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nyheder2019april03

Poll: Pets help older adults cope with health issues, get active and connect with others

Pets help older adults cope with mental and physical health issues, according to a new national poll. But pets can also bring concerns, and some people may even put their animals' needs ahead of their own health, the poll finds. Three-quarters of pet owners aged 50 to 80 say their animals reduce their stress and give them a sense of purpose. But 18 percent also said having one puts a strain on the

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Psychostimulants play a major role in fatal strokes among young adults

An estimated 76 million people use psychostimulants, which include illicit drugs such as methamphetamine, cocaine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, as well as prescription stimulants. A new study from Australia is the first to present national data of psychostimulant use in young adults who experienced a fatal stroke.

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Sleeping pill use linked to greater need for blood pressure medications

A study of 752 older adults with hypertension followed from 2008-2010 through 2012-2013, using sleeping pills on a regular basis was linked with use of an increasing number of blood pressure medications over time.

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Anti-inflammatory plant-based diet helps reduce gingivitis

A plant-based whole food diet reduced gingivitis in a recent randomized trial.

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Counselors may find that focusing on the human-nature connection may help clients

The concept of 'ecowellness' encompasses a sense of appreciation, respect, and awe of nature that can contribute to holistic wellness. A new study examines the relationships between ecowellness measures and overall wellness among 749 participants aged 19-84 years.

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Udvidede åbningstider mindsker ventetiderne på Vejle Sygehus

Medarbejdere på Ortopædkirurgisk Afdeling arbejder et par timer ekstra for at nedbringe ventetiderne. Ledende overlæge er glad for den nye ordning, som afdelingen allerede kan se effekterne af.

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Defects enable RoHS-compliant, high-performance infrared photodetectors

A study led by ICFO researchers reports on a highly sensitive CMOS-compatible broadband photodetector by tailoring material defects.

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New methods to find clothes that fit

Have you ever entered a fitting room and discovered that the clothes did not fit well at all? A new doctoral thesis at the Swedish School of Textiles at the University of Borås shows that there are tools for both the product developer and the consumer that can help in the process of finding the right size.

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Last days of an asteroid

NASA captures a fast-moving rock entering its death throes.

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A Three-Hour Fix for Phobia, a Four-Day Therapy for OCD

Brief but intensive treatments are proving to be effective for many anxiety disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Busy week on the International Space Station

Look again at that space station. That's there. That's home for a crew of six astronauts. That's us, too. On board, astronauts perform science and maintain the spacecraft with the support of a whole team on Earth.

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Giant molecular outflow detected from the quasar PDS 456

Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, astronomers have detected a galaxy-wide molecular outflow from the quasar PDS 456. The findings are presented in a paper published March 25 on arXiv.org, in which the authors investigate the properties of this outflow.

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A Three-Hour Fix for Phobia, a Four-Day Therapy for OCD

Brief but intensive treatments are proving to be effective for many anxiety disorders — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dementia type correlates with criminal behaviour

Study finds one type of neurodegenerative condition is significantly associated with law-breaking and inappropriate acts. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Klargörande vad gäller ”Årets folkbildare”

En grupp ungdomar i Rinkeby arrangerade slutet av februari ett event de kallade ”Förortsgalan 2019”. Under eventet delades ett dussintal utmärkelser ut, bland annat ett som de kallade ”Årets folkbildare”. Detta fick nyligen större spridning eftersom Stockholmdirekt.se publicerade en intervju med pristagaren. Vetenskap och Folkbildning har ingenting med ovanstående utmärkelse att göra. Årets folkb

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Test for T cells is a step toward cancer ‘vaccines’

Researchers have developed a new way to identify the right molecules for personalized cancer immunotherapy. The goal is a vaccine that would cause cancer-repelling T cells to multiply in the body, thereby strengthening the body’s immune defenses. Since on the one hand tumors differ greatly from patient to patient, and on the other no two people (except identical twins) have the same immune system

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Dystra rekord i ny klimatrapport

Den globala medeltemperaturen förra året var 0,99 grader högre än medelvärdet för perioden 1850–1900 (ett referensvärde som kallas ”den förindustriella baslinjen”). År 2018 var lite kallare än 2016 och 2017 Det beror på att väderfenomenet La Nina kylde klimatet. Sammantaget är perioden 2015–2018 den varmaste som uppmätts sedan mitten av 1800-talet.

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Transparent wood can store and release heat

Wood may seem more at home in log cabins than modern architecture, but a specially treated type of timber could be tomorrow's trendy building material. Today, scientists report a new kind of transparent wood that not only transmits light, but also absorbs and releases heat, potentially saving on energy costs.

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Making lead pipes safe

Lead leaching from pipes into the water supply is a serious public health concern. If water sources or treatments are changed, the new chemistry can cause previously safe water distribution systems to begin releasing lead, as the crisis in Flint, Mich., demonstrated. Today, scientists will describe a rapid, cost-effective method to overcome these problems and make lead pipes safe.

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Stress in childhood and adulthood have combined impact on hormones and health

Adults who report high levels of stress and who also had stressful childhoods are most likely to show hormone patterns associated with negative health outcomes, according to new findings.

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Fungal mating: Next weapon against corn aflatoxin?

Native fungi combinations show promise against aflatoxin.

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Origin of photons in mysterious gamma-ray bursts

Scientists have used simulations to show that the photons emitted by long gamma-ray bursts — one of the most energetic events to take place in the universe — originate in the photosphere — the visible portion of the 'relativistic jet' that is emitted by exploding stars.

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A soft spot for stem cells helps cornea healing

New research reveals a potential revolutionary way to treat eye injuries and prevent blindness — by softening the tissue hosting the stem cells which then helps repair wounds, inside the body.

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Doing more with less in the study of plant chemical defense

Current techniques to assess plant chemical defense require large amounts of both time and plant tissue. Researchers have developed a new, high-throughput, cost-effective method that requires only a fraction of the traditional tissue sample weight and makes it possible to investigate multiple compounds at once, look at local vs. systemic responses, and quantify environmental and genetic variation.

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Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities

Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. However, 'super plants' with integrated nanomaterials may be much closer to reality. Today, scientists report the development of plants that can make nanomaterials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and the application of MOFs as coatings on plants. The augmented plants could potentially perform

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You can choose to forget a memory, but it takes effort

Choosing to forget something might take more mental effort than trying to remember it, according to new research. These findings suggest that in order to forget an unwanted experience, you should focus more attention on it. This surprising result extends prior research on intentional forgetting, which focused on reducing attention to the unwanted information through redirecting attention away fro

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Serengeti wildlife feel the squeeze of human activity

Increased human activity around one of Africa’s most iconic ecosystems is damaging habitat and disrupting the migration routes of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle, a new study warns. The Serengeti-Mara ecosystem is one of the largest and most protected ecosystems on Earth, spanning 40,000 square kilometers and taking in the Serengeti National Park and Maasai Mara National Reserve in East Africa. Ev

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Injecting flies with snail venom could help us discover molecules for developing new drugs

Flies could provide a fast and cheap way to screen animal venom on a large scale for chemicals that can be used in drugs.

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Update on Glyphosate

A legal decision against the makers of glyphosate is not supported by the science.

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Defining obesity in children should be based on health issues, not just BMI

A new study aims to identify what influences the success participants achieve in weight management programs and help improve these programs. The study follows participants for three years.

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Plentiful females keep male crickets young

Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.

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Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds

Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest.

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Shift work increases diabetes and heart disease risk

Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

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A possible explanation for one of Saturn's moons having an underground ocean

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Maryland the other with Southwest Research Institute, has found what they believe is a plausible explanation for the existence of the ocean beneath the surface of one of Saturn's moons. In their paper published in the journal Nature Astronomy, Marc Neveu and Alyssa Rhoden describe the computer model they built to replicate conditions near Saturn ov

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Forests Are a Low-Tech but High-Impact Way to Fight Climate Change

Keeping forests intact can go a long way toward saving the planet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The weirdest things we learned this week: Falcon sex hats and buying human skulls on Instagram

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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WVU researchers identify how light at night may harm outcomes in cardiac patients

In a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, West Virginia University neuroscientists linked white light at night–the kind that typically illuminates hospital rooms–to inflammation, brain-cell death and higher mortality risk in cardiac patients.

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Two-armed 3-D printing

Twin robotic arms work together as part of a project to construct what will be the largest, most complex object ever 3-D printed in titanium: a test version of the 3-m diameter 'optic bench' at the heart of ESA's Athena X-ray observatory.

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How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation

Researchers from EPFL and the University of Zurich have developed a model that uses data from sensors worn by meerkats to gain a more detailed picture of how animals behave in the wild.

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Researchers pinpoint origin of photons in mysterious gamma-ray bursts

Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research and collaborators have used simulations to show that the photons emitted by long gamma-ray bursts, among the most energetic events to take place in the universe, originate in the photosphere—the visible portion of the "relativistic jet" that is emitted by exploding stars.

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Why we shouldn't ban 'tiny vehicles'

E-scooter mania is sweeping cities around the world. Fun, accessible and cheap to rent, shared electric scooters are one of the biggest technology stories this year.

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KBU på Sydvestjysk Sygehus

Sydvestjysk Sygehus svarer på 19 spørgsmål om KBU.

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Injecting flies with snail venom could help us discover molecules for developing new drugs

Flies could provide a fast and cheap way to screen animal venom on a large scale for chemicals that can be used in drugs.

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A microlaser emitting helical light

Researchers recently demonstrated the realization of an integrated microlaser based on a novel design that emits light in chiral modes, thus producing corkscrews of light. An object is said to be chiral if it can be distinguished from its mirror image. Due to their helical shape, corkscrews are particularly good examples.

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The transpolar drift is faltering—sea ice is now melting before it can leave the nursery

The dramatic loss of ice in the Arctic is influencing sea-ice transport across the Arctic Ocean. As experts from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research report in a new study, today only 20 percent of the sea ice that forms in the shallow Russian marginal seas of the Arctic Ocean actually reaches the Central Arctic, where it joins the transpolar drift; the rema

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Physicists Stuffed a Ghostly 'Skyrmion' Full of 'Antiskyrmions'

The ghostly 'quasiparticles' have barely any material existence, but physicists are still managing to manipulate them into uncanny shapes.

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Meet the man who helped double-check the sums to keep Apollo 11 safe

The Apollo stories: Dennis Sager was one of the last employees of the human-led backstop for the computation that made the mission possible.

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Image of the Day: Tuft Cells

After a severe case of flu, mice have chemosensory cells in their lungs, a place where they don't normally occur.

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GPS glitch, cholera outbreak and India’s anti-satellite test

GPS glitch, cholera outbreak and India’s anti-satellite test GPS glitch, cholera outbreak and India’s anti-satellite test, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01033-9 The week in science: 29 March–4 April 2019.

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Amped life

Amped life Amped life, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01042-8 Work ethic.

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Radical steps toward clean encapsulation

A polymer with changeable properties and broad applications has been developed at A*STAR. The polymer changes between core-shell nanoparticles, self-assembled agglomerations, and degraded fragments, depending on environmental conditions. It may find applications in personal care products, agrochemicals, and nanomedicine.

