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nyheder2019april06

Scientists set to unveil first picture of a black hole

The world, it seems, is soon to see the first picture of a black hole.

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'Sentencing their dog to death': how the anti-vax movement spread to pets

There has been a spike in people refusing to vaccinate pets against deadly diseases, including some that can infect humans Sam Kovac can’t say for sure what prompted it, but in the past few weeks the Sydney veterinarian has been faced with the same alarming, beguiling question over and over: “Will this vaccination give my dog autism?” “It’s actually ridiculous. I mean you hear chatter over the ye

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Hemmeligholdt udgravning afslører øjeblikket, da dinosaurerne døde

PLUS. Et øjebliksbillede af dagen for 66 millioner år siden, da dinosaurerne blev udslettet af en asteroide, er fundet i USA. Fundet har allerede sendt chokbølger gennem palæontolog-verdenen.

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Facebook’s Ad System Might Be Hard-Coded for Discrimination

The social network says it shows users the most “relevant” ads, but a new study suggests the system perpetuates bias.

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The Defiant, Restorative Joy of Lurking Online

So Twitter's a hellsite. Now what?

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Facebook Won't Stop Being Sketchy, and More Security News This Week

Plus: Mar-a-Lago mishaps, Airbnb's creepy camera problem, tax-season phishing scams, and more.

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Hey Google, sorry you lost your ethics council, so we made one for you

We asked experts for practical suggestions on why Google’s AI ethics council bombed and what the company should do next.

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Recruiting Women to Online Dating Was a Challenge

“Abstinence … Animal rights … Very conservative … Marijuana OK … Children should be given guidelines … Religion guides my life … Make charitable contributions … Would initiate hugs if I wasn’t so shy … Enjoy a good argument … Have to-do lists that seldom get done … Sweet food, baked goods … Artificial or missing limbs … Over 300 pounds … Drag … Exploring my orientation

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Mummified Mice and Falcons Are Found in Egyptian Tomb

Archaeologists said the recently discovered tomb contained dozens of animals along with a married couple. It dates back more than 2,000 years.

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An Arty but Superficial Take on Native Son

This article contains spoilers for Native Son . Just over a year after the author Richard Wright published his first novel, Native Son , in March 1940, the text was adapted for the first time. In March 1941, Wright and the playwright Paul Green staged a contentious, Orson Welles–directed production at New York’s St. James Theatre. Ten years later, Wright played his own protagonist in an unfortuna

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Yes, It Matters That Pete Buttigieg Is Gay

Pete Buttigieg plays harmonica, guitar, and piano! He speaks Norwegian! Whoa, he actually speaks eight languages! I heard he even wrestled a bear live on CNN. None of the gee-whiz stories solidifying into the Buttigieg canon make any difference to me in deciding which of the Democratic candidates will get my vote. But as a gay man, I do care that Buttigieg is gay. In my lifetime, it has been ille

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‘A Convenient Life and a Good Life May Not Be the Same Thing’

The election of Donald Trump, and the Cambridge Analytica scandal that followed, set in motion what some have called the tech-lash—a bout of intense skepticism directed toward Silicon Valley. But long before it became fashionable to jeer Mark Zuckerberg, there was the Danish regulator, Margrethe Vestager. As the European commissioner of competition, a post she has held since 2014, she has fined G

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From the Archives: 10 Previously Unpublished Poems by Emily Dickinson

Getty / Arsh Raziuddin / The Atlantic Emily Dickinson was 31 and entirely unknown in the literary world when she came across Thomas Wentworth Higginson’s “ Letter to a Young Contributor ” in the April 1862 issue of The Atlantic . Hoping for guidance in her writing, she reached out to Higginson that month with four poems and a brief, unsigned letter. “Mr. Higginson,” she began , “Are you too deepl

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Ugens debat: Var olietrykket Viking Skys eneste problem?

