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Nyheder2018september29

 

The Facebook Security Meltdown Exposes Way More Sites Than FacebookFacebook 50M Accounts

The social networking giant confirmed Friday that sites you use Facebook to login to could have been accessed as a result of its massive breach.

19h

 

America Is Finally Listening to Women. It’s Sparking a National Crisis.

“The only consensus,” declared the Washington Post about Thursday’s Judiciary Committee hearings, “was that the Senate — and the nation — had hit a new low.” In the Weekly Standard, Jonathan Last added that, “It’s impossible to look at the Ford-Kavanaugh hearings and not see America as a nation in decline.” A lot of respectable people believe that. It’s the kind of sentiment you hear from nonpart

6h

 

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Katte er for dovne til at fange rotter

Det er ikke katte, der skal løse dit rotteproblem, viser ny forskning. De fortrækker et nemmere bytte, hvilket går udover andet dyreliv.

22min

 

Megapixels: A moth drinks tears from a bird’s eye

Animals This isn’t creepy animal behavior at all A large, brown moth uses it's long, sucking tongue to drink tears from the eye of a little sleeping bird. Apparently, moths do this all the time, just not to birds.

57min

 

Play It Again, Sam

Why repeated sounds are music to our ears — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

 

Klimaforandringer giver arktiske planter vokseværk

Et grønnere Arktis kan betyde enorme mængder CO2 og metan, der frigives fra den frosne undergrund.

1h

 

Patients 65 years of age or older with hip or spine fracture should be treated for osteoporosis

A coalition of the world's top bone health experts, physicians, specialists, and patient advocacy groups today released their clinical recommendations to tackle the public health crisis in the treatment of osteoporosis and the debilitating and often deadly hip and spine fractures caused by the disease.

2h

 

Now is the time to answer questions about climate engineering disease impacts

Radical solutions to climate change might save lives, but a new commentary calls for caution because geoengineering still lacks a 'clean bill of health.'

3h

 

When neglected children become adolescents

Many migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S. border, some of them very young, have landed in shelters where they often experience stress, neglect and minimal social and cognitive stimulation. The latest findings tell a cautionary tale about the psychiatric and social risks of long-term deprivation and family separation as children transition to adolescence.

3h

 

Genetic basis for how harmful algae blooms become toxic

Scientists have uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by certain harmful algae blooms.

3h

 

Fewer biofuels, more green space: Climate action researcher calls for urgent shift

Growing and harvesting bioenergy crops — corn for ethanol or trees to fuel power plants, for example — is a poor use of land, which is a precious resource in the fight against climate change, says a researcher.

3h

 

Steelhead life cycle linked to environment, pink salmon abundance

A new study has found that steelhead trout have a remarkable life-cycle variation that responds to changes in temperature and numbers of other species of salmon.

3h

 

Cancer hijacks the microbiome to glut itself on glucose

A new study shows that leukemia actively undercuts the ability of normal cells to consume glucose, thus leaving more glucose available to feed its own growth.

3h

 

Hidden health problems can appear up to two years after elective hip surgeries

Up to two years following elective, arthroscopic hip surgery, a substantial proportion of patients reported troubling new health issues ranging from sleep problems, to arthritis to cardiovascular disease.

3h

 

In dangerous fungal family's befriending of plants, a story of loss

Researchers show that gene loss — not the evolution of new genes — helped drive the fly amanita mushroom into its symbiotic relationship with plants.

3h

 

Facebook Wins, Facebook Losses, and More Security News This Week

The Facebook breach, 3-D printed guns on Broadway, and more security news this week.

3h

 

So is it nature not nurture after all?

In a new book likely to rekindle fierce controversy, psychologist Robert Plomin argues that genes largely shape our personalities and that the latest science is too compelling to ignore There are few areas of science more fiercely contested than the issue of what makes us who we are. Are we products of our environments or the embodiment of our genes? Is nature the governing force behind our behavi

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Space Photos of the Week: Hubble Captures the Bubble

Nebula’s stellar wind and the cold core of the Milky Way are this week’s stars.

4h

 

Jeff Flake Explains Himself

Jeff Flake barely slept the night before he upended the battle for the Supreme Court. The Arizona senator had spent days agonizing over what to do with the explosive allegation that Judge Brett Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted a young woman when he was in high school. For hours on Thursday, Flake—a key Republican swing vote—listened intently to raw testimony from the accuser and the accused, sear

4h

 

How to get rid of fleas

DIY Protect your pets and your pelt. When the leaves start to turn, fleas suddenly seem to show up everywhere. Here’s how to keep the biting bugs off your turf.

4h

 

Hidden Maya Civilization Revealed Beneath Guatemala's Jungle Canopy

More than 61,000 ancient Maya structures — from large pyramids to single houses — were lurking beneath the dense jungle canopy in Guatemala, revealing clues about the ancient culture's farming practices, infrastructure, politics and economy.

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Pregnant Women Who Get a Flu Shot Protect Their Babies, Too

Pregnant women should get a flu shot, CDC recommends.

5h

 

Ugens debat: Hvem har skylden for passagerflugten fra DSB?

Som Ingeniøren fortalte i sidste uge, er den danske togtransport for første gang i nyere tid faldet over en længere periode. Kun i hovedstadsområdet går det den anden vej, for her er trængslen på vejene så stor, at folk trods alt foretrækker toget. På ing.dk var der trængsel for at debattere arti…

5h

 

The World Adjusts to Donald J. Trump

NEW YORK—The giggles that greeted Donald Trump’s boasts at the United Nations about his accomplishments were widely interpreted in the United States as mockery on the part of world leaders who knew better. But from my perch in the hall that day, this wasn’t so clear. The laughter also seemed to spring from familiarity. One way to translate the snickering that grew as Trump claimed he’d gotten mor

5h

 

Gmail now finishes your sentences, and the results are better than expected

Technology (This headline was not finished by Google.) Google’s new Smart Compose feature has probably found its way into your inbox. What will it mean for human communication?

5h

 

Hank Green Explores the Dark Side of Internet Fame, With Robots

The YouTube star's debut novel caused him to grapple with the dehumanizing nature of celebrity.

5h

 

Is Butter a Healthy Fat?

Butter is making a comeback as a healthy fat. But are the claims for the benefits of butter for real? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

Making Math Joyful

“Mathematician-at-large” James Tanton shares playful mathematics and Sperner’s lemma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

 

First Time Rally | Shifting Gears with Aaron Kaufman

Aaron Kaufman and his Arclight Fab crew take their very first lap around a rally track. Stream Full Episodes of Shifting Gears: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/shifting-gears/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/DiscoveryChannel

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Jill Lepore: America – the surprising roots of our present dilemma

How the two parties got as ideologically divided as they are now. (Hint: Not the organic will of the people) Public shaming: The dangers of using destructive means to constructive ends. None As Alexander Hamilton put it, the American Experiment puts to the test the question " . . . of whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice . .

6h

 

Your Senator's religious beliefs may be more important than yours

Senators let their personal religious beliefs influence how they vote. Theological beliefs affects legislature on broader policy issues. This reality "circumvents" the separation of church and state in the U.S. What does your senator believe in? What text's commandments to they follow? Maybe you think the religious preferences of your elected officials do not have a bearing on how they make laws,

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The Best Neato Vacuum is On Sale, and 17 More of Our Best Weekend Deals: Acer, Patagonia, Amazon

Weekend deals from our favorite Neato robot vacuum, Patagonia jacket, Amazon streaming TV devices, and more.

6h

 

Speed-Listening and the Trouble With 'Podfasters'

Podcasting is an art, every choice subtle and intentional. When you blow through an episode, you’re gutting the experience of its hard-won nuance and cadence.

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Hurom H-AI Juicer Review: It's Too Expensive, and Juice Isn't All That Good for You Anyway

The Hurom H-AI juicer has a self-feeding auger that works very well. But you probably don't need one in your kitchen.