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Researchers advance in the development of 'papaya sugarcane'

When the papaya (Carica papaya) is ripening, its cell walls separate, making the tissue softer and more digestible. The cell contents become accessible and the sucrose in the fruit is more easily extracted. Sugarcane roots have recently been found to undergo a similar process. Their cell walls are modified during development to form gas-filled intercellular spaces in a type of tissue known as aere

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High throughput method to produce and screen engineered antimicrobial lanthipeptides

Nature provides lots of antimicrobials. However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of synthetic antibiotics. Lantibiotics are an interesting option. Molecular biologists from the University of Groningen and their colleagues in Switzerland and Germany have now developed a pipeline to create and screen large numbers of new lantibiotic peptides.

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Dansk succes med cellefabrikker: Forskere erstatter olie med sukker

PLUS. Den danske biotekvirksomhed Cysbio erstatter olie-udvundne kemikalier i polymermaterialer med bæredygtige biokemikalier, som også findes i ålegræs.

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Gravitational-Wave Hunt Restarts–with a Quantum Boost

Detailed data on space-time ripples are set to pour in from LIGO and Virgo’s upgraded detectors — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers advance in the development of 'papaya sugarcane'

When the papaya (Carica papaya) is ripening, its cell walls separate, making the tissue softer and more digestible. The cell contents become accessible and the sucrose in the fruit is more easily extracted. Sugarcane roots have recently been found to undergo a similar process. Their cell walls are modified during development to form gas-filled intercellular spaces in a type of tissue known as aere

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High throughput method to produce and screen engineered antimicrobial lanthipeptides

Nature provides lots of antimicrobials. However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of synthetic antibiotics. Lantibiotics are an interesting option. Molecular biologists from the University of Groningen and their colleagues in Switzerland and Germany have now developed a pipeline to create and screen large numbers of new lantibiotic peptides.

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Exotic signaling mechanism in pathogens

The unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness differs from other eukaryotes in the mode of regulation of an essential cellular signaling pathway. This provides a promising point of attack for drug development.

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Sun, moon and sea as part of a 'seismic probe'

Looking inside the Earth requires a signal that can penetrate rocks, minerals and other opaque material. Seismic waves represent such a signal. By recording them with a seismometer, researchers can draw conclusions from the recorded data about the state of the subsurface through which the waves have passed. Knowledge of subsurface stress or strain fluctuations is just as important for safety in co

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Exotic signaling mechanism in pathogens

The unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness differs from other eukaryotes in the mode of regulation of an essential cellular signaling pathway. This provides a promising point of attack for drug development.

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In shape memory alloys, the right combination of crystal grains can achieve high strength and still retain memory

A*STAR researchers have shown, through a supercomputer simulation, that high strength and shape memory can be realized at the same time by combining crystal grains of different sizes, a feat previously thought impossible. This finding demonstrates the potential of advanced simulations for tailoring materials to achieve previously unattainable physical properties.

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Scientists discover how RNA poII maintains accurate transcription with super computer

The message of life is encoded in our genomic DNA through transcription of messenger RNAs and translation of proteins to perform cellular functions. To ensure accurate transcription—a process that transcribes genomic DNA into messenger RNA by adding nucleotides one by one like letters in the alphabet, an enzyme called RNA polymerase II synthesizes and proofreads messenger RNA to remove any mis-inc

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Keeping genetic engineering localized

Genetic engineering tools that spread genes within a target species have the potential to humanely control harmful pests as well as eradicate parasitic diseases such as malaria.

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Keeping genetic engineering localized

Genetic engineering tools that spread genes within a target species have the potential to humanely control harmful pests as well as eradicate parasitic diseases such as malaria.

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Zooming in on an inner-cell DNA repair shop

Inside every cell in your body are molecular machines that help package, read, and repair DNA. These protein assemblies are essential to survival, yet we know little about how they function because, until recently, it was impossible to accurately describe their structure.

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Facebook Has Been Asking for Email Passwords to Verify New Accounts

You would think that after all its recent privacy missteps, Facebook would exercise a little more caution when it implements new features. Alas, this is Facebook, so it's still blundering from …

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Zooming in on an inner-cell DNA repair shop

Inside every cell in your body are molecular machines that help package, read, and repair DNA. These protein assemblies are essential to survival, yet we know little about how they function because, until recently, it was impossible to accurately describe their structure.

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Politiker frygter for lægevagten på Langeland

På et offentligt møde lørdag i Rudkøbing om fremtiden for Svendborg Sygehus udtrykte regionsrådsmedlem Annette Blynel (SF) sin bekymring for lægevagtens fremtid på Langeland.

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700 klinikker er nu medlem af fælles indkøbsforening

Andelsforeningen voresklinik.info har rundet 700 medlemmer. Det betyder bedre indkøbsaftaler og dermed rabatter til de praktiserende læger, som er en del af foreningen.

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Two-million-year-old toothache may have killed an early human

A new analysis of a rare hominin specimen has revealed what may be the earliest known dental abscess – a painful mass of pus growing inside the jaw – in the Homo genus

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Albino lizards are the world’s first genetically modified reptiles

CRISPR gene editing has been used to create genetically modified reptiles for the first time. The breakthrough could help us study certain eye disorders

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Australia budget fails to impress scientists

Australia budget fails to impress scientists Australia budget fails to impress scientists, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01071-3 Modest investments in nuclear medicine and environment research comprise a lacklustre budget for science.

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Congestion-busting infrastructure plays catch-up on long-neglected needs

Infrastructure spending is one of the central themes of Treasurer Frydenberg's budget speech. His headline announcement was the promise to increase the ten-year federal infrastructure spend from the A$75 billion announced last year to a target of $100 billion.

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More than a carbon copy: OCO-3 on the space station

NASA is ready to launch a new space instrument that will use the vantage point of the International Space Station to monitor Earth's carbon cycle. A follow-on to the still-active OCO-2 mission, OCO-3 will bring not only a new vantage point but new techniques and new technologies to NASA's carbon dioxide observations. Why are we launching a new carbon observatory? Read on.

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Racial bias associated with disparities in disciplinary action across U.S. schools

Studies have shown that black students are subjected to higher disciplinary rates than whites, resulting in a number of negative life outcomes, including involvement in the criminal justice system.

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The World Health Organization Gives the Nod to Traditional Chinese Medicine. Bad Idea

The World Health Organization is now promoting unproved traditional Chinese medicine — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Climate change: 'Magic bullet' carbon solution takes big step

New CO2 removal technology gains significant investment from fossil fuel companies, but greens have doubts.

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A New Way for Scientists to Connect

A networking initiative aims to overcome barriers to scientific careers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sorry, but NASA probably isn't sending astronauts to the moon in 2024

The Trump administration has set NASA an ambitious goal of returning to the moon, but the agency doesn't have enough money or the right spacecraft to achieve this

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The Atlantic and Allstate Grant $200,000 to Local Nonprofits through 2019 Renewal Awards

At a summit in New York City today, The Atlantic and Allstate awarded five nonprofits from across the country with the fourth annual Renewal Awards , a national search to honor community-based organizations for their innovative, grassroots approach to driving change and bringing progress to the country. The five groups were selected from 9,300 nominations and have collectively affected tens of th

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How to Build Community in an Era of Division

For some of the immigrants who take classes in English and citizenship from Welcoming the Stranger, a nonprofit organization in the Philadelphia suburbs that has served new arrivals from more than 100 countries, the past few years have clouded the sense of welcome they felt when they first came to America. “A lot of them said they were surprised when they first arrived that America is so diverse

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Penguins Were a Lonely Explorer’s Best Friends

In the middle of the Southern Ocean, time is measured in latitude and longitude, wave height and wind speed and the proximity of an iceberg. Ice is the language of ocean and land in the waters around Antarctica, and it is on the floating platforms of ice, those liminal places between land and ocean, that emperor penguins gather every year to mate and, if conditions are right, to lovingly raise th

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YouTube reportedly ignored employee warnings over toxic videos as it chased user engagement

Bloomberg spoke to 20 current and former YouTube workers who said employees had offered suggestions on what to do about “false, incendiary and toxic” videos over the last few years. But executives …

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Sundhedsstyrelsen ansætter faglig rådgiver i urologi

Overlæge Per Bagi bliver ny faglig rådgiver i Sundhedsstyrelsen, hvor han skal rådgive inden for sit ekspertområde urologi.

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Regionens nye lægetilbud på sjællandsk ø har fået borgerne til at rase

Den lille ø Orø, nord for Holbæk, mister sin eneste praktiserende læge 1. maj. I stedet vil Region Sjælland bemande lægeklinikken med en sygeplejerske, men den beslutning møder kritik hos øens beboere. Eksemplet illustrerer en generel udfordring med lægedækning på danske øer, siger PLO-formand.

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Nordjysk projekt reducerer genindlæggelser med 20 pct.

En ansættelse af en forløbskoordinerende sygeplejerske og epikriser i hånden ved udskrivelse er nogle af de tiltag, der har hjulpet med at reducere antallet af indlæggelser i Aalborg Kommune.

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A 'magic bullet' to capture carbon dioxide?

A British Columbia-based company has shown that it can extract CO2 from the air in a cost-effective way.

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Top tips for giving an engaging talk

Top tips for giving an engaging talk Top tips for giving an engaging talk, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01041-9 Three researchers share lessons they’ve learnt from presenting at TED conferences.

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The Body Pullers of Syria

Thousands of bodies are buried in shallow graves around Raqqa. One group is using Facebook and Google Earth to identify human remains and rebury them where they belong.

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Tiny pumpkin toadlets have glowing bony plates on their backs

Pumpkin toadlets are the first frogs found to have fluorescent bony plates that are visible through their skin under ultraviolet light.

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A New Way for Scientists to Connect

A networking initiative aims to overcome barriers to scientific careers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Express Scripts Offers Diabetes Patients a $25 Cap for Monthly Insulin

Drug makers, insurers and pharmacy benefit managers face mounting pressure from Congress and the public to reduce the high list prices of drugs like insulin.

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Fossil record: Dippy the dinosaur proves huge attraction in Scotland

More than 373,000 people have visited replica diplodocus since it arrived in Glasgow in January Dippy the dinosaur raises its elegant neck towards the vaulted ceiling of the Centre Hall in Glasgow’s Kelvingrove Museum. The 21-metre-long replica diplodocus skeleton appears nonchalant in advance of the anticipated onrush of young fans during Scotland’s Easter school holidays. Since the Natural Hist

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Edmunds examines costly side effect of safety tech: repairs

Vehicle safety technology continues to evolve at a rapid pace. Today's cars can watch your blind spot, help keep you in your lane, automatically hit the brakes in an emergency, and more. But while the technology helps prevent accidents, there is a potential side effect: increased repair costs.

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Transparent wood can store and release heat

Wood may seem more at home in log cabins than modern architecture, but a specially treated type of timber could be tomorrow's trendy building material. Today, scientists report a new kind of transparent wood that not only transmits light, but also absorbs and releases heat, potentially saving on energy costs. The material can bear heavy loads and is biodegradable, opening the door for its eventual

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Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities

Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human¬-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. However, "super plants" with integrated nanomaterials may be much closer to reality than cyborgs. Today, scientists report the development of plants that can make nanomaterials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and the application of MOFs as coatings on plants. The augmented plants could poten

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Making lead pipes safe

Lead leaching from pipes into the water supply is a serious public health concern. And if water sources or treatment regimens are changed, the new chemistry can cause water distribution systems that were previously safe to begin releasing toxic lead, as the crisis in Flint, Michigan, demonstrated a few years ago. Today, scientists will describe a cost-effective and quick method that could overcome

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"Toffee Planets" Hint at Earth's Cosmic Rarity

Exoplanets with stretchy, flowing rock may be bereft of plate tectonics—and of complex life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Woman Consumed Only Juice and Water for Weeks. Now, She May Have Brain Damage.

