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nyheder2019april05

Screen time — even before bed — has little impact on teen well-being

Data from more than 17,000 teenagers show little evidence of a relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents. The study casts doubt on the widely accepted notion that spending time online, gaming, or watching TV, especially before bedtime, can damage young people's mental health.

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Folketinget vil stoppe EU-støtte til ny a-kraft

Et enigt folketing pålægger nu regeringen at arbejde for, at EU programmet Euratom koncentrerer sig om dekommissionering og sikkerhed på eksisterende atomkraftværker i Europa.

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Geneticist Sydney Brenner, who made tiny worm a scientific legend, dies

Geneticist Sydney Brenner, who made tiny worm a scientific legend, dies Geneticist Sydney Brenner, who made tiny worm a scientific legend, dies, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01128-3 Nobel-prizewinning biologist pioneered use of C. elegans as an animal model.

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Scientists Gene-Hacked Lizards to Make Them Albino

Pink Babies For the first time, reptiles have been gene-edited with CRISPR technology. Scientists at University of Georgia bred four brown anole lizards to be albino pink instead of their typical brown, according to New Atlas . The findings show that CRISPR gene-editing tech is more resilient than scientists previously thought. Tricky Business So far, geneticists have shied away from gene-editing

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Academic Researchers at the University of California Form a Union

The university drops its objections and comes to an agreement on who can be included in Academic Researchers United.

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The Family Weekly: The Reasons for Declining Young-Adult Happiness

This Week in Family (Kidsada Manchinda / Getty) You can’t always measure happiness, but that hasn’t stopped economists from trying to understand trends among young adults. Last year, a record-low number of 18-to-34-year-olds reported that they were “very happy” in life. Some evidence shows that rates of happiness could be tied to the types of social ties people have: Married young adults are much

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Microbes May Take Some of the Blame for the Reproducibility Crisis

Scientists find varied microbiota among the same strain of mice from four vendors–and that variability affects their susceptibility to infection.

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Squeezed nanocrystals: A new model predicts their shape when blanketed under graphene

In a collaboration between the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Northeastern University, scientists have developed a model for predicting the shape of metal nanocrystals or 'islands' sandwiched between or below two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene. The advance moves 2D quantum materials a step closer to applications in electronics.

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Mastodons to the Max

A fossil skeleton found in California leads to the discovery of a new mastodon species. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Four-legged whales once straddled land and sea

Animals Meet Peregocetus pacificus. Whales belong in the ocean, right? That may be true today, but cetaceans (whales, dolphins, porpoises) actually descended from four-legged mammals that once lived on…

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Google Doodle Celebrates Physicist Who Escaped Nazi Germany

Today's Google Doodle celebrates the 132nd birthday of physicist Hedwig Kohn, who escaped Nazi Germany and is known for, among other things, her work on flame spectroscopy, a technique that allows scientists to chemically analyze elements by burning them.

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See the Bizarre Glass “Tulip” Set to Transform London’s Skyline

Flowery Design The Tulip looks nothing like the boxy skyscrapers currently dominating the world’s urban areas. Instead, the proposed tower looks like, well, a glass and metal tulip, with a long stem supporting a bulbous top. But that strange design didn’t stop a London planning committee from sending the Tulip one step closer to construction this week — and their support for the unique project co

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It takes more than rubber to make a boot sole that's less than a millimeter thick

Technology The creation of a thin rubber sole. On the hiking trail, every pound matters, so even a thin outsole can help cut weight.

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An exoplanet’s stormy winds are revealed by telescope teamwork

An exoplanet’s stormy winds are revealed by telescope teamwork An exoplanet’s stormy winds are revealed by telescope teamwork, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01070-4 A technique combines light from several telescopes to probe an exoplanet’s atmosphere.

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Rocket fuel that's cleaner, safer and still full of energy

Research published this week in Science Advances shows that it may be possible to create rocket fuel that is much cleaner and safer than the hypergolic fuels that are commonly used today. And still just as effective. The new fuels use simple chemical 'triggers' to unlock the energy of one of the hottest new materials, a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs.

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Sydney Brenner, a Decipherer of the Genetic Code, Is Dead at 92

A Nobel Prize winner, he was a central player in the golden age of molecular biology, beginning with the discovery of the structure of DNA.

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Optics-less focusing of XUV high-order harmonics

By experimentally studying high-order harmonic beams generated in gases, we show how the spatial characteristics of these ultrashort extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) beams can be finely controlled when a single fundamental beam generates harmonics in a thin gas medium. We demonstrate that these XUV beams can be emitted as converging beams and thereby get focused after generation. We study this optics-le

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Electrically assisted 3D printing of nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capability

Lightweight and strong structural materials attract much attention due to their strategic applications in sports, transportation, aerospace, and biomedical industries. Nacre exhibits high strength and toughness from the brick-and-mortar–like structure. Here, we present a route to build nacre-inspired hierarchical structures with complex three-dimensional (3D) shapes by electrically assisted 3D pr

57min

High-frequency cavity optomechanics using bulk acoustic phonons

To date, microscale and nanoscale optomechanical systems have enabled many proof-of-principle quantum operations through access to high-frequency (gigahertz) phonon modes that are readily cooled to their thermal ground state. However, minuscule amounts of absorbed light produce excessive heating that can jeopardize robust ground-state operation within these microstructures. In contrast, we demons

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In silico construction of a flexibility-based DNA Brownian ratchet for directional nanoparticle delivery

Brownian particles confined in a system with periodic and asymmetric potential can be transported in a specific direction along the potential by repetitively switching the potential on and off. Here, we propose a DNA-based Brownian ratchet for directional transport of positively charged nanoparticles in which nanoparticle delivery follows the path dictated by a single, long, double-stranded DNA.

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Optoelectronic control of single cells using organic photocapacitors

Optical control of the electrophysiology of single cells can be a powerful tool for biomedical research and technology. Here, we report organic electrolytic photocapacitors (OEPCs), devices that function as extracellular capacitive electrodes for stimulating cells. OEPCs consist of transparent conductor layers covered with a donor-acceptor bilayer of organic photoconductors. This device produces

57min

A constant current triboelectric nanogenerator arising from electrostatic breakdown

In situ conversion of mechanical energy into electricity is a feasible solution to satisfy the increasing power demand of the Internet of Things (IoTs). A triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is considered as a potential solution via building self-powered systems. Based on the triboelectrification effect and electrostatic induction, a conventional TENG with pulsed AC output characteristics always n

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How crystals form: A theory of nucleation pathways

Recent advances in classical density functional theory are combined with stochastic process theory and rare event techniques to formulate a theoretical description of nucleation, including crystallization, that can predict nonclassical nucleation pathways based on no input other than the interaction potential of the particles making up the system. The theory is formulated directly in terms of the

57min

Frictional weakening of slip interfaces

When two objects are in contact, the force necessary to overcome friction is larger than the force necessary to keep sliding motion going. This difference between static and dynamic friction is usually attributed to the growth of the area of real contact between rough surfaces in time when the system is at rest. We directly measure the area of real contact and show that it actually increases duri

57min

Giant intrinsic spin Hall effect in W3Ta and other A15 superconductors

The spin Hall effect (SHE) is the conversion of charge current to spin current, and nonmagnetic metals with large SHEs are extremely sought after for spintronic applications, but their rarity has stifled widespread use. Here, we predict and explain the large intrinsic SHE in β-W and the A15 family of superconductors: W 3 Ta, Ta 3 Sb, and Cr 3 Ir having spin Hall conductivities (SHCs) of –2250, –1

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Hypergolic zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) as next-generation solid fuels: Unlocking the latent energetic behavior of ZIFs

Hypergolic materials, capable of spontaneous ignition upon contact with an external oxidizer, are of critical importance as fuels and propellants in aerospace applications (e.g., rockets and spacecraft). Currently used hypergolic fuels are highly energetic, toxic, and carcinogenic hydrazine derivatives, inspiring the search for cleaner and safer hypergols. Here, we demonstrate the first strategy

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New Birth Control Drug Would Work for Men and Women

Unintended Benefits A startup called Your Choice Therapeutics says it’s invented a birth control medication that could be taken by men and women — a possible end to the frustrating era where the onus is solely on women to handle birth control medication. “These male options stand to be a game-changer,” executive director of the Male Contraceptive Initiative Heather Vahdat told Business Insider .

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‘Jumping genes’ kick cancer into high gear

New research heavily implicates a genetic phenomenon commonly known as “jumping genes” in the growth of tumors. Since jumping genes aren’t mutations—mistakes in the letters of the DNA sequence— traditional cancer genome sequencing can’t identify them. As such, this study opens up new lines of research for future cancer therapies that might target such genes. Jumping genes, which scientists call t

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Rocket fuel that's cleaner, safer and still full of energy

Research published this week in Science Advances shows that it may be possible to create rocket fuel that is much cleaner and safer than the hypergolic fuels that are commonly used today. And still just as effective. The new fuels use simple chemical "triggers" to unlock the energy of one of the hottest new materials, a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs. MOFs are ma

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Japan (Very Carefully) Drops Plastic Explosives Onto An Asteroid

The device was detonated as part of a mission to better understand the origins of planets. (Image credit: JAXA/Akihiro Ikeshita)

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The Inca bedecked their sacrificial guinea pigs with earrings

The Inca bedecked their sacrificial guinea pigs with earrings The Inca bedecked their sacrificial guinea pigs with earrings, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01074-0 Finding confirms historic reports that the rodents were killed en masse at South American ceremonies.

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A Precursor Piece to DNA Was Found in Star Material – Facts So Romantic

Stars, of course, not only sustain life, by showering planet Earth in photons, but also can contain, in their protostellar (or very young) form, a precursor material of life: a molecule called glycolonitrile. Photograph by ESA / SPIRE / PACS / P. André (CEA Saclay) / Wikicommons April—National Poetry Month—prompted me to reread some of the work of English-American poet W.H. Auden. In “Funeral Blu

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Rusted root: Weedy rice repeatedly evolves 'cheater' root traits

Researchers have used a new imaging technique to reveal a takeover strategy that has worked for weedy rice over and over again: roots that minimize below-ground contact with other plants.

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Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape

Many resources encourage homeowners and land care managers to create bee-friendly environments, but most of them include lists of recommended plants rarely backed by science. To rectify this, researchers surveyed 72 native and non-native woody plant species in five sample sites throughout the Ohio Valley region to document which species attract which bees.

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Scientists genetically engineer yeast to improve understanding of how cells work

Academics have genetically modified yeast cells to help scientists control how they react to their environment in a more desirable way. Yeast was chosen because it shares key characteristics with human cells — most importantly that it can sense its environment using G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The study will help scientists understand how diseased cells function.

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Fecal transplants could help patients on cancer immunotherapy drugs

Early results hint that benefits seen in mice could extend to people

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Hayabusa2 has blasted the surface of asteroid Ryugu to make a crater

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft shot a projectile at Ryugu. Next: collecting asteroid dust from the probable impact crater left behind.

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Unjamming the genome after DNA damage

A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA.

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Doctors in China are using 5G internet to do surgery from far away

5G is helping doctors in China conduct surgery from hundreds of kilometres away, such as directing cardiac operation and performing brain stimulation

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Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy

Researchers have uncovered a previously unknown structural feature of living cells that is critical to tidying up.

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Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster — but it comes at a cost

New research suggests that bird sperm cells with a spiral or screw-like shape swim faster than straighter sperm — but that the spiral shape also makes them more fragile.

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Think female race car drivers aren't fit enough? Think again

In the world of racing, the debate on whether women are as fit as men behind the wheel can often become heated. A new study has now demonstrated that women drivers, even with 10 years less experience, react and respond just as well as their male counterparts on the race track.

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Japan (Very Carefully) Drops Plastic Explosives Onto An Asteroid

The device was detonated as part of a mission to better understand the origins of planets. (Image credit: JAXA/Akihiro Ikeshita)

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Facebook’s ad-serving algorithm discriminates by gender and race

Even if an advertiser is well-intentioned, the algorithm still prefers certain groups of people over others.

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*Avengers: Endgame* Will Rule the Box Office—But Not For Long

It's on track to open at $200-250 million domestically, clobbering box office buster *The Force Awakens*. But another *Star Wars* movie is on the way.

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Cancer geneticists tackle troubling ethnic bias in studies

Cancer geneticists tackle troubling ethnic bias in studies Cancer geneticists tackle troubling ethnic bias in studies, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01080-2 Multi-million efforts are underway to fill long-standing gaps in genomic data from minority groups.

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Yemen Cannot Afford to Wait

For an American who had a hand in shaping U.S. Mideast policy during the Barack Obama years, coming to Yemen has the unpleasant feel of visiting the scene of a tragedy one helped co-write. It is a scene whose most heartrending aspects are not easily accessible to a visitor. It is still possible to travel north, to the war-battered capital, Sanaa, now controlled by the Houthi insurgent group, or u

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We Asked You to Vote on Which Holidays You’d Make Official. And the Winner Is …

Earlier this year, as the winter holiday season ended and the winter kept right on wintering, we sent an invitation : If you could create a new holiday from scratch—or more widely celebrate an existing but lesser-known one—we asked, what would it be? You responded in force. We received hundreds of nominations, for holidays both whimsical (for example: Kid for a Day Day) and meaningful (for exampl

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Watch 3 Solar Eclipses on Mars, Captured by Curiosity

Curiosity rover captured Martian moons Phobos and Deimos crossing the sun.

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Microsoft Rumored To Combine Xbox Game Pass And Xbox Live Gold At A Discount

Microsoft has long had its Xbox Live service that you must have to play Xbox game online In 2017, it launched another service called Xbox Game Pass that gave gamers access to a slew of streaming …

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Are Trigger Warnings Actually Helpful?

New research suggests that trigger warning are at best trivially helpful. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Why heart failure patients suffer depression, impaired thinking

A new study explains why heart failure patients often have trouble with thinking and depression, pointing to ways to prevent and treat both heart and brain maladies through the emerging field of circadian medicine.

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Power plants: Getting to the bottom of the 'boiling crisis'

Researchers review how a 'boiling crisis' can occur in environments such as nuclear power plants. The findings may lead to better designs of heat-transfer surfaces and might allow plants to generate more power with the same amount of fuel.

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Unexpected rain on sun links two solar mysteries

Researchers find rain on the sun in an unexpected place. The findings could create a new link between two of the biggest mysteries in solar physics.

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Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape

Bees are critical members of the ecosystem: 75% of leading food crops have some level of dependency on pollinators. However, native bee populations are struggling because of loss of habitat and food, often caused by urban and suburban development. The good news is that a single tree or shrub can produce thousands of flowers with high-quality pollen and nectar, providing bees with the protein and c

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Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape

Bees are critical members of the ecosystem: 75% of leading food crops have some level of dependency on pollinators. However, native bee populations are struggling because of loss of habitat and food, often caused by urban and suburban development. The good news is that a single tree or shrub can produce thousands of flowers with high-quality pollen and nectar, providing bees with the protein and c

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UC professor's startup promotes literacy through design

Reneé Seward's last name is pronounced see-word, though some might not realize that when reading her name. So it's fitting that this University of Cincinnati associate professor created an app that helps users with reading, pronunciation and recognizing letters. Appropriately, the tool is called See Word Reading.

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Unexpected rain on sun links two solar mysteries

For five months in mid 2017, Emily Mason did the same thing every day. Arriving to her office at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, she sat at her desk, opened up her computer, and stared at images of the Sun—all day, every day. "I probably looked through three or five years' worth of data," Mason estimated. Then, in October 2017, she stopped. She realized she had been look

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Hayabusa 2 Probe Successfully Bombs Asteroid Ryugu

Today is a big day for humanity. We have bombed an asteroid, finally exacting revenge for what the asteroids did to the dinosaurs. There's a valid scientific reason, too. The post Hayabusa 2 Probe Successfully Bombs Asteroid Ryugu appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy

Marie Kondo herself couldn't do it any better.

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Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy

Marie Kondo herself couldn't do it any better.

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Study calculates costs associated with smoking by patients with cancer

A study released today in JAMA Network Open reported that smoking after a cancer diagnosis is associated with substantial additional costs of cancer treatment.

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Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds

New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species.

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Sydel Silverman, Ardent Defender of Anthropology, Dies at 85

As a scholar, teacher and historian at the City University of New York, she was an impassioned preservationist and an inclusive ethnographer.

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The Latest in Military Strategy: Mindfulness

Soldiers in several countries, including the U.S., are being taught deep breathing and meditation techniques to improve focus during chaos.

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Japanese Space Probe Drops Explosive on Asteroid Ryugu

Hayabusa2 released the projectile to make a crater on the asteroid's surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Japanese spacecraft may have just blown a crater in a distant asteroid

Samples from Ryugu’s interior could lead to new insights into the early solar system

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Parental behavior affects the involvement of children in cyberbullying

Experts have recently published a study of the perception that adolescents have of the upbringing they have had and their relationship to cyberbullying. In this way, the data obtained highlights that the involvement of families and their training in prevention programs is a fundamental as it has been shown that parental behavior has an influence on the involvement of children in cyberbullying.

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New trauma care pathway reduces delirium and likelihood of returning to the hospital

A standardized interdisciplinary clinical pathway to identify and manage frailty in older patients has reduced the rate of one of the most debilitating complications for older patients — delirium — and kept patients from returning to the hospital within 30 days of treatment for traumatic injury.

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Basic Income Made Finland’s Citizens Trust Police More

Finns with Benefits Not only can basic income make people feel better about their finances, but it can also make them feel better about society, according to a new report from Kela, the government agency behind Finland’s recently wrapped two-year-long basic income experiment . “Respondents who received a basic income had more trust in other people and in societal institutions” than people who did

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Artificial light makes birds fly into buildings at night

Birds that produce faint chirps called flight calls during nighttime migration collide with illuminated buildings much more often than closely related species that don’t produce such calls, report researchers. The new analysis of a 40-year record of more than 70,000 nighttime songbird collisions in Chicago and Cleveland suggests that birds disoriented by artificial light from illuminated building

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The Bering Sea Should Be Frozen Right Now. It Isn't.