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Boys And Masculinity In America

NPR's Scott Simon talks with author and psychologist Michael Thompson about masculinity and boys' emotions after emotional hearings this week.

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Bizarre Particles Keep Flying Out of Antarctica's Ice, and They Might Shatter Modern Physics

Cosmic rays emanating from the south polar ice cap could lead to new physics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending September 29, 2018)

This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.

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The Family Weekly: When Parents Enable Teenage Binge Drinking

This Week in Family After the release of the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s high-school calendars, Americans were introduced to a time-honored East Coast teen tradition: Beach Week. This rite of passage beloved by mostly suburban upper-middle-class high-schoolers involves a lot of debauchery—namely, raging parties, binge drinking, and (often drunken) sex —says the Atlantic staff writer A

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WATCH: 'Extremely Rare' 2-Headed Snake Stuns Social Media, Charms Scientists

A Virginia state herpetologist says finding the mutant copperhead in a resident's yard earlier this month is an "extraordinarily rare" occurrence. Even more stunning, he says, is that it is alive. (Image credit: J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries)

6h

 

Hooked review – Art for the people at the new London Science Gallery

From heroin to Playstation, we are all users argues Hooked, a captivating show to launch a gallery with ambitions to demolish the boundaries around science

7h

 

Robert Venturi Made Architecture Less Rigid, Yet More Clubby

Robert Venturi, the Philadelphia architect and writer who died earlier this month at 93, had a gift for maxims and other wryly efficient turns of phrase, many of which appeared in his 1966 book Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture . The most famous of these was “less is a bore”—a cheeky response to “less is more,” Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s summary of modern architecture’s obsession with

7h

 

Britain’s Labour Party Could’ve Had a Good Summer—If It Could Have Stopped Fighting With Itself

LIVERPOOL —It’s been a long, turbulent summer for British Prime Minister Theresa May. Heck, it’s been a long year. From her ill-fated decision to call for a general election last summer (one that, rather than adding to her ruling Conservatives’ majority, lost it completely) to the party infighting, Brexit battles, and cabinet resignations that have followed since, May has spent much of the past y

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Channel Your Inner Fred Flintstone in This Peddle-Powered Car

Yes, someone created a car with bike pedals where the normal pedals should be.

7h

 

The Case Against Elon Musk Will Chill Innovation

Investors in Tesla and other Musk ventures should know that the CEO does not always hew to the literal truth.

7h

 

Kavanaugh Could Carry on Trump’s Agenda for Decades

For Brett Kavanaugh, Thursday’s hearing was an audition. Appearing after Christine Blasey Ford, it originally seemed the judge might find his Supreme Court nomination seriously threatened. Ford had proven a sympathetic and credible witness in detailing allegations that Kavanaugh had sexually assaulted her when the two were in high school, and managed in a plainly hostile cross-examination to soli

8h

 

The Secret to Brett Kavanaugh's Specific Appeal

If you are one of Brett Kavanaugh’s detractors, the accusations against him demonstrate an underlying contempt for women. His attempts to portray himself as a studious, innocent youth make it worse, adding dishonesty to the list of objectionable characteristics. When he testified before the Senate on Thursday, he seemed like an entitled frat-boy infuriated by the possibility of not getting his wa

8h

 

Are Immigrants a Drain on Government Resources?

Last weekend, the Department of Homeland Security released a draft rule change designed to make immigrating to the United States harder and the immigrant experience more fraught, impoverished, and perilous. The proposal would deny green cards to people who use popular government anti-poverty programs—ones for which they legally qualified—including food stamps, Medicaid, prescription-drug subsidie

8h

 

How iRacing Is Democratizing Motorsports

It’s 1 o’clock on a weekday afternoon, and I’m sitting in a race car, idling in the pits at Virginia International Raceway. Typically, this 3.27-mile, 17-turn circuit serves as a proving ground for some of the world’s best drivers. But today, it’s my personal patch, and I’m about as far away from becoming Lewis Hamilton as the Formula One god’s native England is from this southern outcropping of

8h

 

Nye digitale landkort skal give bedre overblik over Grønland

Satellitbilleder skal opgradere de forældede landkort over den isfrie del af landet. Et areal på i alt 450.000 kvadratkilometer skal kortlægges over de kommende år.

8h

 

Smut, grillkylling: Verdens største fugl vejede næsten et ton

Den uddøde fugl 'Vorombe titan' er blevet kåret til verdens største fugl efter flere års debat.

8h

 

Hård proces møder medarbejdere med psykisk arbejdsskade

Når psyken knækker på jobbet, ligger der ofte et langt, sejt forløb foran den…

8h

 

Sådan fungerer elektromotoren

Selvom der endnu ikke var den store interesse for elektriciteten som drivkraft herhjemme i 1893, var udviklingen af elektromotoren i fuld gang i USA og Europa, da ingeniør Alfred Levy fortalte om principperne i Ingeniørforeningen.

10h

 

September's Stunning Space Pictures

September's Stunning Space Pictures Enjoy illustrations of pulsar winds, the planet Vulcan and galactic ripples. 5_crop_STSCI-H-p1843b-m.jpg An illustration of a pulsar wind nebula. Image credits: NASA/ESA/N. Tr'Ehnl Space Friday, September 28, 2018 – 07:45 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) — This September brought pictures depicting a plethora of unusual phenomena. From a ring

10h

 

Powerful typhoon batters Okinawa, churns to Japan mainland

A powerful typhoon pummelled Japan's southern island of Okinawa Saturday, injuring at least five, as weather officials warned the storm would rip through the Japanese archipelago over the weekend.

11h

 

BP reached cozy settlement with Mexico on Deepwater spill: watchdog

British Petroleum struck a deal with the Mexican government to pay a vastly reduced fine for environmental damage caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, a watchdog group alleged Friday.

11h

 

Facts on the nature of a tsunami

A once-exotic word that has now entered the everyday lexicon, a tsunami refers to a shock of water that spreads through the sea, usually after a sub-sea floor quake.

12h

 

Indonesian quake and tsunami devastates coast, many victims

The powerful earthquake and tsunami that hit Indonesia's central Sulawesi has claimed dozens of victims, a disaster official said Saturday, as rescuers raced to reach the region and an AP reporter saw numerous bodies in a hard-hit city.

12h

 

What comes next in Facebook's major data breachFacebook 50M Accounts

For users, Facebook's revelation of a data breach that gave attackers access to 50 million accounts raises an important question: What happens next?

12h

 

NASA finds Trami an organized, wide-eyed typhoon

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Typhoon Trami was symmetrical and had a large eye on its approach to Japan's southern islands.

12h

 

Bacterial protein mimics DNA to sabotage cells' defenses

Infections with Salmonella bacteria, often caused by eating or handling undercooked meat or eggs, affect about 100 million people a year worldwide. The suffering the infection causes—abdominal cramps, fever and diarrhea—is the result of an extremely precise set of molecular interactions between the bacterium and the infected human's cells. In a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chem

12h

 

New research helps to inform the design of scientific advisory committees

At a time of "fake news" and a growing mistrust of scientific experts, researchers at York University's Global Strategy Lab are working to increase the likelihood that policy decisions will be informed by the best available science.

12h

 

Brian Cox on Holst's Planets then and now

One hundred years ago Holst’s Planets suite was premiered, with the composer drawing on metaphors and myths to animate his planets. Today’s scientific realities are just as rich and powerful, writes the physicist and TV presenter. When The Planets was completed in 1916, little was known about the physical nature of the worlds represented musically by Gustav Holst, and he didn’t care. His focus wa

12h

 

UCF selling experimental Martian dirt—$20 a kilogram, plus shipping

The University of Central Florida is selling Martian dirt, $20 a kilogram plus shipping.