A woman in Israel may have irreversible brain damage after drinking only juice and water for three weeks, according to news reports.

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"Toffee Planets" Hint at Earth's Cosmic Rarity

Exoplanets with stretchy, flowing rock may be bereft of plate tectonics—and of complex life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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WhatsApp Now Lets You Block People From Adding You to Group Chats

Have you ever been added to a WhatsApp group chat without your consent? That is about to change, thanks to WhatsApp’s latest privacy move. The Facebook-owned company will now allow you …

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Colonial Cemetery Accidentally Unearthed in Philadelphia, and Researchers Race to Analyze the Bones

While digging a giant hole in the ground for a luxury residential building in Philadelphia, construction workers noticed something odd: Human bones kept turning up in the soil.

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Photos: Remains of Colonial Cemetery in Philadelphia Discovered

Here are the remains of a colonial cemetery that was supposed to be relocated in 1860, but still has hundreds of coffins and skeletons in it.

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This 17th-Century Massacre in Connecticut was New England's 'Jamestown'

Archaeologists in Connecticut are investigating the site of a violent conflict between American colonists and Native Americans in the 17th century.

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Energistyrelsen: Flyt Nord Stream 2-rute syd om Bornholm

Energistyrelsen foreslår, at Nord Stream 2-gasledningen skal gå syd om Bornholm af hensyn til blandt andet dansk skibstrafik og danske naturbeskyttelsesområder.

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Poll: Pets help older adults cope with health issues, get active and connect with others

Pets help older adults cope with mental and physical health issues, according to a new national poll. But pets can also bring concerns, and some people may even put their animals' needs ahead of their own health, the poll finds. Three-quarters of pet owners aged 50 to 80 say their animals reduce their stress and give them a sense of purpose. But 18 percent also said having one puts a strain on the

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Elon Musk recognizes hackers who altered Tesla Autopilot behavior

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Nu får vi det første foto af Mælkevejens centrale sorte hul

PLUS. Efter flere års observationer og dataanalyse vil astronomer 10. april offentliggøre de første fotos af det sorte hul i midten af Mælkevejen. Mens vi venter, er her historien om det ambitiøse, banebrydende og yderst komplicerede projekt.

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The nuclear sins of the Soviet Union live on in Kazakhstan

The nuclear sins of the Soviet Union live on in Kazakhstan The nuclear sins of the Soviet Union live on in Kazakhstan, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01034-8 Decades after weapons testing stopped, researchers are still struggling to decipher the health impacts of radiation exposure around Semipalatinsk.

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The Anachronism

There has always been a thawing-out-of-something-frozen quality to a potential Joe Biden candidacy, an understanding that the man himself might be out of step with these times, but that anachronism might serve him—and the Democratic Party—well. Hardscrabble Scranton Joe , after all, was never going to be the Gen Xer who live-streams his teeth cleanings , but he’s the guy who remembers what it was

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The Democratic Party Is Radicalizing

The transformation of the GOP into the party of Patrick J. Buchanan and Donald J. Trump—defined by cultural resentments, crude populism, and ethnic nationalism—is among the most important political stories of this century. But the GOP is hardly the only party that is undergoing some alarming tectonic shifts. Liberals wondering why conservatives who worry about Trump don’t join the Democrats shoul

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Nothing Trump Said Was True

“We have compiled the accompanying statement of financial condition of Donald J. Trump,” reads part of a two-page disclaimer from the accounting firm Mazars USA. “We have not audited or reviewed the accompanying financial statement and, accordingly, do not express an opinion or provide any assurance about whether the financial statement is in accordance with accounting principles generally accept

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Donald Trump’s Never-Ending Campaign Keeps Getting Angrier

A new president typically comes into the White House ready to spend his time governing and, ideally, binding a nation polarized by the electoral battle that has just finished. Donald Trump upended that centuries-old tradition. The race was over, but the Trump campaign kept going. Even before his full Cabinet was in place, Trump returned to battleground states to renew his attacks on Hillary Clint

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Austin’s Weirdly Aggressive Traffic Stops

Almost two decades ago, Texas started requiring law-enforcement agencies to record demographic information during traffic stops to better understand racial profiling. T he state began requiring even deeper data collection after the 2015 death of Sandra Bland, the black 28-year-old pulled over for failure to signal a lane change, needlessly arrested by a state trooper, and thrown in jail, where sh

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Animal testing: US closes 'kitten slaughterhouse' after outcry

A government department had been using cats to research parasites that can cause kill humans.

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Hacker Eva Galperin Has a Plan to Eradicate Stalkerware

Galperin has already convinced Kaspersky to flag domestic abuse spyware as malware. She expects more to follow.

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Sikkerhedsbrist hos IT-Branchen: »Vi har ikke levet op til det, man kan forvente af os«

Personoplysninger på deltagere til omkring 100 arrangementer har været synlige for andre eventdeltagere.

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Bartleby the author: Did you know you could abstain from a retraction notice?

The Journal of Clinical Investigation has retracted a 2011 paper involving researchers at the National Institutes of Health after the NIH concluded that some of the data were wonky. But the retraction notice reads like a Congressional roll call, with ayes, nays and even — in something we don’t believe we’ve seen before — an … Continue reading Bartleby the author: Did you know you could abstain fro

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Når EU finder skadelig kemi, bliver produktet på hylderne

Skadelige kemikalier bliver på markedet i evigheder, fordi der ikke er ressourcer til at undersøge og forbyde stofferne. Der er brug for skrappere krav til producenterne, mener miljøorganisationer.

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India’s clinical-trial rules to speed up drug approvals

India’s clinical-trial rules to speed up drug approvals India’s clinical-trial rules to speed up drug approvals, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01054-4 Drugs that have been approved in other some countries will no longer require trials in India.

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Sparade träd vid avverkning skyddar mykorrhizasamhället

Alla träd är beroende av samarbete med mykorrhizasvampar för att kunna ta upp vatten och näringsämnen, och Sveriges barrskogar är inget undantag. Därför är våra skogsmarkers mykorrhizasvampars välbefinnande en förutsättning för dessa markers framtida produktivitet. Men svamparna är i lika hög grad beroende av träden, och har kraftigt påverkats av det industriella skogsbrukets jämnåriga, monokultu

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To Combat Binge Drinking, a Search for Chemical Solutions

For decades, efforts to curb binge drinking have largely focused on reducing alcohol purchases and more vigorously enforcing laws against underage drinking and drunk driving. But as the problem continues to rise, a growing number of scientists are turning their attention toward developing chemical solutions.

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Edinburgh science festival charity bans fossil fuel sponsorship

Edinburgh Science faced protests from activists for taking money from oil firms The charity running the Edinburgh international science festival is to ban sponsorship from oil companies including Shell and Total after protests by climate campaigners. Edinburgh Science said on Wednesday it realised its commitment to educating people on climate change was substantially compromised by accepting mone

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Do animals hold the key to the global organ shortage?

Gene-editing technology has accelerated progress on animal organ transplant to the point where scientists will soon begin the first human trials Scientist Wenning Qin holds up a Petri dish, carefully sloshes around the pink liquid inside, and slides it under a microscope. Some identical tiny slashes come into focus. These cells, she explains, are derived from the ear of a pig. And they may contai

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Researchers pinpoint origin of photons in mysterious gamma-ray bursts

Scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research and collaborators have used simulations to show that the photons emitted by long gamma-ray bursts — one of the most energetic events to take place in the universe — originate in the photosphere — the visible portion of the 'relativistic jet' that is emitted by exploding stars.

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A soft spot for stem cells helps cornea healing

New research led by scientists at Newcastle University reveals a potential revolutionary way to treat eye injuries and prevent blindness — by softening the tissue hosting the stem cells which then helps repair wounds, inside the body.

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Making lead pipes safe (video)

Lead leaching from pipes into the water supply is a serious public health concern. If water sources or treatments are changed, the new chemistry can cause previously safe water distribution systems to begin releasing lead, as the crisis in Flint, Mich., demonstrated. Today, scientists will describe a rapid, cost-effective method to overcome these problems and make lead pipes safe. They will presen

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Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities (video)

Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. However, 'super plants' with integrated nanomaterials may be much closer to reality. Today, scientists report the development of plants that can make nanomaterials called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and the application of MOFs as coatings on plants. The augmented plants could potentially perform

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Transparent wood can store and release heat (video)

Wood may seem more at home in log cabins than modern architecture, but a specially treated type of timber could be tomorrow's trendy building material. Today, scientists report a new kind of transparent wood that not only transmits light, but also absorbs and releases heat, potentially saving on energy costs. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring

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New article details evidence around 23 legal levers to promote health equity in housing

A new article published in the Northeastern University Law Review outlines 23 legal mechanisms that may impact health equity in housing in the United States, and reviews the evidence base evaluating each lever.

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The climate revolution that almost was, the science of magic, and sleep disorders examined: Books in brief

The climate revolution that almost was, the science of magic, and sleep disorders examined: Books in brief The climate revolution that almost was, the science of magic, and sleep disorders examined: Books in brief, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01036-6 Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Arc: Old Solution for a Green Future

submitted by /u/wengchunkn [link] [comments]

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Children in South Asia hardest hit by air pollution, says study

Air pollution will shorten the life expectancy of children born today by an average of 20 months and will have the greatest impact in south Asia, according to a study published Wednesday.

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Canada failing in climate change fight: watchdog

Canada is doing too little to combat climate change, a parliamentary report warned Tuesday, a day after government scientists warned the country was warming at twice the global rate.