We're witnessing a catastrophic shift in our planet's sea ice. Here's what the latest chapter means for you.

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The Light Triad: Psychologists Outline the Personality Traits of Everyday Saints

If stories about psychopaths fascinate you, you might’ve heard of something called the dark triad. It’s a trio of traits that psychologists developed in the early 2000s to measure the more sinister aspects of human personality. Now, a team from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Hawai’i-West O’ahu has finally crafted a counterpart test of the so-called light triad traits. Dark Vs

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Federal subsidies for US commercial fisheries should be rejected, analysis concludes

A pending rule change proposed by the US National Marine Fisheries Service would allow the use of public funds to underwrite low-interest loans for the construction of new commercial fishing vessels. The proposed change lacks scientific merit and should be rejected, an analysis by a Duke economist concludes. If approved, the rule could undo years of progress in reducing overfishing and other harmf

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Supporting HIV-affected couples trying to conceive

Timed vaginal insemination is a safe, effective way to help HIV-affected couples conceive, finds a new pilot study in Kenya led by a Michigan Medicine researcher.

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Daily briefing: A romp through the history of calculus

Daily briefing: A romp through the history of calculus Daily briefing: A romp through the history of calculus, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01134-5 From counting with stones to artificial intelligence, an AI warning from a Turing award winner and presentation tips from scientific TED talkers.

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States Target Potent Greenhouse Gases in Absence of Federal Action

The push to restrict hydrofluorocarbons is one of the clearest examples of states banding together on climate policy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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U of G study reveals why heart failure patients suffer depression, impaired thinking

A new study by University of Guelph researchers explains why heart failure patients often have trouble with thinking and depression, pointing to ways to prevent and treat both heart and brain maladies through the emerging field of circadian medicine.

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Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape

Many resources encourage homeowners and land care managers to create bee-friendly environments, but most of them include lists of recommended plants rarely backed by science. To rectify this, Dr. Daniel Potter surveyed 72 native and non-native woody plant species in five sample sites throughout the Ohio Valley region to document which species attract which bees.

2h

Unexpected rain on sun links two solar mysteries

Researchers find rain on the sun in an unexpected place. The findings could create a new link between two of the biggest mysteries in solar physics.

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Khalid’s Free Spirit Is Lost in Vibes

The debut single from Khalid Robinson, 2016’s “ Location, ” marked a new model in an old love-song category: the kind about telecommunications. He wasn’t hanging on the telephone , and he wasn’t emailing someone’s heart . He was getting specific, app-y, and post-privacy. As he pleaded for a crush to send him coordinates on Google Maps or one of its competitors, a harplike trill sounded, questioni

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Sure Is Easy to Find a Cybercriminal Group to Join on Facebook, Researchers Find

You might have a certain idea of where cybercriminals congregate. Maybe you imagine a black hoodie operator working at night on the dark net or something out of Mr. Robot. In fact, these things …

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New discovery provides key to side effects caused by erectile dysfunction drugs

A new study reveals several features of PDE6 that were previously unseen. Included among them were some very promising regions of PDE6 that resemble fish-hooks and are responsible for controlling PDE activity. By targeting the fish-hook-like region with a new class of PDE inhibitors, drug development companies may be able to eliminate unwanted side effects of certain PDE targeting drugs.

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Yes, EPA: Regulating Mercury Pollution Is "Appropriate and Necessary"

Public health professionals call out the toxic sleight of hand in the agency’s latest proposal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Mexican Company is Finding Ways to Use Native Cacti for Biofuel

submitted by /u/pingpong2019 [link] [comments]

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How weedy rice evolves ‘cheater’ roots to take over

A new imaging technique reveals a strategy that weedy rice repeatedly uses to get the upper hand: roots that minimize below-ground contact with other plants. Weedy rice is neither wild rice nor crop rice, but rice gone rogue that has shed some traits important to people. It’s also an incredibly aggressive, potentially detrimental weed that pops up almost everywhere rice is grown, and it can reduc

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Japan Spacecraft Shoots Copper Bomb at Asteroid

It's still unclear how the dramatic operation went. But the hope is the explosive-packed bomb cut an artificial crater into Ryugu.

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What the Finnish concept of sisu can offer the world

The first study dedicated to sisu looks at more than 1,000 responses on what the concept means — as well as whether it is inherently a good thing. One of the most prominent aspects apparent in the data: extraordinary perseverance, in other words, an individual's ability to surpass preconceived limitations, either mentally or physically, by accessing stored-up energy reserves.

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Getting to the bottom of the 'boiling crisis'

Researchers from MIT and elsewhere review how a 'boiling crisis' can occur in environments such as nuclear power plants. The findings may lead to better designs of heat-transfer surfaces and might allow plants to generate more power with the same amount of fuel.

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Eyes reveal early Alzheimer's disease

Reduced blood capillaries in the back of the eye may be a new, noninvasive way to diagnose early cognitive impairment, the precursor to Alzheimer's disease in which individuals become forgetful, reports a new study. Scientists detected these vascular changes in the human eye noninvasively, with an infrared camera and without the need for dyes or expensive MRI scanners.

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Moffitt researchers develop tool to estimate genetic diversity and ancestry of cell lines

It is important that scientists have proper tools and model systems to study how these variations affect cancer development and devise effective therapies for patients of all genetic backgrounds. In a new paper published in Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with scientists at Ponce Health Sciences University in Puerto Rico, investigated this issue by creating an

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Tidying up: A new way to direct trash to autophagy

Marie Kondo herself couldn't do it any better. Now researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have uncovered a previously unknown structural feature of living cells that is critical to tidying up.

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Yes, EPA: Regulating Mercury Pollution Is "Appropriate and Necessary"

Public health professionals call out the toxic sleight of hand in the agency’s latest proposal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Declassified U-2 spy plane photos are a boon for aerial archaeology

Images from the 1950s and ’60s have a better resolution than Google Earth

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VW seals 10-year lithium deal for electric cars

German car behemoth Volkswagen said Friday it had secured 10 years' worth of lithium for electric car batteries from Chinese manufacturer Ganfeng, ensuring supply of a key ingredient for the vital components.

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Dire future etched in the past: CO2 at 3-million year-old levels

Planet-warming carbon dioxide in Earth's atmosphere—at its highest level in three million years—is poised to lock in dramatic temperature and sea level rises over a timescale of centuries, scientists warned this week.

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Warnings up in Western Australia as Suomi NPP satellite views Tropical Cyclone 23S

Tropical Cyclone 23S has developed north of the Kimberley coast, and generated warnings. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead as the low pressure area consolidated into a tropical cyclone.

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British Royalty Wants to Ban “Fortnite”

Dabbing on Thy Haters Prince Harry — His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, Earl of Dumbarton and Baron Kilkeel — is on a crusade against the popular video game “Fortnite.” “It’s created to addict,” Prince Harry told a panel of mental health experts, Variety reports . “An addiction to keep you in front of a computer for as long as possible. It’s so irresponsible.” Battle Royale Wedding Going into

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Introducing the World’s First Gene-Edited Lizard

Scientists weren’t expecting him to look like this.

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Trilobites: Watch a Great White Shark Hunt Through a Kelp Forest for Its Next Meal

The video collected by researchers revealed a surprising hunting behavior in the ocean predators that had never been documented.

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Most links between personality traits and life outcomes are replicable

Studies showing links between personality traits and life outcomes, such as marital stability and vocational achievements, provide a reasonably accurate map of the relationship between personality and various aspects of one's life, according to findings from a large-scale replication project. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Scienc

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Researchers discover CP violation in charm meson decays

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and Yandex, as part of the LHCb collaboration at CERN, have been the first to discover CP violation in charm meson decays. This discovery may become a key to solving the mystery of matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe.

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Large Antarctic Ice Shelf, home to a UK research station, is about to break apart

Glaciology experts have issued evidence that a large section of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is home to the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station, is about break off. The iceberg, measuring over 1,500 square kilometres — which is twice the size of New York City — is expected to break away from the Brunt Ice Shelf within the next few months.

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Dentists underdiagnose when faced with time pressure, research shows

Dentists can miss important details on X-rays when put under time pressure, according to new research led by the University of Plymouth.

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Warnings up in Western Australia as Suomi NPP satellite views Tropical Cyclone 23S

Tropical Cyclone 23S has developed north of the Kimberley coast, and generated warnings. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead as the low pressure area consolidated into a tropical cyclone.

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Study finds screen time — even before bed — has little impact on teen well-being

Research by Oxford University academics has found little evidence of a relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents. Based on data from more than 17,000 teenagers, the study casts doubt on the widely accepted notion that spending time online, gaming or watching TV, especially before bedtime, can damage young people's mental health.

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Reflective roofs can reduce overheating in cities and save lives during heatwaves

A new modeling study from the University of Oxford and collaborators has estimated how changing the reflectivity of roofs can help keep cities cooler during heatwaves and reduce heat-rated mortality rates.

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How good are protein disorder prediction programs actually?

Until now it was difficult to answer this question, as a good benchmark for testing these bioinformatics programs was lacking. AU scientists, Dr. Jakob T. Nielsen and Dr. Frans A.A. Mulder present an analysis in Scientific Reports using a comprehensive compilation of experimental data from NMR spectroscopy.

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California's Eerie 'Earthquake Pause' Is Unprecedented

California hasn't seen a ground-rupturing earthquake in 100 years. That's unprecedented.

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First-of-Its-Kind HIV Therapy Draws out the Virus, Then Kills It

Kick and Kill HIV is a sneaky virus. It can hide in the immune cells of people taking daily antiretroviral therapy (ART) drugs, waiting until they stop the therapy to come back with a vengeance. This forces them to continue ART — and continue dealing with its many side effects — for their entire lives. But now, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh have developed an HIV immunotherapy that

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UK biotechs lead the way in early detection of deadly diseases

There is a global call for the fast diagnosis of deadly conditions, from cancer to strokes

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Kandidat til IDAs-formandspost: »Jeg kan godt tænke mig en ny stor opgave«

IDA skal have større fokus på ledere, lyder en af mærkesagerne fra Ulla Röttger, der er Lederlistens kandidat til ny IDA-formand. Hun vil blandt andet bruge sine erfaringer som topleder på Amager Ressourcecenter i hvervet.

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Radiation and plants: From soil remediation to interplanetary flights

Currently, the study of the effects of ionizing radiation is of great relevance in the context of the challenges in the field of agriculture development, the existence of zones with an elevated natural and man-made radiation background, and the need to develop space biology.

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High-dose stereotactic body radiotherapy well-tolerated by patients with centrally located lung tumors

Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), a high-dose, precisely delivered radiotherapy, is considered the standard treatment for patients with medically inoperable, node-negative, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, this well-tolerated radiation treatment was not previously tested in centrally located NSCLC due to the fact that patients with centrally located lung tumors demonstrate a highe

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Prototype in precision

A finger print can serve as identification to access locked doors and more, but current scanners can be duped with fake or even similar fingerprints. That may change soon, thanks to a collaborative research team based in Japan.

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SUTD uncovers the power of dynamically rewiring swarm robotic systems

Studies on the collective behavior of a swarm of land robots showed that a specific number of interactions among units is required to produce an optimal collective response.

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What are the costs of continued smoking among patients with cancer?

This study was an economic evaluation and it used a model to examine the costs of subsequent cancer treatment associated with continued smoking by patients after their initial cancer treatment failed.

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Changes in gun purchases after mass shootings

For this analysis, researchers examined monthly data on US background checks for gun purchases and permits from November 1998 through April 2016, and they looked for purchasing trends after mass shootings during that time. A total of 124 major mass shootings (five or more individuals injured or killed) and nearly 234 million background checks occurred.

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Fewer people died from heart disease in states that expanded Medicaid coverage through the Affordable Care Act

Counties in states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act had fewer deaths annually from heart disease compared to areas that did not expand Medicaid, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2019.

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Synthetic antibody rapidly protects mice and monkeys from Zika

A DNA-encoded monoclonal antibody prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primates, researchers report April 5 in the journal Molecular Therapy. Injections of synthetic DNA encoding the potent anti-Zika monoclonal antibody ZK190 resulted in high production of ZK190 for weeks to months, effectively controlling infection in all animals. The new platform for monoclonal-antibody gene delivery an

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When robots commit wrongdoing, people may incorrectly assign the blame

Last year, a self-driven car struck and killed a pedestrian in Tempe, Ariz. The woman's family is now suing Arizona and the city of Tempe for negligence. But, in an article published on April 5 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, cognitive and computer scientists ask at what point people will begin to hold self-driven vehicles or other robots responsible for their own actions — and wheth

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Sea Levels Are Rising. Time to Build … Floating Cities?

If climate change ends up coming for your home, you could move inland. Or you could decamp to tessellated platforms floating on the ocean.

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Kitchen spices look startlingly different in the wild

Environment You just won’t bay leaf it. Spices have been giving our lives pizazz for millennia, but many of us wouldn't recognize them out in the wild.

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New surgical method promises to take the knife out of plastic surgery

Simple electrical procedure could reshape noses and correct vision

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Autism brings qualities which help at home and at work, study shows

Autism enhances characteristics such as loyalty and focus which help those with the condition at work and in their relationships with others, experts have found.

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Google Started an Ethics Board and Then Killed It After Protests

Cancelled Last week, Google announced a new advisory board to help the company navigate the murky ethical waters churned by emerging technologies like AI and robotics. Now, after public outcry and internal protest over some of the more controversial selections for committee members, Google told Vox on Thursday that it’s cancelling the whole thing. RIP It’s hard to argue that the Advanced Technolo

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Gun sales surge after some, but not all, mass shootings

Background checks reveal gun sales drop after high fatality shootings, but the reasons are unclear. Andrew Masterson reports.

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First ever private lunar mission enters orbit around the Moon

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An AI smartwatch that detects seizures | Rosalind Picard

Every year worldwide, more than 50,000 otherwise healthy people with epilepsy suddenly die — a condition known as SUDEP. These deaths may be largely preventable, says AI researcher Rosalind Picard. Learn how Picard helped develop a cutting-edge smartwatch that can detect epileptic seizures before they occur and alert nearby loved ones in time to help.

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Sydney Brenner obituary

Nobel prize-winning biologist whose research into a tiny nematode worm led to critical insights into human disease When James Watson and Francis Crick first completed their model of the structure of DNA in April 1953, a group of Oxford scientists drove to the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge to see it. Among them was Sydney Brenner, a short, heavy-browed South African doctoral student in chemistr

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Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees

Researchers conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. They showed that all males had higher stress levels during periods of increased male-male competition while aggression rates were actually lower during this time. This may indicate that in times o

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TTI heat map shows relationship between traffic-related air pollution and childhood asthma

TTI has created a heat map showing the relationship between traffic-related air pollution and childhood asthma. Around 6 million children in the United States are affected by asthma, making the condition the most common chronic lung disease in children. These interactive visualizations illustrate the impact of traffic related air pollution on the burden of incident childhood asthma in the contiguo

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Killing Eve Season 2 Is as Macabre and Audacious as Ever

Early in the first episode of Killing Eve ’s second season, Eve (played by Sandra Oh), pallid and shaky after committing an unplanned act of violence, walks unthinkingly into a train station. She goes into a candy store, where she piles scoop after scoop of jelly beans and gumballs into a pink-and-white-striped paper bag. The saleswoman raises an eyebrow at Eve’s wanton gluttony—the bag is full a

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The Books Briefing: Upending the Marriage Plot

Every year, millions of couples across the United States cement their relationship with a wedding—that expensive , fantastical thing—and the vow that their love will last a lifetime. If you’ve ever wanted to take a Marriage 101 class, consider Lisa Grunwald and Stephen Adler’s massive The Marriage Book as a starting point. Detailing the best and worst of matrimony with perspectives from novelists

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These molecules could trap viruses inside a cell

Viruses are often used as vehicles for delivery in gene therapy because they're engineered not to damage the cell once they get there, but neglecting to consider how the virus will exit the cell could have consequences.

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These molecules could trap viruses inside a cell

Viruses are often used as vehicles for delivery in gene therapy because they're engineered not to damage the cell once they get there, but neglecting to consider how the virus will exit the cell could have consequences.

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EU says BMW, Daimler, VW colluded to limit emissions tech

European Union authorities said Friday that German automakers BMW, Daimler and Volkswagen colluded to limit the development of emissions-cleaning technology in cars.

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Forskers fiskesnack blev misforstået som en aprilsnar

Det er sjovt og lidt trist, siger forskeren bag, der har brugt fire år på projektet.

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Damaging Sichuan earthquakes linked to fracking operations

Two moderate-sized earthquakes that struck the southern Sichuan Province of China last December and January were probably caused by nearby fracking operations, according to a new study.

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A Rare White Whale Has Been Filmed Off the Coast of Mexico

Nope, it's not Moby Dick, but it just might be Milk Gallon.

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Gravitational waves helping to expose black holes, dark matter and theoretical particles

Gravitational waves – the invisible ripples in the fabric of space predicted by Albert Einstein – are opening up a new era of astronomy that is allowing scientists to see parts of the universe once thought to be invisible, such as black holes, dark matter and theoretical subatomic particles called axions.

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Parental behavior affects the involvement of children in cyberbullying

The information analyzed by this group of researchers came to another conclusion: when parenting practices are not very suitable, it seems that the probability increases that the children might be victimized or involved in the double role of aggressor/victim, while in the case of girls, when they are treated in this way, they tend to be cyber-aggressors.