12h

 

Robotarme, nanosatellitter og urin-filter: Her er tre danske teknologier, der former fremtiden

Vil du drikke vand, der er renset fra tis og spildevand? Det kan blandt andet blive en del af fremtiden, mener eksperter.

13h

 

Unveiling the mechanism protecting replicated DNA from degradation

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) in Italy have succeeded in depleting AND-1, a key protein for DNA replication, by using a recently developed conditional protein degradation system. Consequently, they were able to gain unprecedented access to the mechanism behind how AND-1 works during DNA replication and cell proliferation in verte

13h

 

What Drives Our Quest for the Perfect Instagram Picture?

Instagram is a social mirror for more than just selfies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

 

New approach offers high-resolution seismic monitoring of the shallow subsurface

High-resolution seismic monitoring of the shallow subsurface has remained challenging to achieve in practice. Researchers have now developed a spatially windowed surface-wave analysis method using data from a Canadian carbon dioxide-storage site. Using this approach permits accurate and high-resolution monitoring with a single ACROSS unit, and offers the potential to identify natural seismic pheno

17h

 

A 3-D-printed phantom head

Phantoms are not just ghostly figures of our imagination, they are also numerical or physical models that represent human characteristics and provide an inexpensive way to test electromagnetic applications. A bioengineering researcher has developed a realistic phantom head for magnetic resonance studies.

17h

 

Factors linked to mortality after traumatic brain injury identified

New findings shed light on the potential for strategies for prevention and intervention that could improve longevity and quality of life after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

17h

 

New way to control meandering electrons and generate extreme-ultraviolet emissions

Scientists have found a completely new way to generate extreme-ultraviolet emissions — that is, light having a wavelength of 10 to 120 nanometers. The method could open the way for ultrafast spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging and next-generation lithography

17h

 

Building a flu factory from host cell components

A quantitative proteomic study of how influenza virus affects lung-derived cell lines found that protein synthesis machinery relocates to the autophagosome in infected cells.

17h

 

Researchers challenge our assumptions on the effects of planetary rotation

The Coriolis effect impacts global patterns and currents, and its magnitude, relative to the magnitude of inertial forces, is expressed by the Rossby number. For over 100 years, scientists have believed that the higher this number, the less likely Coriolis effect influences oceanic or atmospheric events. Recently, however, researchers found that smaller ocean disturbances with high Rossby numbers

17h

 

Acne stigma linked to lower overall quality of life, Irish study finds

Many people with acne are negatively impacted by perceived social stigma around the skin condition, a new study from Ireland has found.

17h

 

Experimental Martian dirt: $20 a kilogram, plus shipping

A team of astrophysicists has developed a scientifically based, standardized method for creating Martian and asteroid soil known as simulants.

17h

 

Bacterial protein mimics DNA to sabotage cells' defenses

Researchers report some of the details of how Salmonella shuts down an immune pathway after infection.

18h

 

Quantum mechanics work lets oil industry know promise of recovery experiments

Physicists developed detailed quantum mechanical simulations that accurately predict the outcomes of various additive combinations in water used for enhanced oil recovery.

18h

 

Value in unusual type of plant material

Scientists have shown that a recently-discovered variety of lignin called catechyl lignin (C-lignin) has attributes that could make it well-suited as the starting point for a range of bioproducts.

18h

 

Vitamin B supplements may protect kidney function in children with diabetes

Vitamin B supplements have a protective effect on kidney function in children and adolescents with type-1 diabetes, according to research presented today at the 57th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology Meeting. These findings indicate that simple supplementation of vitamin B complex may protect against the development and progression of kidney disease in children with diabetes, wh

19h

 

Secret life of rare antelope revealed

An antelope caught on camera in Uganda for the first time sheds light on an unexplored rainforest.

19h

 

Global Health: Ebola Likely to Spread From Congo to Uganda, W.H.O. Says

Local fighting and fleeing patients led the organization to increase its alert level. The disease has appeared in a Congolese fishing village near Uganda.

19h

 

Take a Number: Syphilis Rises Sharply Among Newborns

Along with an increase in adult infections, the rate of infants born with the disease has reached a 20-year high.

19h

 

Radio Atlantic: Is the Public Square Gone?

After a news week that’s felt more like a news month, Matt Thompson sits down with two experienced editors to ask how people manage to make and consume news in today’s environment. Adrienne LaFrance is the editor of TheAtlantic.com. Franklin Foer is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and the author of World Without Mind . Links – “The Death of the Public Square” (Franklin Foer, July 6, 201

19h

 

What Is a Drought?

Droughts are one of the most damaging types of weather-related phenomena, but classifying them is difficult.

20h

 

Machine learning helps improve photonic applications

Photonic nanostructures can be used for many applications, not just in solar cells, but also in optical sensors for cancer markers or other biomolecules, for example. Researchers using computer simulations and machine learning have now shown how the design of such nanostructures can be selectively optimized.

20h

 

Trump's Auto Emissions Plan Is Full of Faulty Logic

A federal proposal to freeze cars' emissions standards argues that climate change isn't worth fighting at the tailpipe, but scientific research suggests otherwise.

20h

 

‘Truth Is Confirmed by Inspection and Delay’

The Roman historian Tacitus wrote that “truth is confirmed by inspection and delay; falsehood by haste and uncertainty.” After watching Christine Blasey Ford testify about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, and watching him defend himself against her sexual assault allegations, I remain unequipped to confirm the truth of what happened. If forced to wager $500 on the proposition, “Does Ford be

20h

 

Study Challenges CRISPR Method for Making Conditional Knockout Mice

Researchers from 17 labs report low efficacy rates for the popular technique.

20h

 

Teens who've tried marijuana have used it in more than one form

Most teens who've tried marijuana used it in more than one form, according to a new study, raising concerns about adolescent health amid a booming cannabis market.

20h

 

Perovskite solar cells leap toward commercialization

Scientists have developed a new method to fabricate low-cost high-efficiency solar cells. The cells were developed using the materials and compounds that mimic the crystalline structure of the naturally occurring mineral perovskite.

20h

 

New insights into the structure of a killer protein

Researchers have gained new insights into the structure of the killer protein Bax. The protein induces programmed cell death, the method by which the body disposes of cells that are no longer needed or have been pathologically altered. Since Bax is constantly changing its location in the cell, its structure is difficult to investigate.

20h

 

The Atlantic Daily: On One Condition

What We’re Following Exploitation: Find yourself automatically logged out of your Facebook account on Friday? The social-media company found, then fixed, a security defect that allowed attackers to exploit a certain Facebook feature and thus gain control over as many as 50 million user accounts. The frequency of Facebook’s security debacles over the past year has rendered users numb to their magn

20h

 

The ‘Nightmare’ of a Tweeting President

“The idea of a tweeting president would have been a Madisonian dystopia,” argues Jeffrey Rosen in a new video based on the author’s recent article in The Atlantic . According to Rosen, the Founding Fathers designed the constitution to safeguard against the rise of demagogues. Because passionate arguments—the fodder of demagogues—are more likely to be shared on social media than rational arguments

20h

 

You're invited! From robot dinosaurs to ending fake news…

For over three decades, inventor Danny Hillis' ideas have propelled inventions at Walt Disney Imagineering and his own Applied Invention lab, with applications spanning every industry from gaming to satellites to military helicopters. This Monday, October 1st, Hillis will join Big Think President and co-founder Peter Hopkins to discuss his career and new stealth non-profit Underlay , which will r

20h

 

Revised Schrödinger's cat experiment challenges reality

Physicists revise the Schrödinger's cat thought experiment. The new version leads to contradictions in quantum theory. Scientists are stumped by the implications. Quantum mechanics has produced its share of weird ideas, not least of which is what's probably the world's most famous thought experiment devised by physicist Erwin Schrödinger in 1935. It described the uncertain fate of a cat trapped i

20h

 

An uncommon storm called a ‘Medicane’ is headed for Greece

Environment Such systems don't often form above the cool Mediterranean Sea. An uncommon type of storm known as a “Medicane” is swirling to life in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

20h

 

This Is the First Case of a Human Contracting Rat Hepatitis E

A man in Hong Kong is the first human to become infected with a type of hepatitis E infection that's only been seen in rats.