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GRSF1 is an age-related regulator of senescence

GRSF1 is an age-related regulator of senescence GRSF1 is an age-related regulator of senescence, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42064-6 GRSF1 is an age-related regulator of senescence

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Clinical outcomes of patients with T4 or N1b well-differentiated thyroid cancer after different strategies of adjuvant radioiodine therapy

Clinical outcomes of patients with T4 or N1b well-differentiated thyroid cancer after different strategies of adjuvant radioiodine therapy Clinical outcomes of patients with T4 or N1b well-differentiated thyroid cancer after different strategies of adjuvant radioiodine therapy, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42083-3 Clinical outcomes of patients with T4 or N1b well-differ

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Dual role of the colonization factor CD2831 in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis

Dual role of the colonization factor CD2831 in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis Dual role of the colonization factor CD2831 in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42000-8 Dual role of the colonization factor CD2831 in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis

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Whole genome sequencing identifies bacterial factors affecting transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-prevalence setting

Whole genome sequencing identifies bacterial factors affecting transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-prevalence setting Whole genome sequencing identifies bacterial factors affecting transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in a high-prevalence setting, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41967-8 Whole genome sequencing identifies bacterial factors

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Succession matters: Community shifts in moths over three decades increases multifunctionality in intermediate successional stages

Succession matters: Community shifts in moths over three decades increases multifunctionality in intermediate successional stages Succession matters: Community shifts in moths over three decades increases multifunctionality in intermediate successional stages, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41571-w Succession matters: Community shifts in moths over three decades increases

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Assessment of Early Therapeutic Response to Nitroxoline in Temozolomide-Resistant Glioblastoma by Amide Proton Transfer Imaging: A Preliminary Comparative Study with Diffusion-weighted Imaging

Assessment of Early Therapeutic Response to Nitroxoline in Temozolomide-Resistant Glioblastoma by Amide Proton Transfer Imaging: A Preliminary Comparative Study with Diffusion-weighted Imaging Assessment of Early Therapeutic Response to Nitroxoline in Temozolomide-Resistant Glioblastoma by Amide Proton Transfer Imaging: A Preliminary Comparative Study with Diffusion-weighted Imaging, Published on

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Optimization of the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell delivery time for radiation-induced lung fibrosis treatment in rats

Optimization of the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell delivery time for radiation-induced lung fibrosis treatment in rats Optimization of the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell delivery time for radiation-induced lung fibrosis treatment in rats, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41576-5 Optimization of the adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell delivery time for radiat

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3D Synthetic Peptide-based Architectures for the Engineering of the Enteric Nervous System

3D Synthetic Peptide-based Architectures for the Engineering of the Enteric Nervous System 3D Synthetic Peptide-based Architectures for the Engineering of the Enteric Nervous System, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42071-7 3D Synthetic Peptide-based Architectures for the Engineering of the Enteric Nervous System

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Scientists invent 'transparent wood' in search for eco-friendly building material

New material could replace plastic or glass in construction of energy-efficient homes In an era of glass and steel construction, wood may seem old-school. But now researchers say they have given timber a makeover to produce a material that is not only sturdy, but also transparent and able to store and release heat. The researchers say the material could be used in the construction of energy-effic

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Team harnesses spin of electrons to power tech devices

Building on the Air Force's need to develop tech devices that require minimal charging in the field, the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is using principles in quantum science and engineering to build a graphene-based logic device. This new technology will improve the energy efficiency of battery-dependent devices from cell phones to computers.

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Hur tråkig får en lekplats vara?

Hur farlig får en lekplats vara? Frågan kan tyckas rimlig, ingen vill ju att barn skadar sig. Men den som ska bygga en lekplats har också en annan fråga att ta ställning till: Hur tråkig får en lekplats vara? ”Bättre en bruten arm än en stukad vilja.” Så ska någon på myndigheten Barnmiljörådet ha uttryckt sig på 1980-talet. [1] Sedan dess har kraven på lekplatsers säkerhet skärpts väsentligt och

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Tree sleuths are using DNA tests and machine vision to crack timber crimes

Tree sleuths are using DNA tests and machine vision to crack timber crimes Tree sleuths are using DNA tests and machine vision to crack timber crimes, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01035-7 Scientists are optimistic that innovative techniques can pinpoint the true origin of timber.

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Researchers explore 'completely novel, nontoxic' IBD treatment

Researchers identify a new method that could allow them to treat and even prevent the development of inflammatory bowel disease, among other conditions.

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Does live tweeting while watching TV distract from the ads?

Researchers from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and at Goizueta Business School at Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which reveals that advertisers can see a boost in online shopping when television viewers multitask and engage in social media activity while watching certain programs.

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Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits

Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops—or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to Penn State researchers.

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Omega-3 fatty acid supplements, hypothyroidism could lower risk of T-zone lymphoma in dogs

Dogs that receive omega-3 fatty acid supplements or have hypothyroidism may be less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). Those are two findings from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University, who studied associations of environment and health history of the disease among golden retrievers. They published their results in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicin

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More than seed plants, moss has had dynamic evolution

In a Nature Communications paper published today, an international research team including UConn's Bernard Goffinet used DNA-sequencing technology to reconstruct the family tree of mosses, which go back at least 400 million years.

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Pre-eclampsia blood test could help diagnose the condition earlier

NHS England is rolling out a blood test for pre-eclampsia after a study shows that it can diagnose the condition two days earlier

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Omega-3 fatty acid supplements, hypothyroidism could lower risk of T-zone lymphoma in dogs

Dogs that receive omega-3 fatty acid supplements or have hypothyroidism may be less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). Those are two findings from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University, who studied associations of environment and health history of the disease among golden retrievers. They published their results in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicin

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More than seed plants, moss has had dynamic evolution

In a Nature Communications paper published today, an international research team including UConn's Bernard Goffinet used DNA-sequencing technology to reconstruct the family tree of mosses, which go back at least 400 million years.

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Stenuld opsuger vand under Frederiksbergs veje

Frederiksberg Kommune har som de første i Danmark brugt såkaldte Rockflow-batts, der kan gøre fortove og veje til regnvandsbassiner.

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Brightly-colored fairy wrens not attacked by predators more than their dull counterparts

In "Conspicuous Plumage Does Not Increase Predation Risk: A Continent-Wide Test Using Model Songbirds," published in the American Naturalist, Kristal E. Cain examines the factors that drive the predation levels of Australia's fairy wrens. After measuring attack rates on both conspicuously and dull colored 3-D fairy wren models in various habitats, Cain found that bright or "conspicuous" plumage is

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Brightly-colored fairy wrens not attacked by predators more than their dull counterparts

In "Conspicuous Plumage Does Not Increase Predation Risk: A Continent-Wide Test Using Model Songbirds," published in the American Naturalist, Kristal E. Cain examines the factors that drive the predation levels of Australia's fairy wrens. After measuring attack rates on both conspicuously and dull colored 3-D fairy wren models in various habitats, Cain found that bright or "conspicuous" plumage is

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Windows made of transparent wood could help keep buildings warm

Transparent wood could be used for windows. The material retains more heat than double glazing, but cannot yet be made entirely see-through

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Smarta enheter ska bli integritetsvänliga och säkrare

Det finns många problem med smarta enheter med avseende på säkerhet och personlig integritet. Det går till exempel att spåra personer och kartlägga deras aktiviteter. – När man använder smarta enheter behöver man ange en rad personliga uppgifter, säger Simone Fischer-Hübner, professor i datavetenskap vid Karlstads universitet. Men, varför behöver min belysningsapp veta mitt namn, adress och e-pos

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Researchers detect minute levels of disease with a nanotechnology-enhanced biochip

The difficulty in spotting minute amounts of disease circulating in the bloodstream has proven a stumbling block in the detection and treatment of cancers that advance stealthily with few symptoms. With a novel electrochemical biosensing device that identifies the tiniest signals these biomarkers emit, a pair of NJIT inventors are hoping to bridge this gap.

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The complicated future of offshore wind power in the US

Over the past decade, wind power production in the U.S. has tripled, becoming the largest source of renewable energy in the country, the American Wind Energy Association has reported. There are more than 56,800 wind turbines in 41 states and territories, generating more than 6 percent of the nation's electricity, supporting more than 105,000 jobs and garnering billions of dollars in private and pu

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New protein for gene editing may improve disease treatment, sustainable manufacturing

Gene editing has been a much sought after and controversial technology. Last month, part of the World Health Organization called for an international registry to track all research into editing the human genome.

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New protein for gene editing may improve disease treatment, sustainable manufacturing

Gene editing has been a much sought after and controversial technology. Last month, part of the World Health Organization called for an international registry to track all research into editing the human genome.

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Doing more with less in the study of plant chemical defense

Plants can't run away to avoid being eaten, so instead they employ a variety of chemical defenses to keep herbivores at bay. Understanding plant chemical defenses is critical for keeping crops healthy, and for answering a variety of more academic questions about ecology and evolution. However, current techniques for assessing plant chemical defenses are time consuming and require impractically lar

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Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3-D cages

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. Three-dimensional cages are one of the most important targets, both for their simplicity and their application as drug carriers for medicine. DNA nanotechnology uses DNA molecules as programmable "Legos" to assemble structures with a control no

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Fungal mating: Next weapon against corn aflatoxin?

It's not fun when a fungus contaminates crops. Safe native fungi, however, show promise in the fight against toxic fungal contamination.

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Doing more with less in the study of plant chemical defense

Plants can't run away to avoid being eaten, so instead they employ a variety of chemical defenses to keep herbivores at bay. Understanding plant chemical defenses is critical for keeping crops healthy, and for answering a variety of more academic questions about ecology and evolution. However, current techniques for assessing plant chemical defenses are time consuming and require impractically lar

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Fungal mating: Next weapon against corn aflatoxin?

It's not fun when a fungus contaminates crops. Safe native fungi, however, show promise in the fight against toxic fungal contamination.

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Danmark spiller central rolle i stort europæisk projekt om ansvarlig studie- og forskningspraksis

Uvidenhed hos de unge og et stigende pres på den enkelte forsker i den videnskabelige verden gør,…

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Berlin-born polar bear cub named after football club Hertha

Berlin's latest zoo celebrity, a fluffy polar bear cub, has been named "Hertha" after the capital's football club, it was announced Tuesday.

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Bleaching hits world's southernmost coral reef: scientists

The world's southernmost coral reef has been hit by bleaching this summer, Australian scientists said Wednesday, as they warned rising sea temperatures from climate change were affecting even the most isolated ecosystems.

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Canada gives nod to farm for genetically-modified salmon

Canada's first commercial farm for genetically-modified salmon received environmental approval on Tuesday—the final hurdle in a decades-long push to bring the fast-growing fish to market, amid strong opposition.

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Strong quake hits Alaska's remote Aleutians

A strong earthquake has struck a remote section of Alaska's western Aleutian Islands, but seismologists say it didn't generate a tsunami.

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Google to require benefits, minimum wage for contractors

Google said Tuesday it will require staffing companies it works with to pay workers at least $15 an hour and give them health benefits.

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Pentagon refuses Boeing tanker deliveries over quality issues

More bad news for US aviation giant Boeing: the US Air Force said Tuesday it had halted for a second time the acceptance of new KC-46 tankers due to ongoing quality issues.

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Berlin-born polar bear cub named after football club Hertha

Berlin's latest zoo celebrity, a fluffy polar bear cub, has been named "Hertha" after the capital's football club, it was announced Tuesday.

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Canada gives nod to farm for genetically-modified salmon

Canada's first commercial farm for genetically-modified salmon received environmental approval on Tuesday—the final hurdle in a decades-long push to bring the fast-growing fish to market, amid strong opposition.

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Reality TV: Camera-toting sharks hunt seals in kelp forests

Great white sharks fitted with cameras on their dorsal fins have been filmed for the first time stalking prey in dense kelp forests long thought to be no-go zones for the top-level predators.

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Reality TV: Camera-toting sharks hunt seals in kelp forests

Great white sharks fitted with cameras on their dorsal fins have been filmed for the first time stalking prey in dense kelp forests long thought to be no-go zones for the top-level predators.

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Ethiopian 737 pilots followed Boeing guidelines before crash: WSJ

The pilots of the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 MAX plane that crashed last month initially took the emergency steps outlined by the manufacturer but still could not regain control, The Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

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What do you get if you don't teach stats properly? Farage and Trump | Robert de Vries

The modern world runs on numbers. We need to give university students a framework for understanding them Did you know that Sweden has the second highest rate of rape in the world, behind only Botswana? According to official statistics from the UN Organisation on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), in 2015 Sweden recorded 57 occurrences of rape per 100,000 people, compared to 39 in the USA and just 3 in Indi

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Tidigare diagnos av hjärt-kärlsjukdom och typ 2-diabetes behövs

Tidig behandling och livsstilsförändringar mycket viktigt för att minska risken för framtida insjuknande i kardiometabol sjukdom (hjärt-kärlsjukdomar och typ 2-diabetes) Det finns alltså ett stort behov av att hitta specifika markörer som kan diagnostiseras på ett tidigt stadium.