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Quantum Computers Could Go Mainstream Sooner than We Think

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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How Crazy Ex-Girlfriend Revived the TV Musical—And Liberated Its Heroine

By all accounts, 2015 was a make-or-break moment for musical shows on television. Glee finally fizzled out, three years after The Atlantic ’s Kevin Fallon declared that “the TV-musical experiment has failed.” In his 2012 piece, Fallon argued that campy programs such as Glee and Smash had squandered their promising starts, dropping in terms of both quality and ratings. Smash ended in 2013 after ju

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Tree Seedlings Have a Very Good Reason to Shirk Their Parents

In the study of forests, a central mystery has long stood unsolved: The seed that falls far from the tree does a whole lot better in life than the seed that stays close. Though scientists have never fully understood the reasons behind this pattern, they believe that something about the soil of an adult tree makes it unfriendly to seeds of the same species. In a recent study published in the Proce

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Crossing the Border to Hang Out With Your Friend

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two friends who grew up on opposite sides of the U.S.-Mexico border, in Laredo, Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. They both went to high school in Texas and had friends in both cities, meaning the

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Fewer deaths at hospitals that do more of these heart valve replacements

Hospitals that perform the highest volume of transcatheter-aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedures have significantly lower mortality rates than centers that do fewer of the minimally invasive surgeries, according to a new study. The finding, which appears in the New England Journal of Medicine , comes as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is reconsidering the procedure’s cover

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Self-driving spacecraft set for planetary defence expedition

Engineers designing ESA's Hera planetary defence mission to the Didymos asteroid pair are developing advanced technology to let the spacecraft steer itself through space, taking a similar approach to self-driving cars.

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Don't break up digital giants, force them to give users data access, says report

A landmark report produced for the European Commission "Competition policy for the digital era" co-authored by an Imperial academic has been published

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Samsung Electronics flags 60% slump in Q1 operating profit

The world's biggest smartphone and memory chip maker Samsung Electronics warned Friday of a more than 60 percent plunge in first-quarter operating profits in the face of weakening markets.

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Scientists discover, climb and describe the world's tallest tropical tree

Scientists in the U.K. and Malaysia have discovered the world's tallest tropical tree, and possibly the tallest flowering plant, measuring over 100 metres high—laid down, it would extend beyond both goals on a football pitch.

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Scientists discover, climb and describe the world's tallest tropical tree

Scientists in the U.K. and Malaysia have discovered the world's tallest tropical tree, and possibly the tallest flowering plant, measuring over 100 metres high—laid down, it would extend beyond both goals on a football pitch.

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Selvforsynende elektronik snegler sig frem

PLUS. Der er lang vej, før batterier kan erstattes af naturlig høst af energi fra omgivelserne i sensorer og aktuatorer. Norsk professor efterlyser politisk regulering af strømforbruget til Internet of Things.

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Quantum Computers Could Go Mainstream Sooner than We Think

Computers were once considered high-end technology, only accessible to scientists and trained professionals. But there was a seismic shift in the history of computing during the second half of the 1970s. It wasn’t just that machines became much smaller and more powerful—though, of course, they did. It was the shift in who would use computers and where: they became available to everyone to use in

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FT Health: WHO highlights health inequalities

Bill Gates interview, food insecurity, deadly diets

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Climate research needs to change to help communities plan for the future

Climate change is a chronic challenge – it is here now, and will be with us throughout this century and beyond. As the U.S. government's National Climate Assessment report made clear, it's already affecting people throughout the United States and around the world.

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An industrialized global food supply chain threatens human health – here's how to improve it

In an outbreak that has now run for more than 28 months, at least 279 people across 41 states have fallen ill with multidrug-resistant Salmonella infections linked to raw turkey products. Federal investigators are still trying to determine the cause. In response to food company recalls, more than 150 tons of raw turkey products have flowed back through the supply chain as waste.

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New bioinspired glue bonds any surface underwater

Underwater adhesion is technically challenging because of the presence of water, the worst enemy for any glue. Now, scientists from Wageningen University & Research have developed an injectable adhesive able to bond to many surfaces underwater.

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Mutation stands in the way of healthy blood cell maturation

In a new study, researchers from the University of Copenhagen and EMBL in Heidelberg have learned how a specific genetic mutation affects the maturation of blood cells in mouse models. Leukemia patients often have a mutation in this gene, often seen before the disease sets in. The researchers are working on a strategy for treating the mutation.

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Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. They showed that all males had higher stress levels during periods of increased male-male competition while aggression rates were actual

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Rainforest conservation in Peru must become more effective

A few years ago, the Peruvian government launched a program to protect the rainforest. However, an analysis by the Center for Development Research (ZEF) at the University of Bonn shows that its effect is small. But the researchers also have good news: Three measures could probably significantly increase effectiveness. The study is now published in the Journal Environmental Research Letters.

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Josh and Casey Hit King Crab Pay Dirt | Deadliest Catch

Cornelia Marie captains Josh Harris and Casey McManus haul their pots out of the crowded mud pit. On the line: a chance to secure a million dollars in extra quota if they hit pay dirt. Catch the New Season of DEADLIEST CATCH Tuesday April, 9 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/Subscribe

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Implicit Biases toward Race and Sexuality Have Decreased

New findings suggest that internalized attitudes can change—but not for all identity groups — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Implicit Biases toward Race and Sexuality Have Decreased

New findings suggest that internalized attitudes can change—but not for all identity groups — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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UK scientists discover world's tallest tropical tree

Researchers from the University of Nottingham first spotted the tree in a Malaysian rainforest last August.

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Natural selection shaped fertility for the industrial era

Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, according to new research. In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial French-Canadian genealogical history, researchers found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress. “…nature selected individuals who had a predisposition to invest in thei

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IBM’s New AI Does Something Amazing: It Learns From “Memories”

Continual Learning When an AI algorithm learns a new skill — say a video game like StarCraft II — it can get good enough to topple the best human pros. But that’s only true if everyone plays by the rules. Change the parameters of the game, and the AI will find itself totally unable to adapt. AI that excels at the game Pong can’t handle even the slightest shift in distance between the two paddles.

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Damaging Sichuan earthquakes linked to fracking operations

Two moderate-sized earthquakes that struck the southern Sichuan Province of China last December and January were probably caused by nearby fracking operations, according to a new study published in Seismological Research Letters.

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Rusted root: Weedy rice repeatedly evolves 'cheater' root traits

Weedy rice is neither wild rice nor crop rice, but rice gone rogue that has shed some traits important to people. It also is an incredibly aggressive, potentially detrimental weed that pops up almost everywhere rice is grown, and it can reduce crop yields by more than 80 percent if it invades a field.

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Female astronauts: How performance gear is designed to pave the way for women's accomplishments

On my first day of spring break, I woke up to way more emails than necessary and a flurry of activity on my social media. Acquaintances from near and far wrote about "patriarchy," "NASA seems to have a history of lady issues" and posted emojis of sad faces and encouragement to my students to fix the situation.

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Artificial intelligence can now emulate human behaviors – soon it will be dangerously good

When artificial intelligence systems start getting creative, they can create great things – and scary ones. Take, for instance, an AI program that let web users compose music along with a virtual Johann Sebastian Bach by entering notes into a program that generates Bach-like harmonies to match them.

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Australian Murray River habitat restoration increases native fish populations

Dubbed the 'honeypot effect'—a team of scientists from around Australia have shown that providing woody habitat, or 'snags', for native fish in the Murray River increases their population size.

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Cathinone color test is now on the market

Every four days, a new illicit synthetic drug enters the world market. These drugs, which are designed to mimic established drugs of abuse, are cheap, often highly toxic, and difficult—if not impossible—to detect using standard presumptive drug testing methods. Until now.

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Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds

A recent study of centuries-old French-Canadian genealogical data by a Brown University economist revealed evidence that supports his own 17-year-old theory that natural selection played a pivotal role in the emergence of economic growth and industrialization.

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UK to hold social media bosses liable for harmful content: report

Britain will make social media executives personally liable for harmful content published on their platforms, a leaked government proposal said Friday.

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Social media gets thumbs-down in new US poll

Americans are fearful about the impact of social media firms such as Facebook and Twitter, with many saying they spread misinformation and divide the country, even though most people still use these networks, a new poll showed Friday.

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Russia plans to free almost 100 captured whales

Russian officials have invited a French ocean explorer to offer advice on how to safely release nearly 100 illegally captured whales, voicing hope that the animals could be let into the wild during summer.

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Hydrogen fuel cells: With a database of 500,000 materials, researchers zero in on best bets

As researchers work toward next-generation electric vehicles, they may be hitting their heads on the ceiling of what lithium ion batteries can deliver.

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Rusted root: Weedy rice repeatedly evolves 'cheater' root traits

Weedy rice is neither wild rice nor crop rice, but rice gone rogue that has shed some traits important to people. It also is an incredibly aggressive, potentially detrimental weed that pops up almost everywhere rice is grown, and it can reduce crop yields by more than 80 percent if it invades a field.

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Australian Murray River habitat restoration increases native fish populations

Dubbed the 'honeypot effect'—a team of scientists from around Australia have shown that providing woody habitat, or 'snags', for native fish in the Murray River increases their population size.

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Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds

A recent study of centuries-old French-Canadian genealogical data by a Brown University economist revealed evidence that supports his own 17-year-old theory that natural selection played a pivotal role in the emergence of economic growth and industrialization.

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Windows 10 Game Bar Adds Spotify Widget And Cross Platform Chat For Xbox Insiders

Microsoft is working behind the scenes to make its Game Bar a more attractive tool for people who play games on a Windows 10 PC. The improvements are not just visual, but consist of feature …

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Rusted root: Weedy rice repeatedly evolves 'cheater' root traits

Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis and the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center used a new imaging technique to reveal a takeover strategy that has worked for weedy rice over and over again: roots that minimize below-ground contact with other plants.

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New discovery provides key to side effects caused by erectile dysfunction drugs

Study reveals several features of PDE6 that were previously unseen. Included among them were some very promising regions of PDE6 that resemble fish-hooks and are responsible for controlling PDE activity. By targeting the fish-hook-like region with a new class of PDE inhibitors, drug development companies may be able to eliminate unwanted side effects of certain PDE targeting drugs.

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Australian research uncovers link between dietary fiber and lung disease

Dietary fiber may be a new tool in the prevention of progressive lung disease, thanks to the production of anti-inflammatory short chain fatty acids (SCFA), according to a new study by Australia's Priority Research Centre for Healthy Lungs at University of Newcastle, and the Centre for Inflammation, a partnership between the University of Technology Sydney and Centenary Institute.

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Damaging Sichuan earthquakes linked to fracking operations

Two moderate-sized earthquakes that struck the southern Sichuan Province of China last December and January were probably caused by nearby fracking operations, according to a new study published in Seismological Research Letters.

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Australian Murray River habitat restoration increases native fish populations

Dubbed the 'honeypot effect' — a team of scientists from around Australia have shown that providing woody habitat, or 'snags,' for native fish in the Murray River increases their population size.

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Experts call for strategies to address public health crisis of opioid, ID epidemics

Citing the spread of infections linked to rising rates of opioid use across the country including HIV, viral hepatitis, skin and soft tissue infections, bone and joint infections and endocarditis, an article published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases calls on the federal government to support coordinated and strengthened responses by infectious diseases and substance use specialists.

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Expert: In 50 Years, Self-Driving Cars Will Be “Unthinkable”

Drivers Wanted The general consensus among experts is we’re headed toward a future in which humans driving cars will seem downright archaic . In a new Vox essay , New York University data journalism professor Meredith Broussard disagrees. She thinks the era of the autonomous car is far from inevitable, and not because researchers won’t be able to perfect the tech — she argues that it’s the role d

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Japan Lobs Bomb to Blow Hole in Asteroid… For Science

Bomb Squad Japan’s Hayabusa-2 probe keeps attacking the asteroid Ryugu with a vengeance. First it shot the hapless asteroid with a bullet, and then Japan’s space agency, JAXA, announced a plan to have the probe blow a hole in Ryugu with plastic explosives — a scheme it put into motion on Friday, according to the New York Times , by dropping the bomb and kicking up dust on the surface, “suggesting

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Tweeting during TV might push you to shop

People watching “social shows” like Dancing with the Stars or The Bachelor on television and simultaneously sharing their views on Twitter are more likely to shop online, according to new research Marketers have feared that social media distracts viewers from commercials and minimizes their impact. But this research found the opposite. “Social shows” are more beneficial to advertisers because com

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Russia plans to free almost 100 captured whales

Russian officials have invited a French ocean explorer to offer advice on how to safely release nearly 100 illegally captured whales, voicing hope that the animals could be let into the wild during summer.

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Gamma-ray blazars in the sky

When the supermassive black holes at the center of galaxies accrete material, they can eject powerful jets of charged particles at speeds approaching that of light. These particles in turn emit radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum, from radio to gamma-rays. When the jets happen to be aligned toward the Earth, these objects are called blazars, and in a flare they can emit as much radiation

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Egyptian crop circles

This week, ESA is focusing on its core Basic Activities, which, for Earth observation, include preserving precious data. Long-time series of datasets are needed to determine changes in our planet's climate so it is vital that satellite data and other Earth science data are preserved for future generations and are still accessible and usable after many years.

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A decade-long quest to build an ecosystem in a room

Yesterday the MELiSSA pilot plant at the University of Barcelona celebrated 10 years spent demonstrating the ideal technologies to recycle waste from space missions into air, water and food.

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3D printing is quietly transforming an unexpected industry: museums

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The quest to build a commercial quantum computer

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Japanese spacecraft 'bombs' asteroid in scientific mission

submitted by /u/emitremmus27 [link] [comments]

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Nye tal: Danmarks energiforbrug og CO2-udledning steg i 2018

Den foreløbige energistatistik for 2018 er deprimerende læsning, som viser, at Danmark blev mere sort sidste år.

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Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks

A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer.

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Genetic causes of poor sleep

The largest genetic study of its kind ever to use accelerometer data to examine how we slumber has uncovered a number of parts of our genetic code that could be responsible for causing poor sleep quality and duration.

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Compound that kills drug-resistant fungi is isolated from ant microbiota

A project conducted by researchers in Brazil and the US investigated bacteria living in symbiosis with insects as a source for novel drugs.

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Mass drug administration reduces scabies cases by 90% in Solomon Islands' communities

Mass drug administration of two antibiotics can be highly effective at reducing cases of scabies and the bacterial infection impetigo, according to new research.

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Health claims on packaging for many foods marketed to UK kids are 'confusing'

The health claims made on the product packaging for a large proportion of foods marketed to children in the UK are 'confusing,' and could be contributing to rising rates of childhood obesity.

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Countries that help working class students get into university have happier citizens

A study has shown that 'inclusive' educational policies that help working class students access higher education, such as delaying streaming children according to their ability until they are older, lowering the cost of private education, and increasing the intake of universities so that more students can attend all act to reduce the 'happiness gap' between the rich and poor.

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Multiple mechanisms behind disease associated with unexpected heart attacks

An examination of three mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy — a disease best known for revealing itself as an unexpected, fatal heart attack during strenuous exercise — found separate mechanisms at work at the molecular level.

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New hope for treating childhood brain cancer

Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer. But only now have scientists been able to explain how the compound works: by targeting cholesterol production in tumors.

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How to make your life easier with motion sensors

DIY Once you know how they work, you can automate nearly anything. While PIR sensors can be used with Arduino and other microcontroller boards, those best-suited for hobby use are smart enough to perform simple tasks without any…

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How to Turn Failure into Success

Research reveals strategies for staying motivated in the face of challenges — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Technology turns municipal wastewater algae into specialty chemicals for biofuels, bioplastics

A startup is advancing a unique way to transform algae used to purify municipal wastewater into specialty bio-based chemicals such as biofuels or bioplastics that could help reduce the risk of toxic algae blooms that often kill fish and surrounding wildlife.

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Studying the swimming patterns of bacteria near surfaces

A team of researchers at Université Côte d'Azur and Centre Scientifique de Monaco has recently carried out a study aimed at better understanding the near-surface swimming patterns of bacteria. Their paper, published in Nature Physics, could shed some light on how bacteria explore surfaces, how they search for host cells and how they infect these cells.

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Reflective roofs can reduce overheating in cities and save lives during heatwaves

A new modelling study from the University of Oxford and collaborators has estimated how changing the reflectivity of roofs can help keep cities cooler during heatwaves and reduce heat-rated mortality rates.

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How to Turn Failure into Success

Research reveals strategies for staying motivated in the face of challenges — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Grønlands energiminister: »Jeg tror ikke på global opvarmning«

Den grønlandske minister for Erhverv og Energi, Aqqalu Jerimiassen (A), tror ikke på mennesket er skyld i den globale opvarmning. »Vi kan ikke bestemme naturen,« lyder det.

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Trapdoor spider species that stay local put themselves at risk

Several new species of trapdoor spiders found in Queensland are finally described in an article published this month in Invertebrate Systematics.

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Artificial intelligence in Australia needs to get ethical, so we have a plan

The question of whether technology is good or bad depends on how it's developed and used. Nowhere is that more topical than in technolgies using artificial intelligence.

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Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization, study finds

In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers at Brown found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress.

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Like old photographs, memories fade over time

Past events are often vividly recollected. However, it remains unclear how the qualities of memories are reconstructed. A new study finds that as time passes, the visual information that illustrates our memories fades away.

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Mystery of negative capacitance in perovskite solar cells solved

Scientists reveal the origin of apparently high and even negative capacitance values observed in perovskite solar cells.

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Efter tumultarisk forløb: Folketinget klar med skrappere krav til akupunktører

Fremover vil det kræve adskillige hundrede timers uddannelse at udføre akupunktur i brystkassen. En markant stramning, som et flertal udenom regeringen har sikret.

