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nyheder2019april04

A seismically induced onshore surge deposit at the KPg boundary, North Dakota [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The most immediate effects of the terminal-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact, essential to understanding the global-scale environmental and biotic collapses that mark the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction, are poorly resolved despite extensive previous work. Here, we help to resolve this by describing a rapidly emplaced, high-energy onshore surge deposit from the terrestrial Hell Creek…

19h

No US commercial laboratories fully meet guidance for noninvasive prenatal screening

An analysis of the reports and materials provided by commercial laboratories offering noninvasive prenatal screening for genetic disorders finds that none of them fully meet the recommendations published by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics.

20h

How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation

Researchers from EPFL and the University of Zurich have developed a model that uses data from sensors worn by meerkats to gain a more detailed picture of how animals behave in the wild.

6h

New research suggests living near protected areas can have positive impacts on human well-being

Living near a protected area can improve aspects of human well-being across the developing world, new research published today in Science Advances suggests.

4min

Study finds that money, revenge, morals motivate whistleblowers to expose tax fraud

Revenge-seeking ex-lovers, jilted business partners and vindictive former employees are among the nearly 12,000 whistleblowers who reported tax fraud to the IRS in 2017. An estimated $3 trillion dollars is lost worldwide in tax evasion every year.

4min

Millions of sensitive Facebook user records were left exposed on public web, security researchers say

More than 540 million Facebook records — including users' comments, likes, account names and more — were left exposed on an Amazon cloud-computing server, researchers discovered on Wednesday, …

5min

The Strange Beauty of Salt Mines

Although salt is abundant here on Earth, it still requires extraction from stone deposits or salty waters. The process of mining that salt can produce interesting landscapes, including deep, stable caverns, multicolored pools of water, and geometric carvings. Some of these locations have even become tourist destinations, serving as concert halls, museums, and health spas. Collected here are image

5min

New Metascape platform enables biologists to unlock big-data insights

For the modern biologist, large-scale OMICs studies—which map all of the genes, proteins, RNA and more that underlie a biological system—are standard tools of the trade. But interpreting these big-data outputs to generate meaningful information is far from routine: Analyzing the results requires sophisticated tools and highly trained computational scientists. These efforts can be costly and time i

8min

New Metascape platform enables biologists to unlock big-data insights

For the modern biologist, large-scale OMICs studies—which map all of the genes, proteins, RNA and more that underlie a biological system—are standard tools of the trade. But interpreting these big-data outputs to generate meaningful information is far from routine: Analyzing the results requires sophisticated tools and highly trained computational scientists. These efforts can be costly and time i

11min

11min

New family of glass good for lenses

A new composition of germanosilicate glass created by adding zinc oxide has properties good for lens applications, according to Penn State researchers. This marks the discovery of a novel glass family.

13min

More CO2 than ever before in 3 million years, shows unprecedented computer simulation

CO2 levels in the atmosphere are likely higher today than ever before in the past 3 million years. During this time, global mean temperatures never exceeded the preindustrial levels by more than 2°C. The study is based on breakthrough computer simulations of ice age onset in Earth's past climate.

13min

Living near protected areas can have positive impacts on human well-being

Living near a protected area can improve aspects of human well-being across the developing world, new research published today in Science Advances suggests.

13min

North Korea Is Using Hackers to Steal Money for Nuclear Bombs

APT 38 North Korea boasts an elite group of hackers, known as APT 38, that stole $1 billion from online banks and cryptocurrency exchanges last year. The hacker team, which has according to Wired established fraudulent cryptocurrencies and targeted digital money exchanges, is responsible for funneling money straight into the country’s military — and even helping it fund nuclear weapons. Resourcef

16min

Why Do Humans Have Wisdom Teeth That Need to Be Removed?

Wisdom teeth seem like a biological mishap. Our third and final set of molars to grow, wisdom teeth don’t quite fit in many people’s mouths, leading to millions of surgeries per year. But in some people, these "extra" teeth come in just fine, while others don't have them at all. What’s the biological story here? First let’s establish what’s probably not the story: Conventional wisdom about wisdom

16min

New Metascape platform enables biologists to unlock big-data insights

Scientists have revealed an open-access, web-based portal that integrates more than 40 advanced bioinformatics data sources to allow non-technical users to generate insights in one click. Called Metascape, this tool removes data analysis barriers — allowing researchers to spend more time on important biological questions and less time building and troubleshooting a data analysis workflow.

25min

To seal off dangerous lead pipes, just add electricity

A simple electric current could lock lead inside old water pipes

25min

Millennials want spirits—with none of the alcohol. Here's how distilleries make it work.

Health The science behind the latest (non-)drinking trend. Move over, O’Doul’s. The alcohol-free adult beverage industry is filling out. But how (and why) are these beverages made?

31min

Scientists are first to observe, image all-important molecular vibrations

By focusing light down to the size of an atom, scientists have produced the first images of a molecule's normal modes of vibration — the internal motions that drive the chemistry of all things, including the function of living cells.

34min

Does Twitter make political division seem worse than it is?

While partisan users form highly partisan social networks on Twitter, moderate users—or those less politically engaged—continue to avoid politics, potentially creating a void on social media. “We are not necessarily getting farther and farther apart—it’s just the people in the middle are becoming more quiet and withdrawn,” says Michael Kearney, an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Jou

37min

Global warming disrupts recovery of coral reefs

The damage caused to the Great Barrier Reef by global warming has compromised the capacity of its corals to recover, according to new research.

40min

Scientists decipher 3D structure of a promising molecular target for cancer treatment

Researchers have revealed the full structure of human ACLY, a building block of metabolism over-expressed in several types of cancers. Their discovery could be a major step in developing molecular targeted therapies for patients.

40min

Scientists are first to observe, image all-important molecular vibrations

By focusing light down to the size of an atom, scientists have produced the first images of a molecule's normal modes of vibration — the internal motions that drive the chemistry of all things, including the function of living cells.

40min

It's a one-way street for sound waves in this new technology

Imagine being able to hear people whispering in the next room, while the raucous party in your own room is inaudible to the whisperers. Researchers have found a way to do just that — make sound flow in one direction — within a fundamental technology found in everything from cell phones to gravitational wave detectors.

40min

Structure of the molecular machine that links carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

A research team has unraveled the three-dimensional structure and molecular mechanism of ATP citrate lyase (ACLY). This is a central metabolic enzyme — a protein that accelerates chemical reactions — important for the production of fatty acids and cholesterol in the human liver. The reported findings could help targeting ACLY in cancer and metabolic diseases such as atherosclerosis.

40min

3 of the Best iPads Are on Sale Right Now

Amazon and Walmart have deals on the standard iPad, and two iPad Pro models.

41min

Doctors with multiple malpractice suits quit or go solo

Physicians who repeatedly face malpractice suits don’t relocate their practice any more than colleagues who have no claims, according to a new study. Instead, they may quit medicine altogether, or, if they continue to practice, shift to smaller or solo practices. “There is an emerging awareness that a small group of ‘frequent flyers’ accounts for an impressively large share of all malpractice law

51min

Room-temperature valley coherence in a polaritonic system

Room-temperature valley coherence in a polaritonic system Room-temperature valley coherence in a polaritonic system, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09490-6 Owing to the presence of strongly bound excitons and degenerate valleys, monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides show promise for valleytronic applications. Here, the authors embed monolayer WSe2 in a monolithic die

52min

In-situ electron microscopy mapping of an order-disorder transition in a superionic conductor

In-situ electron microscopy mapping of an order-disorder transition in a superionic conductor In-situ electron microscopy mapping of an order-disorder transition in a superionic conductor, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09502-5 Solid-solid phase transitions are processes ripe for the discovery of correlated atomic motion in crystals. Here, the authors monitor an order-dis

52min

Nuclear spin assisted quantum tunnelling of magnetic monopoles in spin ice

Nuclear spin assisted quantum tunnelling of magnetic monopoles in spin ice Nuclear spin assisted quantum tunnelling of magnetic monopoles in spin ice, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09323-6 Spin ice compounds have localised excitations that behave as magnetic monopoles which move by hopping from site to site, creating a chain of spins. Here the authors show that the hyper

52min

Gas phase synthesis of [4]-helicene

Gas phase synthesis of [4]-helicene Gas phase synthesis of [4]-helicene, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09224-8 Helicenes represent key building blocks leading eventually to carbonaceous nanostructures. Here, exploiting [4]-helicene as a benchmark, the authors present a synthetic route to racemic helicenes via a vinylacetylene mediated gas phase chemistry with aryl radica

52min

Reduced nitrogenase efficiency dominates response of the globally important nitrogen fixer Trichodesmium to ocean acidification

Reduced nitrogenase efficiency dominates response of the globally important nitrogen fixer Trichodesmium to ocean acidification Reduced nitrogenase efficiency dominates response of the globally important nitrogen fixer Trichodesmium to ocean acidification, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09554-7 Findings regarding the impacts of ocean acidification (OA) on the growth and N

52min

Zero-temperature glass transition in two dimensions

Zero-temperature glass transition in two dimensions Zero-temperature glass transition in two dimensions, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09512-3 Identifying the nature of the glass transition is challenging because relevant experiments or analytical descriptions are hard to achieve. Here, Berthier et al. develop a Monte Carlo numerical tool to investigate two-dimensional g

52min

Metascape provides a biologist-oriented resource for the analysis of systems-level datasets

Metascape provides a biologist-oriented resource for the analysis of systems-level datasets Metascape provides a biologist-oriented resource for the analysis of systems-level datasets, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09234-6 With the increasing obtainability of multi-OMICs data comes the need for easy to use data analysis tools. Here, the authors introduce Metascape, a bio

52min

The photospheric origin of the Yonetoku relation in gamma-ray bursts

The photospheric origin of the Yonetoku relation in gamma-ray bursts The photospheric origin of the Yonetoku relation in gamma-ray bursts, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09281-z Yonetoku relation provides a diagnostic for the radiation mechanism in the prompt phase of gamma-ray burst (GRB) emission. Here, Ito et al. show the reproduction of this relation in 3D hydrodynami

52min

Global centers of unsustainable harvesting of species identified

Unsustainable harvesting, including hunting, trapping, fishing and logging, is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity. Hotspots identified by the team of scientists.

56min

Biology may make certain PTSD patients unresponsive to behavioral therapy

How well-connected a particular brain network is, and how successfully memories are formed, may determine which patients with post-traumatic stress disorder benefit from behavioral therapy, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have found.

56min

Think the tick threat grows with the grass? Not necessarily!

In a study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, USDA Forest Service scientists report on their quest to get to the bottom of a common assumption about the urban landscape: ticks like long grass. In 144 tick drags in 16 suburban lawns in Springfield, Mass., researchers looking at mowing frequency and native bees did not find a single tick.

56min

Crowdsourcing speeds up earthquake monitoring

Data produced by Internet users can help to speed up the detection of earthquakes. An international team of scientists has presented a method to combine in real time data from seismic networks with information derived from users looking for earthquake information on specific websites, the smartphone app 'LastQuake' and via Twitter. This method significantly reduces the time needed to detect and lo

56min

How understanding animal behavior can support wildlife conservation

Researchers from EPFL and the University of Zurich have developed a model that uses data from sensors worn by meerkats to gain a more detailed picture of how animals behave in the wild.

56min

Children benefit from living near conservation zones

Children who live near protected areas designated by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) live in wealthier and healthier households than those who live far away from the conservation zones, say Robin Naidoo and colleagues. Their findings suggest that the practice of setting aside protected zones for wildlife and cultural conservation

56min

The future of agriculture is computerized

Researchers at the MIT Media Lab Open Agriculture Initiative have used computer algorithms to determine the optimal growing conditions to improve basil plants' taste by maximizing the concentration of flavorful molecules known as volatile compounds.

56min

Discovery shows how mucus build-up, not infections, triggers cystic fibrosis lung damage

The build-up of abnormally thick mucus and the associated inflammation appear to be the initiating cause of damage to the lungs of children with cystic fibrosis (CF), rather than bacterial infections, according to a UNC School of Medicine study published in Science Translational Medicine.

56min

Unique patterns of brain activity predict treatment responses in patients with PTSD

A neuroimaging study of 184 patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has identified unique patterns of brain activity that predict poorer responses to talk therapy (or psychotherapy), the current gold standard and only effective treatment for addressing PTSD.

56min

Study illuminates the brain's inner workings

'We're using computational modeling to investigate the inner workings of the brain,' says Sarah Muldoon, Ph.D., University at Buffalo assistant professor of mathematics. 'When one region of the brain is stimulated, what other regions become active, and how do these patterns of synchronization get distributed across cognitive systems?'

56min

Human history through tree rings: Trees in Amazonia reveal pre-colonial human disturbance

The Brazil nut tree (Bertholletia excelsa) is well known around the world today and has been an important part of human subsistence strategies in the Amazon forest from at least the Early Holocene. These trees can live for hundreds of years and are managed today by humans for their valuable, energy-filled nuts. Patterns in the establishment and growth of living Brazil nut trees in Central Amazonia

56min

Spider monkeys lower their 'whinnies' when making long-distance calls

Isolated spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) likely lower the pitch of their calls to improve the chances of re-establishing contact with their group, according to a study published April 3, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by José D. Ordóñez-Gómez from the German Primate Center, Germany, and colleagues.