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'Very, very unusual': Australian skink lays eggs, then gives birth to live baby

In world first, Sydney researchers observe lizard’s egg laying and live birth three weeks later from a single litter Skinks may be much stranger than previously thought after researchers discovered a lizard that laid eggs and gave birth to live young in the one pregnancy. Researchers at the University of Sydney observed a three-toed skink lay three eggs and weeks later give birth to a live baby.

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Three-point-shooting basketball robot shows off skills

submitted by /u/sanem48 [link] [comments]

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The West Takes NATO for Granted. One Country Still Wants In.

TBILISI—Transnational security cooperation, as an idea, has seen better days. Real and rhetorical commitments to NATO are flagging: President Donald Trump has called the alliance “obsolete”; Germany sees itself soon spending barely half of NATO’s mandated but unenforced target for defense spending; and Britain’s defense budget fell by nearly one-fifth from 2010 to 2015. The trend is largely under

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'Living fossil' given new home at ZSL London Zoo

The extremely rare Chinese giant salamander was rescued after an attempt to smuggle it into the UK.

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The natural world can help save us from climate catastrophe | George Monbiot

Ecological restoration can be a powerful means of protecting the atmosphere – we need to rewild on a massive scale Letter: A natural solution to the climate disaster I don’t expect much joy in writing about climate breakdown. On one side, there is grief and fear; on the other side, machines. I became an environmentalist because I love the living world, but I spend much of my life thinking about e

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Din yndlingsmusik kan dæmpe frygten for en kræft-undersøgelse

Patienter, der skal undersøges for lungesygdomme, kan dæmpe angsten i venteperioden med selvvalgt musik, viser forskning.

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Country diary: field horsetail shoots rise and prepare to swish

Gateshead, Tyne and Wear: This ancient, tenacious plant has already weathered three mass extinctions Every April, rocket-shaped, yellow, nine-inch reproductive shoots of field horsetail ( Equisetum arvense ), tipped with small cones, erupt through this patch of waste ground beside Mill Road car park on the bank of the river Tyne. They’ll soon wither, after they’ve released their payload of spores

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AI Is Good (Perhaps Too Good) at Predicting Who Will Die Prematurely

submitted by /u/ralphbernardo [link] [comments]

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Tennessee Whiskey Relies on Missing Ingredients

Food chemists precisely measured how charcoal filtration contributes to Tennessee whiskey's smoother flavor. Christopher Intagliata reports.

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New protein for gene editing may improve disease treatment, sustainable manufacturing

Purdue University researchers have developed a method that uses the protein Argonaute from Natronobacterium gregoryi (NgAgo) and supplied DNA for gene editing.

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Doing more with less in the study of plant chemical defense

Current techniques to assess plant chemical defense require large amounts of both time and plant tissue. Researchers have developed a new, high-throughput, cost-effective method that requires only a fraction of the traditional tissue sample weight and makes it possible to investigate multiple compounds at once, look at local vs. systemic responses, and quantify environmental and genetic variation.

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Stress in childhood and adulthood have combined impact on hormones and health

Adults who report high levels of stress and who also had stressful childhoods are most likely to show hormone patterns associated with negative health outcomes, according to findings published in Psychological Science , a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Gene levels could help predict prognosis for colorectal cancer

Levels of a gene that helps the immune system differentiate the good cells from the bad could be a good indicator of prognosis in people with colorectal cancers, Medical College of Georgia researchers report.

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Fungal mating: Next weapon against corn aflatoxin?

Native fungi combinations show promise against aflatoxin.

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Counselors may find that focusing on the human-nature connection may help clients

The concept of 'ecowellness' encompasses a sense of appreciation, respect, and awe of nature that can contribute to holistic wellness. A new study described in the Journal of Humanistic Counseling examines the relationships between ecowellness measures and overall wellness among 749 participants aged 19-84 years.

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Anti-inflammatory plant-based diet helps reduce gingivitis

A plant-based whole food diet reduced gingivitis in a recent randomized trial published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology.

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Difficulty hearing may keep older patients from participating in their health care

In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of 13,940 adults age 65 years and older, nearly half reported difficulty hearing, and those reporting difficulty said that they had lower levels of active participation in their health care.

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Sleeping pill use linked to greater need for blood pressure medications

In a Geriatrics & Gerontology International study of 752 older adults with hypertension followed from 2008-2010 through 2012-2013, using sleeping pills on a regular basis was linked with use of an increasing number of blood pressure medications over time.

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Study identifies gender differences in reported adverse drug reactions

In a British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study, investigators uncovered numerous gender differences in reports of adverse drug reactions sent to the National Pharmacovigilance Centre in the Netherlands.

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New insights on liver injury in men taking body building supplements

In a study reported in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 44 men with liver injury, attributed to over-the-counter bodybuilding supplements, experienced a uniform and distinctive pattern of signs and symptoms that were often prolonged, difficult to treat, and accompanied by disability and weight loss.

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Discrimination may affect adolescents' sleep quality

In a Child Development study of daily diary descriptions of discrimination by minority adolescents, experiencing discrimination during the day was associated with compromised sleep quality that night, as well as feelings of greater daytime dysfunction and sleepiness the following day.

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Psychostimulants play a major role in fatal strokes among young adults

An estimated 76 million people use psychostimulants, which include illicit drugs such as methamphetamine, cocaine, and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, as well as prescription stimulants. A new Journal of Forensic Sciences study from Australia is the first to present national data of psychostimulant use in young adults who experienced a fatal stroke.

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Inflammatory arthritis may negatively affect intimate relationships and sexual function

A systematic review and analysis of published studies found consistent links between inflammatory arthritis and impacts on intimacy and sexual function for both men and women. The Arthritis Care & Research analysis included 55 studies.

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Shorter stays in a skilled nursing facility tied to higher risk for readmission

High hospital readmission rates indicate that many elderly heart failure patients may be sent home too soon from skilled nursing facilities, a new study suggests.

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Boston Dynamics buys a better brain for its robots

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Øget præcision i digital p-jagt går fløjten: Københavns Kommune sætter API-projekt i bero

Parkeringsprojektet er blandt de 110 anlægsprojekter, der er blevet sat på pause, fordi der er blevet skåret i Københavns Kommunes anlægsloft.

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Tennessee Whiskey Relies on Missing Ingredients

Food chemists precisely measured how charcoal filtration contributes to Tennessee whiskey's smoother flavor. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Norge satser en halv milliard på udvikling af CO2-fangst og -lagring

PLUS. Den norske regering står overfor at beslutte et fuldskala-CO2 lagringsprojekt. Men flere rapporter peger på dårlig samfundsøkonomi og ringe nytte.

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Scientists witness lizard lay eggs and give live birth in same litter

Normally, animals reproduce by either laying eggs or giving birth to live young, but an Australian species of lizard can apparently do both in the same pregnancy. Scientists at the University …

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Amazing folding door of the future (Source: Storytrender)

submitted by /u/mgladden2 [link] [comments]

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Artificial intelligence helps to better assess treatment response of brain tumors

A team has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. The authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors.

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Liver, colon cancer cells thwarted by compounds derived from hops

The plant that adds flavor, color and bitterness to beer also produces a primary compound that thwarts cancer cells, and two important derivatives of the compound do as well.

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Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. Three-dimensional cages are one of the most important targets, both for their simplicity and their application as drug carriers for medicine. DNA nanotechnology uses DNA molecules as programmable "Legos" to assemble structures with a control

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Is your melanoma hot enough for immunotherapy?

A new study shows that tumors with mutations in genes leading to over-activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway were more than three times as likely to respond to anti-PD1 immunotherapy compared with tumors in which these changes were absent.

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Machine learning for measuring roots

A multidisciplinary team of plant biologists and engineers has developed a software that uses machine learning to measure plant root length accurately. Root analysis is essential in academic and agricultural research. The software, named MyRoot, saves researchers both labor and time and, in the future, it could be a useful tool in agriculture.

16h

Fast-changing genetics key to hospital superbug survival

A highly drug-resistant bacteria common in hospitals, Klebsiella pneumoniae, represents a significant antimicrobial resistance threat and should be monitored globally, say researchers. The warning follows new genetic analyses revealing how K. pneumoniae are able to quickly evolve to change their genetic makeup. This has implications for understanding how several species of bacteria — called Enter

16h

Gout treatment may help prevent obesity-related type 2 diabetes

The drug colchicine, used to treat the arthritic condition gout, could potentially reduce complications accompanying metabolic syndrome, a combination of high blood pressure, high blood sugar and other conditions that increase the risk of heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

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Prostate cancer incidence and mortality have declined in most countries

Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are decreasing or stabilizing in most parts of the world, with the United States recording the biggest drop in incidence, according to new results.

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Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. Three-dimensional cages are one of the most important targets, both for their simplicity and their application as drug carriers for medicine. DNA nanotechnology uses DNA molecules as programmable "Legos" to assemble structures with a control

16h

Breast cancer study by medical student could help patients live longer

A student has shown that surgery is associated with higher survival rates for patients with HER2-positive stage 4 breast cancer compared with those who did not undergo surgery. The protein HER2, or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, can play a role in the development of breast cancer.

16h

Does live tweeting while watching TV distract from the ads?

Researchers reveal that advertisers can see a boost in online shopping when television viewers multitask and engage in social media activity while watching certain programs.

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Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits

Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops — or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to researchers.

16h

New plastic films deflect or trap heat with zero energy required

Researchers have developed new plastic films that stay cool when exposed to sunlight and are very lightweight, strong and bendable. The versatile materials come in a variety of colors and could be incorporated into architectural and wearable products to regulate the temperature of buildings and people without requiring any power.

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IBM CEO Ginni Rometty: AI will change 100 percent of jobs in next decade

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How Artificial Intelligence Could Humanize Health Care

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The complicated future of offshore wind power in the US

In recent years the US Department of Energy laid out an ambitious plan to grow the US offshore wind sector. Researchers make the case that it might not be as easy as it seems, citing specifically the challenge of supplying rare-earth metals needed to build these offshore wind turbines.

16h

Digital device overload linked to obesity risk

If your attention gets diverted in different directions by smartphones and other digital devices, take note: Media multitasking has now been linked to obesity.

16h

Study debunks 'depression genes' hypotheses

A new study assessing data from 620,000 individuals found that the 18 most highly-studied candidate genes for depression are no more associated with depression than randomly chosen genes.

16h

New plastic films deflect or trap heat with zero energy required

Researchers have developed new plastic films that stay cool when exposed to sunlight and are very lightweight, strong and bendable. The versatile materials come in a variety of colors and could be incorporated into architectural and wearable products to regulate the temperature of buildings and people without requiring any power.

17h

The complicated future of offshore wind power in the US

In recent years the US Department of Energy laid out an ambitious plan to grow the US offshore wind sector. Researchers make the case that it might not be as easy as it seems, citing specifically the challenge of supplying rare-earth metals needed to build these offshore wind turbines.

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Is AI as Smart as a Mouse? A Crow? An Expert Physician?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Shift work increases diabetes and heart disease risk

Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research in Experimental Physiology has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes.