Det norske Sjøfartsdirektorat meddelte i sidste uge, at lavt olietryk var den direkte årsag til at alle fire motorer på krydstogts­skibet Viking Sky gik i stå. Blandt læserne på ing.dk førte det til en lang diskussion om olietryk og redundans.

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The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon

As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. A government-run program in the Amazon rainforest in northwestern Brazil transforms forest carbon value into public wealth by focusing on labor rather than land rights. In the Brazilian state of Acre, some of the revenue from carbon credits is distributed to rural laborers and fam

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Digging ancient signals out of modern human genomes

With new genome analysis tools, scientists have made significant advances in our understanding of modern humans' origins and ancient migrations.

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Digging ancient signals out of modern human genomes

With new genome analysis tools, scientists have made significant advances in our understanding of modern humans' origins and ancient migrations.

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What You Need to Know About Candida Auris

C. auris is a mysterious and dangerous fungal infection that is among a growing number of germs that have evolved defenses against common medicines. Here are some basic facts about it.

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Maris ansigt blev knust: Sådan genopbyggede lægerne det

I 2015 var en 17-årig pige centrum for en ulykke, som efterlod norske kirurger med et kompliceret puslespil.

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Boeing cutting production rate of troubled 737 Max jet

Boeing will cut production of its troubled 737 Max airliner this month, underscoring the growing financial risk it faces the longer that its best-selling plane remains grounded after two deadly crashes.

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Life hacking: why self-optimising can be suboptimal

However noble the goal of self-improvement may be, it is not without risks Perfection is the goal of many 21st-century self-improvers. By treating their lives as systems to be hacked, they believe they can optimise their productivity, happiness, health, and intelligence. Tech entrepreneur Serge Faguet is reported to have spent $250,000 on such efforts, with the ultimate goal of living for ever. I

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Digitalization of food value chains

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Preeclampsia treatment for mothers also benefits offspring

An estimated six to 15 million people in the US are children born of a pregnancy complicated by preeclampsia. New research performed in rats reveals that treating preeclampsia with sildenafil citrate (Viagra) may help protect the cardiovascular health of the offspring.

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Churchill, the Greatest Briton, Hated Gandhi, the Greatest Indian

Within his homeland, Winston Churchill’s colossal contribution to saving his people from Hitler eclipses all else, and he is widely regarded as the greatest Briton of all time. So it came as something of a surprise when a senior Labour Party politician recently described him as a “villain” for having ordered troops to fire on striking workers in the Welsh town of Tonypandy in 1910. The claim prov

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Klimaforsker anmelder storslået naturserie: Alle kan lære noget af den

Ny naturserie skildrer et paradis, der forsvinder mellem hænderne på os.

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Epidermal growth factor receptor is a host-entry cofactor triggering hepatitis B virus internalization [Microbiology]

Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) is a host cell receptor required for hepatitis B virus (HBV) entry. However, the susceptibility of NTCP-expressing cells to HBV is diverse depending on the culture condition. Stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to potentiate cell susceptibility to HBV infection. Here, we show…

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Imaging the Renner-Teller effect using laser-induced electron diffraction [Chemistry]

Structural information on electronically excited neutral molecules can be indirectly retrieved, largely through pump–probe and rotational spectroscopy measurements with the aid of calculations. Here, we demonstrate the direct structural retrieval of neutral carbonyl disulfide (CS2) in the B∼1B2 excited electronic state using laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED). We unambiguously identify the.

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Measuring the average shape of transition paths during the folding of a single biological molecule [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Transition paths represent the parts of a reaction where the energy barrier separating products and reactants is crossed. They are essential to understanding reaction mechanisms, yet many of their properties remain unstudied. Here, we report measurements of the average shape of transition paths, studying the folding of DNA hairpins as…

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Rigidity percolation and geometric information in floppy origami [Applied Physical Sciences]

Origami structures with a large number of excess folds are capable of storing distinguishable geometric states that are energetically equivalent. As the number of excess folds is reduced, the system has fewer equivalent states and can eventually become rigid. We quantify this transition from a floppy to a rigid state…