56min

Sunscreen application has better face coverage than SPF moisturizers

Application of sun protection factor (SPF) moisturizers tends to miss more of the face, especially around the eyelid regions, compared with sunscreen application, according to a study published April 3 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kevin Hamill of the University of Liverpool, and colleagues. Moreover, people applying these products are unaware that they are failing to cover regions vulner

56min

Every Breath You Take: An Indoor Smog Story

Just keep breathin' and breathin' and breathin' and breathin'… (Image credit: NOEL CELIS/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

First successful model simulation of the past 3 million years of climate change

Guest post by Matteo Willeit, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research A new study published in Science Advances shows that the main features of natural climate variability over the last 3 million years can be reproduced with an efficient model of the Earth system. The Quaternary is the most recent geological Period, covering the past ~2.6 million years. It is defined by the presence of glac

1h

Advance boosts efficiency of flash storage in data centers

New architecture promises to cut in half the energy and physical space required to store and manage user data.

1h

Optical tweezers achieve new feats of capturing atoms

Physicists have shown that they could organize groups of individual atoms into large grids with an efficiency unmatched by existing methods.

1h

Effects of reintroducing top predators questioned

There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research.

1h

Tackling challenge of antifungal resistance

Ground-breaking work is helping develop a better understanding of the growing threat posed by antifungal drug resistance. Invasive aspergillosis is a devastating disease caused by breathing in small airborne spores of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and it is a condition where drug resistance has been encountered. They have just released a paper revealing how they have been able to identify a pre

1h

You're Probably Using Your Sun-Blocking Moisturizer Wrong

SPF facial moisturizers can block the sun's dangerous ultraviolet rays as effectively as comparable sunscreens, but only if you use them correctly.

1h

The FDA Is Investigating a Possible Link Between E-Cigarettes and Seizures

There have been 35 reported cases of people who had seizures shortly after they used e-cigarettes.

1h

The Physics of the Doppler Effect, Represented as Tiny Balls

Why do vehicles coming toward you (and moving away) make that characteristic sound? Let's explore.

1h

Optimal network topology for responsive collective behavior

Animals, humans, and multi-robot systems operate in dynamic environments, where the ability to respond to changing circumstances is paramount. An effective collective response requires suitable information transfer among agents and thus critically depends on the interaction network. To investigate the influence of the network topology on collective response, we consider an archetypal model of dis

1h

Identifying global centers of unsustainable commercial harvesting of species

Overexploitation is one of the main threats to biodiversity, but the intensity of this threat varies geographically. We identified global concentrations, on land and at sea, of 4543 species threatened by unsustainable commercial harvesting. Regions under high-intensity threat (based on accessibility on land and on fishing catch at sea) cover 4.3% of the land and 6.1% of the seas and contain 82% o

1h

Urban heat island: Aerodynamics or imperviousness?

More than half of the world’s population now live in cities, which are known to be heat islands. While daytime urban heat islands (UHIs) are traditionally thought to be the consequence of less evaporative cooling in cities, recent work sparks new debate, showing that geographic variations of daytime UHI intensity were largely explained by variations in the efficiency with which urban and rural ar

1h

Eastern equatorial Pacific cold tongue evolution since the late Miocene linked to extratropical climate

The timing and mechanisms of the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) cold tongue development, a salient feature of the tropical ocean, are intensely debated on geological time scales. Here, we reconstruct cold tongue evolution over the past 8 million years by computing changes in temperature gradient between the cold tongue and eastern Pacific warm pool. Results indicate that the cold tongue remaine

1h

Helicobacter pylori-induced matrix metallopeptidase-10 promotes gastric bacterial colonization and gastritis

The interaction between gastric epithelium and immune response plays key roles in H. pylori –associated pathology. We demonstrated a procolonization and proinflammation role of MMP-10 in H. pylori infection. MMP-10 is elevated in gastric mucosa and is produced by gastric epithelial cells synergistically induced by H. pylori and IL-22 via the ERK pathway. Human gastric MMP-10 was correlated with H

1h

Navigating the complexities of coordinated conservation along the river Nile

The river Nile flows across 11 African countries, supporting millions of human livelihoods, and holding globally important biodiversity and endemism yet remains underprotected. No basin-wide spatial conservation planning has been attempted to date, and the importance of coordinated conservation planning for the Nile’s biodiversity remains unknown. We address these gaps by creating a basin-wide co

1h

Cognitive chimera states in human brain networks

The human brain is a complex dynamical system, and how cognition emerges from spatiotemporal patterns of regional brain activity remains an open question. As different regions dynamically interact to perform cognitive tasks, variable patterns of partial synchrony can be observed, forming chimera states. We propose that the spatial patterning of these states plays a fundamental role in the cogniti

1h

Crowdsourcing triggers rapid, reliable earthquake locations

In many cases, it takes several minutes after an earthquake to publish online a seismic location with confidence. Via monitoring for specific types of increased website, app, or Twitter usage, crowdsourced detection of seismic activity can be used to "seed" the search in the seismic data for an earthquake and reduce the risk of false detections, thereby accelerating the publication of locations f

1h

Evaluating the impacts of protected areas on human well-being across the developing world

Protected areas (PAs) are fundamental for biodiversity conservation, yet their impacts on nearby residents are contested. We synthesized environmental and socioeconomic conditions of >87,000 children in >60,000 households situated either near or far from >600 PAs within 34 developing countries. We used quasi-experimental hierarchical regression to isolate the impact of living near a PA on several

1h

Targeting RalGAP{alpha}1 in skeletal muscle to simultaneously improve postprandial glucose and lipid control

How insulin stimulates postprandial uptake of glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) into skeletal muscle and the mechanisms by which these events are dampened in diet-induced obesity are incompletely understood. Here, we show that RalGAPα1 is a critical regulator of muscle insulin action and governs both glucose and lipid homeostasis. A high-fat diet increased RalGAPα1 protein but decreased

1h

Near-infrared upconversion-activated CRISPR-Cas9 system: A remote-controlled gene editing platform

As an RNA-guided nuclease, CRISPR-Cas9 offers facile and promising solutions to mediate genome modification with respect to versatility and high precision. However, spatiotemporal manipulation of CRISPR-Cas9 delivery remains a daunting challenge for robust effectuation of gene editing both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we designed a near-infrared (NIR) light–responsive nanocarrier of CRISPR-Cas9 fo

1h

Mid-Pleistocene transition in glacial cycles explained by declining CO2 and regolith removal

Variations in Earth’s orbit pace the glacial-interglacial cycles of the Quaternary, but the mechanisms that transform regional and seasonal variations in solar insolation into glacial-interglacial cycles are still elusive. Here, we present transient simulations of coevolution of climate, ice sheets, and carbon cycle over the past 3 million years. We show that a gradual lowering of atmospheric CO

1h

Earthquakes track subduction fluids from slab source to mantle wedge sink

Subducting plates release fluids as they plunge into Earth’s mantle and occasionally rupture to produce intraslab earthquakes. It is debated whether fluids and earthquakes are directly related. By combining seismic observations and geodynamic models from western Greece, and comparing across other subduction zones, we find that earthquakes effectively track the flow of fluids from their slab sourc

1h

Ultra-multiplexed analysis of single-cell dynamics reveals logic rules in differentiation

Dynamical control of cellular microenvironments is highly desirable to study complex processes such as stem cell differentiation and immune signaling. We present an ultra-multiplexed microfluidic system for high-throughput single-cell analysis in precisely defined dynamic signaling environments. Our system delivers combinatorial and time-varying signals to 1500 independently programmable culture

1h

Modulation of mtDNA copy number ameliorates the pathological consequences of a heteroplasmic mtDNA mutation in the mouse

Heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations typically act in a recessive way and cause mitochondrial disease only if present above a certain threshold level. We have experimentally investigated to what extent the absolute levels of wild-type (WT) mtDNA influence disease manifestations by manipulating TFAM levels in mice with a heteroplasmic mtDNA mutation in the tRNA Ala gene. Increase of total mtDNA levels am

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Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Quaternary period has seen a lot of temperature changes, but none as quick as man-made climate change.

1h

Living near a national park is good for children’s health

Kids who live near nature preserves are likely to be wealthier and taller than those who don’t. Samantha Page reports.

1h

Carbon dioxide dip propelled longer glaciation cycles

New modelling confirms unprecedented levels of atmospheric carbon in modern era. Nick Carne reports.

1h

Antibiotic reduces harmful effects of HIV

Common med provides a cheap and effective treatment in sub-Saharan Africa. Andrew Masterson reports.

1h

Scientists Add Windows to Mice Skulls to Watch Their Brains

See-Through Skull By implanting transparent skulls into mice, scientists think they may be able to glean new insights into how the brain works as a whole — research that could lead to new treatments for Alzheimer’s , Parkinson’s , and other brain disorders. “This new device allows us to look at the brain activity at the smallest level zooming in on specific neurons while getting a big picture vie

1h

Think the tick threat grows with the grass? Not necessarily

When Susannah Lerman talked with fellow researchers and friends about her study of the effects of less frequent lawn mowing to improve habitat for native bees, the response she heard most had nothing to do with bees. "The first thing people said was that letting the grass get longer would invite ticks," said Lerman, a research ecologist with the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station. "It

1h

Spider monkeys lower their 'whinnies' when making long-distance calls

Isolated spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) likely lower the pitch of their calls to improve the chances of re-establishing contact with their group, according to a study published April 3, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by José D. Ordóñez-Gómez from the German Primate Center, Germany, and colleagues.

1h

This experimental airplane will change shape while flying

Technology The wing is strong but light. NASA, MIT, and other institutions are working on a plane that looks radically different from, say, a Boeing 737. The craft takes the shape of a flying wing, similar to a…

1h

Human history through tree rings: Trees in Amazonia reveal pre-colonial human disturbance

In a new paper published in PLOS ONE, an international team of scientists reports the combined use of dendrochronology and historical survey to investigate the effects of societal and demographic changes on forest disturbances and growth dynamics in a neotropical tree species, the Brazil nut tree. The study, led by scientists from the National Institute for Amazonian Research, alongside colleagues

1h

Think the tick threat grows with the grass? Not necessarily

When Susannah Lerman talked with fellow researchers and friends about her study of the effects of less frequent lawn mowing to improve habitat for native bees, the response she heard most had nothing to do with bees. "The first thing people said was that letting the grass get longer would invite ticks," said Lerman, a research ecologist with the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station. "It

1h

Crowdsourcing speeds up earthquake monitoring

Data produced by internet users can help to speed up the detection of earthquakes. Fast and accurate information is essential in the case of earthquakes: Epicentre location, depth and magnitude are minimum requirements to reliably estimate their possibly catastrophic consequences. An international team of scientists has presented a method to combine in real time data from seismic networks with inf

1h

Spider monkeys lower their 'whinnies' when making long-distance calls

Isolated spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) likely lower the pitch of their calls to improve the chances of re-establishing contact with their group, according to a study published April 3, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by José D. Ordóñez-Gómez from the German Primate Center, Germany, and colleagues.

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PSU study finds that money, revenge, morals motivate whistleblowers to expose tax fraud

A study by Portland State University School of Business accounting professor Cass Hausserman finds that people who expose others of tax fraud often do so as revenge that's disguised as their moral obligation. Blowing the whistle is also motivated by a financial gain for the whistleblower. Revenge is commonly considered a primary reason why whistleblowers report tax fraud — so much so, that it's o

1h

Researchers test new imaging method for first time on human patients

A new study by researchers at the University of Arkansas could significantly improve methods for detecting and diagnosing congenital heart disease in infants and small children. Researchers used vector flow imaging to create detailed images of two three-month-old babies' hearts.

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A step toward recovering reproduction in girls who survive childhood cancer

Leukemia treatments often leave girls infertile, but a procedure developed by researchers at the University of Michigan working with mice is a step toward restoring their ability to be biological mothers.

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Government subsidies could be key to containing hospital-born infections

Princeton University researchers propose fighting hospital infections with matching government subsidies for every dollar a hospital spends on infection control. This incentive could drive down regional rates of healthcare-associated infections by motivating individual hospitals to be more vigilant.

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Widely used public health surveys may underestimate global burden of childhood diarrhea

Public health surveys used in as many as 90 countries may be missing the number of recent diarrhea episodes among children by asking parents and caregivers to recall events two weeks versus one week out, suggests a study from researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Watch Now: Gravitational Waves as New Windows on the Universe

Astrophysicist Chad Hanna discusses how ripples in spacetime are revolutionizing our understanding of the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Machine learning is making pesto even more delicious

Researchers at MIT have used AI to improve the flavor of basil. It’s part of a trend that is seeing artificial intelligence revolutionize farming.

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Crowdsourced reports could save lives when the next earthquake hits

Combining app check-ins and tweets with traditional detection data could give rescue teams and residents a vital head start.