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Link Swanson | Belief, Expectations, and Psychedelic Drug Effects

submitted by /u/jacobgossel [link] [comments]

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USDA Terminates Deadly Cat Experiments, Plans To Adopt Out Remaining Animals

Scientists infected the cats with toxoplasmosis and later killed them. Bipartisan members of Congress complained about the practice, and the agency ended the program. (Image credit: USDA photo obtained through a FOIA request/White Coat Waste Project)

18h

Male Animals Might Benefit From Infecting Their Female Partners With STDs

(Inside Science) — In the battle of the sexes, sexually transmitted diseases may sometimes be a weapon that males use to win. That’s the conclusion of a new study that used mathematics to model an age-old evolutionary struggle: the quest to fill the next generation with as many of your offspring as possible. The findings probably don't apply to humans, and the outcome would vary depending on the

18h

SNAPSHOT: Underwater Archaeologists Find Pre-Incan Artifacts in Lake Titicaca

Underwater archaeologists excavating Lake Titicaca in Bolivia, South America, have been uncovering artifacts like this bowl. The finds offer clues to a long-vanished culture. Recently, a group working on Khoa Reef at the lake have uncovered a number of ritual offerings, including ceramic puma shaped incense burners, the remains of sacrificial llamas, and ornaments made of shell, gold and stone. Th

18h

PET scans make a difference in Alzheimer’s diagnosis

Brain imaging to detect Alzheimer’s-related plaques affects clinical diagnosis and management of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia, according to a new study. The findings, which appear in in the Journal of the American Medical Association , are a step toward understanding how imaging results ultimately affect patient outcomes. The study included 11,409 Medicare beneficiaries, 5

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Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds

Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest.

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Minute levels of disease detected with nanotechnology-enhanced biochip

The difficulty in spotting minute amounts of disease circulating in the bloodstream has proven a stumbling block in the detection and treatment of cancers that advance stealthily with few symptoms. With a novel electrochemical biosensing device that identifies the tiniest signals these biomarkers emit, inventors are hoping to bridge this gap.

19h

Focus on human witnesses lags behind our digital world

As society becomes more automated, the structure of evidence rules needs to keep up with the times, researchers argue. For centuries, trials have centered on witness testimony, a practice enshrined in the Sixth Amendment, which guarantees criminal defendants the right to confront witnesses in court. That focus on witnesses made sense a hundred years ago, when individuals created most evidence, bu

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Lego’s Break Dancing Robot, Best Email Apps, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Netting to stop birds nesting: Call for new safeguards

Wildlife experts want more controls on nets over hedges and trees, amid growing public concern.

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Potential fix for hospital star rating program

Allowing for more quality measures in the federal government's Quality Star Rating program would create a fairer and more equitable model for assessing the level of quality at US acute-care hospitals, according to a new study.

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Researchers advance in the development of 'papaya sugarcane'

Description of genes involved in sugarcane root cell separation could lead to the development of varieties with softened cell walls similar to those of papaya, boosting the production of second-generation etanol.

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Brightly-colored fairy wrens not attacked by predators more than their dull counterparts

Biologists have examined the factors that drive the predation levels of Australia's fairy wrens. After measuring attack rates on both conspicuously and dull colored 3D fairy wren models in various habitats, they found that bright or 'conspicuous' plumage is not associated with an increase in predation.

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Minute levels of disease detected with nanotechnology-enhanced biochip

The difficulty in spotting minute amounts of disease circulating in the bloodstream has proven a stumbling block in the detection and treatment of cancers that advance stealthily with few symptoms. With a novel electrochemical biosensing device that identifies the tiniest signals these biomarkers emit, inventors are hoping to bridge this gap.

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The Atlantic Daily: A Logjam

What We’re Following The U.K. has about a week to go before it’s supposed to depart the EU, and yet the terms of Brexit are, well … who knows. On Tuesday, Prime Minister Theresa May took the unconventional step of indicating that she’ll negotiate an exit plan with her Labour Party archrival, Jeremy Corbyn. As Brexit devolves into a Shakespearean tragicomedy that has Brits fearing what comes next,

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'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction

Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate.

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Peptidoglycan hydrolase of an unusual cross-link cleavage specificity contributes to bacterial cell wall synthesis [Biochemistry]

Bacteria are surrounded by a protective exoskeleton, peptidoglycan (PG), a cross-linked mesh-like macromolecule consisting of glycan strands interlinked by short peptides. Because PG completely encases the cytoplasmic membrane, cleavage of peptide cross-links is a prerequisite to make space for incorporation of nascent glycan strands for its successful expansion during cell…

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Daisy-chain gene drives for the alteration of local populations [Applied Biological Sciences]

If they are able to spread in wild populations, CRISPR-based gene-drive elements would provide new ways to address ecological problems by altering the traits of wild organisms, but the potential for uncontrolled spread tremendously complicates ethical development and use. Here, we detail a self-exhausting form of CRISPR-based drive system comprising…

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Racial disparities in school-based disciplinary actions are associated with county-level rates of racial bias [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

There are substantial gaps in educational outcomes between black and white students in the United States. Recently, increased attention has focused on differences in the rates at which black and white students are disciplined, finding that black students are more likely to be seen as problematic and more likely to…

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O-GlcNAcylation of core components of the translation initiation machinery regulates protein synthesis [Biochemistry]

Protein synthesis is essential for cell growth, proliferation, and survival. Protein synthesis is a tightly regulated process that involves multiple mechanisms. Deregulation of protein synthesis is considered as a key factor in the development and progression of a number of diseases, such as cancer. Here we show that the dynamic…

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Maternal microbes complicate coexistence for tropical trees [Commentaries]

How can hundreds of tree species coexist in a single hectare of tropical forest when the environmental conditions, as well as the species’ basic requirements, appear so similar? A leading explanation, particularly in tropical forests, is called the Janzen–Connell hypothesis after the two ecologists who proposed it in the early…

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Prion protein quantification in human cerebrospinal fluid as a tool for prion disease drug development [Applied Biological Sciences]

Reduction of native prion protein (PrP) levels in the brain is an attractive strategy for the treatment or prevention of human prion disease. Clinical development of any PrP-reducing therapeutic will require an appropriate pharmacodynamic biomarker: a practical and robust method for quantifying PrP, and reliably demonstrating its reduction in the…

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Spontaneous ribosomal translocation of mRNA and tRNAs into a chimeric hybrid state [Biochemistry]

The elongation factor G (EF-G)–catalyzed translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is essential for vacating the ribosomal A site for the next incoming aminoacyl-tRNA, while precisely maintaining the translational reading frame. Here, the 3.2-Å crystal structure of a ribosome translocation intermediate complex containing mRNA and two tRNAs, formed…

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Correction for Faller et al., Regulation of arousal via online neurofeedback improves human performance in a demanding sensory-motor task [Corrections]

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Regulation of arousal via online neurofeedback improves human performance in a demanding sensory-motor task,” by Josef Faller, Jennifer Cummings, Sameer Saproo, and Paul Sajda, which was first published March 12, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1817207116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:6482–6490). The authors note that the grant…

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Multicentury perspective assessing the sustainability of the historical harvest of seaducks [Sustainability Science]

Where available, census data on seabirds often do not extend beyond a few years or decades, challenging our ability to identify drivers of population change and to develop conservation policies. Here, we reconstruct long-term population dynamics of northern common eiders (Somateria mollissima borealis). We analyzed sterols together with stable nitrogen…

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Chemical synthesis rewriting of a bacterial genome to achieve design flexibility and biological functionality [Systems Biology]

Understanding how to program biological functions into artificial DNA sequences remains a key challenge in synthetic genomics. Here, we report the chemical synthesis and testing of Caulobacter ethensis-2.0 (C. eth-2.0), a rewritten bacterial genome composed of the most fundamental functions of a bacterial cell. We rebuilt the essential genome of…

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Ephemeral states in protein folding under force captured with a magnetic tweezers design [Applied Physical Sciences]

Magnetic tape heads are ubiquitously used to read and record on magnetic tapes in technologies as diverse as old VHS tapes, modern hard-drive disks, or magnetic bands on credit cards. Their design highlights the ability to convert electric signals into fluctuations of the magnetic field at very high frequencies, which…

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The STEP61 interactome reveals subunit-specific AMPA receptor binding and synaptic regulation [Neuroscience]

Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific protein phosphatase that regulates a variety of synaptic proteins, including NMDA receptors (NAMDRs). To better understand STEP’s effect on other receptors, we used mass spectrometry to identify the STEP61 interactome. We identified a number of known interactors, but also ones including the…

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Correction for Wieczynski et al., Climate shapes and shifts functional biodiversity in forests worldwide [Corrections]

ECOLOGY Correction for “Climate shapes and shifts functional biodiversity in forests worldwide,” by Daniel J. Wieczynski, Brad Boyle, Vanessa Buzzard, Sandra M. Duran, Amanda N. Henderson, Catherine M. Hulshof, Andrew J. Kerkhoff, Megan C. McCarthy, Sean T. Michaletz, Nathan G. Swenson, Gregory P. Asner, Lisa Patrick Bentley, Brian J. Enquist,…

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Ammonia emission control in China would mitigate haze pollution and nitrogen deposition, but worsen acid rain [Environmental Sciences]

China has been experiencing fine particle (i.e., aerodynamic diameters ≤ 2.5 µm; PM2.5) pollution and acid rain in recent decades, which exert adverse impacts on human health and the ecosystem. Recently, ammonia (i.e., NH3) emission reduction has been proposed as a strategic option to mitigate haze pollution. However, atmospheric NH3…

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Pejvakin-mediated pexophagy protects auditory hair cells against noise-induced damage [Neuroscience]

Noise overexposure causes oxidative stress, leading to auditory hair cell damage. Adaptive peroxisome proliferation involving pejvakin, a peroxisome-associated protein from the gasdermin family, has been shown to protect against this harmful oxidative stress. However, the role of pejvakin in peroxisome dynamics and homeostasis remains unclear. Here we show that sound…

19h

Cryoprotectant-free cryopreservation of mammalian cells by superflash freezing [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cryopreservation is widely used to maintain backups of cells as it enables the semipermanent storage of cells. During the freezing process, ice crystals that are generated inside and outside the cells can lethally damage the cells. All conventional cryopreservation methods use at least one cryoprotective agent (CPA) to render water…

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Nanobody-based CAR T cells that target the tumor microenvironment inhibit the growth of solid tumors in immunocompetent mice [Medical Sciences]

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has been successful in clinical trials against hematological cancers, but has experienced challenges in the treatment of solid tumors. One of the main difficulties lies in a paucity of tumor-specific targets that can serve as CAR recognition domains. We therefore focused on developing…

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Night-sky radiometry can revolutionize the characterization of light-pollution sources globally [Environmental Sciences]

The city emission function (CEF), describing the angular emission from an entire city as a light source, is one of the key elements in night-sky radiance models. The CEF describes the rate at which skyglow depends on distance and is indispensable in any prediction of light-pollution propagation into nocturnal environments….

19h

Earth history and the passerine superradiation [Evolution]

Avian diversification has been influenced by global climate change, plate tectonic movements, and mass extinction events. However, the impact of these factors on the diversification of the hyperdiverse perching birds (passerines) is unclear because family level relationships are unresolved and the timing of splitting events among lineages is uncertain. We…

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Tropical cyclone activity affected by volcanically induced ITCZ shifts [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Volcanic eruptions can affect global climate through changes in atmospheric and ocean circulation, and therefore could impact tropical cyclone (TC) activity. Here, we use ensemble simulations performed with an Earth System Model to investigate the impact of strong volcanic eruptions occurring in the tropical Northern (NH) and Southern (SH) Hemisphere…

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Repertoires of G protein-coupled receptors for Ciona-specific neuropeptides [Biochemistry]

Neuropeptides play pivotal roles in various biological events in the nervous, neuroendocrine, and endocrine systems, and are correlated with both physiological functions and unique behavioral traits of animals. Elucidation of functional interaction between neuropeptides and receptors is a crucial step for the verification of their biological roles and evolutionary processes….