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Rational design of an argon-binding superelectrophilic anion [Chemistry]

Chemically binding to argon (Ar) at room temperature has remained the privilege of the most reactive electrophiles, all of which are cationic (or even dicationic) in nature. Herein, we report a concept for the rational design of anionic superelectrophiles that are composed of a strong electrophilic center firmly embedded in…

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Realizing the values of natural capital for inclusive, sustainable development: Informing China’s new ecological development strategy [Sustainability Science]

A major challenge in transforming development to inclusive, sustainable pathways is the pervasive and persistent trade-off between provisioning services (e.g., agricultural production) on the one hand and regulating services (e.g., water purification, flood control) and biodiversity conservation on the other. We report on an application of China’s new Ecological Development…

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Light-heat conversion dynamics in highly diversified water-dispersed hydrophobic nanocrystal assemblies [Chemistry]

We investigate, with a combination of ultrafast optical spectroscopy and semiclassical modeling, the photothermal properties of various water-soluble nanocrystal assemblies. Broadband pump–probe experiments with ∼100-fs time resolution in the visible and near infrared reveal a complex scenario for their transient optical response that is dictated by their hybrid composition at…

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Superhydrophobic frictions [Physics]

Contrasting with its sluggish behavior on standard solids, water is extremely mobile on superhydrophobic materials, as shown, for instance, by the continuous acceleration of drops on tilted water-repellent leaves. For much longer substrates, however, drops reach a terminal velocity that results from a balance between weight and friction, allowing us…

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Complete biosynthetic pathways of ascofuranone and ascochlorin in Acremonium egyptiacum [Applied Biological Sciences]

Ascofuranone (AF) and ascochlorin (AC) are meroterpenoids produced by various filamentous fungi, including Acremonium egyptiacum (synonym: Acremonium sclerotigenum), and exhibit diverse physiological activities. In particular, AF is a promising drug candidate against African trypanosomiasis and a potential anticancer lead compound. These compounds are supposedly biosynthesized through farnesylatio

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Fake Apple iPhone scheme tied to Oregon college students, feds allege

Two students face federal charges, after being accused of importing more than 1,000 fake iPhones from China and exchanging them to later be sold.

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How storytelling imbues life with meaning

"An experience of being alive" is what mythologist Joseph Campbell said humans strive for. Though we live in an age of distraction, short videos still tell big stories. That said, losing a connection to the environment to stare at a screen has disastrous consequences. None In the opening moments of an epic dialogue between Bill Moyers and Joseph Campbell, Moyers mentions the means by which mythol

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Innovation Meets Citizen Science

Citizen science has been around as long as science, but innovative approaches are opening doors to more and deeper forms of public participation. Below, our editors spotlight a few projects that feature new approaches, novel research, or low-cost instruments. They all provide opportunities to act upon issues you may care about. Cheers! The SciStarter Team Colony B Unravel the secrets of microscopi

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A Planet's Core and a Dead Star Give Us a Glimpse of Earth's Future

White dwarfs are weird objects. These dense cores of dead stars pack as much mass as the Sun into a body about the size of Earth. They're left behind when a small- to mid-sized star ends its life by ballooning into a red giant and blowing off its outer layers in a series of explosive pulses. Although these puffs of ejected material eventually create a beautiful and expansive cloud of glowing gas c

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Last week in tech: Snapchat’s barfing buildings, new Beats headphones, and an Impossible Whopper

Technology Listen to the latest episode of our podcast! Catch up on tech news.