21h

 

A Rare ‘Gentleman’s Agreement’ in the Senate

Brett Kavanaugh may yet be confirmed. Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell may somehow find a way to unravel it, and President Trump could still balk. But for at least one brief, shining moment on Friday, Senators Jeff Flake and Chris Coons’ gentleman’s agreement to postpone a floor vote on Kavanaugh’s nomination for no more than one week to allow a swift FBI investigation of the sexual assault

21h

 

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Torn Flake

Written by Elaine Godfrey ( @elainejgodfrey ) Today in 5 Lines President Trump ordered the FBI to conduct an additional investigation into Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The Senate Judiciary Committee made the request following demands from Republican Senator Jeff Flake and other senators. Earlier in the afternoon, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted along party lines to advance Kavanaug

21h

 

The debate over stand-your-ground laws, explained

Markeis McGlockton parks his car and heads into a convenience store with his five-year-old son. A few minutes later, he notices a man screaming and cursing at his girlfriend, who is waiting in the vehicle with their younger children. McGlockton rushes out and pushes the man to the ground. The man draws a concealed handgun. McGlockton backs away, hands raised, but the man shoots him in the chest

21h

 

Three robot advances that’ll be needed for DARPA’s new underground challenge

What kind of robot could handle this impossible-seeming cave mission?

21h

 

The Good Place Offers a Heavenly Reprieve

In her 1991 book, Anything We Love Can Be Saved: A Writer’s Activism , the author Alice Walker offered a simple explanation for why she continued to believe in the human capacity for change even as untold harm is wrought all around her: Whenever I experience evil, and it is not, unfortunately uncommon to experience it in these times, my deepest feeling is disappointment. I have learned to accept

21h

 

Father Transmits HIV to Newborn Son in Rare Case: How Did It Happen?

In a rare case, a father in Portugal transmitted HIV to his child.

21h

 

Elon Musk Has Finally Picked a Fight He Can't Win

The Tesla CEO’s decision to refuse an SEC settlement sets him up for battle against the government, and shareholders aren't happy.

21h

 

Oodles of virtual planets could help Google and NASA find actual aliens

Space Teaming up to explore the galaxy with an AI assist. The researchers at NASA’s Frontier Development Lab (FDL) in Mountain View California spent the summer working on out-of-this-world problems.

21h

 

EPA Plans to Discontinue a Senior Science Advisor Position

This change is part of an overhaul taking placing within the research arm of the environmental agency.

21h

 

Quantum mechanics work lets oil industry know promise of recovery experiments

Vanderbilt University physicists developed detailed quantum mechanical simulations that accurately predict the outcomes of various additive combinations in water used for enhanced oil recovery.

22h

 

UCF selling experimental Martian dirt — $20 a kilogram, plus shipping

The University of Central Florida is selling Martian dirt, $20 a kilogram plus shipping. A team of UCF astrophysicists has developed a scientifically based, standardized method for creating Martian and asteroid soil known as simulants. The team published its findings this month in the journal Icarus.

22h

 

Long-Banned Pollutants Will Decimate Orcas: Study

PCBs persist in the environment and accumulate in killer whales, driving their numbers down.

22h

 

Why Making Decisions at Game Speed Can Lead to Penalties for NFL Players

Why Making Decisions at Game Speed Can Lead to Penalties for NFL Players New safety rules pose challenges for players and officials. football-crash-minus-text.jpg Image credits: Evgenii Matrosov/ Shutterstock Sports Friday, September 28, 2018 – 15:30 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — As the NFL regular season enters its fourth week, it's apparent that players are struggling to adjust to ne

22h

 

22h

 

New research helps to inform the design of scientific advisory committees

At a time of 'fake news' and a growing mistrust of scientific experts, researchers at York University's Global Strategy Lab have produced new research to help inform the design of scientific advisory committees and help maximize the application of high-quality scientific research towards future policy and program decisions. Research was done to support the WHO.

22h

 

New Cell Complete Notification Showcases Your Contributions to Neuroscience

The first personalized neuroscience notification is finally live in Eyewire thanks to our fabulous Computer Science Intern Spencer Franklin! The new Cell Complete Notificatio n will arrive in your feed when a cell that you’ve contributed to has been finished. Here’s a walk through all that’s included. Check out your own contributions by points, cubes, and trailblazes (first player to map a cube).

22h

 

7-Degree Global Temperature Rise Is Inevitable, Trump Administration Presumes (and Shrugs It Off)

Catastrophic climate change can't be stopped, the Trump administration suggested in a report.

22h

 

Human Brain: Facts, Functions & Anatomy

The human brain is the command center for the human nervous system.

22h

 

Gadget Lab Podcast: Oculus Quest, Elon Musk and the SEC, and More

The Gadget Lab team talks to WIRED editor and author Peter Rubin about the new Oculus Quest. Also: Why the SEC is suing Elon Musk.

22h

 

Matter: Who Wants to Eat a Gooey Jellyfish? Pretty Much Everyone in the Ocean

Scientists had long assumed that few creatures dined on these gelatinous animals. But new research suggests that jellyfish may be an important part of the ocean’s food supply.

22h

 

An American Spectacle Grabs Attention Overseas

LONDON —Even from another continent, it was obvious that America was going through a defining moment in its democracy. Millions of Americans huddled around televisions , cellphones , and local bars Thursday to watch Christine Blasey Ford testify about her sexual-assault allegation against the U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. The world was watching, too. Here in Europe, there has been a

22h

 

Another Day, Another Facebook Problem

Updated on September 28 at 5:33 p.m. ET More bad news: Facebook has announced that a security exploit allowed attackers to gain control of at least 50 million user accounts. According to the company, the exploit impacted a feature that lets users see what their profile looks like to another user. In this case, the breach doesn’t appear to involve extracting data from servers. Instead, the defect—

22h

 

How Trauma Affects Memory: Scientists Weigh In On The Kavanaugh Hearing

Christine Blasey Ford presented her allegations against Brett Kavanaugh Thursday. He denied them. But how can either of them remember? Here's what science says about memory and trauma — and alcohol. (Image credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

22h

 

NASA finds Trami an organized, wide-eyed typhoon

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed Typhoon Trami was symmetrical and had a large eye on its approach to Japan's southern islands.

23h

 

Bacterial protein mimics DNA to sabotage cells' defenses

In a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at Imperial College London and the Francis Crick Institute report some of the details of how Salmonella shuts down an immune pathway after infection.

23h

 

The Pernicious Double Standards Around Brett Kavanaugh’s Drinking

On Thursday, the testimony delivered by Brett Kavanaugh to the Senate Judiciary Committee took a turn that was at once unexpected and, the past week being what it has been, deeply predictable: Sheldon Whitehouse, the senator from Rhode Island, used a portion of his allotted questioning time to ask the Supreme Court nominee about the definition of the “ devil’s triangle .” For most Americans who c

23h

 

Red and Blue's 20th anniversary: Five ways Pokémon influenced the U.S.

On Sept. 28, 1998, Pokémon Red and Blue came to the United States and asked children to catch 151 adorably abstract creatures. Today, Pokémon is the highest-grossing media franchise in the world, defeating the likes of Mickey Mouse, Star Wars , and Anpanman (trust us, it's a thing). In anticipation of another 20 years, we look back at fives ways Pokémon has influenced the United States. On Sept.

23h

 

Facebook's Massive Security Breach: Everything We KnowFacebook 50M Accounts

Up to 50 million Facebook users were affected—and possibly 40 million more—when hackers compromised the social network's systems.