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Trapdoor spider species that stay local put themselves at risk

Several new species of trapdoor spiders found in Queensland are finally described in an article published this month in Invertebrate Systematics.

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Stunningly realistic video game visuals made by simulating light rays

Real-time ray tracing is creating impressively realistic video game graphics. It uses powerful chips to calculate how millions of light rays reflect in a scene

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Microsoft responds to female harassment claims

Dozens of incidents of sexual harassment and discrimination have been lodged by women at the firm.

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Manatees face new challenge in Florida from harassing, non-native armored catfish

Watching manatees gather in the crystalline waters of Blue Spring is one of Central Florida's outdoor treasures.

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Evolution: How the theory is inspiring a new way of understanding language

Words are often seen as the building blocks of languages. But as children we don't learn lists of words like we might in a school language class. We learn longer strings of sounds and break them up into words as we grow up. One of the problems with our current theory of how language works is that it doesn't take these longer strings into account.

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Maryland lawmakers approve bill to become first state in the country to ban foam food containers

The Maryland General Assembly gave final approval Wednesday night to a bill that would make Maryland the first state in the country to ban polystyrene foam food containers and cups.

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How a startup plans to clean up space

Since 2012, engineers at EPFL's Space Center have been hard at work on a new junk-clearing satellite to capture debris orbiting the earth. The team has now shifted up a gear, founding a company called ClearSpace to pick up where the CleanSpace One project leaves off. For the first test mission, penciled in for 2024, the company has set its sights on capturing and destroying SwissCube, a nanosatell

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Manatees face new challenge in Florida from harassing, non-native armored catfish

Watching manatees gather in the crystalline waters of Blue Spring is one of Central Florida's outdoor treasures.

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Large Antarctic ice shelf, home to a UK research station, is about to break apart

Glaciology experts have issued evidence that a large section of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is home to the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station, is about break off.

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The Impossible mission — to save the planet with a burger

Pat Brown has developed plant-based meat that looks, tastes, and even bleeds like the real thing

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A new protein structure that helps viruses with lipid membranes enter cells discovered

Many viruses, including that perennial winter affliction, the influenza virus, are protected by a lipid membrane on loan from the host cell. The fusion proteins on the surface of the membrane are tasked with merging the lipid membrane of the virus with that of the cell. After this, the virus is able to slip inside the cell, turning it into a virus factory.

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Like a Rock: Tesla Sales, Worldwide and US, Sank in Q1

Misery loves company? Take Tesla out of the mix and EV sales didn't reach 10,000 in the first quarter. Meanwhile, Toyota Prius Prime and Honda Clarity plug-in hybrids had banner quarters. The post Like a Rock: Tesla Sales, Worldwide and US, Sank in Q1 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Deepfake Malware Can Trick Radiologists Into Believing You Have Cancer

Researchers have demonstrated that deepfakes can be used to fool radiologists, either by adding cancer to an image or removing cancerous material that should have shown up on footage. The post Deepfake Malware Can Trick Radiologists Into Believing You Have Cancer appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Long-term data on atmospheric carbon dioxide reveals an increase in carbon uptake by Northern Hemisphere vegetation

Based on long-term data on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations, an international group of scientists coordinated by the Laboratory of Climate and Environmental Sciences (CEA/CNRS/UVSQ) have discovered that vegetation in the Northern Hemisphere is absorbing increasing amounts of the CO2 produced by human activities, thereby partially offsetting the effects of global warming. The research was

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A new protein structure that helps viruses with lipid membranes enter cells discovered

Many viruses, including that perennial winter affliction, the influenza virus, are protected by a lipid membrane on loan from the host cell. The fusion proteins on the surface of the membrane are tasked with merging the lipid membrane of the virus with that of the cell. After this, the virus is able to slip inside the cell, turning it into a virus factory.

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Getting a big look at tiny particles

At the turn of the 20th century, scientists discovered that atoms were composed of smaller particles. They found that inside each atom, negatively charged electrons orbit a nucleus made of positively charged protons and neutral particles called neutrons. This discovery led to research into atomic nuclei and subatomic particles.

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Facebook Let Dozens of Cybercrime Groups Operate in Plain Sight

Who needs the dark web? Researchers found 74 groups offering stolen credit cards and hacking tools with simple Facebook searches.

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Prince Harry Has a Very Important Message About 'Fortnite'

As in, he doesn't think kids should play it. Oh, and Snapchat is getting mobile games now, apparently.

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How Google Is Cramming More Data Into Its New Atlantic Cable

Google says its planned Dunant cable from Virginia to France will transmit 250 terabits per second, enough to zap the Library of Congress through it three times a second.

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Robots reading feelings

Robots are getting smarter—and faster—at knowing what humans are feeling and thinking just by "looking" into their faces, a development that might one day allow more emotionally perceptive machines to detect changes in a person's health or mental state.

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BepiColombo is ready for its long cruise

Following a series of tests conducted in space over the past five months, the ESA-JAXA BepiColombo mission has successfully completed its near-Earth commissioning phase and is now ready for the operations that will take place during the cruise and, eventually, for its scientific investigations at Mercury.

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Thawing permafrost is triggering landslides across the Arctic

Spring in the town of Deadhorse was 20 degrees warmer than average, and that means bad news, writes Dave Petley from the UK's University of Sheffield.

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How Some U.S. Cities Saw 70 Degree F Temperature Swings between January and February

The polar vortex struck in January, giving Chicago a brief blast of Arctic weather — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Report: Toledo area most vulnerable to automation in employment

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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DeepMind created a maths AI that can add up to 6 but gets 7 wrong

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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DOD Warns the US Could Be Left in the Dust During 5G Transition

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Sydney Brenner, 1927-2019

A scientific giant, Sydney Brenner has died at the age of 92. He was present at the beginning of molecular biology – while in the chemistry department at Oxford, he car-pooled with Dorothy Hodgkin, Leslie Orgel, Jack Dunitz and others over to Cambridge to see Watson and Crick’s new model for the structure of DNA back in April 1953. And he never looked back. He and Crick ended up collaborating for

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Study shows human-built offshore structures can benefit seabirds

A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.K. has found evidence that suggests some seabirds may benefit from the existence of human-built offshore structures. In their paper published in the journal Communications Biology, the group describes their study of foraging seabirds in a tidal channel near Northern Ireland and what they learned.

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Will the ocean benefit from the battle of the microbeads bans?

I close my eyes and instead of falling asleep I see this: "Talc, Mica, Magnesium Stearate, Polyethylene…" – one of the thousands of product ingredient lists I had meticulously combed through. This particular one came from a make-up product and stood out to me because it raised so many excellent questions about the scale of the microbead pollution problem (or microplastic ingredients as I prefer to

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Why agricultural groups fiercely oppose the carbon tax

When the Pan-Canadian Approach to Pricing Carbon Pollution was announced in October 2016, it was met with passionate responses, from supporters and those in opposition.

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Study shows human-built offshore structures can benefit seabirds

A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.K. has found evidence that suggests some seabirds may benefit from the existence of human-built offshore structures. In their paper published in the journal Communications Biology, the group describes their study of foraging seabirds in a tidal channel near Northern Ireland and what they learned.

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A new model predicts squeezed nanocrystal shape when blanketed under graphene

In a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory and Northeastern University, scientists have developed a model for predicting the shape of metal nanocrystals or "islands" sandwiched between or below two-dimensional (2-D) materials such as graphene. The advance moves 2-D quantum materials a step closer to applications in electronics.

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Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster—but it comes at a cost

A study by Ph.D. student Hanna Nyborg Støstad has investigated the peculiar spiral shape of songbird sperm. Støstad compared sperm cells of 36 bird species including house sparrows and tree swallows, and found that species whose sperm had a particularly distinct spiral or corkscrew shape also had sperm with high average swimming speed. However, those species also tended to have high rates of abnor

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Carbon dioxide to methanol conversion

NUS chemists have developed a highly efficient nanostructured catalyst based on zinc and silver that can convert carbon dioxide, an environmental pollutant and greenhouse gas, to methanol for use as chemical feedstock and fuel.

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Photons trained for optical fibre obstacle course will deliver stronger cyber security

Beneath many cities are complex networks of optical fibres that carry data, encoded in pulses of light, to offices and homes. Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Singtel, Asia's leading communications technology group, have demonstrated a technique that will help pairs of light particles smoothly navigate these networks, a breakthrough that will enable stronger cyber se

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Screw-shaped bird sperm swim faster—but it comes at a cost

A study by Ph.D. student Hanna Nyborg Støstad has investigated the peculiar spiral shape of songbird sperm. Støstad compared sperm cells of 36 bird species including house sparrows and tree swallows, and found that species whose sperm had a particularly distinct spiral or corkscrew shape also had sperm with high average swimming speed. However, those species also tended to have high rates of abnor

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Scientists discover deep microbes' key contribution to Earth's carbon cycle

Hydrocarbons play key roles in atmospheric and biogeochemistry, the energy economy, and climate change. Most hydrocarbons form in anaerobic environments through high temperature or microbial decomposition of organic matter. Microorganisms can also "eat" hydrocarbons underground, preventing them from reaching the atmosphere. Using a new technique developed at the Earth-Life Science Institute (ELSI)

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Cyclone Idai shows why long-term disaster resilience is so crucial

Cyclone Idai struck Beira, the fourth largest city in Mozambique, in mid-March with torrential rains and winds of more than 190 km per hour. It took days for the sheer size of the resulting disaster to be understood.

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Researcher uses lightning storms to measure the density of Earth's upper atmosphere

No one has a firm grasp on the dimensions and activity of the lowest part of our upper atmosphere, known as the ionospheric D region, because it's literally a moving target. Located 40 to 60 miles above the Earth's surface, the region moves up and down, depending on the time of day. And it's nearly impossible to monitor: it's too high for airplanes and research balloons, too low for satellites, an

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Study explains why some of our famous flightless birds can't fly

University of Otago researchers in association with colleagues from Harvard University have discovered new evidence of what made some of New Zealand's iconic birds such as the kiwi and extinct moa flightless.

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Study explains why some of our famous flightless birds can't fly

University of Otago researchers in association with colleagues from Harvard University have discovered new evidence of what made some of New Zealand's iconic birds such as the kiwi and extinct moa flightless.

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How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?

Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. Forces are produced by contractile chains of the proteins actin and myosin, which pull on muscle-tendon connections called attachments. During animal development, these muscle-tendon attachments must be established such that they resist high mechanical forces for the entire life of the animal. An interd

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Plants grow less in hotter temperatures

Plants have developed a robust system that stops their cell cycle in hostile environments such as abnormally hot temperatures. In response, they direct their energy to survival rather than growth. A new study led by scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) reports in eLife that two transcription factors, ANAC044 and ANAC085, are critical for this response in the flowering

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Plants grow less in hotter temperatures

Plants have developed a robust system that stops their cell cycle in hostile environments such as abnormally hot temperatures. In response, they direct their energy to survival rather than growth. A new study led by scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) reports in eLife that two transcription factors, ANAC044 and ANAC085, are critical for this response in the flowering

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Tiny Footprints May Have Been Made by World's Smallest Nonavian Dinosaur

The raptorlike prints could also have been from juveniles of a larger species — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fabrics that protect against chemical warfare agents

A new coating for textile fibers shows promise for efficiently capturing toxic industrial chemicals and chemical warfare agents under real-world conditions, including high humidity. The research could lead to improved masks and personal protective equipment for soldiers and others at risk of exposure.

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Pin-sized sensor could bring chemical ID to smartphone-sized devices

Imagine pointing your smartphone at a salty snack you found at the back of your pantry and immediately knowing if its ingredients had turned rancid.

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'Enhancing' forensic audio can mislead juries in criminal trials

Many criminal trials feature forensic evidence in the form of audio recordings, typically from bugging houses or cars, or intercepting phone calls.

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New understanding of heat transfer in boiling water could lead to efficiency improvements in power plants

The simple act of boiling water is one of humankind's oldest inventions, and still central to many of today's technologies, from coffee makers to nuclear power plants. Yet this seemingly simple process has complexities that have long defied full understanding.

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Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees

An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. They showed that all males had higher stress levels during periods of increased male-male

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Here's what the most extreme modes of travel do to your body

Science We're not built for this stuff. The fragile human frame takes a beating during ultramarathons, skydives, and even racecar drives.

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Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees

An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. They showed that all males had higher stress levels during periods of increased male-male

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Cell lesson: better coordinated than isolated

A new study led by Juana Díez, principal investigator of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF, has found a new system in cells that makes them more robust against possible alterations in the expression of genes. The work was published yesterday, 21 March, in Nature Communications.

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Compound that kills drug-resistant fungi is isolated from ant microbiota

Antimicrobial and antifungal resistance, which describe the ability of bacteria and other pathogens to resist the effects of drugs to which they were once sensitive, is a major public health problem worldwide. A study published recently in the journal Nature Communications suggests that the solution may come from the tiny bodies of insects, or more accurately, from the microbiota that they host.

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Cell lesson: better coordinated than isolated

A new study led by Juana Díez, principal investigator of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF, has found a new system in cells that makes them more robust against possible alterations in the expression of genes. The work was published yesterday, 21 March, in Nature Communications.

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Chemists warn against unreasonable wastage upon acquisition of scientific equipment

Compared to the human eye, a spectrometer can be certainly regarded as a scientific instrument. Production and marketing of scientific equipment have now become a profitable industry.

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Compound that kills drug-resistant fungi is isolated from ant microbiota

Antimicrobial and antifungal resistance, which describe the ability of bacteria and other pathogens to resist the effects of drugs to which they were once sensitive, is a major public health problem worldwide. A study published recently in the journal Nature Communications suggests that the solution may come from the tiny bodies of insects, or more accurately, from the microbiota that they host.

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Economics can help tackle the global challenge of antimicrobial resistance

Applying the economics of climate change to antimicrobial resistance could help to avert the 10 million deaths that are predicted to occur by 2050 if urgent action isn't taken, research involving University of Exeter finds.

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The holm oak transcriptome rebuilt: A key step towards understanding its biology

Holm oaks are some of the most emblematic trees in Mediterranean forests and the most abundant ones on the Iberian Peninsula. Holm oaks have provided countless applications throughout their hundreds of thousands of years of history, and currently are one of the main resources for livestock farmers in the dehesa, a vital ecosystem in southern Spain. The AGR-164 research group at the University of C

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How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?

Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. Forces are produced by contractile chains of the proteins actin and myosin, which pull on muscle-tendon connections called attachments. During animal development, these muscle-tendon attachments must be established such that they resist high mechanical forces for the entire life of the animal. An interd

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The Scams Are Winning

Late last month—shortly after the special counsel’s office delivered the results of Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian collusion in the 2016 election to the Justice Department (and shortly after Attorney General William Barr sent his four-page summary of the years-in-the-making report to Congress, and shortly after President Donald Trump summed up the summary by declaring that report amo

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Poll: Pets add exercise, cut stress for older adults

Pets of all kinds help older adults cope with health issues, stay physically active, and connect with others, a poll shows. In the poll, 55 percent of adults ages 50 to 80 said they have a pet—and more than half of those have more than one. More than three-quarters of pet owners said their animals reduce stress, and nearly as many said pets give them a sense of purpose. But 18 percent also said h

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Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health

Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found.

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The Color of Vowels

What is the color, if you had to choose, of the “oo” sound in “boot”? What about the “ay” sound in “say”? Researchers asked 1,000 participants this question , 200 of which have synesthesia – a condition in which different sensory and cognitive modalities blend into each other. Interestingly, 70% of non-synesthetes still had a structured answer to these questions. They had a mental map of what vow

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The holm oak transcriptome rebuilt: A key step towards understanding its biology

Holm oaks are some of the most emblematic trees in Mediterranean forests and the most abundant ones on the Iberian Peninsula. Holm oaks have provided countless applications throughout their hundreds of thousands of years of history, and currently are one of the main resources for livestock farmers in the dehesa, a vital ecosystem in southern Spain. The AGR-164 research group at the University of C

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'Phantom' Predator's Speedy Dance of Death Is Both Graceful and Creepy

Fearsome yet tiny creatures have one of the fastest strikes in the animal kingdom.

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Jaguar Mom Eats Dead Cub, and Zoo Caretakers Can't Explain Why

A newborn jaguar cub lived a mere two days before it died and — to the horror of its caretakers at Associação Mata Ciliar in Brazil — its mother gobbled it up.

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Image of the Day: Macrophages in Action

Researchers watch cellular interactions in high definition as the immune cells absorb E. coli bacteria.

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Testing mosquito pee could help track the spread of diseases

A new way to monitor the viruses that wild mosquitoes are spreading passes its first outdoor test.

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Machines That Read Your Brain Waves

How to make sure noninvasive neural interfaces stay that way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Female race car drivers react just as quickly as men

Women race car drivers, even with 10 years less experience, react and respond just as well as their male counterparts on the race track, according to a new study. In the world of racing, the debate on whether women are as fit as men behind the wheel can often become heated. Just last year, Carmen Jorda, a member of the FIA Women in Motorsport Commission, was criticized for encouraging female driv

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(Grey's) Anatomy of an Opioid Crisis

The popular medical drama gets it right—with a little romance on the side, naturally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Skogen – Sveriges försvar mot växthuseffekten

I rapporten ”Det svenska skogsbrukets klimatpåverkan” har Skogforsk sammanfattat kunskapsläget inom området och tittat på den svenska skogens roll i klimatarbetet. En slutsats är att produktionen av virke ska vara så hög som möjligt, med hänsyn till andra värden, för att ge största möjliga klimatnytta. – Att lämna skogen orörd skulle under en tid öka inlagringen av kol. Men i fullmogen skog sker

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Stunning realistic video game visuals created by simulating light rays

Real-time ray tracing is creating impressively realistic video game graphics. It uses powerful chips to calculate how millions of light rays reflect in a scene

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(Grey's) Anatomy of an Opioid Crisis

The popular medical drama gets it right—with a little romance on the side, naturally — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A peptide against cannibalism

A worm whose favorite dish is – of all things—worm larvae has to take great care not to accidentally devour its own progeny. How these tiny worms of merely a millimeter in length manage to distinguish their own offspring from that of other worms and avoid cannibalism has recently been discovered by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen. They found that Pristi

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A peptide against cannibalism

A worm whose favorite dish is – of all things—worm larvae has to take great care not to accidentally devour its own progeny. How these tiny worms of merely a millimeter in length manage to distinguish their own offspring from that of other worms and avoid cannibalism has recently been discovered by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen. They found that Pristi

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Video: Preserving satellite data

Satellites provide vast quantities of data. While these data are processed and used by scientists and analysts to understand and monitor Earth, they are also carefully archived.