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Craft Beer’s Quest For The Funky Flavors of Wild Yeast

Whether your preferred pint is crisp or hoppy, fruity or caramelly, you owe a lot to the single-celled fungus doing the important work of putting the booze in your brews. Hops may get most of the love on the craft beer scene, but yeast is an overlooked heavy-hitter when it comes to giving beer flavor. “Cool people are obsessed with yeast,” says Simon McConico, co-owner of Milwaukee’s Vennture Brew

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The Atlantic Daily: All Politics Isn’t Local

What We’re Following The European project: One mayoral candidate in Barcelona used to be the prime minister … of France. Manuel Valls was born in Barcelona to a Catalan father, but at an early age he moved to France before ascending the ranks in the country’s Socialist Party. After stepping down as prime minister in 2016, he decamped to Barcelona. His campaign, like his dual identity, is centered

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5 life skills we need to teach in school

A stunning number of adults seem to be coasting by without knowledge of what many would consider extremely basic life skills. From financial literacy to learning how to communicate, the U.S. education system could stand to incorporate courses on the basic skills we need to navigate daily life. This list describes 5 life skills, why we need them in our schools, and the consequences of their absenc

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Busted Mastodon is Ice Age Roadkill

A mastodon said to be pulverized by Ice Age humans was probably busted up by roadwork. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rocket fuel that's cleaner, safer and still full of energy

Research shows that it may be possible to create rocket fuel that is much cleaner and safer than the hypergolic fuels that are commonly used today. And still just as effective. The new fuels use simple chemical 'triggers' to unlock the energy of one of the hottest new materials, a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs.

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The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon

As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. A government-run program in the Amazon rainforest in northwestern Brazil transforms forest carbon value into public wealth by focusing on labor rather than land rights. In the Brazilian state of Acre, some of the revenue from carbon credits is distributed to rural laborers and fam

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Unjamming the genome after DNA damage

A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA.

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Rocket fuel that's cleaner, safer and still full of energy

Research shows that it may be possible to create rocket fuel that is much cleaner and safer than the hypergolic fuels that are commonly used today. And still just as effective. The new fuels use simple chemical 'triggers' to unlock the energy of one of the hottest new materials, a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs.

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Squeezed nanocrystals: A new model predicts their shape when blanketed under graphene

Scientists have developed a model for predicting the shape of metal nanocrystals or 'islands' sandwiched between or below two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene. The advance moves 2D quantum materials a step closer to applications in electronics.

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Eyes reveal early Alzheimer's disease

Reduced blood capillaries in the back of the eye may be a new, noninvasive way to diagnose early cognitive impairment, the precursor to Alzheimer's disease in which individuals become forgetful, reports a new study. Scientists detected these vascular changes in the human eye noninvasively, with an infrared camera and without the need for dyes or expensive MRI scanners.

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New trauma care pathway reduces delirium and likelihood of returning to the hospital

A standardized interdisciplinary clinical pathway to identify and manage frailty in older patients has reduced the rate of one of the most debilitating complications for older patients — delirium — and kept patients from returning to the hospital within 30 days of treatment for traumatic injury.

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Large Antarctic Ice Shelf, home to a UK research station, is about to break apart

Glaciology experts have issued evidence that a large section of the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is home to the British Antarctic Survey's Halley Research Station, is about break off. The iceberg, measuring over 1,500 square kilometers — which is twice the size of New York City — is expected to break away from the Brunt Ice Shelf within the next few months.

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Most links between personality traits and life outcomes are replicable

Studies showing links between personality traits and life outcomes, such as marital stability and vocational achievements, provide a reasonably accurate map of the relationship between personality and various aspects of one's life, according to findings from a large-scale replication project.

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Digging ancient signals out of modern human genomes

Trying to find ancient DNA, let alone prove that the ancient DNA is ancestral to a population living today, is extremely challenging. A new study in Molecular Biology and Evolution (MBE) adds to this understanding by reconstructing artificial genomes with the analyses of the genome of 565 contemporary South Asian individuals to extract ancient signals that recapitulate the long history of human mi

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NASA isn't happy about India's anti-satellite missile test

Space But this is far from the first time a country has destroyed a satellite with a missile and caused a ruckus. What exactly does this “44 percent increase in risk” to the ISS mean?

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Study calculates costs associated with smoking by patients with cancer

A study has reported that smoking after a cancer diagnosis is associated with substantial additional costs of cancer treatment.