23h

 

Tesla shares plunge after US fraud suit against Musk

Tesla shares plunged Friday in the first session since US securities regulators sued chief Elon Musk for fraud, with the company shedding more than 10 percent as US stocks retreated.

23h

 

Fisheries nations to decide fate of declining bigeye tuna

Dozens of nations with commercial fisheries in the Atlantic Ocean will grapple next week with a new finding that bigeye tuna, the backbone of a billion dollar business, is severely depleted and overfished.

23h

 

A Facebook breach put 50 million accounts at risk: Here's what you need to know

Technology The company says your password and credit card info are safe This is one of the biggest security issues in the company's history.

23h

 

23h

 

NASA looks at major Hurricane Rosa's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Hurricane Rosa. On Sept. 28, Rosa is a major hurricane, now a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

23h

 

NASA identifies wind shear tearing apart Tropical Cyclone Liua

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that strong wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Cyclone Liua in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

23h

 

In dangerous fungal family's befriending of plants, a story of loss

If Lewis Carroll had described in detail the mushroom Alice nibbles in Wonderland to shrink and grow to her rightful size, he might have noted a scarlet cap topped with white warts: the fly amanita.

23h

 

Fewer biofuels, more green space: Climate action researcher calls for urgent shift

Growing and harvesting bioenergy crops—corn for ethanol or trees to fuel power plants, for example—is a poor use of land, which is a precious resource in the fight against climate change, says a University of Michigan researcher.

23h

 

Steelhead life cycle linked to environment, pink salmon abundance

A Simon Fraser University study has found that steelhead trout have a remarkable life-cycle variation that responds to changes in temperature and numbers of other species of salmon. They may go to the ocean when they are only a year old and the size of a pinky finger, or when they are five years old and the size of a standard ruler. The study appears this week in the journal Ecosphere.

23h

 

The cart before the horse: A new model of cause and effect

Natural little scientists, human babies love letting go of things and watching them fall. Baby's first experiment teaches them about more than the force of gravity. It establishes the concept of causality—the relationship between cause and effect that all human knowledge depends on. Let it go, it falls. The cause must precede its effect in time, as scientist from Galileo in the 16th Century to Cli

23h

 

Dr. Lois Jovanovic, 71, Dies; Helped Diabetic Women Have Babies

A third-generation diabetic herself, she upset conventional wisdom in finding that women whose blood sugar level was controlled could safely give birth.

23h

 

The New Old Age: In the Nursing Home, Empty Beds and Quiet Halls

Fewer patients are winding up in nursing homes, and hundreds of the facilities are closing each year.

23h

 

US review of fetal research signals the return of the abortion wars

Backed by the “most pro-life president in modern history”, conservatives are gearing up for a new assault on reproductive rights, says Lara Williams

23h

 

Researchers challenge our assumptions on the effects of planetary rotation

The earth's rotation causes the Coriolis effect, which deflects massive air and water flows toward the right in the Northern Hemisphere and toward the left in the Southern Hemisphere. This phenomenon greatly impacts global wind patterns and ocean currents, and is only significant for large-scale and long-duration geophysical phenomena such as hurricanes. The magnitude of the Coriolis effect, relat

23h

 

Video: Natto, the stinky, slimy soybean snack

Natto, a food made from fermented soybeans, often turns off newcomers to Japanese food due to its strong smell and stringy slime.

23h

 

Building a flu factory from host cell components

Perhaps inspired by the annual 3 to 5 million cases of severe influenza worldwide, the Guinness World Record organization is advertising for individuals or organizations to attempt a record for the most people getting a flu awareness lesson at once. Meanwhile, a smaller group of people is making a more focused attempt to learn about lots of flu proteins.

23h

 

Now is the time to answer questions about climate engineering disease impacts

Radical solutions to climate change might save lives, but a commentary in the October 2018 issue of the journal Nature Climate Change calls for caution because geoengineering still lacks a "clean bill of health."

23h

 

New, highly stable catalyst may help turn water into fuel

Breaking the bonds between oxygen and hydrogen in water could be a key to the creation of hydrogen in a sustainable manner, but finding an economically viable technique for this has proved difficult. Researchers report a new hydrogen-generating catalyst that clears many of the obstacles—abundance, stability in acid conditions and efficiency.

23h

 

NASA looks at Tropical Storm Kirk's Caribbean rainfall

Tropical Storm Kirk just passed through the Leeward Islands and when the GPM satellite passed overhead, it revealed that Kirk continued to bring rain to the chain on Sept. 28.

23h

 

Why the Ivy League Needs to Admit More Students

In the spring, Yale University sent the last of its rejection letters to more than 35,000 teenagers who had applied for one of the roughly 1,550 slots in its freshman class. Like other top colleges, Yale is extremely selective: Just 6 percent of students who vied for admission in Class of 2022 were accepted. On Wednesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that the U.S. Justice and Education depart

23h

 

NASA looks at Tropical Storm Kirk's Caribbean rainfall

Tropical Storm Kirk just passed through the Leeward Islands and when the GPM satellite passed overhead, it revealed that Kirk continued to bring rain to the chain on Sept. 28.

1d

 

Acne stigma linked to lower overall quality of life, Irish study finds

Many people with acne are negatively impacted by perceived social stigma around the skin condition, a new study from University of Limerick (UL), Ireland, has found.A survey of 271 acne sufferers has revealed that their own negative perceptions of how society views their appearance is associated with higher psychological distress levels and further physical symptoms such as sleep disturbance, head

1d

 

Researchers find value in unusual type of plant material

UW-Madison scientists have shown that a recently-discovered variety of lignin called catechyl lignin (C-lignin) has attributes that could make it well-suited as the starting point for a range of bioproducts.

1d

 

New, highly stable catalyst may help turn water into fuel

Breaking the bonds between oxygen and hydrogen in water could be a key to the creation of hydrogen in a sustainable manner, but finding an economically viable technique for this has proved difficult. Researchers report a new hydrogen-generating catalyst that clears many of the obstacles — abundance, stability in acid conditions and efficiency.

1d

 

Researchers find value in unusual type of plant material

An ideal biorefinery would turn renewable crops into a variety of fuels and products with little waste. A significant challenge in realizing this vision is what to do with lignin, a fibrous and difficult-to-break-down material in the cell walls of plants that gives them their sturdiness.

1d

 

The Confirmation of Trumpism

O n a Friday evening in 1991, Clarence Thomas’s nomination was in trouble. Anita Hill’s sober, matter-of-fact demeanor during her testimony that Thomas had sexually harassed her during their time at the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission had been inconsistent with the conservative campaign to paint her as an emotionally unstable, and perhaps romantically spurned, liar. Now, it was Thomas’s t

1d

 

Hidden health problems can appear up to two years after elective hip surgeries

Up to two years following elective, arthroscopic hip surgery, a substantial proportion of patients reported troubling new health issues ranging from sleep problems, to arthritis to cardiovascular disease.

1d

 

Model System Researchers identify factors linked to mortality after traumatic brain injury

'Among individuals who died, we found significantly poorer performance on all measures,' noted co-author Erica Weber, PhD, of Kessler Foundation. 'Most significant was the difference in FIM Motor scores, which points to independence in mobility as an important factor in survival. Another big difference was in community participation. By identifying modifiable risk factors, we can develop strategie

1d

 

What the Nobels Are–and Aren't–Doing to Encourage Diversity

The prize-awarding academies are making changes to their secretive nomination processes to tackle bias, but some say the measures don’t go far enough — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

Hints of weird particles from space may defy physicists’ standard model

Signals from the ANITA experiment don’t square with the properties of elementary particles cataloged in the standard model.