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Compass orientation of a migratory bat species depends on sunset direction

Millions of mammals navigate over thousands of kilometres each year. How they navigate during migration remains remarkably understudied compared to birds or sea turtles, however. A team of scientists led by the Leibniz-IZW in Berlin has now combined a mirror experiment simulating a different direction of the setting sun and a new test procedure to measure orientation behaviour in bats to understan

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Black nanoparticles slow the growth of tumors

The dark skin pigment melanin protects against the sun's damaging rays by absorbing light energy and converting it to heat. This could make it a very effective tool in tumor diagnosis and treatment, as demonstrated by a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München. The scientists created melanin-loaded cell membrane-derived nanoparticles, which improved tumor im

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Catalyst research for solar fuels: Amorphous molybdenum sulfide works best

Efficient and inexpensive catalysts will be required for production of hydrogen from sunlight. Molybdenum sulfides are considered good candidates. A team at HZB has now explained what processes take place in molybdenum sulfides during catalysis and why amorphous molybdenum sulfide works best. The results have been published in the journal ACS Catalysis.

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Zelda And Super Mario Odyssey Take Virtual Reality Plunge With Nintendo Labo

Part of the success of the Nintendo Switch has been due to the popularity its first-party games. Now a few of these games will be available with in VR. Nintendo recently announced that Super …

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EU says BMW, Daimler, VW colluded to limit emissions tech

European Union authorities said Friday that German automakers BMW, Daimler and Volkswagen colluded to limit the development of emissions-cleaning technology in cars.

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Compass orientation of a migratory bat species depends on sunset direction

Millions of mammals navigate over thousands of kilometres each year. How they navigate during migration remains remarkably understudied compared to birds or sea turtles, however. A team of scientists led by the Leibniz-IZW in Berlin has now combined a mirror experiment simulating a different direction of the setting sun and a new test procedure to measure orientation behaviour in bats to understan

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EU investigates video game companies over antitrust concerns

The European Union's competition watchdog is stepping up its investigation of a U.S. video game platform and five game makers over concerns they blocked players from buying cheaper versions of games in other countries.

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India weighs ban on popular online game after deaths

A boy's suicide this week in southern India after his mother scolded him for playing a popular online game has inflamed a national debate over whether the game should be banned.

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Italian company wins big Australian hydroelectric contract

Italy's leading construction company Salini Impregilo said Friday it would share in a contract to build a hydroelectric station in Australia, the biggest deal ever in the country's hydropower sector.

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BMW, Daimler, VW broke antitrust rules, EU says in 'preliminary view'

The European Union warned German car giants BMW, Daimler and Volkswagen on Friday that a preliminary inquiry has concluded they colluded not to compete on emission control technology.

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Is It OK to Make Your Dog Vegan?

When the ethos of eating meets the pathos of puppies, so many tears flow. What there’s considerably less of, though, is science.

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5 of the Best Demos of Projectile Motion and Its Quirks

A dude jumping on a moving trampoline is a great excuse to dive into the unexpected properties of projectile motion.

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Chiropractic Manipulation Under Anesthesia in Infants with Congenital Torticollis: All Risk and No Benefit

It may sound too unethical to be true, but some chiropractors and their conventional medical conspirators are placing infants under general anesthesia for treatment of congenital muscular torticollis

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Sydney Brenner: Molecular biology pioneer dies

He taught himself to read from newspapers but went on to win a Nobel Prize.

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A New View of Life on Earth, the Paradox of Quantum Reality and Other New Science Books

Book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cyberchondriacs Just Know They Must Be Sick

Researchers are unraveling the psychological reasons why some people relentlessly self-diagnose themselves online for hours a day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fler väljer bostadsort efter tillgång på friluftsliv

I den nu genomförda enkäten svarade varannan svensk, drygt 52 procent, att tillgången på friluftsliv är viktig när man väljer bostadsort. Det är en tydlig ökning jämfört med en liknande undersökning som gjordes år 2007 då knappt 40 procent av de tillfrågade svarade att tillgången till friluftsliv påverkade valet av bostadsort. – Vi ser i enkätsvaren att i stort sett alla svenskar ägnar sig åt fri

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Cyberchondriacs Just Know They Must Be Sick

Researchers are unraveling the psychological reasons why some people relentlessly self-diagnose themselves online for hours a day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cyberchondriacs Just Know They Must Be Sick

Researchers are unraveling the psychological reasons why some people relentlessly self-diagnose themselves online for hours a day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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50 years ago, scientists were unlocking the secrets of bacteria-infecting viruses

In 1969, a bacteria-infecting virus held promise for unlocking the secrets of viral replication. Fifty years later, the virus is a versatile tool for scientists.

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The whale with legs shows how little we know about Earth’s fantastical past | Riley Black

The excavation of the extraordinary fossil Peregocetus pacificus in Peru is a reminder of the wonders still awaiting discovery Whales used to live on land. This fact never ceases to amaze me. Even though every living species of cetacean – from the immense blue whale to the river dolphins of the Amazon basin – is entirely aquatic, there were times when the word “whale” applied entirely to amphibiou

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Varmes af havet: 5 MW varmepumpe skal levere fjernvarme i hovedstaden

PLUS. Sammen med varmeselskaberne CTR og Veks har Hofor etableret et varmepumpe-demonstrationsanlæg til 75 mio. kroner, der har spildevand og havvand som varmekilde

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Telling us to stop washing our hands is dangerous and unacceptable

Media misinterpretations of the hygiene hypothesis are encouraging us to stop washing our hands – and it's undermining our public health, says Sally Bloomfield

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Borgmestre til Ole Birk: Billundbane vil afkoble Herning og Struer

Den nye togforbindelse, som regeringen og DF vil skabe mellem Vejle og Billund, vil koble Herning og Struer af det landsdækkende tognet med alvorlige konsekvenser for egnen, påpeger seks borgmestre i et brev til trafikminister Ole Birk Olesen.

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It Hurts to See Nipsey Hussle’s Life Not Mattering

I didn’t know Nipsey Hussle, but I knew Nipsey Hussle. Hussle’s murder in his Los Angeles neighborhood last Sunday was a heartbreaking conclusion to an unfortunately common story. Another talented young black man was senselessly killed, police say, by another black man, leaving behind mourning families and communities that have become accustomed to absorbing such standard trauma. It hurts to see

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Warning From Wisconsin

A funny thing happened Tuesday to the Democrats’ momentum in Wisconsin: It sputtered out. Despite being heavily favored to win a crucial seat on Wisconsin’s Supreme Court, the candidate backed by liberal groups was apparently upset by a conservative. This still unofficial result should serve as a warning to national Democrats, especially when it comes to the issue of religious liberty. The Wiscon

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Native Son Gets the James Baldwin Edit

This article contains spoilers for Native Son . Selling more than 215,000 copies in the three weeks following its American debut, Richard Wright’s 1940 novel, Native Son , successfully captivated readers nationwide. The story of Bigger Thomas—a hardened, murderous black 20-year-old confronting poverty in Depression-era Chicago—thrust audiences into a complicated conversation about race and racism

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Socialism, but in Iowa

DES MOINES—Caroline Schoonover has two immediate goals. One of them is to systematically dismantle capitalism. The other is to finish watching all seven seasons of Vanderpump Rules . “There are a lot of things that are not funny to me when I’m thinking about the state the world is in, but there is something about Vanderpump Rules ,” the 28-year-old told me, referring to the Bravo reality show tha

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Former university president up to ten retractions

The former president of Tohoku University in Japan has just had a tenth paper retracted, because it duplicated one of his earlier works. One of the most recent retractions by materials scientist Akihisa Inoue, late last month, was of a paper in Materials Transactions that had duplicated a now-retracted paper and was subject to an expression of … Continue reading Former university president up to t

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Where Will Man Take Us – By Atul Jalan

submitted by /u/Manthansystem [link] [comments]

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For Purdue Pharma, Lawsuits and Criticism Mount

For years, Purdue Pharma has been plagued by investigations and lawsuits into its marketing of the opioid painkiller OxyContin. While the company and several executives pled guilty in 2007 to criminal charges, legal action and criticism against the family behind Purdue continues to mount.

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Små sensorer sluger batterier og et fantastisk fossil-fund

Nye trådløse teknologier er ved at blive et miljøproblem, fordi de ofte benytter miljøbelastende batterier og forbruger kolossalt meget energi.

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Fifty years ago, scientists were unlocking the secrets of bacteria-infecting viruses

In 1969, a bacteria-infecting virus held promise for unlocking the secrets of viral replication. Fifty years later, the virus is a versatile tool for scientists.

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Why the 'alpha male' stereotype is wrong

The cultural notion of an alpha male as a strong, mean aggressor is rampant but wrong. The reality is more complex. Frans de Waal notes two types of alpha males: Bullies and leaders. In chimpanzee society, the former terrorizes the group while the latter mediates conflict. The reign of alpha male bullies usually ends poorly in the wild. Chimpanzee bullies get expelled or even killed by their grou

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Einstein, quantum theory and the battle for reality

Has physics been hijacked by an anti-realist philosophy?

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EMA har amerikansk gigtmiddel under kritisk lup

Det europæiske lægemiddelagentur advarer læger mod at udskrive høje doser af gigtmedicinen Xeljanz, da nyt studie indikerer øget risiko for blodpropper i lungerne.

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Bornholm skræddersyr forebyggelsesforløb til diabetespatienter

Hospital, kommune og almen praksis på Bornholm samarbejder om nye forebyggelsesforløb for type 2-diabetespatienter. Forløbene skal være skræddersyet den enkelte borger, og efterspørgslen har været med stor.

9h

Söndersliten planet kretsar runt döende stjärna

En ny studie, som nu publiceras i Science, lägger fram bevis för att forskare har hittat en liten himlakropp, en så kallad planetesimal, runt en vit dvärg drygt 400 ljusår från Jorden. Planetesimaler består av sten eller is, som asteroider eller kometer, och är allt från några kilometer till några tiotals mil i storlek. De kan antingen utgör byggstenar till kommande planetbildning eller vara rest

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Sorry, graphene—borophene is the new wonder material that’s got everyone excited

Stronger and more flexible than graphene, a single-atom layer of boron could revolutionize sensors, batteries, and catalytic chemistry.

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Mystery of negative capacitance in perovskite solar cells solved

EPFL scientists reveal the origin of apparently high and even negative capacitance values observed in perovskite solar cells.

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Research identifies genetic causes of poor sleep

The largest genetic study of its kind ever to use accelerometer data to examine how we slumber has uncovered a number of parts of our genetic code that could be responsible for causing poor sleep quality and duration.

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Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks

A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer.

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Japan’s Hayabusa 2 spacecraft just bombed an asteroid

The Hayabusa 2 spacecraft has shot an explosive projectile at the asteroid Ryugu to release dust and collect a sample

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Periocular skin warming elevates the distal skin temperature without affecting the proximal or core body temperature

Periocular skin warming elevates the distal skin temperature without affecting the proximal or core body temperature Periocular skin warming elevates the distal skin temperature without affecting the proximal or core body temperature, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42116-x Periocular skin warming elevates the distal skin temperature without affecting the proximal or core

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Safety and Efficacy of Intraventricular Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hemorrhagic Stroke Model

Safety and Efficacy of Intraventricular Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hemorrhagic Stroke Model Safety and Efficacy of Intraventricular Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Hemorrhagic Stroke Model, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42182-1 Safety and Efficacy of Intraventricular Delivery of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem

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High-Throughput, Time-Resolved Mechanical Phenotyping of Prostate Cancer Cells

High-Throughput, Time-Resolved Mechanical Phenotyping of Prostate Cancer Cells High-Throughput, Time-Resolved Mechanical Phenotyping of Prostate Cancer Cells, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42008-0 High-Throughput, Time-Resolved Mechanical Phenotyping of Prostate Cancer Cells

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Mapping Bromodomains in breast cancer and association with clinical outcome

Mapping Bromodomains in breast cancer and association with clinical outcome Mapping Bromodomains in breast cancer and association with clinical outcome, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41934-3 Mapping Bromodomains in breast cancer and association with clinical outcome

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Effect of ranolazine on plasma arginine derivatives and urinary isoprostane 8-iso-PGF2α in patients with myocardial infarction in the randomized RIMINI-Trial

Effect of ranolazine on plasma arginine derivatives and urinary isoprostane 8-iso-PGF 2α in patients with myocardial infarction in the randomized RIMINI-Trial Effect of ranolazine on plasma arginine derivatives and urinary isoprostane 8-iso-PGF 2α in patients with myocardial infarction in the randomized RIMINI-Trial, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42239-1 Effect of ranola

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Thermal transport across grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicene: A multiscale modeling

Thermal transport across grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicene: A multiscale modeling Thermal transport across grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicene: A multiscale modeling, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42187-w Thermal transport across grain boundaries in polycrystalline silicene: A multiscale modeling

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Polarimetry of photon echo on charged and neutral excitons in semiconductor quantum wells

Polarimetry of photon echo on charged and neutral excitons in semiconductor quantum wells Polarimetry of photon echo on charged and neutral excitons in semiconductor quantum wells, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42208-8 Polarimetry of photon echo on charged and neutral excitons in semiconductor quantum wells

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A Comparison of Static and Dynamic Functional Connectivities for Identifying Subjects and Biological Sex Using Intrinsic Individual Brain Connectivity

A Comparison of Static and Dynamic Functional Connectivities for Identifying Subjects and Biological Sex Using Intrinsic Individual Brain Connectivity A Comparison of Static and Dynamic Functional Connectivities for Identifying Subjects and Biological Sex Using Intrinsic Individual Brain Connectivity, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42090-4 A Comparison of Static and Dynam

9h

Jannik rykkede fra Aarhus til Grenaa og vinkede farvel til en halv lægeløn

Vil vi uligheden i sundhed og lægemanglen i yderområderne til livs, skal det være attraktivt at være læge for de tunge patienter. Det er ikke tilfældet i dag. Tværtimod, mener Jannik Falhof, som selv skiftede praksislivet i Aarhus midtby ud med Grenaa.

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Dagbog fra klinikken: Sådan ser en arbejdsdag ud for Jannik Falhof

På en tilfældig arbejdsdag i april så Jannik Falhof 14 patienter, hvoraf kun én ikke var relativt kompliceret. »Jeg kunne sagtens have brugt tre gange så meget tid for at komme længere rundt om patienternes problemer«

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Democrats Have to Decide Whether Faith Is an Asset for 2020

In the two and a half months since Pete Buttigieg announced that he’s exploring a presidential bid, the 37-year-old South Bend, Indiana, mayor has embraced a fraught figure in Democratic politics: God. “We need to not be afraid to invoke arguments … on why Christian faith is going to point you in a progressive direction,” he recently told USA Today . He also questioned Donald Trump’s religious si

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DeepMind created a maths AI that can add up to 6 but gets 7 wrong

AI firm DeepMind taught an AI to take a maths exam designed for 16-year-olds in the UK, but it only managed to get an E grade

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Bing Brings New Action Extension to Show Call-to-Action

submitted by /u/ahmadnazir0000 [link] [comments]

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Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks

A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer. The work, published in the journal Nature Communications, offers a potential framework and more efficient methods that can be used to investigate a wide-range of vital pathways in any organism.

10h

Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks

A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer. The work, published in the journal Nature Communications, offers a potential framework and more efficient methods that can be used to investigate a wide-range of vital pathways in any organism.

10h

Galaksen uden mørkt stof er bekræftet – og der er en mere

Skepsis fra kolleger fik astronom til at lave mere detaljerede observationer. Men han blev kun mere sikker i sin sag: Galaksen NGC1052-DF2 har intet eller meget lidt mørkt stof.

10h

#60 Historier fra gamle dage

Stetoskopet tager dig med tilbage i tiden på hospitalerne til den gang, portørerne kunne ryge på hospitalerne, og hvor lægen havde hund med til stuegang.

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Käkbensdöd orsakad av mediciner kan behandlas

Läkemedel, som ges till patienter med benskörhet och till patienter med spridd bröst- och prostatacancer för att minska risken för frakturer, kan ha en oönskad biverkning i käken. Här kan läkemedlen leda till käkbensdöd. De flesta fall av läkemedelsrelaterad käkbensdöd kan dock behandlas. Det visar forskaren Fredrik Hallmer som i en ny avhandling kartlagt riskfaktorer och behandlingsmetoder.

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Snowflakes are making the Arctic warm faster by acting like a blanket

The Arctic seas could become ice-free 20 years earlier than expected thanks to snowflakes that trap heat to warm the surface beneath them

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Scientists warn of pandemic endangering amphibians

A deadly disease affecting amphibians has descended into a global pandemic that has already wiped out 90 species, a prominent US biologist warned Thursday at the World Organisation for Animal Health Aquatic Conference in Santiago, Chile.