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Watch Now: Gravitational Waves as New Windows on the Universe

Astrophysicist Chad Hanna discusses how ripples in spacetime are revolutionizing our understanding of the cosmos — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Good News, People: That Amazon Mothership Blimp is Fake

The Future Is Here If you’ve been online recently, you likely encountered a viral video of an Amazon mega-blimp dispatching a swarm of delivery drones onto an unsuspecting city. It’s ominous, terrifying, vaguely dystopian , and also fake. CGI Dystopia The video comes from a Hiroshima-based artist who was inspired by an existing airship, Lockheed Martin’s P 791 hybrid aircraft, Gizmodo reports . D

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The Great Barrier Reef is losing its ability to recover from bleaching

Climate change has contributed to an 89 per cent decrease in the amount of coral replenishing the Great Barrier Reef

1h

UK Military Could Deploy Iron Man-Style Jet Suit in Combat

Iron Man At a test flight for U.K. startup Gravity’s Jet Suit , UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson mused about using similar suits for combat missions. “Can you just imagine doing an assault on to a ship?” he asked the suit’s test pilot after the flight, according to The Telegraph . He later added, the paper wrote, that if he could “have a go in future there could be a bigger order.” Gravity F

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Tower Bridge, London's Engineering Marvel, Turns 125

A new pocket photo book celebrates one of Great Britain's most iconic landmarks.

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Amazon slashes prices at Whole Foods Market, offers $10 off

Amazon is lowering prices at Whole Foods Market and will offer even more savings for Prime members.

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Automated car system learns from past experiences

Researchers have developed a new way of controlling autonomous cars that integrates prior driving experiences. The system will help the cars perform more safely in extreme and unknown circumstances. The researchers tested the system at the limits of friction on a racetrack using Niki, an autonomous Volkswagen GTI, and Shelley, an autonomous Audi TTS. The system performed about as well as an exist

1h

For Potential Investors in Lyft and Uber, It's Buyer Beware

Lyft leads an expected wave of big IPOs, from Uber, Pinterest, and others. These firms are stronger than the dot-coms, but that doesn't make them good investments.

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Google Ethics Adviser: Controlling Future AI is “Wishful Thinking”

Incoming Disruption As Google’s new advisory council for artificial intelligence development prepares to convene for the first time, one member has a dire warning. “AI is the single most disruptive force that humanity has ever encountered and my concern is that so much of the discussion that we hear about now is very incremental,” Hong Kong computer scientist De Kai told the South China Morning P

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Beats Powerbeats Pro true wireless earphones unveiled – CNET

The Powerbeats Pro is the first truly wireless headphones from Beats. They have many of the same features as the AirPods, including Apple's new H1 chip and always-on Siri, but they have better …

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Nintendo Switch Online is getting three more classic NES games

Super Mario Bros.: The Lost Levels first appeared in Japan on June 3, 1986, as Super Mario Bros. 2. This sequel to Super Mario Bros. was much more difficult than the original – so much so, in …

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'Super recognizer' cops give facial recognition systems a run for their money

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Climate change 'magic bullet' gets boost

submitted by /u/nirjhari [link] [comments]

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Walmart, Google make grocery shopping easier with new voice ordering, which launches today

Ordering groceries from Walmart is about to get easier.

1h

Author Correction: CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors

Author Correction: CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors Author Correction: CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1084-8 Author Correction: CasX enzymes comprise a distinct family of RNA-guided genome editors

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Author Correction: Consistent success in life-supporting porcine cardiac xenotransplantation

Author Correction: Consistent success in life-supporting porcine cardiac xenotransplantation Author Correction: Consistent success in life-supporting porcine cardiac xenotransplantation, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1108-4 Author Correction: Consistent success in life-supporting porcine cardiac xenotransplantation

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Author Correction: Targeted therapy in patients with PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndrome

Author Correction: Targeted therapy in patients with PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndrome Author Correction: Targeted therapy in patients with PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndrome, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1109-3 Author Correction: Targeted therapy in patients with PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndrome

1h

Scientists decipher 3D structure of a promising molecular target for cancer treatment

Columbia researchers have revealed the full structure of human ACLY, a building block of metabolism over-expressed in several types of cancers. Their discovery could be a major step in developing molecular targeted therapies for patients.

1h

Structure of the molecular machine that links carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

A research team led by dr. Kenneth Verstraete in the Unit for Structural Biology at the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research has unraveled the three-dimensional structure and molecular mechanism of ATP citrate lyase (ACLY). This is a central metabolic enzyme — a protein that accelerates chemical reactions — important for the production of fatty acids and cholesterol in the human liver. The

1h

UCI scientists are first to observe, image all-important molecular vibrations

By focusing light down to the size of an atom, scientists at the University of California, Irvine have produced the first images of a molecule's normal modes of vibration — the internal motions that drive the chemistry of all things, including the function of living cells.

1h

Global warming disrupts recovery of coral reefs

The damage caused to the Great Barrier Reef by global warming has compromised the capacity of its corals to recover, according to new research published today in Nature.'Dead corals don't make babies,' said lead author Professor Terry Hughes, Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University (JCU).

1h

Leukocytes use their nucleus as a ruler to choose path of least resistance

How do mobile cell types like leukocytes or metastatic cancer cells reach their place of action during immune surveillance or cancer dissemination, respectively? The research group around Michael Sixt at IST Austria has now shown that leukocytes use their nucleus as a ruler to screen their surroundings for the largest pores — and thereby find the path of least resistance.

1h

It's a one-way street for sound waves in this new technology

Imagine being able to hear people whispering in the next room, while the raucous party in your own room is inaudible to the whisperers. Yale researchers have found a way to do just that — make sound flow in one direction — within a fundamental technology found in everything from cell phones to gravitational wave detectors.

1h

Scientists discover first organism with chlorophyll genes that doesn't photosynthesize

For the first time scientists have found an organism that can produce chlorophyll but does not engage in photosynthesis. The peculiar organism is dubbed 'corallicolid' because it is found in 70 per cent of corals around the world and may provide clues as to how to protect coral reefs in the future.

1h

Newly discovered mechanism of plant hormone auxin acts the opposite way

Increased levels of the hormone auxin usually promote cell growth in various plant tissues. Researchers at IST Austria have now shown that in special areas of the seedling, increased auxin levels trigger a different gene expression pathway leading to growth inhibition. The discovery, published in the journal Nature, helps to explain the formation of the typical bend or so called apical hook that h

1h

Blocking protein's activity restores cognition in old mice, Stanford study shows

By blocking a protein's activity with antibodies, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators were able to improve cognitive behavior in aging mice.

1h

Structure of the molecular machine that links carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

A research team led by dr. Kenneth Verstraete in the Unit for Structural Biology at the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research has unraveled the three-dimensional structure and molecular mechanism of ATP citrate lyase (ACLY). This is a central metabolic enzyme — a protein that accelerates chemical reactions — important for the production of fatty acids and cholesterol in the human liver. The

1h

Metal asteroids may have once had iron-spewing volcanoes

Two groups of scientists introduce the idea of “ferrovolcanism,” or iron volcanoes, that could have occurred on metal asteroids like Psyche.

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Teflon stirrers can skew lab science

Using the wrong stir bar in a chemistry lab can introduce errors, according to a new study. Scientists have discovered that stir bars made of PTFE, more commonly known as Teflon, can introduce errors into a standard lab reaction used to manipulate the properties of carbon or boron-nitride nanotubes. Stir bars are pellet-like rods of ferromagnetic metal covered in PTFE that sit in the bottom of a

1h

UCI scientists are first to observe, image all-important molecular vibrations

By focusing light down to the size of an atom, scientists at the University of California, Irvine have produced the first images of a molecule's normal modes of vibration—the internal motions that drive the chemistry of all things, including the function of living cells.

2h

Structure of the molecular machine that links carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

A research team led by Dr. Kenneth Verstraete in the Unit for Structural Biology at the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research has unraveled the three-dimensional structure and molecular mechanism of ATP citrate lyase (ACLY). This is a central metabolic enzyme, a protein that accelerates chemical reactions, important for the production of fatty acids and cholesterol in the human liver. The rep

2h

Scientists discover first organism with chlorophyll genes that doesn't photosynthesize

For the first time scientists have found an organism that can produce chlorophyll but does not engage in photosynthesis.

2h

Newly discovered mechanism of plant hormone auxin acts contrarily

Increased levels of the hormone auxin usually promote cell growth in plant tissues. Chinese scientists, together with researchers from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), have now shown that in special areas of the seedling, increased auxin levels trigger a different gene expression pathway leading to growth inhibition. The discovery, published in the journal Nature, hel

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Unpaired 1 — A new candidate gene to contribute to lifespan regulation

Moskalev Lab published a new study on the influence of Unpaired 1 Gene overexpression on age-associated changes in flies.

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New Metascape platform enables biologists to unlock big-data insights

Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys and the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation have revealed an open-access, web-based portal that integrates more than 40 advanced bioinformatics data sources to allow non-technical users to generate insights in one click. Called Metascape, this tool removes data analysis barriers–allowing researchers to spend more time on important biologic

2h

Opioid Settlement Money to Fund Addiction Research Center

Oklahoma dropped its lawsuit against OxyContin-maker Purdue Pharma in exchange for a National Center for Addiction Studies and Treatment in Tulsa.

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PTC-bearing mRNA elicits a genetic compensation response via Upf3a and COMPASS components

PTC-bearing mRNA elicits a genetic compensation response via Upf3a and COMPASS components PTC-bearing mRNA elicits a genetic compensation response via Upf3a and COMPASS components, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1057-y mRNA that contains a premature termination codon (PTC) triggers a genetic compensation response that involves both transcription of its homologous genes an

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Object-vector coding in the medial entorhinal cortex

Object-vector coding in the medial entorhinal cortex Object-vector coding in the medial entorhinal cortex, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1077-7 Cells in the mouse medial entorhinal cortex that fire when mice are at a specific distance and direction from a stationary object suggest that vector coding is important for rodent navigation.

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Genetic paradox explained by nonsense

Genetic paradox explained by nonsense Genetic paradox explained by nonsense, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00823-5 Gene mutations that truncate the encoded protein can trigger the expression of related genes. The discovery of this compensatory response changes how we think about genetic studies in humans and model organisms.

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Genetic compensation triggered by mutant mRNA degradation

Genetic compensation triggered by mutant mRNA degradation Genetic compensation triggered by mutant mRNA degradation, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1064-z Transcriptional adaptation, a genetic compensation process by which organisms respond to mutations by upregulating related genes, is triggered by mRNA decay and involves a sequence-dependent mechanism.

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Observation of fermion-mediated interactions between bosonic atoms

Observation of fermion-mediated interactions between bosonic atoms Observation of fermion-mediated interactions between bosonic atoms, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1055-0 Embedding a Bose–Einstein condensate of caesium atoms in a degenerate Fermi gas of lithium atoms gives rise to fermion-mediated attractive boson–boson interactions, which can lead to the formation of a

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Nuclear positioning facilitates amoeboid migration along the path of least resistance

Nuclear positioning facilitates amoeboid migration along the path of least resistance Nuclear positioning facilitates amoeboid migration along the path of least resistance, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1087-5 Geometrically defined microenvironments are used to show that leukocytes migrate along chemokine gradients using the nucleus as a mechanical gauge to sample potent

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Oxytocin-dependent reopening of a social reward learning critical period with MDMA

Oxytocin-dependent reopening of a social reward learning critical period with MDMA Oxytocin-dependent reopening of a social reward learning critical period with MDMA, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1075-9 A critical period for social reward learning in mice, which closes at maturity, can be reopened by MDMA-mediated upregulation of oxytocin-dependent plasticity.

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An allosteric mechanism for potent inhibition of human ATP-citrate lyase

An allosteric mechanism for potent inhibition of human ATP-citrate lyase An allosteric mechanism for potent inhibition of human ATP-citrate lyase, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1094-6 The structure of human ATP-citrate lyase, in complex with a newly developed small-molecule inhibitor, shows extensive conformational changes that reveal an allosteric site for the inhibitor

2h

Global warming impairs stock–recruitment dynamics of corals

Global warming impairs stock–recruitment dynamics of corals Global warming impairs stock–recruitment dynamics of corals, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1081-y A regional-scale shift in the relationships between adult stock and recruitment of corals occurred along the Great Barrier Reef, following mass bleaching events in 2016 and 2017 caused by global warming.

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Visualizing vibrational normal modes of a single molecule with atomically confined light

Visualizing vibrational normal modes of a single molecule with atomically confined light Visualizing vibrational normal modes of a single molecule with atomically confined light, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1059-9 The vibrational normal modes in a single molecule are imaged using tip-enhanced Raman spectromicroscopy performed in the atomistic near-field.

2h

Coral symbiosis is a three-player game

Coral symbiosis is a three-player game Coral symbiosis is a three-player game, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00949-6 DNA analysis and microscopy reveal a third organism in the symbiosis that forms coral. The finding underscores the functional and evolutionary complexity of the symbiotic relationships that support many ecosystems.