1d

 

Photos of the Week: Norway Surf, Monkey Drummer, Underwater Offense

Continued flooding from Hurricane Florence, colorful festivals in India, a water landing in Micronesia, fall colors in Wales, preserving a Communist monument in Bulgaria, spiderwebs cover a Greek shoreline, emotional confirmation hearings in Washington, D.C., a wedding in Yosemite National Park, Anak Krakatau erupts in Indonesia, and much more

1d

 

‘I Got Into Yale’ Isn’t a Moral Defense

On Thursday, as he testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh responded to more questions about beer than he probably would have liked. At one point, Senator Sheldon Whitehouse pursued a line of questioning about the “Beach Week Ralph Club,” a phrase that appeared in Kavanaugh’s yearbook next to his senior photo. Kavanaugh told Whitehouse that

1d

 

Elite Law Schools Turn Against Conservatism

Judge Brett Kavanaugh is a conservative who has flourished in institutions dominated by liberals. Over the course of a long legal career, he has cultivated cordial relationships with a number of prominent liberal legal academics and lawyers, some of whom spoke on his behalf after he was nominated to the Supreme Court. Since Christine Blasey Ford came forward to accuse Kavanaugh of sexual assault,

1d

 

How Sacred Ibis mummies provided the first test of evolution

A debate over mummified birds brought to France after Napoleon's conquest of Egypt played a central role in delaying acceptance of evolutionary theory; an episode in the history of biology.

1d

 

The cart before the horse: A new model of cause and effect

Natural little scientists, human babies love letting go of things and watching them fall. Baby's first experiment teaches them about more than the force of gravity. It establishes the concept of causality – the relationship between cause and effect that all human knowledge depends on. Let it go, it falls. The cause must precede its effect in time, as scientist from Galileo in the 16th Century to C

1d

 

NASA identifies wind shear tearing apart Tropical Cyclone Liua

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that strong wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Cyclone Liua in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

1d

 

Why Did An Octopus-Wielding Sea Lion Slap A Kayaker In The Face?

A sea lion in a viral video was probably just messing around with its food. Researchers say sea lions don't care enough about humans to want to slap one of us with an octopus. (Image credit: Taiyo Masuda/Screenshot by NPR)

1d

 

Did key building blocks for life come from deep space?

All living beings need cells and energy to replicate. Without these fundamental building blocks, living organisms could not exist. Little was known about a key element in the building blocks, phosphates, until now. Researchers have now provide compelling new evidence that this component for life was generated in outer space and delivered to Earth in its first one billion years by meteorites or com

1d

 

Hummingbirds and bats hover in very different ways

New research digs into how the only two animals that can hover, hummingbirds and certain bats, fly in place. Each sunrise in Las Cruces, Costa Rica, River Ingersoll’s field team trekked into the jungle to put the finishing touches on nearly invisible nets. A graduate student in the lab of David Lentink, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Stanford University, Ingersoll needed these d

1d

 

IPhone XS and XS Max review: Apple's beautiful big-screen beasts exact a small ransom

The radical changes came with the iPhone X last year. So, while the elegant new iPhone XS Max that I've been testing since Wednesday (along with the XS) has, by far, the largest display and is the most expensive and best iPhone ever, Apple's latest handsets, good as they are, don't move the needle all that much.

1d

 

Building a flu factory from host cell components

A quantitative proteomic study of how influenza virus affects lung-derived cell lines found that protein synthesis machinery relocates to the autophagosome in infected cells.

1d

 

Crime, not money, drives migration from El Salvador and Honduras

A new analysis shows that immigration policies designed to deter economic migrants do not dissuade Central American migrants fleeing crime from seeking asylum.

1d

 

Cancer hijacks the microbiome to glut itself on glucose

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published today in the journal Cancer Cell shows that leukemia actively undercuts the ability of normal cells to consume glucose, thus leaving more glucose available to feed its own growth.

1d

 

Child Mind Institute study: Wearables could inform selective mutism research, diagnosis, treatment

Child Mind Institute researchers found that specially-designed wearable devices have the potential to inform research into selective mutism by providing standardized, objective measurements that can aid in diagnosis and assess the efficacy of treatment approaches.

1d

 

NSF awards new level of support for tribal colleges, establishes STEM centers

The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP) has awarded $14 million to tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to establish four new centers — the first of their kind.

1d

 

Konto eller ej: Sådan bruger Facebook hemmelige data om dig

Facebook målretter annoncer ud fra personlige data, du aldrig selv har givet dem, viser ny forskning.

1d

 

Amazon is planning to open up to 3,000 cashier-free stores by 2021, report says

Amazon, which has transformed the retail landscape, may be about to strike again.

1d

 

Puppy Outbreak: What Dog Owners Should Know About Campylobacter

Disease outbreaks among humans are common. But outbreaks among humans from puppies? That's a scenario that's much rarer.

1d

 

Medicaid expansions linked to slower rises in overdose deaths

In a study examining the potential impact of 2001-02 Medicaid expansions by Arizona, Maine and New York — expansions that occurred just prior to the rise in overdose mortality nationwide — researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found that from the time of these expansions through 2008, overdose mortality rates (mostly driven by fatal overdoses of opioi

1d

 

Steelhead life cycle linked to environment, pink salmon abundance

A Simon Fraser University study has found that steelhead trout have a remarkable life-cycle variation that responds to changes in temperature and numbers of other species of salmon.

1d

 

The cart before the horse: A new model of cause and effect

In a recent paper in Nature Communications, scientists led by Albert C. Yang, M.D., Ph.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, introduce a new approach to causality that moves away from this temporally linear model of cause and effect.

1d

 

Natto, the stinky, slimy soybean snack (video)

Natto, a food made from fermented soybeans, often turns off newcomers to Japanese food due to its strong smell and stringy slime. But many people love its earthy, cheesy flavor or eat it for its supposed health benefits. In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of natto — and we try some for ourselves. https://youtu.be/a9a7LKle9AQ.

1d

 

Moffitt researchers use new technique to identify a novel drug combination for NSCLC

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among men and women. About 85 percent of lung cancers are non-small cell lung cancer. For a handful of these patients, therapies that target specific genetic mutations are effective. But for the majority of non-small cell lung cancer patients, targeted therapies are limited and many patients develop resistance to treatment, highlighting the need for

1d

 

In dangerous fungal family's befriending of plants, a story of loss

Researchers show that gene loss — not the evolution of new genes — helped drive the fly amanita mushroom into its symbiotic relationship with plants.

1d

 

Fewer biofuels, more green space: Climate action researcher calls for urgent shift

Growing and harvesting bioenergy crops — corn for ethanol or trees to fuel power plants, for example — is a poor use of land, which is a precious resource in the fight against climate change, says a University of Michigan researcher.

1d

 

Researchers challenge our assumptions on the effects of planetary rotation

The Coriolis effect impacts global patterns and currents, and its magnitude, relative to the magnitude of inertial forces, is expressed by the Rossby number. For over 100 years, scientists have believed that the higher this number, the less likely Coriolis effect influences oceanic or atmospheric events. Recently, however, researchers found that smaller ocean disturbances with high Rossby numbers

1d

 

Adobe to acquire San Mateo's Marketo for $4.75 billion

In an effort to expand its cloud-based marketing business, Adobe Systems said Thursday it will acquire San Mateo-based Marketo for $4.75 billion.

1d

 

Five rad and random dog products I found this week

Gadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 56. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.

1d

 

Microsoft to invest $40 million in AI technology for humanitarian issues

Microsoft will invest $40 million to apply artificial intelligence to humanitarian issues, the company said Monday, the third program in a previously announced series of AI initiatives.

1d

 

Where do Maryland crabs come from? Researchers use a virus, ocean current maps and more to find out

A common joke between politicians from Maryland and Virginia holds that all Maryland blue crabs actually come from Virginia, where saltier waters are hospitable to egg-bearing females. The retort: As soon as they can, they move to Maryland.

1d

 

Scientists discover genetic basis for how harmful algae blooms become toxic

Scientists have uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by certain harmful algae blooms.

