Are we alone in the universe?' The question has fascinated, tantalized and even disconcerted humans for as long as we can remember.

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Ledumahadi mafube: South Africa's new jurassic giant

A new species of a giant dinosaur has been found in South Africa's Free State Province. The plant-eating dinosaur, named Ledumahadi mafube, weighed 12 tons and stood about four meters high at the hips. Ledumahadi mafube was the largest land animal alive on Earth when it lived, nearly 200 million years ago. It was roughly double the size of a large African elephant.

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How swarms of nanomachines could improve the efficiency of any machine

All machines convert one form of energy into another form – for example a car engine turns the energy stored in fuel into motion energy. Those processes of energy conversion, described by the theory called thermodynamics, don't only take place on the macro-level of big machines, but also at the micro-level of molecular machines that drive muscles or metabolic processes and even on the atomic level

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Bones Reveal The Brontosaurus Had An Older, Massive Cousin In South Africa

The scientists think when this new dinosaur was alive, it was the largest creature ever to have walked the Earth. And unlike the lumbering creatures that came later, it could pop up on its hind legs. (Image credit: Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand)

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Ny allergivaccine mod høfeber viser lovende resultater

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet udviklet en lovende vaccine mod høfeber, der kan forhindre høfeber hos mus.

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UC political scientist reveals surprising answers about religious freedom

Can political conservatives accept inclusive religious freedom rights when viewing similar issues from another perspective?

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What Can Be Done to Prevent Another Rise in Flu Deaths This Year

The 2017 to 2018 flu season in the U.S. was the worst in four decades

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For Christine Blasey Ford to Be Believable, She Had to Be ‘Likable’

“Does that work for you? Does that work for you, as well?” That was the professor Christine Blasey Ford, on Thursday, during her testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee—and, consequently, before the nation and the world—responding to the possibility, after an hour of being interrogated on live television, of taking a break. Chuck Grassley, the chair of the committee, had suggested the ide

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Once Christine Blasey Ford's Humanity Was on Display, It Was All Over

The question is no longer whether Republicans have lost the fight over Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the Supreme Court. It’s how. The answer is that they lost by allowing Christine Blasey Ford to speak. Yes, they didn’t subpoena Mark Judge; yes, they didn’t request an FBI investigation, as they should have done. But ultimately, it didn’t matter, because they made a far greater concession: The

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