19h

Profile of Dame Carol Robinson [Profiles]

Over a quarter century ago, chemist Carol Robinson led research that yielded the first mass spectra of molecular chaperones in complex with protein ligands. The achievement, which defied early scientific dogma concerning the theorized limits of mass spectrometry, inspired a discipline: gas-phase structural biology. Since then, the work of this…

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Boron-oxygen complex yields n-type surface layer in semiconducting diamond [Applied Physical Sciences]

Diamond is a wide-bandgap semiconductor possessing exceptional physical and chemical properties with the potential to miniaturize high-power electronics. Whereas boron-doped diamond (BDD) is a well-known p-type semiconductor, fabrication of practical diamond-based electronic devices awaits development of an effective n-type dopant with satisfactory electrical properties. Here we report the synthes

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Punishing and toxic neighborhood environments independently predict the intergenerational social mobility of black and white children [Economic Sciences]

We use data on intergenerational social mobility by neighborhood to examine how social and physical environments beyond concentrated poverty predict children’s long-term well-being. First, we examine neighborhoods that are harsh on children’s development: those characterized by high levels of violence, incarceration, and lead exposure. Second, we examine potential supportive or…

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Correction for Bandala-Sanchez et al., CD52 glycan binds the proinflammatory B box of HMGB1 to engage the Siglec-10 receptor and suppress human T cell function [Corrections]

IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “CD52 glycan binds the proinflammatory B box of HMGB1 to engage the Siglec-10 receptor and suppress human T cell function,” by Esther Bandala-Sanchez, Naiara G. Bediaga, Ethan D. Goddard-Borger, Katrina Ngui, Gaetano Naselli, Natalie L. Stone, Alana M. Neale, Lesley A. Pearce, Ahmad Wardak, Peter…

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Modeling cocaine traffickers and counterdrug interdiction forces as a complex adaptive system [Sustainability Science]

Counterdrug interdiction efforts designed to seize or disrupt cocaine shipments between South American source zones and US markets remain a core US “supply side” drug policy and national security strategy. However, despite a long history of US-led interdiction efforts in the Western Hemisphere, cocaine movements to the United States through…

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Underwater ritual offerings in the Island of the Sun and the formation of the Tiwanaku state [Anthropology]

Considerable debate surrounds the economic, political, and ideological systems that constitute primary state formation. Theoretical and empirical research emphasize the role of religion as a significant institution for promoting the consolidation and reproduction of archaic states. The Tiwanaku state developed in the Lake Titicaca Basin between the 5th and 12th…

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The mixed effects of online diversity training [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

We present results from a large (n = 3,016) field experiment at a global organization testing whether a brief science-based online diversity training can change attitudes and behaviors toward women in the workplace. Our preregistered field experiment included an active placebo control and measured participants’ attitudes and real workplace decisions…

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Hybrid species could hold secret to protect Darwin's finches against invasive parasite

A hybrid bird species on the Galapagos Islands could help scientists find a way to stop an invasive fly which is killing off the hatchlings of famous Darwin's finches at an alarming rate, according to new research.

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Which came first, the lizard or the egg?

In a world first, Sydney biologists have observed a three-toed skink lay eggs and give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy, opening a useful pathway to study the evolution of pregnancy.

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Plentiful females keep male crickets young

Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.

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Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds

Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest.

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How hermit crabs shake off competitors for shells

House hunters are deterred from evicting incumbents by strong vibrations from inside Hermit crabs shake in their shells to ward off competitors who have designs on their homes, scientists have found. Field tests conducted on a beach in Costa Rica showed Pacific hermit crabs are swiftly deterred from ousting an incumbent when they sense strong vibrations coming from inside. Continue reading…

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Fatal chirps: Nocturnal flight calls increase building collisions among migrating birds

Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don't produce such calls, according to a new analysis of a 40-year record of thousands of building collisions in the Midwest.

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New role for a driver of metastatic cancers

Metastatic ovarian, prostate and breast cancers are notoriously difficult to treat and often deadly. Now, researchers have revealed a new role for the CDK12 protein.

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Tweeting while flying kills migratory birds

Species that call out at night are far more likely to crash into buildings

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Global Health: Cholera Is Spreading in Mozambique, and It’s Far From the Only Health Threat

About two million people are displaced, cholera has broken out, and malaria is expected. But doses of cholera vaccine have arrived, and the humanitarian crisis may yet be contained, aid agencies say.

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Hybrid species could hold secret to protect Darwin's finches against invasive parasite

A hybrid bird species on the Galapagos Islands could help scientists find a way to stop an invasive fly which is killing off the hatchlings of famous Darwin's finches at an alarming rate, according to new research.

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Spielberg proposal to ban streaming from Oscars may be illegal, DOJ warns

DOJ says an Oscars ban could be illegal attempt to "exclude new competitors."

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Lizard produces eggs and live young

For the first time, a vertebrate has been observed spreading its reproductive options. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Hybrid species could hold secret to protect Darwin's finches against invasive parasite

A hybrid bird species on the Galapagos Islands could help scientists find a way to stop an invasive fly which is killing off the hatchlings of famous Darwin's finches at an alarming rate, according to new research.

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Which came first, the lizard or the egg?

In a world first, researchers at the University of Sydney have observed a normally live-bearing Australian lizard lay three eggs and then weeks later, give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy. This is the first time such an event has been documented in a single litter of vertebrate babies.

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Plentiful females keep male crickets young

Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.

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Which came first, the lizard or the egg?

In a world first, researchers at the University of Sydney have observed a normally live-bearing Australian lizard lay three eggs and then weeks later, give birth to a live baby from the same pregnancy. This is the first time such an event has been documented in a single litter of vertebrate babies.

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Plentiful females keep male crickets young

Male crickets age more slowly if they have access to plenty of females, new research shows.

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Berkeley's soda tax election changed drinking habits months before prices went up

Berkeley's soda tax election may have played a major role in changing drinking habits in the city, a new study shows. An analysis of food and drink purchases at UC Berkeley-owned dining facilities and in drug stores in the city of Berkeley revealed that soda sales dropped an average of 10 to 20 percent in the three months immediately following the vote — before the tax and any associated price hi

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Artificial intelligence helps to better assess treatment response of brain tumors

A team from Heidelberg University Hospital and the German Cancer Research Centre has developed a new method for the automated image analysis of brain tumors. The authors show that machine learning methods carefully trained on standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are more reliable and precise than established radiological methods in the treatment of brain tumors.

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Defining obesity in children should be based on health issues, not just BMI

Details of the study called the Canadian Pediatric Weight Management Registry (CANPWR). The CANPWR study aims to identify what influences the success participants achieve in weight management programs and help improve these programs. The study follows participants for three years. The 10 clinics taking part in the study are in Vancouver, Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa and Montreal.

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Prebiotic chemistry: Stable majorities

How could prebiotic information-bearing DNA sequences survive in the face of competition from a vast excess of shorter molecules with random sequences? Scientists now show that a relatively simple mechanism could have done the trick.

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Colorectal cancer ‘signature’ transcends culture and diet

Patients with colorectal cancer have the same consistent changes in their gut bacteria across continents, cultures, and diets, according to a new study. Scientists hope to one day use the findings to develop a new method of diagnosing the disease. Researchers have long known that cancers arise due to environmental exposures such as unhealthy diet or smoking. Lately, the microbes living in and on

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Permian volcanism contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gas content in Antarctica

The Choiyoi magmatic Province, with an estimated volume of ~1.3 million square kilometers, represents a voluminous Permian subduction-related volcanic episode that has thus far been described only from South America. Geologists have investigated Permian volcaniclastic rocks from central Antarctica to determine the potential magmatic source of volcanic detritus in southwestern Gondwana.

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New Bombali ebolavirus found in Kenyan bat

Researchers have identified Bombali ebolavirus in an Angolan free-tailed bat captured in the Taita Hills, southeast Kenya. No ebolaviruses have been previously reported from wildlife in countries along the east coast of Africa. There is no current evidence that Bombali ebolavirus infects people.

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Emergency rooms push Medicaid patients out more often than privately-insured people

Health Gaps in access to quality medical care persist, despite laws against it. Uninsured patients or those on Medicaid who come to the emergency department with pulmonary conditions like pneumonia or asthma are more likely to be transferred to…

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Understanding stock market returns: Which models fits best?

A comparison of two models for stock market prediction shows clear differences in their accuracy, depending on the length of the forecasting period.

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Scientists capture live, atomic-level detail of nanoparticle formation

Scientists have achieved real-time atom rearrangement monitoring using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy during the synthesis of intermetallic nanoparticles.

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Prebiotic chemistry: Stable majorities

How could prebiotic information-bearing DNA sequences survive in the face of competition from a vast excess of shorter molecules with random sequences? Scientists now show that a relatively simple mechanism could have done the trick.

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Parasitology: Exotic signaling mechanism in pathogens

The unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness differs from other eukaryotes in the mode of regulation of an essential cellular signaling pathway. This provides a promising point of attack for drug development.

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Sea snakes make record-setting deep dives

Sea snakes, best known from shallow tropical waters, have been recorded swimming at 250 meters in the deep-sea 'twilight zone,' smashing the previous diving record of 133 meters held by sea snakes.

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Publisher Correction: Menstrual cycle rhythmicity: metabolic patterns in healthy women

Publisher Correction: Menstrual cycle rhythmicity: metabolic patterns in healthy women Publisher Correction: Menstrual cycle rhythmicity: metabolic patterns in healthy women, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41392-x Publisher Correction: Menstrual cycle rhythmicity: metabolic patterns in healthy women

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A glossary of essential motorcycle terms

Cars Sound like you know what you're talking about A glossary of essential motorcycle terms…

21h

It Takes Just 3 Stickers to Make a Tesla Drive Into Oncoming Traffic

Drivers can have their cars remain in their lane, brake as needed, and even change lanes at the press of a button. However, this isn't a fully autonomous driving system. According to researchers from Keen Security Lab, all it takes to make a Tesla drive into oncoming traffic is a few small stickers. The post It Takes Just 3 Stickers to Make a Tesla Drive Into Oncoming Traffic appeared first on Ex

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Does anti-pollution make-up work?

Some make-up companies are reporting record sales of products which claim to protect skin from toxic air.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: NATO’s Republic

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, April 2. ‣ Amid growing tensions between the U.S. and Europe, Donald Trump met with NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg in the Oval Office. Stoltenberg will address Congress tomorrow to mark the alliance’s 70th anniversary. ‣ The House Oversight Committee subpoenaed Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross for records relating to a proposed 2020 census question

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Food for thought: Why did we ever start farming?

A recent paper sheds light on the question regarding the adaptation farming in early populations in the Eastern United States.