1d

 

NASA looks at major Hurricane Rosa's water vapor concentration

When NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Eastern Pacific Ocean, water vapor data provided information about the intensity of Hurricane Rosa. On Sept. 28, Rosa is a major hurricane, now a Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.

1d

 

Cancer risk due to certain lifestyle and environmental factors is preventable

Almost four in every 10 new cases of cancer in Germany are attributable to lifestyle and environmental factors, including smoking, low physical activity, overweight, and infections. Hermann Brenner and his group of authors from the German Cancer Research Center report on how these risk factors affect the number of cancer cases in Germany in concrete terms.

1d

 

New, highly stable catalyst may help turn water into fuel

Breaking the bonds between oxygen and hydrogen in water could be a key to the creation of hydrogen in a sustainable manner, but finding an economically viable technique for this has proved difficult. Researchers report a new hydrogen-generating catalyst that clears many of the obstacles — abundance, stability in acid conditions and efficiency.

1d

 

Now is the time to answer questions about climate engineering disease impacts

Radical solutions to climate change might save lives, but a commentary in the October 2018 issue of the journal Nature Climate Change calls for caution because geoengineering still lacks a 'clean bill of health.'

1d

 

Early Parkinson's patients waiting too long to seek medical evaluation

Too many early Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are treating symptoms before they appear, shrinking the pool of candidates for clinical trials and limiting the chances for a cure.

1d

 

Single-atom data storage has just been figured out

Scientists have figured out how to store binary data in single atoms Our technological ambitions require this kind of storage breakthrough The new study may herald the start of a new age in computing You've probably noticed that our appetite for storing data is ravenous. Just three or four years ago, we thought a terabyte of storage space was ridiculously capacious. Now, multi-terabyte storage is

1d

 

Have you seen the new Big Think?

Big Think has a brand-new look! Our new site makes it easier to stream knowledge from the palm of your hand. Get a tour of our HD video playlists and see how Big Think's world-class experts could shape up your organization. Bigthink.com has relaunched! The biggest ideas of the 21st century are looking better than ever. We took it apart, threw out the rusty bits, added shiny new features, then put

1d

 

NASA wants to begin hunting for intelligent aliens who, like us, create technology

For decades, the search for life in outer space has focused on finding tiny microbes that would do little to satisfy a growing appetite for connection with beings that more closely resemble us.

1d

 

Men outnumber women as TV and movie characters in STEM

Women are outnumbered by men nearly 2 to 1 in science, technology, engineering and math roles on TV, and a new study suggests that dramatic imbalance might be discouraging girls from pursing STEM careers.

1d

 

1d

 

Data mining reveals the hidden laws of evolution behind classical music

Musicologists are beginning to uncover statistical patterns that govern how trends in musical composition have spread.

1d

 

China’s Tiangong-2 space station is set to re-enter Earth’s atmosphere

Last year Chinas’ space agency lost control of the Tiangong-1 space station during de-orbiting – they will be hoping history doesn’t repeat with Tiangong-2

1d

 

Trilobites: Life With No Males? These Termites Show That It’s Possible

A discovery among termite colonies in Japan suggests that males can be discarded from advanced societies in which they once played an active role.

1d

 

Q&A: How Wet Clothes Become Translucent

When water replaces air in a fabric, the material itself reflects less light.

1d

 

Mindfulness classes for parents benefit their kids, too

Mindfulness lessons for parents can help them manage their emotions and cope with stressful situations, but the lessons also benefit their kids, according to a new small study. Parents, picture the situation: Your child is misbehaving. You’ve had a hard day, and one more outburst sends you over the edge. You threaten. You yell. Maybe you announce a punishment so over the top you know you won’t, a

1d

 

Scientists blow up their lab after creating strongest magnet ever

Scientists knew that it would probably explode, but they did not expect to reach such a record magnetic field. Magnetic fields are measured in teslas, after Nikola Tesla . This one reached a record 1,200 teslas, 400 times stronger than an MRI; watch it explode in the video None "With magnetic fields above 1,000 teslas, you open up some interesting possibilities," lead researcher Takeyama explaine

1d

 

Vitamin D supplements may promote weight loss in obese children

Vitamin D supplements may promote weight loss and reduce risk factors for future heart and metabolic disease in overweight and obese children, according to new research. These findings indicate that simple vitamin D supplementation may be part of an effective strategy to tackle childhood obesity and reduce the risk of serious health problems, such as heart disease, in adulthood.

1d

 

2018 Arctic summertime sea ice minimum extent tied for sixth lowest on record

Arctic sea ice likely reached its 2018 lowest extent on Sept. 19 and again on Sept. 23, 2018. Analysis of satellite data showed that, at 1.77 million square miles (4.59 million square kilometers), 2018 effectively tied with 2008 and 2010 for the sixth lowest summertime minimum extent in the satellite record.

1d

 

Hold the Dark Is a Revenge Epic That’s Not Quite What It Seems

Midway through Hold the Dark , a gun battle breaks out between a disgruntled resident of a rural Alaskan settlement and the local police. What starts out as a siege turns into a spectacle, with automatic weapons blazing, cars exploding, and blood flying in every direction. It’s the kind of showdown that would provoke instant national attention in real life, but in the world of the director Jeremy

1d

 

Warm tropical Atlantic waters juiced the 2017 hurricane season

Anomalously warm ocean waters in the tropical Atlantic Ocean drove 2017’s hurricane powerhouses.

1d

 

Letters: ‘At The Time, I Told No One.’

My Rapist Apologized The Kavanaugh allegations led Deborah Copaken to confront the man who assaulted her years ago . After he apologized, she wrote, “30 years of pain and grief fell out of me.” Kudos to Ms. Copaken for her insightful article, and for having the courage to provide an opportunity both for her catharsis and for her rapist’s personal redemption. He may not have remembered his 30-year

1d

 

The hormone FGF23 is linked to structural deficits in the brain

Scientists find that high levels of a hormone called FGF23 are linked to changes in brain structure. They are associated with structural changes in the brain's frontal lobes.

1d

 

How a sleeping cancer awakens and metastasizes

Scientists have determined one of the ways in which cancers in remission can spring back into action. This knowledge has inspired a new treatment idea designed to prevent cancer recurrence and metastasis.

1d

 

Physical exercise improves the elimination of toxic proteins from muscles

A new study could contribute to the development of alternatives to treat muscle weakness and atrophy. An article describes how rats subjected to an aerobic exercise routine preserved their muscle's contractility properties and their autophagic system's memory even after having a sciatic nerve injury induced.

1d

 

Putting noise to work

Noise is often an undesirable phenomenon, for example a recorded conversation in a noisy room, astronomical observations with large background signals or in image processing. A research team has now demonstrated that noise can induce spatial and temporal order in nonlinear systems. This effect may be used in the future to identify signals that are hidden in a large amount of noise.

1d

 

Research teams find widespread inflammation in the brains of fibromyalgia patients

A study has documented for the first time widespread inflammation in the brains of patients with the poorly understood condition called fibromyalgia.

1d

 

Teens who've tried marijuana have used it in more than one form

Most teens who've tried marijuana used it in more than one form, raising concerns about adolescent health amid a booming cannabis market.

1d

 

Minority medical residents face burden of bias during training

Black, Hispanic, and Native Americans constitute one-third of the US population, but only 9 percent of practicing physicians. To address the lack of diversity and inclusion in medicine, Yale physicians conducted a study exploring the role of race and ethnicity in minority resident training experiences.

1d

 

How do minority resident physicians view the role of race/ethnicity in training experiences?

Workplace experiences of minority resident physicians in training are described in a new study.

1d

 

To what extent are adolescents using multiple types of cannabis?

Most 10th-graders who had ever used cannabis had used more than one type of the drug, including cannabis products that were combustible, edible or vaporized.