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How good are protein disorder prediction programs actually?

Disorder in proteins is vital for biological function, and structural disorder in protein is more pervasive than you might think. Proteins with disordered regions may also be sticky, and clump together inside and between cells, and are directly implicated in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, being able to identify disordered regions in proteins is highly important.

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Australian Murray River habitat restoration increases native fish populations

Dubbed the 'honeypot effect' — a team of scientists from around Australia have shown that providing woody habitat, or 'snags,' for native fish in the Murray River increases their population size.

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Microglia, cells thought restricted to central nervous system, are redefined in new study

Scientists have discovered microglia actually squeeze through the spinal boundary, crossing into the peripheral nervous system in response to injury.

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Why is the brain in the head?

submitted by /u/markchangizi [link] [comments]

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cob Save America

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, April 5. ‣ The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said it will no longer classify people in same-sex marriages as “apostates,” and will allow children from same-sex marriages to be blessed and baptized as infants. ‣ The U.S. economy added 196,000 jobs in March, a rebound from the February jobs report, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 3.

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Older adults with blood cancers: How they fare

Recently, a team of researchers examined older adults who have cancer to see whether their ability to manage daily activities was linked to staying alive longer.

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Medical guidelines may be biased, overly aggressive in US

A doctor practiced general medicine for several years in the United Kingdom's National Health Service. When she came to the United States, she noticed something strange. The U.K. guidelines for tests such as mammograms and colon cancer screenings drastically differed from those in the U.S. – even though they were based on the same medical evidence.

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Study measures gluten in gluten-free labeled restaurant food

Even tiny amounts of gluten in foods are troublesome for people with celiac disease, and restaurants may be the hardest places to avoid the protein, finds a new study. More than half of gluten-free pizza and pasta dishes in restaurants tested positive for the presence of gluten; about one-third of supposedly gluten-free foods had detectable gluten. Gluten-free pasta samples were positive in 51 per

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Scientists explore causes of biodiversity in perching birds

New research by a global team of scientists has resulted in significant strides in ornithological classification and identified possible causes of diversity among modern bird species.

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Building a future Mars base

submitted by /u/Caesar95 [link] [comments]

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Prince Harry Hates Fortnite, How Hackers Use Facebook, And More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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For Some Reason, New World Flying Squirrels Fluoresce Pink

No other placental mammals have ever shown this ability — perhaps because we haven't looked — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study measures gluten in gluten-free labeled restaurant food

Even tiny amounts of gluten in foods are troublesome for people with celiac disease, and restaurants may be the hardest places to avoid the protein, finds a Columbia study. More than half of gluten-free pizza and pasta dishes in restaurants tested positive for the presence of gluten; about one-third of supposedly gluten-free foods had detectable gluten. Gluten-free pasta samples were positive in 5

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Gadget Lab Podcast: Reporting From Syria

Two passports, three voice recorders, one gas mask: How journalist Kenneth R. Rosen reports his stories from conflict zones in the Middle East.

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Neighborhood Science with GLOBE Mission Mosquito

Spring is a great time to start using the GLOBE Observer Mosquito Habitat Mapper. Have you noticed any mosquitoes yet? Spring is upon us in the United States, and mosquitoes are already buzzing in many parts of the country. Below is a map that shows the approximate onset of the mosquito session throughout the contiguous U.S. You can observe how the mosquito season works its way northward as condit

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Top 5 strangest fad diets

It's perfectly normal to want a healthy body. But like everything in life, moderation is the key. Some people want the ideal body so bad, they're willing to make any number of bizarre changes to their lives. And pop nutritionists, dietitians, and public figures are more than happy to sell ill-advised diets to them. Here's just 5 of some of the strangest fad diets through history. None Everybody w

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The Decades-long Struggle to Draw a Realistic Black Hole