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Five decades of northern land carbon uptake revealed by the interhemispheric CO2 gradient

Five decades of northern land carbon uptake revealed by the interhemispheric CO 2 gradient Five decades of northern land carbon uptake revealed by the interhemispheric CO 2 gradient, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1078-6 Measurements of the interhemispheric gradient of atmospheric carbon dioxide show that the Northern Hemisphere carbon land sink remained stable between th

2h

Snapshots of vibrating molecules

Snapshots of vibrating molecules Snapshots of vibrating molecules, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00987-0 A spectroscopic imaging method has reached a resolution 1,000 times better than the limits of standard optical imaging techniques — and reveals vibrational modes of molecules previously seen only in computational models.

2h

Stem cell competition orchestrates skin homeostasis and ageing

Stem cell competition orchestrates skin homeostasis and ageing Stem cell competition orchestrates skin homeostasis and ageing, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1085-7 COL17A1-driven stem cell competition and symmetric cell divisions initially govern skin homeostasis, but the same mechanisms result in skin ageing later in life.

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A widespread coral-infecting apicomplexan with chlorophyll biosynthesis genes

A widespread coral-infecting apicomplexan with chlorophyll biosynthesis genes A widespread coral-infecting apicomplexan with chlorophyll biosynthesis genes, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1072-z A newly identified lineage of apicomplexans, named corallicolids, are intracellular symbionts of many coral species, and possesses a plastid that retains genes for chlorophyll bio

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TMK1-mediated auxin signalling regulates differential growth of the apical hook

TMK1-mediated auxin signalling regulates differential growth of the apical hook TMK1-mediated auxin signalling regulates differential growth of the apical hook, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1069-7 In Arabidopsis thaliana, a newly identified auxin signalling pathway that involves TMK1 protein cleavage and IAA32 and IAA34 transcriptional repressors mediates complex develo

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CD22 blockade restores homeostatic microglial phagocytosis in ageing brains

CD22 blockade restores homeostatic microglial phagocytosis in ageing brains CD22 blockade restores homeostatic microglial phagocytosis in ageing brains, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1088-4 CD22 inhibits microglial phagocytosis in the ageing brain, and treatment with a CD22-blocking antibody restores microglial homeostasis and cognitive function in ageing mice.

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Precise therapeutic gene correction by a simple nuclease-induced double-stranded break

Precise therapeutic gene correction by a simple nuclease-induced double-stranded break Precise therapeutic gene correction by a simple nuclease-induced double-stranded break, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1076-8 Disease-causing microduplications can be corrected by harnessing an endogenous double-stranded break DNA repair pathway.

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Structure of ATP citrate lyase and the origin of citrate synthase in the Krebs cycle

Structure of ATP citrate lyase and the origin of citrate synthase in the Krebs cycle Structure of ATP citrate lyase and the origin of citrate synthase in the Krebs cycle, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1095-5 Crystal structures of ATP citrate lyase from bacteria, archaea and humans unravel how the enzyme directs the formation of the central metabolite acetyl-CoA, and shed

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Podcast: MDMA and the malleable mind, and keeping skin young

Podcast: MDMA and the malleable mind, and keeping skin young Podcast: MDMA and the malleable mind, and keeping skin young, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01075-z Hear the latest in science, brought to you by Nick Howe and Benjamin Thompson.

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Innate lymphoid cells support regulatory T cells in the intestine through interleukin-2

Innate lymphoid cells support regulatory T cells in the intestine through interleukin-2 Innate lymphoid cells support regulatory T cells in the intestine through interleukin-2, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1082-x A microbiota- and IL-1β-dependent axis of IL-2 production by group-3 innate lymphoid cells is shown in a mouse model to be necessary to maintain immunological

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Nonreciprocal control and cooling of phonon modes in an optomechanical system

Nonreciprocal control and cooling of phonon modes in an optomechanical system Nonreciprocal control and cooling of phonon modes in an optomechanical system, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1061-2 A cavity optomechanical scheme produces robust nonreciprocal coupling between phononic resonators and is used to control the resonators’ thermal fluctuations.

2h

Elimination of unfit cells in young and ageing skin

Elimination of unfit cells in young and ageing skin Elimination of unfit cells in young and ageing skin, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00825-3 Cell competition in the skin promotes tissue youthfulness, but the same process later leads to skin ageing. This finding helps to explain how skin is maintained, and uncovers potential anti-ageing therapeutic targets.

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Ultrafast spin-lasers

Ultrafast spin-lasers Ultrafast spin-lasers, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1073-y Room-temperature modulation frequencies exceeding 200 GHz are demonstrated in birefringent semiconductor spin-lasers by coupling the spin of the charge carriers to the light polarization.

2h

New interactions seen in an ultracold gas

New interactions seen in an ultracold gas New interactions seen in an ultracold gas, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00988-z Experiments have revealed an attractive interaction between pairs of particles that is mediated by a surrounding quantum gas. The finding paves the way for a detailed study of the properties of such mediated interactions.

2h

Scientists discover first organism with chlorophyll genes that doesn't photosynthesize

For the first time scientists have found an organism that can produce chlorophyll but does not engage in photosynthesis.

2h

UCI scientists are first to observe, image all-important molecular vibrations

By focusing light down to the size of an atom, scientists at the University of California, Irvine have produced the first images of a molecule's normal modes of vibration—the internal motions that drive the chemistry of all things, including the function of living cells.

2h

Newly discovered mechanism of plant hormone auxin acts contrarily

Increased levels of the hormone auxin usually promote cell growth in plant tissues. Chinese scientists, together with researchers from the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), have now shown that in special areas of the seedling, increased auxin levels trigger a different gene expression pathway leading to growth inhibition. The discovery, published in the journal Nature, hel

2h

Global warming disrupts recovery of coral reefs

The damage caused to the Great Barrier Reef by global warming has compromised the capacity of its corals to recover, according to new research published today in Nature.

2h

Structure of the molecular machine that links carbohydrate and lipid metabolism

A research team led by Dr. Kenneth Verstraete in the Unit for Structural Biology at the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research has unraveled the three-dimensional structure and molecular mechanism of ATP citrate lyase (ACLY). This is a central metabolic enzyme, a protein that accelerates chemical reactions, important for the production of fatty acids and cholesterol in the human liver. The rep

2h

It's a one-way street for sound waves in this new technology

Imagine being able to hear people whispering in the next room, while the raucous party in your own room is inaudible to the whisperers. Yale researchers have found a way to do just that—make sound flow in one direction—within a fundamental technology found in everything from cell phones to gravitational wave detectors.

2h

Barrier Reef baby coral numbers crash

New research offers little hope for recovery of the biggest reef on the planet. Andrew Masterson reports

2h

Photos: Cretaceous 'Graveyard' Holds a Snapshot of the Dino-Killing Asteroid Impact

A fossil site in North Dakota preserves a unique snapshot of the minutes after an asteroid struck Earth around 66 million years ago.

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Andrew Yang’s Audacious Plan to Save Us from Automation

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Gorillas gather around and groom their dead

It is now known that many animals exhibit unique behaviors around same-species corpses, ranging from removal of the bodies and burial among social insects to quiet attendance and caregiving among elephants and primates. Researchers in Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo have been able to take a close look at the behavioral responses to the deaths of three individuals—both known and unknown—in

2h

Gorillas gather around and groom their dead

It is now known that many animals exhibit unique behaviors around same-species corpses, ranging from removal of the bodies and burial among social insects to quiet attendance and caregiving among elephants and primates. Researchers in Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo have been able to take a close look at the behavioral responses to the deaths of three individuals—both known and unknown—in

2h

Gorillas gather around and groom their dead

It is now known that many animals exhibit unique behaviors around same-species corpses, ranging from removal of the bodies and burial among social insects to quiet attendance and caregiving among elephants and primates. Researchers in Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo have been able to take a close look at the behavioral responses to the deaths of three individuals — both known and unknown.

2h

Racial bias associated with disparities in disciplinary action across US schools

Across US counties, black students experience higher rates of suspension, expulsion, in-school arrests and law enforcement referrals than whites, according to a new study.

2h

Scientists Put Cameras on Sharks to Watch Them Hunt Seals in a Kelp Forest

Tall undulating seaweed known as kelp grows in thick underwater forests off the southern coasts of Africa. The kelp forests were once thought to provide a safe haven to Cape fur seals from great white sharks. Then researchers put GoPro-like high-resolution cameras on the predators. Instead of being deterred by the underwater flora, the sharks dive right into thick kelp forests in pursuit of prey,

2h

Fossil Site May Capture the Dinosaur-Killing Impact, but It’s Only the Beginning of the Story

The Tanis site in North Dakota contains evidence of the asteroid impact that killed off the dinosaurs

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Verizon's new 'Just Kids' plan aims to become your child's first smartphone plan

A child's first cell phone is increasingly becoming an earlier, and pricier, decision for parents.

2h

Daily briefing: A fossil snapshot of the last day of the dinosaurs

Daily briefing: A fossil snapshot of the last day of the dinosaurs Daily briefing: A fossil snapshot of the last day of the dinosaurs, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01077-x An unconventional palaeontologist’s big find, the cold-war legacy etched in a city’s DNA and our take on an eye-opening documentary about Theranos.

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Amazon awards 100 computer science scholarships

Amazon will provide $4 million in scholarships for 100 high school students as part of its new program to support computer science education.

2h

Egypt Red Sea province to ban single-use plastic

Egypt's Red Sea Governorate is to introduce a ban on single-use plastics that are destroying marine life, the province's top official said Wednesday.

2h

German state to accept environmentalists' bee-saving plan

The German state of Bavaria is set to accept in large part a plan by environmentalists to save bees and protect biodiversity, averting a referendum on the issue.

2h

New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators

For years, scientists have assumed that when top predators are reintroduced to an ecosystem, the effects are predictable: The ecosystem will return to how it was before the predators were wiped out.

2h

Researchers' breakthrough in tackling challenge of antifungal resistance

Ground-breaking work by university experts in Tennessee, Texas and Swansea is helping develop a better understanding of the growing threat posed by antifungal drug resistance.

2h

Last time CO2 levels were this high, there were trees at the South Pole

Pilocene beech fossils in Antarctica when CO 2 was at similar level to today point to planet’s future Trees growing near the South Pole, sea levels 20 metres higher than now, and global temperatures 3C-4C warmer. That is the world scientists are uncovering as they look back in time to when the planet last had as much carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as it does today. Using sedimentary records and

2h

Joaquin Phoenix breathes new life into an iconic role in first Joker trailer

It's a standalone film as DC Films moves away from the shared universe model.

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Verizon said it turned on 5G wireless in two cities. Here’s what it is, and who can access it.

Verizon said Wednesday it had turned on its ultra-fast 5G wireless network in parts of Chicago and Minneapolis, though it'll only be available to certain subscribers who pay a fee and own a …

2h

Integrating infant mental health into the neonatal intensive care unit

Psychotherapists attend to mental health needs of NICU families, specifically focusing on the developing relationship between babies and parents.

2h

Gorillas gather around and groom their dead

It is now known that many animals exhibit unique behaviors around same-species corpses, ranging from removal of the bodies and burial among social insects to quiet attendance and caregiving among elephants and primates. Researchers in Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo have been able to take a close look at the behavioral responses to the deaths of three individuals — both known and unknown

2h

Liquid Crystals Could Protect Pilots Against Laser Pointer Attacks

Liquid Crystals Could Protect Pilots Against Laser Pointer Attacks New proof of concept could guard against the disorienting effects of laser pointers invading the cockpit. laserairplane.jpg Image credits: riopatuca/Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, April 3, 2019 – 11:00 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) — The FAA received more than 6,700 reports of lasers striking aircraft in 2017, a drama

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German state to accept environmentalists' bee-saving plan

The German state of Bavaria is set to accept in large part a plan by environmentalists to save bees and protect biodiversity, averting a referendum on the issue.

2h

New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators

For years, scientists have assumed that when top predators are reintroduced to an ecosystem, the effects are predictable: The ecosystem will return to how it was before the predators were wiped out.

2h

Researchers' breakthrough in tackling challenge of antifungal resistance

Ground-breaking work by university experts in Tennessee, Texas and Swansea is helping develop a better understanding of the growing threat posed by antifungal drug resistance.

2h

Otherworldly mirror pools and mesmerizing landscapes discovered on ocean floor

While exploring hydrothermal vent and cold seep environments, Dr. Mandy Joye (University of Georgia), and her interdisciplinary research team discovered large venting mineral towers that reach up to 23 meters in height and 10 meters across. These towers featured numerous volcanic flanges that create the illusion of looking at a mirror when observing the superheated (366ºC) hydrothermal fluids bene

2h

The whisper room: Moderates on Twitter are losing their voice

A researcher finds that partisan users form highly partisan social networks on Twitter, moderate users — or those less politically engaged — continue to avoid politics, potentially creating an important void on social media.

2h

Order hidden in disorder

Partitioning space into cells with optimum geometrical properties is a central challenge in many fields of science and technology. Researchers from several countries have now found that in amorphous, i.e. disordered, systems optimization of the individual cells gradually results in the same structure, although it remains amorphous. The disordered structure quickly converges to hyperuniformity — a

2h

GPS glitch threatens thousands of scientific instruments

GPS glitch threatens thousands of scientific instruments GPS glitch threatens thousands of scientific instruments, Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01048-2 A quirk in how Global Positioning System signals are time-stamped risks messing up devices’ data from 6 April.