1d

 

Cross section: Mark Miodownik – Science Weekly podcast

What can a materials scientist learn from artists? How do you make robotic trousers? And what should we do about plastics? Hannah Devlin sits down with Mark Miodownik to find out As a teenager, Mark Miodownik was stabbed with a razor blade, which penetrated his leather jacket, his school blazer and shirt before slicing his skin. The silver lining was that this harrowing event sparked a life-long

1d

 

Weedkiller weakens bees by messing with their microbiomes

Environment New study links Roundup to plummeting bee populations. Scientists have linked glyphosate, the active ingredient in the popular weed-killer Roundup to problems in the microbiome of honey bees.

1d

 

'Fortnite' Season 6 Lands, and the Rest of the Week in Games

We've got skins, pets, and spooky purple lights everywhere—and even some stuff that isn't 'Fortnite.'

1d

 

Weird signals in Antarctica could be hints of a new realm of physics

A NASA radio balloon floating over Antarctica has spotted high-energy events that can’t be explained by our current understanding of particle physics

1d

 

Cross section: Mark Miodownik – Science Weekly podcast

What can a materials scientist learn from artists? How do you make robotic trousers? And what should we do about plastics? Hannah Devlin sits down with Mark Miodownik to find out

1d

 

Women much less likely to ask questions in academic seminars than men

A new study reveals a stark disparity between male and female participation in departmental seminars which helps to explain the 'leaky pipeline' of female representation in academic careers. The observational study of 250 events at 35 institutions found that women are 2.5 times less likely to ask a question in seminars than men. The researchers argue this reflects significant differences in self-r

1d

 

How DEET muddles critters’ minds

New research shows that, rather than repelling pests, DEET confuses them—messing with neurons that help animals smell their surroundings. Further, the effects of DEET aren’t limited to insects: Spiders, ticks, and many other pests also act strangely in the chemical’s presence. In this sense, DEET may be less of an insect repellent and more of an invertebrate confusant, researchers say. The term d

1d

 

Jeff Flake's Deal With Democrats Puts Kavanaugh's Nomination in Limbo

Updated on September 28 at 2:53 p.m. ET Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Supreme Court was all set to move unimpeded through the Senate Judiciary Committee on Friday morning. Then Jeff Flake had a sudden change of heart. Hours after declaring his support for Kavanaugh, the Arizona Republican simultaneously voted to advance his nomination in committee while warning his party leadership that he

1d

 

Voting Machines Are Still Absurdly At Risk

A new report details dozens of vulnerabilities across seven models of voting machines—all of which are currently in use.

1d

 

Higher Rainfall Estimates Could Alter Construction Plans

Major storms in Texas produce more rain than previously thought, increasing flood risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

 

1d

 

Workplace messaging startup Slack eyes 2019 IPO: report

Workplace collaboration software firm Slack is actively preparing for a share offering in early 2019, which be the largest in the tech sector since Snap's debut last year, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

1d

 

Sugar-powered sensor developed to detect, prevent disease

Researchers have developed an implantable, biofuel-powered sensor that runs on sugar and can monitor a body's biological signals to detect, prevent and diagnose diseases.

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Predicting US end-of-season corn yield

Researchers have developed a new method of predicting end-of-season corn yield that outperforms the USDA's estimations, in a scientifically rigorous and reproducible way.

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Amazon mangroves store twice as much carbon per acre as region's famous rainforest

Scientists have determined for the first time that Amazon's waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region's famous rainforest.

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Merkel wants car giants to pick up 100% of diesel refit bill

Chancellor Angela Merkel heaped pressure on auto giants to pick up the full bill for any refits of older polluting diesel vehicles, as key negotiations got underway Friday on the potentially politically explosive issue.

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Why you can't always trust your handy map app

For centuries, people have relied on maps to figure out where they are and where they're going. But today's digital maps—seemingly more precise than ever —aren't always as dependable as they appear.

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Intimate photos of a senior love triangle | Isadora Kosofsky

Photographer and TED Fellow Isadora Kosofsky is a chronicler of love, loss and loneliness. In this searching talk, she shares photos from her four years documenting the lives of a senior citizen love triangle — and reveals what they can teach us about the universal search for identity and belonging.

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How Aung San Suu Kyi Lost Her Way

HANOI —Last month, Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s de facto civilian leader, appeared at a panel hosted by Singapore’s ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute. At the event, one attendee asked her what had surprised her most since taking power in 2016, citing a long list of struggles the country faces, from the sluggish economy to ethnic conflict. When she replied, “Nothing has really surprised me,” the audience

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Sensitive babies become altruistic toddlers

Our responsiveness to seeing others in distress accounts for variability in helping behavior from early in development, according to a study published Sept. 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Tobias Grossmann from the Max Planck Institue for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) and the University of Virginia, and his team.

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How Natural Killer cells regulate protective HIV antibodies

In the quest to develop a vaccine that triggers the immune system to prevent HIV infection, researchers have focused on identifying and eliciting a particular type of antibody that is capable of neutralizing the virus.

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New electro-optic laser pulses 100 times faster than usual ultrafast light

Physicists have used common electronics to build a laser that pulses 100 times more often than conventional ultrafast lasers. The advance could extend the benefits of ultrafast science to new applications such as imaging of biological materials in real time.

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The Spooky Genius of Artificial Intelligence

Subscribe to Crazy/Genius : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Can artificial intelligence be smarter than a person? Answering that question often hinges on the definition of artificial intelligence . But it might make more sense, instead, to focus on defining what we mean by “smart.” In the 1950s, the psychologist J. P. Guilford divided creative thought into two categories: conver

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Elon Musk Is His Own Worst Enemy

Elon Musk is a believer. In space travel, in clean energy, in massive engineering solutions to human problems. So the naysayers who don’t believe in the future of Tesla—which has struggled with production, labor, and debt issues—have always bugged him. On August 7, he announced a possible solution: Withdrawing from the public market and the scrutiny it brings. “Am considering taking Tesla private

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Ice-free corridor sustained Arctic marine life during last Ice Age

During the last ice age, there was an ice free corridor wedged between two large ice masses in the Arctic. This corridor, which spanned several hundred kilometers, provided habitats for highly adaptable marine life-forms.

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9 takeaways from the Blasey Ford and Kavanaugh Senate testimonies

Ford maintained she's sure it was Kavanaugh who sexually assaulted her, while Kavanaugh vehemently denied the allegations. Democrats want an FBI investigation, and even asked Kavanaugh to request one from the president, though Kavanaugh refused to do so. As of Thursday afternoon, the Senate is still set to vote on Kavanaugh's confirmation on Friday morning. Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Fo

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Miljøgift forbudt i årtier: PCB vil alligevel udrydde halvdelen af verdens spækhuggere

Mange lande bortskaffer ikke affald med PCB forsvarligt, og miljøgiften ender i havet. Det betyder døden for halvdelen af verdens spækhuggere indenfor 30-50 år.

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Why a Tennis Ball Goes Flying When Bounced on a Basketball

When you bounce a tennis ball off a moving basketball, the tennis ball goes careening off at high speed. Here's why that happens.

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Recent Research Sheds New Light on Why Nicotine Is So Addictive

It's not just rewarding to the brain by itself; it also enhances and prolongs the pleasure we get from other activities — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Historian reveals link between suicide and political crisis

A link between major political and social crises and mental health has been highlighted as part of research by a historian at the University of Sheffield that is seeking to increase our understanding of suicide.

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Global study finds taller plant species taking over as mountains and the Arctic warm

A study by more than 100 global researchers, including Simon Fraser University biologist David Hik, is linking the effects of climate change to new and taller plant species in the Arctic and alpine tundra.

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Green mango peel: A slick solution for oil-contaminated soils

Nanoparticles derived from green mango peel could be the key to remediating oil sludge in contaminated soil according to new research from the University of South Australia.

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