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France insists on digital tax despite US anger

France will stick to plans for a tax on digital giants such as Facebook and Apple, Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said on Friday, despite angry opposition from Washington.

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Gone in 6 minutes: an Ethiopian Airlines jet's final journey

From nearly the moment they roared down the runway and took off in their new Boeing jetliner, pilots of an Ethiopian Airlines flight encountered problems with the plane.

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Scientists warn of pandemic endangering amphibians

A deadly disease affecting amphibians has descended into a global pandemic that has already wiped out 90 species, a prominent US biologist warned Thursday at the World Organisation for Animal Health Aquatic Conference in Santiago, Chile.

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US judge orders talks between Tesla's Musk, securities regulators

A federal judge on Thursday gave Tesla chief executive Elon Musk and US securities regulators two weeks to resolve their differences over Musk's prolific social media use.

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Samsung Electronics flags 60% slump in Q1 operating profit

The world's biggest smartphone and memory chip maker Samsung Electronics warned Friday of a more than 60 percent plunge in first-quarter operating profits in the face of weakening markets.

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Facebook to block foreign ads for Australia election

Facebook will block election advertising from outside Australia ahead of polls next month, in the wake of growing criticism of the social media giant's role in the spread of disinformation.

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Climate change blights children's lives in Bangladesh

Environmental disasters linked to climate change are threatening the lives and futures of over 19 million children in Bangladesh, including prompting many families to push their daughters into child marriages, UNICEF said Friday.

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Google disbands artificial intelligence ethics board

Google on Thursday confirmed that it has disbanded a recently assembled artificial intelligence ethics advisory panel in the face of controversy over its membership.

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Japan space drops explosive on asteroid to make crater

Japan's space agency said an explosive dropped Friday from its Hayabusa2 spacecraft successfully blasted the surface of an asteroid for the first time to form a crater and pave the way for the collection of underground samples for possible clues to the origin of the solar system.

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Fik du læst: Københavns pandaer får et hjem helt uden rette vinkler

I nat flyttede to pandaer fra Kina ind i et nyopført hus i Zoologisk Have København. Avanceret geometri og specielle krav til udsmykningen gjorde pandahuset til en kompleks opgave.

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Japanese spacecraft 'bombs' asteroid in scientific mission

Scientists hope samples from Hayabusa 2 will provide clues about origins of life on Earth A Japanese spacecraft has “bombed” a speeding asteroid 187m miles (300m km) from Earth in an attempt to retrieve material that could offer scientists new clues about the origins of life on the planet. The Hayabusa 2 probe released the device – called a small carry-on impact – on Friday as it hovered 500 metr

12h

Quiz og vind: Hvad ved du om IDA?

I anledning af repræsentantskabsvalget kan du teste din viden – og være med i konkurrencen om ti gavekort à 500 kroner.

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Japanese space probe drops explosive on asteroid Ryugu

Japanese space probe drops explosive on asteroid Ryugu Japanese space probe drops explosive on asteroid Ryugu, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01081-1 Hayabusa2 released the projectile to make a crater on the asteroid's surface.

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Har du en dårlig dag? Så brug 12 minutter på at tænke godt om andre

Forskning viser, at du bliver gladere, mindre angst og udvikler mere empati, hvis du tænker positivt om andre mennesker.

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Do Police Body Cameras Provide an Impartial Version of Events?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Why France’s Former Prime Minister Wants to Be a Mayor in Spain

BARCELONA —As Manuel Valls walked through La Sagrada Família , the Antoni Gaudí basilica, French tourists would every so often look with a start and point his way. Trailed by one of his security guards, Valls listened impassively as a guide explained the challenges to the over-the-top building project—sandcastle on the outside, sci-fi columns on the inside—which has been ongoing for more than a c

13h

Cross Section: David Spiegelhalter – Science Weekly podcast

Prof Sir David Spiegelhalter has a passion for statistics but some argue this type of number crunching is losing its influence and its ability to objectively depict reality. Nicola Davis and Ian Sample investigate how significant statistics are in today’s ‘post-truth’ world Prof Sir David Spiegelhalter has a love of statistics and has done ever since he was inspired by a teacher at university. To

14h

Cross Section: David Spiegelhalter – Science Weekly podcast

Prof Sir David Spiegelhalter has a passion for statistics but some argue this type of number crunching is losing its influence and its ability to objectively depict reality. Nicola Davis and Ian Sample investigate how significant statistics are in today’s ‘post-truth’ world. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Thousands of homes destroyed as Iran braces for more floods

Deadly flash floods in Iran kill dozens, and cause destruction across the country.

14h

Like old photographs, memories fade over time

Past events are often vividly recollected. However, it remains unclear how the qualities of memories are reconstructed. A new study finds that as time passes, the visual information that illustrates our memories fades away.

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Screen time — even before bed — has little impact on teen well-being

Data from more than 17,000 teenagers show little evidence of a relationship between screen time and well-being in adolescents. The study, published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, casts doubt on the widely accepted notion that spending time online, gaming, or watching TV, especially before bedtime, can damage young people's mental health.

14h

Futuristic new tower wins planning approval in London

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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Geopuzzle: One of These Three Postulations is Right Out

Can you determine the least likely scenario? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14h

Regelmæssig MR-scanning gavner ikke gigtpatienter

Ny dansk forskning viser, at MR-scanninger ikke er et gavnligt værktøj til at bremse sygdomsudviklingen hos gigtramte. Men forskerne vil alligevel arbejde videre med projektet.

14h

Diabetesforeningen får ny forskningschef

Tidligere ansat ved Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen er blevet ansat som ny forskningschef i Diabetesforeningen. Hun skal være foreningens nye chef for Forskning & Analyse.

14h

Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen lancerer diabetesråd

Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen lancerer et netbaseret brugerpanel, der skal give borgerne i Region Hovedstaden mulighed for at bidrage til diabetesbehandling.

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Nyt forskningsprojekt skal forbedre opsporing af hjertekarsygdomme hos type 2-diabetespatienter

Forskere vil scanne ca. 900 diabetikere og gennem registeropfølgning få ny viden om sammenhængen mellem forandringer i hjertets små blodkar og hjertekarsygdom.

14h

Datatilsynet: Erhvervsstyrelsen har ulovligt offentliggjort følsomme personoplysninger

Datatilsynet udtaler »alvorlig kritik« af Erhvervsstyrelsen, efter styrelsen har registreret og offentliggjort personoplysninger på ulovligt grundlag, herunder oplysninger om religiøs overbevisning.

15h

A Response to Steven Pinker on AI

submitted by /u/Elariom23 [link] [comments]

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Spider Monkeys Optimize Jungle Acoustics

The monkeys lower the pitch of their "whinnies" when they're far from the rest of their group, which might help the calls travel further through jungle foliage. Christopher Intagliata reports.

15h

Google dissolves AI ethics board just one week after forming it

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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How under-screen camera works? The real solution for notch?

submitted by /u/iamparameswaran [link] [comments]

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Nye trådløse teknologier sluger miljøbelastende batterier

PLUS. Energiforbruget i små Internet of Things-enheder kan inden for få år nå et niveau svarende til den samlede globale elproduktion i dag. Og de fleste forsynes af miljøbelastende batterier.

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Spider Monkeys Optimize Jungle Acoustics

The monkeys lower the pitch of their "whinnies" when they're far from the rest of their group, which might help the calls travel further through jungle foliage. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Spider Monkeys Optimize Jungle Acoustics

The monkeys lower the pitch of their "whinnies" when they're far from the rest of their group, which might help the calls travel further through jungle foliage. Christopher Intagliata… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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First reported UK case of likely dog-to-dog transmission of leishmaniosis

Veterinary professionals have sounded the alarm in this week's Vet Record after treating the first UK case of a dog with the potentially fatal infection, leishmaniosis, that is thought to have been passed on by another dog, rather than by travel to an area where the infection is endemic.

16h

Artificial intelligence approach optimizes embryo selection for IVF

A team, consisting of embryologists, reproductive medicine clinicians, computer scientists, and precision medicine experts, trained an artificial intelligence algorithm to discriminate between poor and good embryo quality.

16h

How ALS progresses on genetic and cellular level revealed by high-res spinal cord study

Precise experiments have revealed for the first time how Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progresses on a genetic and cellular level. The work comprises tens of thousands of minuscule measurements of spinal tissue and opens new avenues for developing potential treatments for the disease, which affects around 450,000 people worldwide.

16h

Microscopic swimmers with visual perception of group members form stable swarms

Physicists were able to show that the formation of stable groups requires only few skills: forward visual perception over large distances and regulation of the speed according to the number of perceived individuals.

16h

Cancer exports molecular 'saboteurs' to remotely disarm immune system

Immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors have revolutionized cancer treatment: many patients with malignancies that until recently would have been considered untreatable are experiencing long-term remissions. Now, researchers have identified a surprising phenomenon that may explain why many cancers don't respond to these drugs, and hints at new strategies to unleash the immune system aga

16h

Parkinson's clues seen in tiny fish could aid quest for treatments

Parkinson's patients could be helped by fresh insights gained from studies of tiny tropical fish. Research using zebrafish has revealed how key brain cells that are damaged in people with Parkinson's disease can be regenerated.

16h

Durability vs. recyclability: Dueling goals in making electronics more sustainable

Researchers have looked into the impact of government policies put in place to reduce the amount of electronics waste filling up landfills.

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Engineers develop novel techniques to trick object detection systems

New adversarial techniques developed by engineers can make objects 'invisible' to image detection systems that use deep-learning algorithms. These techniques can also trick systems into thinking they see another object or can change the location of objects. The technique mitigates the risk for compromise in automated image processing systems.

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Scott Gottlieb Says He Will Return to Conservative Think Tank After Leaving F.D.A.

His last day at the agency is Friday, then he will return part-time to the American Enterprise Institute where he will focus on drug prices.

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Multiple mechanisms behind disease associated with unexpected heart attacks

An examination of three mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy — a disease best known for revealing itself as an unexpected, fatal heart attack during strenuous exercise — found separate mechanisms at work at the molecular level.

17h

Plague, camels, and lice [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, the paper by Namouchi et al. (1) suggests that there were no reservoirs of plague in Europe in the Middle Ages, but rather multiple reintroductions. This study may be completed by reporting several works poorly cited in literature which add to our comprehension of plague transmission. It is…

17h

Reply to Barbieri et al.: Out of the Land of Darkness: Plague on the fur trade routes [Letters (Online Only)]

In their letter, Barbieri et al. (1) cite valuable works on human ectoparasite transmission well known to us. Indeed, we previously tested alternatives to the rat/rat–flea mechanism of transmission and found that a model with human ectoparasites was the most appropriate in Europe (2, 3) where there were no known…

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Antarctic: 'No role' for climate in Halley iceberg splitting

Scientists say natural events are driving the ice changes near Britain's Halley base in Antarctica.

18h

Plastic patrol: 'I've pulled engines out of the water'

Paddle boarder Lizzie Carr takes her plastic patrol to the waterways.

19h

Cats Might Not Act Like It, But They Know Their Names As Well As Dogs, Study Says

In the study by Japanese researchers, cats reacted to their own name. Researchers say it's the first evidence showing cats can understand spoken words. (Image credit: Hasan Jamali/AFP/Getty Images)

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Fossil of ancient four-legged whale found in Peru

Researchers believe the four-metre-long mammal, found in Peru, was able to swim and walk on land.

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For Deeper Insights, Japanese Space Mission Bombed an Asteroid to Make a Crater

The Hayabusa2 spacecraft aimed to advance its study of the rock called Ryugu by making a hole on its surface with a copper projectile.

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Physics fight: Theoretical or experimental?

How best to study the universe’s matter and energy? That question has long divided the world’s physicists. Theoretical physicists devise mathematical models to explain the complex interactions between matter and energy, while experimental physicists conduct tests on specific physical phenomena, using advanced tools from lasers to particle accelerators and telescopes, to arrive at answers. There’s

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Alexa, What's My Blood-Sugar Level?

Amazon reveals new skills for its voice assistant Alexa, a sign of its growing interest in health care.

19h

Microsoft Employees Revolt, Beheaded Mosquitos, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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The whale with hooves and a tail

Swimming would have been a challenge, but somehow the prehistoric beast got from Asia to South America

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A light-based carrier system for CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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These ‘harmless’ gut bacteria actually kill good microbes

A subtype of a common kind of gut bacteria can kill “good” bacteria in the body and could potentially even lead to colon cancer, according to new research. Since most of the microbes in our gut are bacteria, they tend to hog much of the microbiome research limelight. But, lurking among the bacteria are other microbes such as single-cell eukaryotes and viruses, which researchers have largely ignor

19h

Making room for poor kids at school produces fairer societies

Europe-wide study finds educational policies directly influence social strata. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Countries that help working class students get into university have happier citizens

A study has shown that 'inclusive' educational policies that help working class students access higher education, such as delaying streaming children according to their ability until they are older, lowering the cost of private education, and increasing the intake of universities so that more students can attend all act to reduce the 'happiness gap' between the rich and poor.

20h

The Atlantic Daily: ‘They Had It Coming’

Subscribe to our Daily email newsletter , and get our editors’ guide to what matters in the world, delivered to your inbox every weekday. Sign up here. What We’re Following Whistle-blowers of Capitol Hill: For decades, tipsters have cooperated with Congress’s House Oversight Committee to report wrongdoing within the U.S. government— but in the latest presidency, that number has spiked. Earlier th

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Amazon Has A Rumored Alexa-Powered AirPods Competitor Waiting In The Wings

Amazon may be getting ready to inject its popular Alexa digital assistant into a pair of wireless earbuds. They would be similar to Apple's premium wireless AirPods, except users would be able …

20h

Alan Watts: What is the self?

Alan Watts believed that we can comprehend a greater sense of the self. The self is not alienated from the universe, but a part of the whole process. Scientists have conceptualized a similar idea that sounds like it's straight out of the Indian Vedanta. Western cultures rooted in scientific thinking and reductionist philosophies have always flirted with the tempting holism of the East. It was dur

20h

Mass drug administration reduces scabies cases by 90% in Solomon Islands' communities

Mass drug administration of two antibiotics can be highly effective at reducing cases of scabies and the bacterial infection impetigo, according to new research published in Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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The Lancet: Moderate alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke, study shows

Studies of East Asian genes that strongly affect how much alcohol people choose to drink show that alcohol itself directly increases blood pressure and the chances of having a stroke, according to a new study published in The Lancet. It was known that stroke rates were increased by heavy drinking, but it wasn't known whether they were increased or decreased by moderate drinking.

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First reported UK case of likely dog-to-dog transmission of leishmaniosis

Veterinary professionals have sounded the alarm in this week's Vet Record after treating the first UK case of a dog with the potentially fatal infection, leishmaniosis, that is thought to have been passed on by another dog, rather than by travel to an area where the infection is endemic.

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Health claims on packaging for many foods marketed to UK kids are 'confusing'

The health claims made on the product packaging for a large proportion of foods marketed to children in the UK are 'confusing,' and could be contributing to rising rates of childhood obesity, suggests research published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Even low alcohol consumption is bad news for strokes – study

Moderate drinking of one or two glasses a day does not protect against stroke, say researchers A low level of alcohol consumption does not protect against stroke, new research suggests, in the latest blow to the idea that a few drinks can be beneficial to health. At least 100,000 people have strokes in the UK every year , according to recent figures. It had been thought that low levels of alcohol

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First reported UK case of likely dog-to-dog transmission of leishmaniosis

Veterinary professionals have sounded the alarm in this week's Vet Record after treating the first UK case of a dog with the potentially fatal infection, leishmaniosis, that is thought to have been passed on by another dog, rather than by travel to an area where the infection is endemic.

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First reported UK case of likely dog-to-dog transmission of leishmaniosis

Veterinary professionals have sounded the alarm in this week's Vet Record after treating the first UK case of a dog with the potentially fatal infection, leishmaniosis, that is thought to have been passed on by another dog, rather than by travel to an area where the infection is endemic.

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Ralph Metzner, LSD and Consciousness Researcher, Dies at 82

After participated in controversial studies by Timothy Leary involving hallucinogens, he continued researching alternate states of consciousness.

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N.Y. Attorney General Sues Manhattan Stem Cell Clinic, Citing Rogue Therapies

Echoing F.D.A. concerns, the state’s top prosecutor accused Park Avenue Stem Cell of charging thousands of dollars for unproven, unregulated treatments.

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Four-legged Whale Fossil Reveals When Whales Reached The Americas

Whales evolved from hoofed, four-legged land walkers in south Asia more than 50 million years ago. Now researchers have unearthed the skeleton of an ancient four-legged whale in Peru. The discovery sheds light on how cetaceans dispersed from the Indo-Pakistan region to the Pacific Ocean. “The new find from Peru is the geologically oldest quadrupedal whale from the Americas, so it gives a minimum a

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Scientists Uncover a Protein That Seems to Fight Aging in Our Skin

In the quest for everlasting youth, many women buy hope in a jar. But despite being a multi-billion dollar industry, many skin creams and serums on the market don’t deliver the age-defying results they promise. But now, scientists say that it may be possible to reverse our skin's timeline at the cellular level. In a new paper published in Nature, a research team found that a collagen protein calle

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Hayabusa2 is Going to Blow a Crater in an Asteroid Tonight

The Japanese Hayabusa2 mission has been in orbit around the asteroid Ryugu since June 2018, but tonight is its most spectacular event. In a few hours, the spacecraft will drop off its carry-on impactor, scurry to a safe hiding spot, and then blow a crater into the side of its asteroid home. The spacecraft has spent its time so far studying the asteroid’s rocky and weathered surface, and researcher

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What we know about the polio-like illness paralyzing children—and what we don't

Health Acute flaccid myelitis is challenging to predict. In 2014, doctors in Colorado and California started to notice cases of a polio-like illness, which caused limb weakness and spinal cord abnormalities. For the past five…

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Stop The Presses! Newspapers Affect Us, Often In Ways We Don't Realize

This week we consider what we misunderstand about newspapers – from their long history of hype, to the hidden price we pay when they close. (Image credit: John Moore/John Moore/Getty Images)

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Apple, Amazon, and Uber are moving in on health care. Will it help?