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Your digital life is a mess. Our 30-day deep-clean newsletter will fix that.

Technology We're here to help, or your money back. (Also our help is free.) We compiled a list of all the cleanup tasks you need to knock out, and we'll email you one simple tutorial each day. You'll be living a more secure, productive digital…

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How the World's First Dengue Vaccination Drive Ended in Disaster

Is a runaway immune reaction making a dengue vaccine dangerous? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ancient Pompeii 'Fast-Food' Spot Lured Customers with Sexy Logo

Before Mount Vesuvius blasted Pompeii to smithereens in 79, it was possible to grab a bite to eat there at a "fast-food" joint decorated with a handsome sea nymph.

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How the World's First Dengue Vaccination Drive Ended in Disaster

Is a runaway immune reaction making a dengue vaccine dangerous? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Disrupting the Single-Use Plastic Economy

An innovative business model could remedy a pervasive environmental harm — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers' breakthrough in tackling challenge of antifungal resistance

Ground-breaking work by university experts in Tennessee, Texas and Swansea is helping develop a better understanding of the growing threat posed by antifungal drug resistance. Invasive aspergillosis is a devastating disease caused by breathing in small airborne spores of the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and it is a condition where drug resistance has been encountered. They have just released a pap

2h

New study questions effects of reintroducing top predators

There's little evidence that reintroducing top predators to ecosystems will return them to the conditions that existed before they were wiped out, according to new research.

2h

Optical tweezers achieve new feats of capturing atoms

In a new study, physicists showed that they could organize groups of individual atoms into large grids with an efficiency unmatched by existing methods.

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Advance boosts efficiency of flash storage in data centers

New architecture promises to cut in half the energy and physical space required to store and manage user data.

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Racial disparities persist in access to kidney transplants

In a new study of patients awaiting kidney transplants, Yale researchers found significant racial disparities. This occurred despite a new system designed to reduce inequities, the researchers said. The study was published in JAMA Surgery.

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Researchers demonstrate latest neurotechnologies at international conference

Scientists and engineers met to collaborate on their latest research and demonstrate new technologies at the 9th International IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society conference on neural engineering, in San Francisco, Calif., March 19-23. For more information about the recent study visit the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Otherworldly mirror pools and mesmerizing landscapes discovered on ocean floor

Scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor recently discovered and explored a hydrothermal field at 2,000 meters depth in the Gulf of California where towering mineral structures serve as biological hotspots for life. These newly discovered geological formations feature upside down 'mirror-like flanges' that act as pooling sites for discharged fluids.

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From 'Us' to 'The Favourite,' Rabbits Are Now Hollywood's Creepiest Creatures

Bunnies are now avatars of evil—but what did they ever do to us?

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Optical tweezers achieve new feats of capturing atoms

Trapping single atoms is a bit like herding cats, which makes researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder expert feline wranglers.

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Shazam! Is a Blockbuster Straight From the Spielberg Era

Many a superhero origin story—and heaven knows that cinemas have been flooded with them in the past decade—has an extended early sequence in which the protagonist gets to fool around with his or her newly acquired powers. Think of Spider-Man before he learns that with great power comes great responsibility, when he’s using his wall-crawling abilities to win wrestling matches and swing around the

3h

Labeling proteins with ubiquitin paves new road to cell regulation research

Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. In a first, scientists have succeeded in marking proteins with ubiquitin in a targeted manner, in test tubes as well as in living cells. The procedure opens the door to exploring the inner workings of this vital regulatory system.

3h

Apple employee detained by US customs agents after declining to unlock phone, laptop

Andreas Gal, an American citizen, was asked to turn over the passwords to his mobile phone and laptop, which were both owned by Apple.

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This “Transparent Wood” Could Cut the Cost of Heating Your Home

Hot in Here Scientists have added a polymer called polyethylene glycol (PEG) to transparent wood to give it the ability to absorb and release heat — and it could make heating and cooling future homes far less costly. “During a sunny day, the material will absorb heat before it reaches the indoor space, and the indoors will be cooler than outside,” researcher Céline Montanari said in a press relea

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People with obesity often 'dehumanized,' study finds

New research has found that people with obesity are not only stigmatized, but are blatantly dehumanized.

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A 5,000-year-old barley grain discovered in Finland changes understanding of livelihoods

A 5,000-year-old barley grain discovered in Aland, southern Finland, turns researchers' understanding of ancient Northern livelihoods upside down. New findings reveal that hunter-gatherers took to farming already 5,000 years ago in eastern Sweden, and on the Aland Islands, located on the southwest coast of Finland.

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Amplifier for terahertz lattice vibrations in a semiconductor crystal

In analogy to the amplification of light in a laser, vibrations of a semiconductor crystal, so called phonons, were enhanced by interaction with an electron current. Excitation of a metal-semiconductor nanostructure by intense terahertz (THz) pulses results in a ten-fold amplification of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons at a frequency of 9 THz. Coupling such lattice motions to propagating sound w

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Labeling proteins with ubiquitin paves new road to cell regulation research

Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. In a first, scientists have succeeded in marking proteins with ubiquitin in a targeted manner, in test tubes as well as in living cells. The procedure opens the door to exploring the inner workings of this vital regulatory system.

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The brain's auto-complete function

When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new study now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function.

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Creating blood vessels on demand

Researchers discover new cell population that can help in regenerative processes.

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Abnormalities in a protein affecting how nerve cells change shape

Since 1993, when the gene that causes Huntington's disease (HD) was identified, there has been intense focus on understanding how this genetic mutation causes the disease's severe progressive neural deterioration.

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Dark Energy Instrument's lenses see the night sky for the first time

On April 1, the dome of the Mayall Telescope near Tucson, Arizona, opened to the night sky, and starlight poured through the assembly of six large lenses that were carefully packaged and aligned for a new instrument that will launch later this year.

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This Greek philosopher had the right idea, just too few elements

The ancient Greek philosopher Empedocles wrongly believed matter to consist of just four elements, but he grasped the basic idea of forces governing unchanging matter.

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Disrupting the Single-Use Plastic Economy

An innovative business model could remedy a pervasive environmental harm — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China's acceptance of certain non-animal testing methods for the regulation of cosmetics

The Institute for In Vitro Sciences (IIVS) applauds China's National Medical Products Administration (NMPA) for their acceptance of certain non-animal (alternative) test methods for the regulation of cosmetics.

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Global Health: Scientists Thought They Had Measles Cornered. They Were Wrong.

Following intensive vaccination efforts, measles cases plunged across the world. Now clusters of new infections — some linked, some not — have confounded health officials.

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California's current earthquake hiatus is an unlikely pause

There have been no major ground rupturing earthquakes along California's three highest slip rate faults in the past 100 years. A new study published in Seismological Research Letters concludes that this current "hiatus" has no precedent in the past 1000 years.

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A Predictable Coda to the Waco Biker Gunfight

Almost four years after a gunfight among rival motorcycle gangs left nine bikers dead at a Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas, this story of wild misconduct and ineptitude in the criminal-justice system came to a predictable conclusion on Tuesday. Roughly 200 bikers were arrested on May 17, 2015, according to the Waco Tribune-Herald ; 155 were charged with engaging in organized criminal activit

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The whisper room: Moderates on Twitter are losing their voice

With the growing popularity of social media, Twitter has become a prominent place to voice opinions on both ends of the political spectrum. With the ability to follow those who only argue one side, voices of people who are in the middle, disinterested in politics or use social media solely for entertainment purposes might be getting drowned out amidst the political noise.

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How Your "Lifestyle Score" Affects Your Risk of Colorectal Cancer

Unhealthy habits can increase a person's risk of colorectal cancer

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New formula better predicts speed of tumor growth in 12 cancers

University at Buffalo researchers have developed a new method to more accurately predict tumor growth rates, a crucial statistic used to schedule screenings and set dosing regimens in cancer treatment.

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California's current earthquake hiatus is an unlikely pause

There have been no major ground rupturing earthquakes along California's three highest slip rate faults in the past 100 years. A new study published in Seismological Research Letters concludes that this current 'hiatus' has no precedent in the past 1000 years.

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Strong link between air pollution in Southwestern Ontario and adverse birth outcomes

A study by researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, Western University and Brescia University College has found evidence of a strong association between exposure to sulfur dioxide during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes.

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Dermatology students improve Wikipedia entries on skin disease

A group of medical students recruited to improve Wikipedia articles on skin-related diseases, saw millions more views of those stories following their editing, highlighting the value of expert input on the popular web encyclopedia.

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The whisper room: Moderates on Twitter are losing their voice

MU researcher finds that partisan users form highly partisan social networks on Twitter, moderate users — or those less politically engaged — continue to avoid politics, potentially creating an important void on social media.

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Abnormalities in a protein affecting how nerve cells change shape

Amsterdam, NL, April 3, 2019 – Since 1993, when the gene that causes Huntington's disease (HD) was identified, there has been intense focus on understanding how this genetic mutation causes the disease's severe progressive neural deterioration.

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Study looks to iron from microbes for climate help

Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could "fertilize" microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers.

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How to move more cars, faster

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Renewable energy now makes up a third of global power capacity.

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Scientists Say New Cyborg Plants Could Someday Grow on Mars

Superplants Scientists have figured out how to give plants a high-tech upgrade. In new research, Australian scientists show how plants can be augmented with nanomaterials that make them better at absorbing sunlight — and may help them survive on futuristic Martian farms. Old System People have long been able to introduce new compounds into plants via their vascular systems, which shuttle water an

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What we know and don’t know about how mass trauma affects mental health

Three people connected to mass shootings have recently killed themselves. Here’s what we know, and don’t, about the lingering effects of mass trauma.

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Working Scientist podcast: Why universities are failing to embrace AI

Working Scientist podcast: Why universities are failing to embrace AI Working Scientist podcast: Why universities are failing to embrace AI , Published online: 03 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01076-y Mark Dodgson and Lee Cronin discuss the revolutionary potential of artificial intelligence on university teaching, research, and scientific careers.

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Ældre kvinder bliver ikke screenet, men de har størst risiko for at dø af livmoderhalskræft

Ældre kvinder har op til fem gange højere risiko end yngre kvinder for at dø af livmoderhalskræft, viser dansk forskning.

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Make Concrete Roman Again! – Facts So Romantic

Pliny’s literary challenge, in composing his “Natural History” in 1st century A.D., was giving “novelty to what is old, and authority to what is new.” Modern engineering’s is to see that what is old has some authority, too. “Roman Capriccio: The Pantheon and Other Monuments,” by Giovanni Paolo Panini (1735) The Roman naturalist Pliny the Elder can be charmingly self-deprecating. He attempted, in

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Creating blood vessels on demand

Researchers discover new cell population that can help in regenerative processes.

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The brain's auto-complete function

When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new collaborative study between the Universities of Birmingham and Bonn now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function. It is now published in the journ

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A 5,000-year-old barley grain discovered in Finland changes understanding of livelihoods

A 5,000-year-old barley grain discovered in Aland, southern Finland, turns researchers' understanding of ancient Northern livelihoods upside down. New findings reveal that hunter-gatherers took to farming already 5,000 years ago in eastern Sweden, and on the Aland Islands, located on the southwest coast of Finland.

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More policy work needed to reduce use of smokeless tobacco, say researchers

Researchers at the University of York have shown that regulations on smokeless tobacco are still lacking, despite 181 countries agreeing to a common approach to controlling the demand and supply.

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Alcohol-induced brain damage continues after alcohol is stopped

Now, a joint work of the Institute of Neuroscience CSIC-UMH, in Alicante, and the Central Institute of Mental Health of Mannheim, in Germany, has detected, by means of magnetic resonance, how the damage in the brain continues during the first weeks of abstinence, although the consumption of alcohol ceases.

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Study examines association of individual factors, likelihood of bullying

Exposure to bullying is common. This study included about 5,000 children in the United Kingdom and it used genetic data, information on observable traits and exposure to bullying to identify individual risk factors associated with the likelihood of being bullied.

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Racial disparities, access to kidney transplants after new organ allocation system

Among the priorities of a new Kidney Allocation System implemented in 2014 was to improve access to transplants to underserved populations. This study included nearly 43,000 patients on a kidney transplant wait-list after implementation of the new system.

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GALLERI: Kæmpekran monterer brofag

Den flydende kæmpekran Hebo-Lift 9 gik onsdag i gang med at hejse de fire brofag til Lille Langebro fra transportprammen over til deres lejer i Københavns Havn.

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Københavns næste cykelbro på vej: Lille Langebro hejses på plads

Kæmpekranen Hebo-Lift 9 er i øjeblikket i gang med at hejse brofagene på plads til den nye cykel- og gangbro Lille Langebro i Københavns Havn.

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Megapixels: CRISPR turned these lizards into ghosts

Animals Albino lizards? For spring? Groundbreaking In an eye-popping reptilian first, researchers were able to genetically modify a reptile embryo using the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR. The technology has been…

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The psychology behind solving cold case homicides

Probing unsolved crimes from years or decades ago is a challenge for any police officer. But the task is made even more difficult because the very term "cold case" puts a dampener on expectations of success, according to a university criminologist whose latest book calls for a new investigative mindset in detectives who are assigned to re-open case files.