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New Singapore Law Would Force Facebook to Issue “Corrections”

You Asked for It On Saturday, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg penned an op-ed in The Washington Post asking governments to create new rules and regulations for the internet. Two days later, Singapore submitted legislation in parliament designed to govern how sites such as Zuckerberg’s handle “fake news” on their platforms. If it passes, the bill would require sites to place warnings or “correcti

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New fossils may capture the minutes after the dinosaur-killing asteroid impact

North Dakota fossils may depict the aftermath of the dinosaur-killing asteroid, but controversial claims about the breadth of the find are unproven.

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Laysan Albatross: An Unexpected Attraction In Hawaii

For more than a decade, Cathy Granholm has been tracking the Laysan albatross. They come down to Hawaii every winter from Alaska to nest and raise their chicks.

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Here's Why Some Mess Is Not Always A Bad Thing

Does mess drive you nuts? Astrophysicist Adam Frank says to think of it as showing off — all proteins need mess to do their own work.

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Bacteria can be coaxed into making the toughest kind of spider silk

Lab-altered bacteria have made a copy of a spider’s strongest silk strands, which could one day be used to make more sturdy materials.

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Scientists Gene-Hacked Bacteria to Make Bullet-Proof Spider Silk

Bacteria Farms Scientists have figured out how to genetically alter bacteria to churn out super-strong spider silk. Pound for pound, spider silk is much stronger than steel, but farming spiders is incredibly inefficient, according to a press release — so finding a way to mass produce the material could lead to super-strong fabrics and perhaps even next-generation space suits. Genetic Trickery Put

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Restaurant Analyzes Your Bodily Fluids to Make Ultra-Nutritious Sushi

Hyper-Personal You’ll need more than a reservation to dine at Sushi Singularity — you’ll also need to be willing to share samples of your bodily fluids. The futuristic restaurant, which is set to open in Tokyo in 2020, collects samples of reservation-holders’ saliva, feces, and urine two weeks prior to their visits. Then it analyzes the samples to determine each diner’s unique nutritional require

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The many and diverse roles of a research scientist

The many and diverse roles of a research scientist The many and diverse roles of a research scientist , Published online: 02 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01043-7 A scientist needs to embrace many different jobs, says Christiana Crook.

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How an Injection of Tiny Beads into Stomach Arteries Might Help with Weight Loss

The treatment, called "bariatric embolization," led to weight loss in a small study.

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Imaging Tool Helps Doctors Predict How Cancer Will Respond to Radiation

Imaging Tool Helps Doctors Predict How Cancer Will Respond to Radiation A special type of spectroscopy helped doctors differentiate between tumors in mice that responded to radiation therapy and those that resisted it. RadiationTherapy.jpg Image credits: Mark_Kostich/Shutterstock Human Tuesday, April 2, 2019 – 16:30 Peter Gwynne, Contributor (Inside Science) — Clinicians who prescribe radiation

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Google to require benefits, minimum wage for contractors

Google said Tuesday it will require staffing companies it works with to pay workers at least $15 an hour and give them health benefits.

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Programmable 'Legos' of DNA and protein building blocks create novel 3D cages

The central goal of nanotechnology is the manipulation of materials on an atomic or molecular scale, especially to build microscopic devices or structures. Three-dimensional cages are one of the most important targets, both for their simplicity and their application as drug carriers for medicine. DNA nanotechnology uses DNA molecules as programmable "Legos" to assemble structures with a control no

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Nye satellitter kan dække hele jorden: Kan give bedre sikkerhed for fly

Et dansk firma er medejere af et nyt overvågningssystem, der dækker 100 procent af jordens overflade.

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Is your melanoma hot enough for immunotherapy?

University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at AACR 2019 shows that tumors with mutations in genes leading to over-activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway were more than three times as likely to respond to anti-PD1 immunotherapy compared with tumors in which these changes were absent.

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Breast cancer study by UCR medical student could help patients live longer

A student at the University of California, Riverside, presented research results at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, or AACR, in Atlanta showing that surgery is associated with higher survival rates for patients with HER2-positive stage 4 breast cancer compared with those who did not undergo surgery. The protein HER2, or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2,

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New role for a driver of metastatic cancers

Metastatic ovarian, prostate and breast cancers are notoriously difficult to treat and often deadly. Now, Salk Institute researchers have revealed a new role for the CDK12 protein. The findings were published in the print version of Genes & Development on April 1, 2019.

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So Long, Inbox! Try These Email Apps Instead

Inbox was a great email app until Google killed it Tuesday. Fortunately, there are plenty of others out there.

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How ‘extinction neurons’ help us block out our worst memories

A new study examined how the effects of fear-related memories can be silenced in the brain. Forming new and positive "extinction memories" can help to silence fearful memories. The study found that the hippocampus plays a significant role in "extinction training." None Memories associated with traumatic events can cause unexpected problems in everyday life. A woman with a phobia of dogs might exp

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'NarcoLogic' computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction

Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate.

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Digital device overload linked to obesity risk

If your attention gets diverted in different directions by smartphones and other digital devices, take note: Media multitasking has now been linked to obesity.

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Brightly-colored fairy wrens not attacked by predators more than their dull counterparts

In 'Conspicuous Plumage Does Not Increase Predation Risk: A Continent-Wide Test Using Model Songbirds,' published in the American Naturalist, Kristal E. Cain examines the factors that drive the predation levels of Australia's fairy wrens. After measuring attack rates on both conspicuously and dull colored 3D fairy wren models in various habitats, Cain found that bright or 'conspicuous' plumage is

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Researchers advance in the development of 'papaya sugarcane'

Description of genes involved in sugarcane root cell separation could lead to the development of varieties with softened cell walls similar to those of papaya, boosting the production of second-generation etanol.

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NJIT researchers detect minute levels of disease with a nanotechnology-enhanced biochip

The difficulty in spotting minute amounts of disease circulating in the bloodstream has proven a stumbling block in the detection and treatment of cancers that advance stealthily with few symptoms. With a novel electrochemical biosensing device that identifies the tiniest signals these biomarkers emit, a pair of NJIT inventors are hoping to bridge this gap.

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A Mathematician Just Solved a Deceptively Simple Puzzle That Has Boggled Minds for 64 Years

Can you add three cubed numbers and get 33? A mathematician just did, and it took only a few quadrillion attempts.

23h

Study identifies potential fix for hospital star rating program

Allowing for more quality measures in the federal government's Quality Star Rating program would create a fairer and more equitable model for assessing the level of quality at US acute-care hospitals, according to a Henry Ford Health System study.

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Study debunks 'depression genes' hypotheses

A new study assessing data from 620,000 individuals found that the 18 most highly-studied candidate genes for depression are no more associated with depression than randomly chosen genes.

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The complicated future of offshore wind power in the US

In recent years the US Department of Energy laid out an ambitious plan to grow the US offshore wind sector. In a new paper, Yale researchers make the case that it might not be as easy as it seems, citing specifically the challenge of supplying rare-earth metals needed to build these offshore wind turbines.

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Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?

Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors.

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Mosses — Dynamic and built to last

New UConn research dives deep into the genetic history of mosses. The researchers use DNA from multiple moss organelles and reveal how dynamic these heretofore evolutionary 'dead ends' are.

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Remembering The Great Tomsoni

Johnny Thompson’s magical insights informed neuroscience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Europe Is Stockpiling Wind Energy by Converting It to Hydrogen

Clean Chemistry Ørsted, an energy company in Denmark, announced in March its new plans to convert electricity from its wind turbines into hydrogen fuel, joining the ranks of several other prominent European power companies. While it’s expensive, stockpiling renewable electricity as hydrogen makes sense as Europe tries to reach its ambitious climate goals , according to Scientific American — it co

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These $17,000 Mice Are Gene-Edited to Mimic Human Diseases

Gene Hackman A fascinating new Bloomberg story looks at the growing market for mice scientists have gene-edited to mimic human diseases ranging from prostate cancer to diabetes. Researchers are shelling out big money for the CRISPR-modified rodents, according to Bloomberg , sometimes paying as much as $17,000 for a pair — a medicine-disrupting development that’s projected to be a $1.59 billion in

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Melting roads are just one downside of record-breaking Alaskan heat

Environment People have died attempting to cross ice that normally would be stable this time of year. A lot of Alaska is unusually warm for this time of year, especially in northern and coastal regions near declining sea ice. “The average March temperature over the north…

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Does live tweeting while watching TV distract from the ads?

Researchers from the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University and at Goizueta Business School at Emory University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which reveals that advertisers can see a boost in online shopping when television viewers multitask and engage in social media activity while watching certain programs.

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Manure application changes with winter crop can cut nitrogen loss, boost profits

Dairy farmers in the Northeast can improve water quality and boost the profitability of their operations by changing the timing and method of applying manure to their fields in the fall, along with planting rye as a cover crop between corn crops — or by double-cropping rye and corn, according to Penn State researchers.

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ISS at Increased Risk of Impact After Indian Anti-Satellite Weapon Test

Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced last week that the Mission Shakti test had successfully destroyed a satellite in low-Earth orbit. Now, NASA is expressing concern that the test could have placed the International Space Station at risk. The post ISS at Increased Risk of Impact After Indian Anti-Satellite Weapon Test appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Boston Dynamics buys a better brain for its robots

The world’s most agile robots are about to get a lot smarter thanks to the purchase of a startup focused on computer vision and machine learning.

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What Boston Dynamics' Rolling 'Handle' Robot Really Means

It's about the hardware, yes. But more and more it's about the AI inside the scarycute dogs and humanoids.

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Avengers: Endgame tickets now on sale online, if you can get them – CNET

Snap to it, Marvel fans, if you want to see what happens after Thanos' big move.

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Blue light could treat superbug infections

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes infection in various parts of the body, is often called a 'superbug' thanks to its ability to dodge many common antibiotics. Rather than rolling the dice with a multi-drug combination or wasting precious time trying to determine which medicine to prescribe, doctors could soon use a new method for disarming the superbugs: l

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Omega-3 fatty acid supplements, hypothyroidism could lower risk of T-zone lymphoma in dogs

Dogs that receive omega-3 fatty acid supplements or have hypothyroidism may be less likely to develop T-zone lymphoma (TZL). Those are two findings from Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University, who studied associations of environment and health history of the disease among golden retrievers. They published their results in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicin

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Mars Has Methane–But Does It Have Life?

Multiple lines of evidence suggest the gas occasionally surges into the Red Planet’s atmosphere. Could it be a sign of a subsurface biosphere? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Walmart partners with Google on grocery shopping via voice

Walmart will now allow its shoppers to order their groceries by voice through Google's smart home assistant, its latest attempt to challenge Amazon's growing dominance.

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Ryanair one of Europe's top polluters, EU data suggests

It is the first time a company not running a coal-fired power plant has come near the top of the ranking.

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Watch Russia’s New Shotgun-Wielding Drone in Action

Death From Above Earlier this year, Russian weapons manufacturer Almaz-Antey filed a patent for a new drone that was little more than a shotgun with wings. When Futurism first reported on the drone , details were scarce. But now, video footage of flight tests has surfaced showing the drone — which looks like a murderous model plane ­— in action. Balancing Act The drone carries a 12-caliber Vepr-1

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China Is Installing “AI Guards” in Prison Cells

Escape-Proof Prison If any of the inmates at Yancheng prison are considering an escape attempt, they’d better do it soon. The Chinese prison is currently wrapping up months of construction on a new “smart” surveillance system designed to monitor prisoners at every moment, including while they are in their cells. According to officials , this digital panopticon will make prison breaks virtually im

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