Companies like Apple, Amazon, and Google have been busy investing in health care companies, developing new apps, and hiring health professionals for new business ventures. Their current focus appears to be on tech-savvy millennials, but the bulk of health care expenditures goes to the elderly. Big tech should look to integrating its most promising health care devise, the smartphone, more thorough

21h

The Politics & Policy Daily: From Lotus to POTUS?

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, April 4. ‣ President Donald Trump walked back his threat to close the U.S.-Mexico border, saying that he’ll give Mexico a “one-year warning” to address his concerns about the flow of migrant workers and drugs into the United States. ‣ Members of Robert Mueller’s team are reportedly frustrated about Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the special co

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How to cut food waste: Turn unused food into take-home meals for hungry kids

An Indiana school district recently partnered with a nonprofit to send some students home with a set of frozen meals on weekends. In the U.S., about 12 percent of households with children will experience food insecurity at some point during the year. The U.S. wastes a massive amount of food. Programs like this might be a first step in cutting back on waste. None A school district in Indiana devis

21h

Tesla Is Better at Making Cars. Delivering Them? Not So Much.

The always-exciting electric carmaker suffers its biggest drop in deliveries yet in the first quarter.

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Watch a Neural Network Make Trump Sing Eminem’s “Lose Yourself”

Live In Concert! New audio of Trump singing Eminem’s “Lose Yourself” was uploaded to YouTube on Wednesday. Thankfully, the unholy song is the work of a neural network — an AI algorithm trained on Trump’s voice and patterns of speech and tasked with churning out this cursed musical tribute. Palms Are Sweety The algorithm isn’t perfect — the video description says the algorithm didn’t have enough t

21h

Electricity-conducting bacteria yield secret to tiny batteries, big medical advances

These strange bacteria conduct electricity via a structure never before seen in nature — a structure scientists can co-opt to miniaturize electronics, create powerful-yet-tiny batteries, build pacemakers without wires and develop a host of other medical advances.

21h

Curiosity captured two solar eclipses on Mars

When NASA's Curiosity Mars rover landed in 2012, it brought along eclipse glasses. The solar filters on its Mast Camera (Mastcam) allow it to stare directly at the Sun. Over the past few weeks, Curiosity has been putting them to good use by sending back some spectacular imagery of solar eclipses caused by Phobos and Deimos, Mars' two moons.

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Trilobites: Watch Two Tiny Moons Eclipse the Sun on Mars

Phobos and Deimos, the two Martian moons, got between the red planet and the sun in March.

21h

Mind: Beyond Biden: How Close Is Too Close?

Psychologists have studied personal space and physical contact for decades. Here's why people get so uncomfortable.

21h

Memorial Sloan Kettering Leaders Violated Conflict-of-Interest Rules, Report Finds

A policy review follows months of turmoil at the cancer center, which pledged an overhaul, including new rules on public disclosure and limits on outside profits.

21h

Electricity-conducting bacteria yield secret to tiny batteries, big medical advances

These strange bacteria conduct electricity via a structure never before seen in nature — a structure scientists can co-opt to miniaturize electronics, create powerful-yet-tiny batteries, build pacemakers without wires and develop a host of other medical advances.

21h

Researchers identify 'beauty spots' in the genome

Genes play a role in determining the beauty of a person's face, but that role varies with the person's sex, according to a new study.

21h

Cytomegaloviruses deploy a novel stealth strategy to subvert immune surveillance

Owl monkey cytomegalovirus produces a decoy molecule A43 to evade detection and destruction by immune cells in their hosts, according to a new study. As the authors note, the findings provide a novel example of an immune evasion strategy developed by viruses.

21h

Gut microbiome may contribute to HIV transmission in high-risk men

Gut microbes from high HIV-risk men who have sex with men drive immune activation in mice and HIV infection in cells, according to a new study.

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Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems

On the Hawaiian island of Oahu, it is possible to stand in a lush tropical forest that doesn't contain a single native plant. The birds that once dispersed native seeds are almost entirely gone too, leaving a brand-new ecological community composed of introduced plants and birds. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers demonstrate that these novel communities are organized in much the same way a

21h

How Tasmanian devils are evolving to fight back against extinction

Devil facial tumor disease, or DFTD, is a transmissible cancer that Tasmanian devils spread through bites. The cancer is highly infectious and lethal, and the Tasmanian devil population has dropped by 90 percent since it was first discovered. In the short time that we've known about the disease, however, the devils seem to be evolving new defenses that are helping some of them fight back and surv

21h

The 1 thing to avoid in online political arguments

A recent study examined the role that incivility plays in how people perceive online political arguments. The results showed that incivility led to more negative perceptions of political arguments — even when the argument was logical. The researchers suggested that name-calling, mockery and other forms of incivility should be avoided if you want to persuade people along political lines. None What

21h

Plant-Based Meat Sales Rise, Fueled by Carnivores

submitted by /u/aerovado [link] [comments]

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US remains committed to private sector-led 5G wireless: Kudlow

A top advisor to President Donald Trump said Thursday the United States is committed to private sector deployment of 5G wireless networks, brushing aside the notion of a nationalized system.

22h

Biologists: Killing hungry sea lions saving endangered fish

A plan to kill California sea lions to save an endangered run of fish on a river that cuts through Portland, Oregon, appears to be working just months after wildlife officials began euthanizing the giant marine mammals, Oregon biologists said Thursday.

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Biologists: Killing hungry sea lions saving endangered fish

A plan to kill California sea lions to save an endangered run of fish on a river that cuts through Portland, Oregon, appears to be working just months after wildlife officials began euthanizing the giant marine mammals, Oregon biologists said Thursday.

22h

Unlocking the female bias in lupus

The majority of lupus patients are female, and new findings from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on why. The research suggests that female lupus patients don't fully silence their second X chromosome in T cells, leading to an immune response gone awry.

22h

Compound that kills drug-resistant fungi is isolated from ant microbiota

A project conducted by researchers in Brazil and the US investigated bacteria living in symbiosis with insects as a source for novel drugs.

22h

Durability vs. recyclability: Dueling goals in making electronics more sustainable

The falling cost of solar power has led to a boom in recent years, with more and more photovoltaic panels popping up on rooftops and backyard solar farms around the world.

22h

This music-oriented app can help you learn a new language

Check out the Earworms Musical Brain Trainer app. Earworms Musical Brain Trainer is a music-oriented app that can help you learn a new language.

22h

Genome-wide analysis reveals new strategies to target pancreatic cancer

An international team of scientists employed an array of next-generation sequencing and gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR, to map the molecular dependencies – and thus vulnerabilities — of pancreatic cancer stem cells.

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Insulin receptor and gene expression

Insulin triggers genome-wide changes in gene expression via an unexpected mechanism. The insulin receptor is transported from the cell surface to the cell nucleus, where it helps initiate the expression of thousands of genes. Targeted genes are involved in insulin-related functions and disease but surprisingly not carbohydrate metabolism. Findings outline a set of potential therapeutic targets for

22h

Research improves understanding of new form of cell-cell communication

Scientists have improved their understanding of a new form of cell-cell communication that is based on extracellular RNA (exRNA) by developing the exRNA Atlas resource, the first detailed catalog of human exRNAs in bodily fluids.

22h

Blocking epigenetic Swiss army knife may be a new strategy for treating colorectal cancer

A new study shows that blocking specific regions of a protein called UHRF1 switches on hundreds of cancer-fighting genes, impairing colorectal cancer cells' ability to grow and spread throughout the body.

22h

Linux Creator: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter Are “A Disease”

Pull The Plug Linus Torvalds, the Linux creator who’s himself known for angry tirades , said that if he could fix one thing about the internet, it would be modern social media — a flame-spitting recrimination by the inventor of the software that keeps much of the social web running. “I absolutely detest modern media — Twitter, Facebook, Instagram,” Torvalds told Linux Journal in a new interview.

22h

Spacewatch: Nasa moonshot to come four years early

US plan to return astronauts to moon before end of 2024 will need additional funds The US will return astronauts to the moon before the end of 2024, according to the country’s vice-president, Mike Pence. He made the announcement last week at the fifth meeting of the National Space Council, which took place at the US Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Continue reading…

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What Elon Musk’s SEC Hearing Could Mean for Tesla’s Future

Musk vs. SEC The ongoing war between Elon Musk and the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) just wrapped up its latest battle. The bare bones: On Thursday afternoon, a federal court heard oral arguments related to the SEC’s recently filed motion asserting that Tesla’s CEO violated the terms of a 2018 settlement agreement — the most recent drama in an unusual and high-profile spa

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US judge orders talks between Tesla's Musk, securities regulators

A federal judge on Thursday gave Tesla chief executive Elon Musk and US securities regulators two weeks to resolve their differences over Musk's prolific social media use.

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Durability vs. recyclability: Dueling goals in making electronics more sustainable

Research released by a team at Georgia Institute of Technology, where researchers looked into the impact of government policies put in place to reduce the amount of electronics waste filling up landfills.

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New hope for treating childhood brain cancer

Recent research has shown that a drug known as MI-2 can kill cells that cause a fatal brain cancer. But only now have scientists been able to explain how the compound works: by targeting cholesterol production in tumors.

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Soyuz rocket launches telecom satellite from French Guiana

A Soyuz rocket blasted off from French Guiana on Thursday carrying four telecommunications and internet satellites, according to France's National Centre for Space Studies.

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Snapchat launches own multi-player gaming platform

Messaging app Snapchat, which is widely popular among younger users but has struggled to turn a profit since its creation in 2011, on Thursday unveiled new features including an integrated gaming platform, an expansion of its original series and new parnerships with developers.

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Ethiopian report says faulty sensor data led to jet crash

A doomed Ethiopian Airlines jet suffered from faulty readings by a key sensor, and pilots followed Boeing's recommended procedures when the plane started to nose dive but could not avoid crashing, according to a preliminary report released Thursday by the Ethiopian government.

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High March temperatures shortened Alaska's winter weather

Unusually high March temperatures lopped weeks off Alaska's long winter and reflect a warming climate trend, state climate experts say.

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Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study

Inside the body, disease and injury can leave behind quite the mess—a scattering of cellular debris, like bits of broken glass, rubber and steel left behind in a car accident.

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Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study

Inside the body, disease and injury can leave behind quite the mess—a scattering of cellular debris, like bits of broken glass, rubber and steel left behind in a car accident.

22h

Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health

Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found.

22h

World's first (CRISPR-Cas9) gene-edited lizards are in the pink

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

23h

See the United Nations’ Floating, Hurricane-Ready City Concept

submitted by /u/Alexo321 [link] [comments]

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Offshore Human-Built Structures Offer Habitat For Dining Seabirds

These days, offshore oil and gas platforms, harbors, breakwaters, and offshore turbines, litter coastal areas. Artificial structures now alter more than 50 percent of some natural coastlines in Australia, the United States and Europe. The noise and the risk of collision raises concerns for marine life. But the human-built structures benefit wildlife, too. Now researchers have discovered that wakes

23h

Peptides with brominated tryptophan analogs could protect marine animals

Bromotryptophan is a nonstandard amino acid that is rarely incorporated in ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (ribosomal peptides). Bromotryptophan and its analogs sometimes occur in non-ribosomal peptides. This paper presents an overview of ribosomal and non-ribosomal peptides that are known to contain bromotryptophan and its analogs.

23h

About TFE: Old and new findings

The fluorinated alcohol 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol (TFE) has been implemented for many decades now in conformational studies of proteins and peptides. In peptides, which are often disordered in aqueous solutions, TFE acts as secondary structure stabilizer and primarily induces an α -helical conformation.

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Megapixels: An epic wildebeest crossing, a really hungry fox, and more Smithsonian Photo Contest finalists

Technology Plus, a lava lizard perched atop a marine iguana. The winners and finalists of this year's Smithsonian Photo Contest depict scenes of playful whales, the humbling aftermath of wildfires, a sneaky Arctic fox stealing a…

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The lunar effect

For centuries, our lunar neighbour has been a source of fascination and inspiration for poets and artists.

23h

Russia Says It Will Try to Free Almost 100 Whales Held in ‘Jail’

Russian officials brought in two famous ocean experts, Jean-Michel Cousteau and Charles Vinick, to help determine how to release the young mammals.

23h

Researchers uncover hidden deicer risks affecting bridge health

Common magnesium chloride deicers used on roadways and bridges around the U.S. may be doing more damage than previously thought, researchers have found.

23h

Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems

Nonnative plants and birds in Hawaii interact in a manner similar to native ecosystems, new research shows.

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Artificial intelligence approach optimizes embryo selection for IVF

The team, consisting of embryologists, reproductive medicine clinicians, computer scientists, and precision medicine experts, trained an artificial intelligence algorithm to discriminate between poor and good embryo quality. In a collaboration between the Center for Reproductive Medicine and the Englander Institute for Precision Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, the investigators spent more than

23h

NASA Is Sending Cute “Robotic Bees” to the Space Station

Not the Bees! NASA is sending a pair of “robotic bees” to the space station later this month, according to Digital Trends — a project the space agency is positioning as one of the most advanced space collaborations between humans and robots. “Astrobee is a robot that will soon be flying around the International Space Station (ISS) alongside the astronauts,” reads a NASA page about the bees, which

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Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study

Scientists at the University of Notre Dame discovered microglia actually squeeze through the spinal boundary, crossing into the peripheral nervous system in response to injury.

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Palm's tiny companion phone is now available as a standalone device

The comically tiny Palm smartphone launched late last year is now available to purchase as a standalone product.

23h

Nipsey Hussle’s Eritrean American Dream

I n April 2018 , the Los Angeles–born street rapper Nipsey Hussle traveled to his father’s native Eritrea for the first time in 14 years . The trip found the musician, née Ermias Davidson Asghedom, both contemplative and triumphant: After a prolific run of mixtapes spanning more than a decade, the fiercely independent artist had recently released his major-label studio debut, Victory Lap . (The F

23h

Heavy metal planet fragment survives destruction from dead star

A fragment of a planet that has survived the death of its star has been discovered by astronomers in a disc of debris formed from destroyed planets, which the star ultimately consumes.

23h

Amazon Plans to Launch 3,200 Satellites to Bring Internet to the World

The effort, known as Project Kuiper, looks like a direct challenge to SpaceX's planned Starlink satellite internet service. The post Amazon Plans to Launch 3,200 Satellites to Bring Internet to the World appeared first on ExtremeTech .

23h

Q&A: Epigenetic Therapies for Breast Cancer

Breast cancer researcher and oncologist Nancy Davidson discusses what we've learned from the first wave of epigenetic trials for breast cancer, and what challenges lie ahead before such therapies reach the clinic.

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Mystery of how beetles that live in aquifers breathe solved

You can't always count on finding water above ground in Australia. Some rivers flow through the sand beneath their beds and arid calcite crusts in Western Australia seal off water trapped in permeable rocks beneath. Yet, far from being sterile isolated pools, these calcrete aquifers are teaming with life. 'It can be a really bustling metropolis down there', chuckles Karl Jones from the University

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Improving 3D-printed prosthetics and integrating electronic sensors

Virginia Tech professor and his team have made inroads in integrating electronic sensors with personalized 3D-printed prosthetics

1d

NIH Tightens Security, Blocking Iranian Scientists from Campus

Two scientists, who came to the Bethesda campus to give presentations, hold US green cards and had previously visited without incident.

1d

These charts will help you visualize just how unhealthy diets are around the world

Health Poor diet kills more people worldwide than any other risk factor. Nearly everyone's diet is out of whack—it's just a question of how. Nearly every nation fails to get the right balance of nutrients.