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Tips för att bemöta personer med självskadebeteende

Under slutet av 90-talet började allt fler unga skada sig själva. Nu blir det inte längre fler, men fenomenet tycks tyvärr finnas här för att stanna. Varför väljer någon att göra sig själv illa? Enligt Jonas Bjärehed, psykolog, lektor i psykologi och en av bokförfattarna, är det ett sätt att reglera svåruthärdliga känslor. Det kan handla om ångest, nedstämdhet, tomhetskänslor, skam eller självhat

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Käkbensdöd kan behandlas kirurgiskt

Bisfosfonater och denosumab är läkemedel som ges till patienter med benskörhet och till patienter med bröst- och prostatacancer som spritts till skelettet. Läkemedlen används för att hämma den bennedbrytning som ökar risken för frakturer hos dessa patienter. Käkbensdöd, eller käkbensnekros som är den medicinska termen, är en biverkning av medicineringen. Den kan uppstå i käken men den uppstår int

4h

Unga nyanlända döms på vagare grunder än svenska ungdomar

Under år 2016 blossade en debatt upp runt om i Europa där nyanlända ungdomar pekades ut som en särskild riskgrupp vad gäller sexualbrott. Den sociala oron kring gruppen ”flyktingar” ökade och påverkade attityderna till flyktingmottagandet. – Jag har haft som mål att studera hur rättsstatsideal upprätthålls i en tid som präglas av förhöjd social oro kring en viss grupp i samhället, i detta fall gr

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Racial bias associated with disparities in disciplinary action across US schools

Across US counties, black students experience higher rates of suspension, expulsion, in-school arrests and law enforcement referrals than whites, according to a new study led by Princeton University researchers.

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Tipping the scales

Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. In a first, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded in marking proteins with ubiquitin in a targeted manner, in test tubes as well as in living cells. The procedure opens the door to exploring the inner workings of this vital regulatory system.

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Secure relationship with new parents reduces anxiety in adopted children

In children who have experienced early institutional care, a strong relationship with their adoptive parents plays a positive role in brain development and the child's long-term mental health, according to a new study, published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, published by Elsevier

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Is adenosine the missing link in restless leg syndrome?

Researchers have identified a common mechanism implicating adenosine in the cause of restless leg syndrome (RLS) symptoms — the periodic limb movements characteristic of RLS and the state of enhanced arousal that both disrupt sleep.

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HPV infection high in minority men who have sex with men despite available vaccine

The rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is high among young minority gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men despite the availability of a vaccine that can prevent the infection, a Rutgers School of Public Health study found.

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Amplifier for terahertz lattice vibrations in a semiconductor crystal

In analogy to the amplification of light in a laser, vibrations of a semiconductor crystal, so called phonons, were enhanced by interaction with an electron current. Excitation of a metal-semiconductor nanostructure by intense terahertz (THz) pulses results in a ten-fold amplification of longitudinal optical (LO) phonons at a frequency of 9 THz. Coupling such lattice motions to propagating sound w

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study looks to iron from microbes for climate help

Distributing iron particles produced by bacteria could 'fertilize' microscopic ocean plants and ultimately lower atmospheric carbon levels, according to a new paper in Frontiers. The paper proposes a novel way to provide iron to large areas of the ocean, 30 percent of which is poor in the essential element.

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High-tech material in a salt crust

MAX phases unite the positive properties of ceramics and metals. A method developed by scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich now makes it possible to produce this material class on an industrial scale: a salt crust protects the raw material from oxidation at a temperature of more than 1,000 degrees Celsius — and can then simply be washed off with water. The method, which was recently published

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Public art that turns cities into playgrounds of the imagination | Helen Marriage

Visual artist Helen Marriage stages astonishing, large-scale public art events that expand the boundaries of what's possible. In this visual tour of her work, she tells the story of three cities she transformed into playgrounds of the imagination — picture London with a giant mechanical elephant marching through it — and shows what happens when people stop to marvel and experience a moment toget

4h

More delays for Boeing's new space capsule for astronauts

Boeing's new space capsule for astronauts faces more launch delays.

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As Sea Ice Disappears, So Do Nutrients for Wildlife

Increasingly threatened young ice is crucial in transporting nutrients to the deep, central Arctic Ocean — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As Sea Ice Disappears, So Do Nutrients for Wildlife

Increasingly threatened young ice is crucial in transporting nutrients to the deep, central Arctic Ocean — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Risky Stem-Cell Treatments Come Under F.D.A. Scrutiny — Again

Warning that unapproved stem-cell treatments put patients at risk, the F.D.A. is notifying clinics and manufacturers that flout its rules.

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Tesla Will Demonstrate Full Self-Driving Capabilities This Month

You’re Invited (Kinda) Tesla is ready to put on a show for its investors — complete with a possible demo of its hotly anticipated “full self-driving” feature. On Wednesday, the company shared a press release announcing plans to host an “ Investor Day ” at its headquarters in Palo Alto on the morning of April 19. Tesla’s reason for the shindig is to “provide a deep dive into our self-driving techn

4h

New Technique Alters Your Facial Appearance Without Surgery

Operation Station A new type of medical procedure could help replace some kinds of painful, invasive surgeries. By using electrical current and 3D-printed molds, doctors figured out how to soften and re-shape cartilage without making a single incision — a development that could significantly shorten the recovery time for medical procedures and make the whole process less painful. Surgery Shocker

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Only 53 years left until the world's fossil fuels run dry

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VW Joins BMW in Testing Self-Driving Cars on German City Streets

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GM, Ford and Toyota join to advance self-driving testing, standards

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New insights on liver injury in men taking body building supplements

Forty-four men with liver injury, attributed to over-the-counter bodybuilding supplements, experienced a uniform and distinctive pattern of signs and symptoms that were often prolonged, difficult to treat, and accompanied by disability and weight loss, according to a new study.

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Elucidation of functional mechanism of 'love hormone,' oxytocin, at molecular level

Oxytocin is essential in activities of the social brain such as trust and love and in maternal bonding behaviors. It is produced in the brain and secreted into the circulation. Here, by analyzing maternal behaviors of RAGE gene-manipulated mice, oxytocin was found to be transported back to the brain, crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), an extremely effective barrier, by binding to the receptor

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VLA makes first direct image of key feature of powerful radio galaxies

A dusty, doughnut-shaped feature long thought to be an essential part of the 'engines' at the cores of active galaxies is seen for the first time in one of the most powerful galaxies in the Universe.

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Citizen science shows that climate change is rapidly reshaping Long Island Sound

In the summer of 1973, Joe Hage was in the seventh grade. Together with his peers, he boarded the old Boston Whaler from Project Oceanology just as dawn began to shimmer from behind the trees of Bluff Point. He remembers how instructors led the crowd into knee-deep waters, the velvety green marsh, eel grass tickling their mud-stuck legs, the crabs and snails and fish that flailed around in a beach

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Here's why you need to keep your voice down when on a wildlife tour

Anyone who has ever spent time observing wild animals in nature will know that silence is golden. Wildlife tours recommend that people stay quiet in order to see more, but research on Tibetan macaques suggests that high levels of noise from tourists can also lead to more aggressive behaviour.

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Adobe After Effects gets content-aware fill to let you remove unwanted objects from videos

Adobe’s After Effects now has the power of Photoshop’s content-aware fill for video, as introduced in today’s Spring update. The feature lets users remove unwanted objects videos, …

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Immunotherapy kicks and kills HIV by exploiting a common virus

In a first on the quest to cure HIV, University of Pittsburgh scientists report that they've developed an all-in-one immunotherapy approach that not only kicks HIV out of hiding in the immune system, but also kills it. The key lies in immune cells designed to recognize an entirely different virus.

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Order hidden in disorder

Partitioning space into cells with optimum geometrical properties is a central challenge in many fields of science and technology. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and colleagues from several countries have now found that in amorphous, i.e. disordered, systems optimization of the individual cells gradually results in the same structure, although it remains amorphous. The disordered

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Thirteen new ant species discovered in Hong Kong

Dr. Benoit Guénard and his team from the School of Biological Sciences, the University of Hong Kong have recently expanded the knowledge on Hong Kong ants by adding 13 new species, of which three are newly described in the world, but five are unwelcome new non-native species. The findings were published in two separate academic journal articles.

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Here's why you need to keep your voice down when on a wildlife tour

Anyone who has ever spent time observing wild animals in nature will know that silence is golden. Wildlife tours recommend that people stay quiet in order to see more, but research on Tibetan macaques suggests that high levels of noise from tourists can also lead to more aggressive behaviour.

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Blue light breaks down MRSA’s defenses

Rather than wasting precious time to find which medicine will best treat MRSA, doctors could soon use a new method to disarm the superbug: Light therapy. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a bacterium that causes infection in various parts of the body can dodge many common antibiotics. Although most MRSA infections aren’t serious, some can be life-threatening, sometimes resulting

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Anxiety can spike when seniors’ daily needs go unmet

Older adults who struggle with dressing, bathing, and preparing meals, but don’t get the help they need, may experience high levels of anxiety, researchers report. That can lead to adverse consequences, such as wearing soiled clothes or going hungry. A new study tracked the behavior of older adults, when no one properly handled their needs, leading to elevated anxiety symptoms. This created “a vi

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Efter 50 års forvirring: Fysikere har fået styr på beregningen af betahenfald

PLUS. Forklaringen på en forskel på beregninger og eksperimenter på 25 pct. er nu fundet ved, at teoretikere har lavet en meget kompliceret beregning helt fra bunden. Efter 50 års forvirring stemmer regnestykket nu.

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Older women have the highest risk of dying from cervical cancer

New research shows that women aged 65 and older have a higher risk of dying from cervical cancer than previously thought — although this age group is not covered by the Danish screening program.

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Why men are more likely to develop liver cancer

Researchers have discovered that a hormone secreted by fat cells that is present at higher levels in women can stop liver cells from becoming cancerous. The study helps explain why hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is more common in men, and could lead to new treatments for the disease, which is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide.

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Coral study traces excess nitrogen to Maui wastewater treatment facility

A new method for reconstructing changes in nitrogen sources over time has enabled scientists to connect excess nutrients in the coastal waters of West Maui, Hawaii, to a sewage treatment facility that injects treated wastewater into the ground.

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Global eradication of 'fly of death' not ethically justified, researchers conclude

Researchers argue that human-caused extinction of the tsetse fly would be unethical, but elimination campaigns targeting isolated populations of the fly are ethically defensible.

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Kan liv från jorden överleva på Mars?

Liv på Mars är ett forskningstema som sysselsätter många forskare runt om i världen. Det internationella BIOMEX forskningsteamet (BIOlogy and Mars Experiment) har gjort en förstudie till hur organismer från jorden kan överleva under Mars-liknande villkor. En översikt av deras resultat har nu publicerats. Syftet med BIOMEX-projektet var att undersöka hur olika biologiska prover (bland annat olika

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What Cape Town's drought can teach other cities about climate adaptation

Extreme weather events, such as Cyclone Idai that has recently devastated Beira, Mozambique, and Hurricane Harvey that hit Houston, USA, in 2017are the types of climate extremes that cities increasingly have to prepare for.

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Geographers use big data to predict how slope affects human travel rates

Have you ever been running on a sidewalk making pretty good time, then hit a hill and slowed way down? If so, you've experienced how slope affects travel rates. For most of us, understanding how slope steepness impacts our speed is a matter of fitness. For others, such as wildland firefighters retreating from the fire line to a safety zone, predicting how long it takes to move across terrain can b

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People with obesity often 'dehumanized,' study finds

New research, published in Obesity, has found that people with obesity are not only stigmatized, but are blatantly dehumanized.

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Predicting the uphill battle

For wildland firefighters retreating from the fire to a safety zone, predicting how long it takes to move across terrain can be a matter of life and death. Geographers developed a series of models that strongly predict how terrain slope impacts travel rates. Using a crowdsourced fitness-tracking database, they analyzed GPS data from nearly 30,000 people. The resulting models are the first to accou

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Five things people can do for a 'healthier environment'

Christiana Figueres, who helped secure the Paris Climate Change Agreement, gives her suggestions.

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Your heartbeat may help you sync up with other people to cooperate

Your movements are more likely to occur between heartbeats than during them, a quirk that could help us synchronise with other people

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Testing radiation resistance without using a nuclear reactor

The University of Huddersfield's combined electron microscope and ion beam accelerator is a world-class facility responsible for a large and growing global network of research collaborations. One of the latest is a partnership with Brazil's leading university and the scientific significance of this link and how it could help ensure the safety of nuclear power is described in an article that appear

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Highly economical LED street lights tested in practice

Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a novel, even more economical LED street light. They replaced conventional high-performance diodes by a special array of weaker LEDs and, thus, succeeded in reducing power consumption by another 20%. As a result, CO2 emission is decreased and municipalities might save millions of power costs. Pfalzwerke Netz AG, the local utilit

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Global eradication of 'fly of death' not ethically justified, researchers conclude

The tsetse fly, also known as the "fly of death" and the "poverty fly," is the primary means of transmission for the parasite that causes trypanosomosis.