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Mystery of how beetles that live in aquifers breathe solved

You can't always count on finding water above ground in Australia. Some rivers flow through the sand beneath their beds and arid calcite crusts in Western Australia seal off water trapped in permeable rocks beneath. Yet, far from being sterile isolated pools, these calcrete aquifers are teaming with life. 'It can be a really bustling metropolis down there', chuckles Karl Jones from the University

1d

If You’ve Been Waiting for a Reason to Buy a Raspberry Pi Mini PC, This Is It

Ever since it was first released back in 2012, the Raspberry Pi has been wildly popular with tech enthusiasts across the globe. While it was originally created as a simple low-cost device for teaching kids how to code, the pocket-sized miniature computer quickly developed a cult following among programmers, gamers, and other hobbyists looking for computing power on the cheap. The latest version c

1d

Photocycle-dependent conformational changes in the proteorhodopsin cross-protomer Asp-His-Trp triad revealed by DNP-enhanced MAS-NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Proteorhodopsin (PR) is a highly abundant, pentameric, light-driven proton pump. Proton transfer is linked to a canonical photocycle typical for microbial ion pumps. Although the PR monomer is able to undergo a full photocycle, the question arises whether the pentameric complex formed in the membrane via specific cross-protomer interactions plays…

1d

Post-stress bacterial cell death mediated by reactive oxygen species [Microbiology]

Antimicrobial efficacy, which is central to many aspects of medicine, is being rapidly eroded by bacterial resistance. Since new resistance can be induced by antimicrobial action, highly lethal agents that rapidly reduce bacterial burden during infection should help restrict the emergence of resistance. To improve lethal activity, recent work has…

1d

Horizontal gene transfer allowed the emergence of broad host range entomopathogens [Microbiology]

The emergence of new pathogenic fungi has profoundly impacted global biota, but the underlying mechanisms behind host shifts remain largely unknown. The endophytic insect pathogen Metarhizium robertsii evolved from fungi that were plant associates, and entomopathogenicity is a more recently acquired adaptation. Here we report that the broad host-range entomopathogen…

1d

Quintet-triplet mixing determines the fate of the multiexciton state produced by singlet fission in a terrylenediimide dimer at room temperature [Chemistry]

Singlet fission (SF) is a photophysical process in which one of two adjacent organic molecules absorbs a single photon, resulting in rapid formation of a correlated triplet pair (T1T1) state whose spin dynamics influence the successful generation of uncorrelated triplets (T1). Femtosecond transient visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of a…

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Chronic psychosocial stress compromises the immune response and endochondral ossification during bone fracture healing via {beta}-AR signaling [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Chronic psychosocial stress/trauma represents an increasing burden in our modern society and a risk factor for the development of mental disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD, in turn, is highly comorbid with a plethora of inflammatory disorders and has been associated with increased bone fracture risk. Since a balanced…

1d

Biosynthesis and secretion of the microbial sulfated peptide RaxX and binding to the rice XA21 immune receptor [Microbiology]

The rice immune receptor XA21 is activated by the sulfated microbial peptide required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity X (RaxX) produced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Mutational studies and targeted proteomics revealed that the RaxX precursor peptide (proRaxX) is processed and secreted by the protease/transporter RaxB, the function of…

1d

PCH1 regulates light, temperature, and circadian signaling as a structural component of phytochrome B-photobodies in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The members of the phytochrome (phy) family of bilin-containing photoreceptors are major regulators of plant photomorphogenesis through their unique ability to photointerconvert between a biologically inactive red light-absorbing Pr state and an active far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. While the initial steps in Pfr signaling are unclear, an early event for…

1d

Prostaglandin signaling regulates renal multiciliated cell specification and maturation [Developmental Biology]

Multiciliated cells (MCCs) are specialized epithelia with apical bundles of motile cilia that direct fluid flow. MCC dysfunction is associated with human diseases of the respiratory, reproductive, and central nervous systems. Further, the appearance of renal MCCs has been cataloged in several kidney conditions, where their function is unknown. Despite…

1d

Oncogenic PIK3CA promotes cellular stemness in an allele dose-dependent manner [Cell Biology]

The PIK3CA gene, which encodes the p110α catalytic subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K), is mutationally activated in cancer and in overgrowth disorders known as PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS). To determine the consequences of genetic PIK3CA activation in a developmental context of relevance to both PROS and cancer, we engineered isogenic…

1d

Inhibitors of the Neisseria meningitidis PilF ATPase provoke type IV pilus disassembly [Microbiology]

Despite the availability of antibiotics and vaccines, Neisseria meningitidis remains a major cause of meningitis and sepsis in humans. Due to its extracellular lifestyle, bacterial adhesion to host cells constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. Here, we present a high-throughput microscopy-based approach that allowed the identification of compounds able to decrease…

1d

Mechanism mediated by a noncoding RNA, nc886, in the cytotoxicity of a DNA-reactive compound [Biochemistry]

DNA-reactive compounds are harnessed for cancer chemotherapy. Their genotoxic effects are considered to be the main mechanism for the cytotoxicity to date. Because this mechanism preferentially affects actively proliferating cells, it is postulated that the cytotoxicity is specific to cancer cells. Nonetheless, they do harm normal quiescent cells, suggesting that…

1d

Pore condensation and freezing is responsible for ice formation below water saturation for porous particles [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Ice nucleation in the atmosphere influences cloud properties, altering precipitation and the radiative balance, ultimately regulating Earth’s climate. An accepted ice nucleation pathway, known as deposition nucleation, assumes a direct transition of water from the vapor to the ice phase, without an intermediate liquid phase. However, studies have shown that…

1d

Phylogenetic, functional, and taxonomic richness have both positive and negative effects on ecosystem multifunctionality [Ecology]

Biodiversity encompasses multiple attributes such as the richness and abundance of species (taxonomic diversity), the presence of different evolutionary lineages (phylogenetic diversity), and the variety of growth forms and resource use strategies (functional diversity). These biodiversity attributes do not necessarily relate to each other and may have contrasting effects on…

1d

Molecular design of self-coacervation phenomena in block polyampholytes [Physics]

Coacervation is a common phenomenon in natural polymers and has been applied to synthetic materials systems for coatings, adhesives, and encapsulants. Single-component coacervates are formed when block polyampholytes exhibit self-coacervation, phase separating into a dense liquid coacervate phase rich in the polyampholyte coexisting with a dilute supernatant phase, a process…

1d

VSMC-specific EP4 deletion exacerbates angiotensin II-induced aortic dissection by increasing vascular inflammation and blood pressure [Medical Sciences]

Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in vascular homeostasis. Its receptor, E-prostanoid receptor 4 (EP4) is essential for physiological remodeling of the ductus arteriosus (DA). However, the role of EP4 in pathological vascular remodeling remains largely unknown. We found that chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion of mice with vascular…

1d

Rational conversion of chromophore selectivity of cyanobacteriochromes to accept mammalian intrinsic biliverdin [Biochemistry]

Because cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors need only a single compact domain for chromophore incorporation and for absorption of visible spectra including the long-wavelength far-red region, these molecules have been paid much attention for application to bioimaging and optogenetics. Most cyanobacteriochromes, however, have a drawback to incorporate phycocyanobilin that is not available in…

1d

Microsoft Employees Protest Treatment of Women to CEO Nadella

Employees confronted CEO Satya Nadella after weeks of complaints on an internal discussion about lack of advancement and sexual harassment.

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This High-Tech Test Could Be the Answer to America’s Gut Health Crisis

Over the last decade, scientists and researchers have made huge advancements in our understanding of the human microbiome, which is the complex community of microorganisms that live in the human body. Of particular interest has been the human gut microbiome , which consists of the bacteria, fungi, phages, yeast, parasites, and viruses that live in our digestive tract and dramatically affect our o

1d

Apocalypse Next? Astronomers Find a Chunk of Planet Around a Distant, Dead Star

A disk of debris around a faraway white dwarf offers a glimpse of our own planet’s eventual fate.

1d

Trilobites: How Seals Took to the Seas

By comparing the bones of ancient and contemporary seals, researchers say a particular biting style helped the marine mammals’ landlubber ancestors move into the oceans.

1d

Snapchat launches own multi-player gaming platform

Messaging app Snapchat, which is widely popular among younger users but has struggled to turn a profit since its creation in 2011, on Thursday unveiled new features including an integrated gaming …

1d

Tracking diarrheal disease in kids requires the right question

The way public health surveys ask parents in as many as 90 countries about their children’s diarrhea may result in inaccuracies, new research suggests. The researchers, whose findings appear in the International Journal of Epidemiology , compared the responses to two large public health surveys with almost identical wording, and conclude that the survey with a two-week recall period, which has be

1d

Robots to autocomplete Soldier tasks, new study suggests

Smart phones autocorrect in texting, search engines autocomplete queries, and mapping applications redirect navigation in real-time to avoid slowed traffic. These ubiquitous AI-based technologies adapt to everyday needs and learn user habits by focusing on making the algorithm better, but Army researchers want to enhance AI by providing more information about the intent of the user.

1d

This perspective trick may hinder your health goals

Imagining yourself in the third person—as if through someone else’s eyes—can derail efforts to improve your health, research suggests. The findings, published by the Journal of Consumer Psychology , are counter to existing research showing people are more likely to succeed when they see themselves from an observer’s perspective, rather than through their own eyes. Third-person visualization works

1d

Climate panel axed by Trump releases plan to help United States deal with warming

Climate panel axed by Trump releases plan to help United States deal with warming Climate panel axed by Trump releases plan to help United States deal with warming, Published online: 04 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01090-0 Reconstituted group proposes effort to translate climate science into practical advice for businesses and communities.

1d

SwRI engineers develop novel techniques to trick object detection systems

New adversarial techniques developed by engineers at Southwest Research Institute can make objects 'invisible' to image detection systems that use deep-learning algorithms. These techniques can also trick systems into thinking they see another object or can change the location of objects. The technique mitigates the risk for compromise in automated image processing systems.

1d

Ready, steady, go: 2 new studies reveal the steps in plant immune receptor activation

Two landmark studies provide unprecedented structural insight into how plant immune receptors are primed — and then activated — to provide plants with resistance against microbial pathogens.

1d

Federal subsidies for US commercial fisheries should be rejected

A pending rule change proposed by the US National Marine Fisheries Service would allow the use of public funds to underwrite low-interest loans for the construction of new commercial fishing vessels. The proposed change lacks scientific merit and should be rejected, an analysis by a Duke economist concludes. If approved, the rule could undo years of progress in reducing overfishing and other harmf

1d

See and be seen

Physicists at the University of Konstanz were able to show that the formation of stable groups requires only few skills: forward visual perception over large distances and regulation of the speed according to the number of perceived individuals.

1d

Noncoding DNA drives the convergent loss of flight in flightless birds

Tucked away in the noncoding regions of bird DNA, researchers have discovered molecular roots of the loss of flight seen in so many disparate paleognathous birds.

1d

Peptide keeps predatory nematodes from eating their kin

A small peptide produced in the skin of predatory nematodes prevents them from cannibalizing their immediate family members, while they feed upon their close relatives, a new study finds.

1d

Seed dispersal by invasive birds in Hawaii fills critical ecosystem gap

On the Hawaiian island of O'ahu, where native birds have nearly been replaced by invasive ones, local plants depend almost entirely on invasive birds to disperse their seeds, new research shows.

1d

Scientists discover a small, dense planet orbiting a white dwarf

A new study reports discovery of one of the first small, intact planetary bodies orbiting a white dwarf star, a finding that sheds light into the twilight years of planetary systems.

1d

Heavy metal planet fragment survives destruction from dead star

A fragment of a planet that has survived the death of its star has been discovered by University of Warwick astronomers in a disc of debris formed from destroyed planets, which the star ultimately consumes.

1d

Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems

On the Hawaiian island of Oahu, it is possible to stand in a lush tropical forest that doesn't contain a single native plant. The birds that once dispersed native seeds are almost entirely gone too, leaving a brand-new ecological community composed of introduced plants and birds. In a first-of-its-kind study published today in Science, researchers demonstrate that these novel communities are organ

1d

How ALS progresses on genetic and cellular level revealed by high-res spinal cord study

Precise experiments have revealed for the first time how Lou Gehrig's disease, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), progresses on a genetic and cellular level. The work comprises tens of thousands of minuscule measurements of spinal tissue and opens new avenues for developing potential treatments for the disease, which affects around 450,000 people worldwide.

1d

New ALS gene expression atlas offers unprecedented detail into disease progression

ALS researchers at the New York Genome Center have utilized new technologies for mapping gene expression in spinal cord samples that provide new insights into the mechanisms that contribute to disease onset and progression in ALS patients.

1d

Gut microbiome may contribute to HIV transmission in high-risk men

Gut microbes from high HIV-risk men who have sex with men drive immune activation in mice and HIV infection in cells, according to a study published April 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Brent Palmer and Catherine Lozupone of the University of Colorado Anschutz, and colleagues.

1d

Cytomegaloviruses deploy a novel stealth strategy to subvert immune surveillance

Owl monkey cytomegalovirus produces a decoy molecule A43 to evade detection and destruction by immune cells in their hosts, according to a study published April 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Ana Angulo of the University of Barcelona, and colleagues. As the authors note, the findings provide a novel example of an immune evasion strategy developed by viruses.

1d

A dead planet is orbiting a dead sun in a distant dead solar system

A piece of a planet that survived the death of its star has been spotted orbiting the stellar corpse. Planets in our solar system may look similar when the sun dies

1d

Liquid jets break up more readily on a substrate

Researches have used computer simulations to study the way liquid filaments break up into smaller droplets. This holds implications, among others, for inkjet printer technology.

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Ecstasy may reopen brain’s ‘critical period’ to treat PTSD

The psychedelic drug MDMA reopens a “critical period,” when the brain is sensitive to learning the reward value of social behaviors, according to a new study with mice. The findings may explain why the drug may help treat people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Scientists first described critical periods in the 1930s using snow geese. About 24 hours after a gosling hatches, if it can’t

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Bezos ex-wife to surrender 75% of couple's Amazon shares

MacKenzie Bezos, ex-wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, announced Thursday the couple had finalized their divorce, and that she would surrender 75 percent of the couple's shares in the tech giant.

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Poverty leaves a mark on our genes

In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. They discovered that lower socioeconomic status is associated with levels of DNA methylation (DNAm) — a key epigenetic mark that has the potential to shape gene expression — at more than 2,500 sites, across more than 1,500 genes.

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Using a promiscuous inhibitor to uncover cancer drug targets

Scientists have developed a method that exploits the multitargeted nature of a chemical inhibitor to pinpoint vulnerabilities within cancer cells.

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Climate panel disbanded by Trump, now regrouped, releases its report

A federal advisory committee started meeting in 2016 to explore how to make the National Climate Assessment more usable for communities who want to take action. President Trump dismissed the panel in 2017. But with support from the Earth Institute at Columbia University, New York state and the American Meteorological Society, the committee reconvened. Today, the committee's findings and recommenda

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Global centers of unsustainable harvesting of species identified

Unsustainable harvesting, including hunting, trapping, fishing and logging, is one of the biggest threats to biodiversity. Hotspots have now been identified by scientists.

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Routine HPV vaccination linked to dramatic reduction in cervical disease among young women

Routine vaccination of girls aged 12 or 13 years with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in Scotland has led to a dramatic reduction in cervical disease in later life, finds a new study.

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Computational model of a human kinase may provide insights for cancer treatment

Researchers have developed a computational model for human MEK1, a protein with potential as a drug target for a variety of human cancers. This insight into the previously unknown structure of MEK1 opens the door to the development of new classes of inhibitors.

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How emus and ostriches lost the ability to fly

Changes in regulatory DNA, rather than mutations to genes themselves, grounded some birds, a study finds.

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Not all of us can ride a scooter. Here's a plan to get everyone where they need to go.

Technology New hubs will connect Columbus commuters to buses, rideshares, rental cars, bikes, and, yes OK, scooters. The last mile between public transit and home or office is often harder than you think. Here’s how the Smart Columbus initiative is trying to help all residents get…

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Dead Planet's Heavy Metal Core Found Rocketing Around a Dead Sun in a Distant Solar System

Astronomers found the remains of a dead planet orbiting a dead sun in a dead solar system. Happy spring!

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A Heavy-Metal Planet Orbiting a Dead Star May Foretell Our World's End

The iron core of what was once a world has been found around a white dwarf star, shedding light on the final days of planetary systems—including our own — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amazon's Bezos, wife reach biggest divorce deal in history (Update)

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and his wife, MacKenzie, finalized the biggest divorce settlement in history on Thursday, leaving him with 75 percent of their stock in the tech giant and giving her nearly $36 billion in shares.

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Astronomers spy an iron planet stripped of its crust around a burned-out star

Planetary slag heap gives a glimpse of Earth’s future

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Cannibal worms recognize their children—and don’t eat them as a result

Predatory worm depends on a small protein to identify its own kin

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This planetary remnant somehow survived the death of its sun

A small, sturdy piece of planet survived the collapse of its sun and now orbits the dead star.

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Confirmed: a planet orbiting a white dwarf star

Astronomers find convincing evidence of a small body spinning rapidly around a dense and dying star. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Astronomers Discover Fragment of Planet Orbiting Its Dead Star

Formidable Fragment The death of its star wasn’t enough to destroy a planet 400 light years away from Earth. Not totally, anyway. For just the second time ever, astronomers have found a fragment of a planet circling around one of the small, dense remains of a star known as a white dwarf. Even cooler: This is the first such discovery made using spectroscopy, a technique that could make it far easi

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Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems

On the Hawaiian island of Oahu, it is possible to stand in a lush tropical forest that doesn't contain a single native plant. The birds that once dispersed native seeds are almost entirely gone too, leaving a brand-new ecological community composed of introduced plants and birds. In a first-of-its-kind study published today in Science, researchers demonstrate that these novel communities are organ

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Ready, steady, go: Two new studies reveal the steps in plant immune receptor activation

Although separated by more than one billion years of evolution, plants and animals have hit upon similar immune strategies to protect themselves against pathogens. One important mechanism is defined by cytoplasmic receptors called NLRs that, in plants, recognize so-called effectors, molecules that invading microorganisms secrete into the plant's cells. These recognition events can either involve d

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Bacterial nanowire mystery solved

Deep in the ocean or underground, where there is no oxygen, Geobacter bacteria 'breathe' by projecting tiny protein filaments called 'nanowires' into the soil, to dispose of excess electrons resulting from the conversion of nutrients to energy.

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Poverty leaves a mark on our genes

In this study, researchers found evidence that poverty can become embedded across wide swaths of the genome. They discovered that lower socioeconomic status is associated with levels of DNA methylation (DNAm) — a key epigenetic mark that has the potential to shape gene expression — at more than 2,500 sites, across more than 1,500 genes.

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Tweeting while viewing doesn't diminish TV advertising's reach and often leads to shopping

People watching 'social shows' like 'Dancing with the Stars' or 'The Bachelor' on television and simultaneously sharing their views on Twitter are more likely to be committed to the program and shop online, according to new research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

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Using a promiscuous inhibitor to uncover cancer drug targets

Scientists at Harvard Medical School and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a method that exploits the multitargeted nature of a chemical inhibitor to pinpoint vulnerabilities within cancer cells.

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Thirst and Drinking Spark Widespread Activity in the Mouse Brain

Researchers have recorded tens of thousands of brain cells in mice as the animals transitioned from feeling thirsty to quenched.

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Science during crisis

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News at a glance

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