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Coral study traces excess nitrogen to Maui wastewater treatment facility

A new method for reconstructing changes in nitrogen sources over time has enabled scientists to connect excess nutrients in the coastal waters of West Maui, Hawaii, to a sewage treatment facility that injects treated wastewater into the ground.

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Did a microbe ‘merger’ create Earth’s first complex life?

New evidence strengthens the hypothesis that the first complex life forms, called eukaryotes, arose from the merger of two simpler life forms, researchers report. The same team previously identified living relatives of ancestors of eukaryotes, while this latest study shows how those ancestors might have shared the work of metabolism with bacteria they acted as hosts for. “This study is exciting b

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Global eradication of 'fly of death' not ethically justified, researchers conclude

The tsetse fly, also known as the "fly of death" and the "poverty fly," is the primary means of transmission for the parasite that causes trypanosomosis.

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The Buttigieg Boomlet Isn’t Like the Others

The Mayor Pete boomlet is real. The question is whether he’s on the edge of a breakthrough in the Democratic race—or likely to just be the butt of future jokes. Not long ago, Pete Buttigieg was, if anything, that guy whose name no one seemed sure how to pronounce. But after a few weeks of extensive positive press, and the announcement of an impressive $7 million first-quarter fundraising haul, he

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There May Be a Link Between Coffee and Lung Cancer, Study Suggests

Drinking coffee has been linked to a slew of health benefits, but a new study suggests coffee intake may be linked to an increased risk of lung cancer.

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Austria proposes taxing internet giants 5 percent of ad revenue

Austria on Wednesday proposed taxing internet giants such as Google and Facebook five percent of their digital advertising revenue, a higher rate than France and other EU countries are seeking.

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Spider surprise: Philippines seizes 750 smuggled tarantulas

Philippine authorities said Wednesday they cracked open a gift-wrapped package shipped from Poland to discover 757 tarantulas crammed into plastic containers.

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Rwanda's gorillas have figured out where to find their sodium fix—but it's dangerous

Mountain Gorilla conservation in Rwanda is a great success story. A number of extreme conservation measures – like daily monitoring and protection, veterinary interventions and controlled ecotourism – have enabled the population to bounce back after a precarious low in the 1960s and 1970s that was brought about by habitat destruction and poaching.

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As climate change erodes US coastlines, an invasive plant could become an ally

Many invasive species are found along U.S. coasts, including fishes, crabs, mollusks and marsh grasses. Since the general opinion is that invasives are harmful, land managers and communities spend a lot of time and resources attempting to remove them. Often this happens before much is known about their actual effects, either good or bad.

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Three ways cities can help feed the world, without costing the Earth

Climate change is underway, and human activities such as urbanisation, industrialisation and food production are key contributors. Food production alone accounts for around 25% of global carbon emissions. Ironically, the changing weather patterns and more frequent extreme weather events resulting from climate change also put the world's food supplies at risk.

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Car-sharing offers ways to profit from or ditch personal car

While a growing number of Americans are struggling to make payments on their auto loans, a new crop of companies is offering alternative ways for car owners to get rid of costly vehicles or earn money while their cars would normally sit idle.

5h

Optimizing proton beam therapy with mathematical models

Particle beam therapy, a form of radiotherapy that involves using beams of positively charged particles rather than X-rays, is becoming increasingly popular. Treatment plans need to be optimized so as to maximize irradiation of the tumor while minimizing damage to normal tissue. A new study shows that replacing well-known, simple parameters with more complex ones can enhance the delivery of radiat

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A universal description of non-equilibrium colloid phase separation

A research team simulated phase separation in colloidal suspensions. By treating colloid particles as undeformable highly viscous liquid droplets suspended in a solvent, they predicted the kinetics of colloid demixing — separation into a particulate phase – with high efficiency. A microscope study of real colloidal suspensions confirmed the accuracy of the model, which crucially included hydrodyn

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Why Blackwater cannot be the future of U.S. warfare

The West has stopped winning wars because it still operates on WWII strategies, says Sean McFate. Poor strategy results in so-called 'forever wars'. To end the nearly 20-year-long war in Afghanistan, the U.S. is considering replacing all U.S. troops with Blackwater mercenaries. Why is that so dangerous? Because this is what the future looks like when you resurrect privatized warfare.

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Usain Bolt’s Split Times and the Power of Calculus

“Art,” said Pablo Picasso , “is a lie that makes us realize truth.” The same could be said for calculus as a model of nature. To see why, let me tell you a story about the fastest sprinter on the planet. The evening of August 16, 2008, was windless in Beijing. At 10:30, the eight fastest men in the world lined up for the finals of the 100-meter dash. One of them, a 21-year-old Jamaican sprinter n

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Spider surprise: Philippines seizes 750 smuggled tarantulas

Philippine authorities said Wednesday they cracked open a gift-wrapped package shipped from Poland to discover 757 tarantulas crammed into plastic containers.

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Rwanda's gorillas have figured out where to find their sodium fix—but it's dangerous

Mountain Gorilla conservation in Rwanda is a great success story. A number of extreme conservation measures – like daily monitoring and protection, veterinary interventions and controlled ecotourism – have enabled the population to bounce back after a precarious low in the 1960s and 1970s that was brought about by habitat destruction and poaching.

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As climate change erodes US coastlines, an invasive plant could become an ally

Many invasive species are found along U.S. coasts, including fishes, crabs, mollusks and marsh grasses. Since the general opinion is that invasives are harmful, land managers and communities spend a lot of time and resources attempting to remove them. Often this happens before much is known about their actual effects, either good or bad.

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New study identifies genetic variant that could help reduce need for liver transplants

A new study has identified a genetic variant associated with liver fibrosis (scarring) in chronic hepatitis C patients. This finding is a step toward reducing the number of patients requiring liver transplants.

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How IBM Watson Overpromised and Underdelivered on AI Health Care

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Future Farms: Agritech Innovations To Feed A Changing Planet

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Synthetic Cell Component Expands the Code of Life in Complex Cells

Two billion years ago, on a geochemically bubbly youth Earth, a simple bacteria engulfed its neighbor. Rather than dissolving into nutrients, against all odds the eaten organism formed a symbiotic partnership with its host and metamorphosed into specialized tiny factories called organelles. The eukaryotic cell was born. Despite their exotic name, eukaryotic cells are intimately familiar to humans

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Older women have the highest risk of dying from cervical cancer

New research from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital shows that women aged 65 and older have a higher risk of dying from cervical cancer than previously thought — although this age group is not covered by the Danish screening program.

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A new hope of quantum computers for factorizations of RSA with a thousand-fold excess

Universal quantum computers are still in its infancy that cannot achieve practical applications (code-cracking) in near term. Other than Shor algorithm, novel quantum computing ways for breaking public-key cryptosystem are required. The dedicated quantum computer, D-Wave machine, can find approximate answers for exponential-level problems in computer science, which is intractable for classical cou

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Elucidation of functional mechanism of 'love hormone,' oxytocin, at molecular level

Oxytocin is essential in activities of the social brain such as trust and love and in maternal bonding behaviors. It is produced in the brain and secreted into the circulation. Here, by analyzing maternal behaviors of RAGE gene-manipulated mice, oxytocin was found to be transported back to the brain, crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), an extremely effective barrier, by binding to the receptor

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Metal-free catalyst to convert aldehyde into ketone, a basic structure of pharmaceuticals

We succeeded in synthesizing a ketone, a basic structure of many pharmaceuticals, from an aldehyde and a carboxylic acid using N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst under mild conditions. Conventional methods for such syntheses required transition-metal catalysts. Our method is also applicable to conversion of a carboxylic acid, a part of many pharmaceuticals, into a corresponding ketone. A reaction pat

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Coral study traces excess nitrogen to Maui wastewater treatment facility

A new method for reconstructing changes in nitrogen sources over time has enabled scientists to connect excess nutrients in the coastal waters of West Maui, Hawaii, to a sewage treatment facility that injects treated wastewater into the ground.

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Academic journal Polar Science features polar science in India

The National Institute of Polar Research (NIPR) published a special issue 'Recent advances in climate science of polar region (to commemorate the contributions of late Dr. S.Z. Qasim, a pioneering doyen of the Indian polar programme)' in the comprehensive academic journal Polar Science. In this issue, 23 articles on polar science primarily by Indian researchers were published. Additionally, a mess

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New study identifies genetic variant that could help reduce need for liver transplants

A new study from the Westmead Institute for Medical Research has identified a genetic variant associated with liver fibrosis (scarring) in chronic hepatitis C patients. This finding is a step toward reducing the number of patients requiring liver transplants.

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Global eradication of 'fly of death' not ethically justified, researchers conclude

Oregon State University researchers argue that human-caused extinction of the tsetse fly would be unethical, but elimination campaigns targeting isolated populations of the fly are ethically defensible.

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The mathematics of hill walking

Big data and geographers combine to better calculate how to climb up slopes. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Machine learning for measuring roots

Researchers from the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) and La Salle-Ramon Llull University, both in Barcelona, Spain, have developed software that uses image processing and machine learning to semi-automate the analysis of root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings growing directly in agar plates. The software, named MyRoot, is available to the research community free of charg

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New record on the growth of graphene single crystals

Graphene, especially the graphene single crystal, is a star material for future photonics and electronics due to its unique properties, such as giant intrinsic charge carrier mobility, record thermal conductivity, super stiffness and excellent light transmission. However, whether graphene can live up to the expectation depends on reliable, high-quality synthesis with high efficiency.

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Electrical engineers look to the human immune system for clues on how to best protect digital networks

Engineers at the University of South Florida have developed a new type of cybersecurity software that mimics the human immune system.

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Order hidden in disorder

Partitioning space into cells with optimum geometrical properties is a central challenge in many fields of science and technology. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and colleagues from several countries have now found that in amorphous, i.e. disordered, systems, optimization of the individual cells gradually results in the same structure, although it remains amorphous. The dis

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Brooke Reaches the Extraction Point | Naked and Afraid

It's day 21 and Brooke heads for the extraction point to complete her Naked and Afraid challenge. Stream Full Episodes of Naked and Afraid: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/naked-and-afraid/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NakedandAfraid https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/NakedAndAfr

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Machine learning for measuring roots

Researchers from the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) and La Salle-Ramon Llull University, both in Barcelona, Spain, have developed software that uses image processing and machine learning to semi-automate the analysis of root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings growing directly in agar plates. The software, named MyRoot, is available to the research community free of charg

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How Brexit has changed the mental map of Britain

Stumbling from one Brexit delay to the next, Britain is paralysed by its political division Stark new work by Anish Kapoor reflects on the UK's deep internal divide 'Archipelago maps' show Britons living in two separate countries – much like Americans March 29th was supposed to be Brexit Day. As clocks struck 11 pm across the UK, the country should have departed from the European Union. Instead,

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Image: Space antenna

Unlike traditional satellite dishes used to pick up television signals, this antenna has to work in space itself. Rather than being clamped to an apartment balcony, it will be installed on the exterior of Europe's Columbus laboratory, becoming part of the International Space Station.

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Wild bees flock to forested areas affected by severe fire

A groundbreaking two-year study in southern Oregon found greater abundance and diversity of wild bees in areas that experienced moderate and severe forest fires compared to areas with low-severity fires.

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Caring for an older adult with cancer comes with emotional challenges for caregivers, too

Until now, no large study has evaluated whether or not caring for older adults with advanced cancer is linked to caregivers' emotional health or to their quality of life. Recently, researchers studied a group of adults aged 70 or older who had advanced cancer (as well as other challenges).

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Nature versus nurture: Environment exerts greater influence on corn health than genetics

In one of the largest and most diverse leaf microbe studies to date, the team monitored the active bacteria on the leaves of 300 diverse lines of corn growing in a common environment. They were especially interested to see how corn genes affected bacteria and found there was little relationship between the two — in fact, the bacteria were much more affected by the environment, although genetics s

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3D-printed transparent skull provides a window to the brain

Researchers have developed a unique 3D-printed transparent skull implant for mice that provides an opportunity to watch activity of the entire brain surface in real time. The device allows fundamental brain research that could provide new insight for human brain conditions such as concussions, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

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Study reveals genes associated with heavy drinking and alcoholism

A large genomic study of nearly 275,000 people has revealed new insights into genetic drivers of heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD), the uncontrollable pattern of alcohol use commonly referred to as alcoholism. In the largest-ever genome-wide association study (GWAS) of both traits in the same population, a team of researchers found 18 genetic variants of significance associated with ei

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Transplanted bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells delay ALS disease progression

Transplanting human bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells into mice mimicking symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) helped more motor neurons survive and slowed disease progression by repairing damage to the blood-spinal cord barrier, researchers report. The new research contributes to a growing body of work exploring cell therapy approaches to barrier repair in ALS and other

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Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons.

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New approach to repairing damaged peripheral nervous system

A new understanding of cell migration may eventually help in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases — and even allow children to 'get out of their wheelchairs and live an enhanced quality of life.'

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Dopamine conducts prefrontal cortex ensembles

New research in rodents reveals for the first time how dopamine changes the function of the brain's prefrontal cortex. Researchers found that dopamine has little effect on individual cells. Instead, it generates sustained activity in the ensemble of cells in the prefrontal cortex that lasts for up to 20 minutes.

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How RNA PoII maintains accurate transcription

Scientists have recently uncovered the mechanisms of how RNA polymerase II performs intrinsic cleavage reaction to proofread RNA transcriptions, shedding light on how misregulation of accurate transcription can lead to diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease.

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A universal description of non-equilibrium colloid phase separation

A research team simulated phase separation in colloidal suspensions. By treating colloid particles as undeformable highly viscous liquid droplets suspended in a solvent, they predicted the kinetics of colloid demixing — separation into a particulate phase – with high efficiency. A microscope study of real colloidal suspensions confirmed the accuracy of the model, which crucially included hydrodyn

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Breakthrough alpha-ray treatment of cancer without external radiation

Radioactive iodine has been used for treatment of thyroid cancer. However, some thyroid tumors become resistant to iodine treatment. A research team used a large accelerator to produce sodium astatide for injection, which emits highly therapeutic alpha rays that can be used in cancer treatment. This systemic alpha-ray exposure may enable breakthrough outpatient treatment of cancerous lesions throu

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Wild bees flock to forested areas affected by severe fire

A groundbreaking two-year study in southern Oregon found greater abundance and diversity of wild bees in areas that experienced moderate and severe forest fires compared to areas with low-severity fires.

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UBC research recommends graduated return to work after prostatectomy

UBC research cautions men recovering from a radical prostatectomy to take it easy when returning to work. School of Nursing Professors Joan Bottorff and John Oliffe are scientists with UBC's Men's Health Research program. They, along with study lead Wellam Yu Ko, recently published research exploring the journey back into the workforce following surgery to remove prostate cancer. Their research co

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Wild bees flock to forested areas affected by severe fire

A groundbreaking two-year study in southern Oregon found greater abundance and diversity of wild bees in areas that experienced moderate and severe forest fires compared to areas with low-severity fires.

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Light pollution: The dark side of keeping the lights on

Twenty five years ago, Los Angeles experienced a massive power blackout due to an earthquake. The entire city was thrust into darkness. The emergency call service, 911, was inundated with panicked residents reporting "a giant silvery cloud," was engulfing the sky. Unknown to the callers, they were seeing the Milky Way, the galaxy containing our solar system, in the night sky for the first time. So

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Solving the decision-making problem with information described in natural language

Computing with words is a computational method where the objects of computation are words and propositions drawn from a natural language rather than the ones and zeroes of binary. Computing with words is perhaps what makes humanity a unique animals species in many regards allowing us to communicate detailed abstract concepts, to reason, to make predictions based on experience and observation. More

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Using computers to crack open centuries-old mathematical puzzles

In mathematics, no researcher works in true isolation. Even those who work alone use the theorems and methods of their colleagues and predecessors to develop new ideas.

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Even if you missed out on the Concorde, you may soon get a chance to fly in a supersonic airliner

Aviation More than a decade after the supersonic passenger aircraft landed for the last time, a new class of faster-than-sound planes prepares for liftoff. More than a decade after the supersonic passenger aircraft landed for the last time, a new class of faster-than-sound planes prepares for liftoff.

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A Close Look at Fragments

Here’s a look from the D. E. Shaw research team at fragment binding, and even if you don’t do fragment-based drug discovery, it’s worth a read. That’s because the mechanisms by which fragments bind to proteins are most likely the fundamental ones by which larger molecules bind as well; this is the reductionist look at small molecule-protein interactions. So what kinds of interactions are they? Th

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Study sheds light on social drivers of animal dispersal

Why would male and female animals choose different reproductive strategies? For golden lion tamarins in the Brazilian rain forest, the answer may offer clues to help save this neotropical primate.

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Google Duplex available on some Android phones other than Pixel

Google is reportedly expanding Duplex support to beyond Pixel phones. According to Max Weinbach, with XDA-Developers, he was recently able to use Duplex on his Samsung Galaxy S10+.

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Study sheds light on social drivers of animal dispersal

Why would male and female animals choose different reproductive strategies? For golden lion tamarins in the Brazilian rain forest, the answer may offer clues to help save this neotropical primate.

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Hermit crabs found to use vibration to ward off would-be shell evictors

A pair of researchers with Dartmouth College has found that Pacific hermit crabs use vibration to ward off other crabs trying to steal their shells. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Louise Roberts and Mark Laidre describe their study of hermit crabs attempting to protect their shells and what they found.

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Optimizing proton beam therapy with mathematical models

Particle beam therapy, a form of radiotherapy that involves using beams of positively charged particles rather than X-rays, is becoming increasingly popular. Treatment plans need to be optimized so as to maximize irradiation of the tumor while minimizing damage to normal tissue. A new study shows that replacing well-known, simple parameters with more complex ones can enhance the delivery of radiat

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New study demonstrates radio signal benefits from decades-old theory

Engineering researchers have demonstrated that a longstanding theoretical method called direct antenna modulation has real-world utility for boosting the quality of radio signals when transmitting at high data rates. The finding has applications in fields such as military communications.

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High throughput method to produce and screen engineered antimicrobial lanthipeptides

Nature has provided us with lots of antimicrobials. However, given the rapid increase of antimicrobial resistance, there is a need for the development of new-to-nature antibiotics. Lantibiotics are an interesting option. Molecular biologists have now developed a pipeline to create and screen large numbers of new lantibiotic peptides.

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Hermit crabs found to use vibration to ward off would-be shell evictors

A pair of researchers with Dartmouth College has found that Pacific hermit crabs use vibration to ward off other crabs trying to steal their shells. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, Louise Roberts and Mark Laidre describe their study of hermit crabs attempting to protect their shells and what they found.

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Tapping into 100-year supply of natural gas

It is a figure that has been thrown around quite a bit lately in the energy debate – the United States has enough energy in shale to provide all of the nation's transportation fuels for 100 years. But two challenges remain – how to tap into that supply and how to process it into fuel at a reasonable price.

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Where Reasons End and the Trickiness of Stories About Suicide

“And if there is another end beyond the dead end, it cannot be called dead, can it?” In Yiyun Li’s novel Where Reasons End , an unnamed narrator converses with her teenage son, Nikolai, in the months following his death by suicide. This question, posed by the narrator, is one of many attempts by a grieving mother to make sense of losing her son by interrogating language itself. Throughout the boo

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Løbehjul kommer til Aarhus: Nyt udlejningskoncept skal afværge kaos som i København

I løbet af april flytter 150 elektriske løbehjul ind i Aarhus, hvor kommunen har indgået et samarbejde med virksomheden Voi, der også udlejer løbehjul i København – men aarhusianerne håber at undgå løbehjul, der flyder i gaderne.

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From medicine to nanotechnology: How gold quietly shapes our world

The periodic table of chemical elements turns 150 this year. The anniversary is a chance to shine a light on particular elements – some of which seem ubiquitous but which ordinary people beyond the world of chemistry probably don't know much about.

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Atomic switches by plasmonic heating of metallic contact points

Scientists have recently developed a light controlled nano-switch to lay groundwork for atomic device development in nanotechnology. They engineered the switches at the nanoscale in a first step toward fully integrated electronic device miniaturization. The multidisciplinary research was conducted by Weiqiang Zhang and co-workers, and an international team of collaborators. Results of the study ar

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Journey to the Big Bang through the lithium of a Milky Way star

Researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of Cambridge have detected lithium in a primitive star in our galaxy. The observations were made at the VLT, at the Paranal Observatory of ESO in Chile.

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Here we go again: Paper linking vaccines to cognitive damage (in sheep) retracted

In what seems like another entry in our occasional “Retraction Watch Mad Libs” series, Elsevier has withdrawn a paper that claimed to link the aluminum in vaccines to behavioral changes in sheep. The paper, which appeared online in Pharmacological Research in November of last year, was swiftly picked up by antivaccine advocates such as Celeste … Continue reading Here we go again: Paper linking vac

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Saving bees, protecting forests and improving livelihoods

Imagine you are standing in a beautiful mosaic of meadow and forest habitats – buzzing bees flying from flower to flower. You are in the Zarand landscape corridor in Romania. As well as having rich floral diversity, this landscape corridor provides an element of wilderness through which brown bears, grey wolves and Eurasian lynx can move between the Western and Southern Carpathian Mountains.

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Scientific American Is the Source of More Than 1,000 New Terms

A famous dictionary cites the magazine for new words and new meanings of old words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Saving bees, protecting forests and improving livelihoods

Imagine you are standing in a beautiful mosaic of meadow and forest habitats – buzzing bees flying from flower to flower. You are in the Zarand landscape corridor in Romania. As well as having rich floral diversity, this landscape corridor provides an element of wilderness through which brown bears, grey wolves and Eurasian lynx can move between the Western and Southern Carpathian Mountains.

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A universal description of non-equilibrium colloid phase separation

Liquids, with their flowing dynamics, are often far from equilibrium. This makes it particularly hard to model processes in soft matter or living tissue, which contain liquids. New research from the University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science (IIS) offers an elegant approach to modeling the self-organization of out-of-equilibrium systems.

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A CRISPR Approach to Treating Sickle Cell Disease

submitted by /u/SirT6 [link] [comments]

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Loss of habitat causes double damage to species richness

Loss and fragmentation of habitat are among the main reasons why biodiversity is decreasing in many places worldwide. Now, a research team with participation of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has established that the destruction of habitat causes double damage to biodiversity; if habitat patches disappear, not only

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Origin of the saffron crocus traced back to Greece

The origin of C. sativus has long been the subject of speculation and research, as this knowledge would enable breeders to introduce genetic diversity into the otherwise genetically uniform plant species. Two new studies have now shown that the saffron crocus originated from a Greek ancestor.

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Experimental Biology highlights — Cancer, neurodegenerative diseases and medical news

Embargoed press materials are now available for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held in Orlando April 6-9. EB is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together more than 12,000 scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

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Experimental Biology highlights — Environment and public health

Embargoed press materials are now available for the Experimental Biology (EB) 2019 meeting, to be held in Orlando April 6-9. EB is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together more than 12,000 scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

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Researchers discover why men are more likely to develop liver cancer

Researchers in Spain have discovered that a hormone secreted by fat cells that is present at higher levels in women can stop liver cells from becoming cancerous. The study, which will be published April 3 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, helps explain why hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is more common in men, and could lead to new treatments for the disease, which is the fourth leading caus

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Adiponectin, the hormone that protects women against liver cancer

The study, published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that adiponectin protects the liver against the development of the main form of liver cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma.

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Loss of habitat causes double damage to species richness

Loss and fragmentation of habitat are among the main reasons why biodiversity is decreasing in many places worldwide. Now, a research team with participation of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) and Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has established that the destruction of habitat causes double damage to biodiversity; if habitat patches disappear, not only

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Origin of the saffron crocus traced back to Greece

The origin of C. sativus has long been the subject of speculation and research, as this knowledge would enable breeders to introduce genetic diversity into the otherwise genetically uniform plant species. Two new studies have now shown that the saffron crocus originated from a Greek ancestor.

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More children for the highly educated: Broadband Internet creates a digital fertility divide

Access to broadband internet has a positive effect on fertility, overall life satisfaction and time spent with children. Since this effect is largely driven by higher-educated women, though, it risks creating another digital divide, according to a study by Francesco Billari and Luca Stella (Bocconi University), with Osea Giuntella (University of Pittsburgh), just published in Population Studies.

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Smart liquid goes dark in the heat

A smart liquid that darkens dramatically in response to rising temperature has been developed by researchers at A*STAR. The nanowire-based thermochromic liquid's tunable color-changing behavior was retained even after hundreds of heat-cool cycles. This liquid could have applications ranging from smart windows to paper-based temperature sensors, the researchers say.

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Metabolically engineered organisms could sustainably produce ingredients for natural foods, flavors and fragrances

metabolically engineered organisms could sustainably produce ingredients for natural foods, flavors and fragrances

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Metabolically engineered organisms could sustainably produce ingredients for natural foods, flavors and fragrances

metabolically engineered organisms could sustainably produce ingredients for natural foods, flavors and fragrances

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'Jobs for the boys': women don't get a fair go in sports administration

Women represent just 22% of board chairs and 13% of CEOs across more than 60 Australian sporting organisations.

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Physicist applies statistical mechanics theories to explain how children learn a language

Eric DeGiuli, a physicist at École Normale Supérieure, has proposed that a human language grammar can be viewed as if it were a physical object, allowing theories such as those in statistical mechanics to explain how a child learns a language. In his paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, he describes his ideas and his hopes that they might one day be associated with neurological

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Toyota offers free access to over 20 years of electric vehicle patents

Almost 5 years after Elon Musk allowed other manufacturers access to Tesla patents without fear of legal action – effectively making them open source – Toyota has announced that it's …

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How light at night may harm outcomes in cardiac patients

Nneuroscientists linked white light at night — the kind that typically illuminates hospital rooms — to inflammation, brain-cell death and higher mortality risk in cardiac patients.

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