We're probably going to get our very first actual picture of a black hole next week. Researchers with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) have scheduled a press conference for the morning of April 10, and they're expected to unveil an image of a supermassive black hole. It will be the first time humanity has actually seen one of the massive objects with our own eyes, and scientists are understandabl

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SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy Completes Engine Test Fire, Readies for First Commercial Launch

SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket completed a static fire engine test shortly after 11am eastern today, in preparation for its first commercial launch next week. This will mark the second-ever flight of Falcon Heavy, delivering a communications satellite into space. Falcon Flight The test firing this morning went well, and mission managers are now targeting a launch on April 9. This is a slight delay f

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Now in Lunar Orbit, Israel's Beresheet Mission Preps for Moon Landing

The scrappy Israeli Beresheet mission successfully entered lunar orbit on April 4, joining a select club of nations and agencies that have ever circled the moon. This morning, SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI), who built and operate the spacecraft, released its first close-up pictures of the moon’s mysterious far side. And next week, on April 11, Beresheet will make its most daring man

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As the Arctic heads into the warm melt-season, sea ice is tracking at record lows

As winter gives way to spring in the Arctic, the region's lid of floating sea ice is shriveling much more sharply than normal. According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center's latest monthly update, published April 3, Arctic sea ice reached its maximum extent on March 13, which marked the end of the winter season. Since then, warming spring temperatures have caused the ice to shrink — and late

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Evidence for a prolonged Permian–Triassic extinction interval from global marine mercury records

Evidence for a prolonged Permian–Triassic extinction interval from global marine mercury records Evidence for a prolonged Permian–Triassic extinction interval from global marine mercury records, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09620-0 Previously, little direct evidence has been found to link large volcanic eruption events with the end-Permian mass extinction. Here, the aut

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The parasitic worm product ES-62 normalises the gut microbiota bone marrow axis in inflammatory arthritis

The parasitic worm product ES-62 normalises the gut microbiota bone marrow axis in inflammatory arthritis The parasitic worm product ES-62 normalises the gut microbiota bone marrow axis in inflammatory arthritis, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09361-0 Gastrointestinal infection with parasitic helminths can protect against mucosal diseases via impacting on the microbiome.

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FoxK1 and FoxK2 in insulin regulation of cellular and mitochondrial metabolism

FoxK1 and FoxK2 in insulin regulation of cellular and mitochondrial metabolism FoxK1 and FoxK2 in insulin regulation of cellular and mitochondrial metabolism, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09418-0 Insulin signaling represses Forkhead transcription factor FoxO activity, which contributes to organismal metabolism. Here, the authors use proteomics to identify positively reg

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Pellino1 regulates reversible ATM activation via NBS1 ubiquitination at DNA double-strand breaks

Pellino1 regulates reversible ATM activation via NBS1 ubiquitination at DNA double-strand breaks Pellino1 regulates reversible ATM activation via NBS1 ubiquitination at DNA double-strand breaks, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09641-9 Occurrence of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is important for genome integrity. Here, the authors reveal that Pellino1 is a DSB-respon

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Genetic studies of accelerometer-based sleep measures yield new insights into human sleep behaviour

Genetic studies of accelerometer-based sleep measures yield new insights into human sleep behaviour Genetic studies of accelerometer-based sleep measures yield new insights into human sleep behaviour, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09576-1 Quality, quantity and timing of sleep are important factors for overall human health. Here, the authors perform GWAS for sleep traits

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Beating the exclusion rule against the coexistence of robust luminescence and ferromagnetism in chalcogenide monolayers

Beating the exclusion rule against the coexistence of robust luminescence and ferromagnetism in chalcogenide monolayers Beating the exclusion rule against the coexistence of robust luminescence and ferromagnetism in chalcogenide monolayers, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09531-0 2D chalcogenide semiconductors with luminescence and ferromagnetism (FM) are demanded in spint

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Improved measures for evolutionary conservation that exploit taxonomy distances

Improved measures for evolutionary conservation that exploit taxonomy distances Improved measures for evolutionary conservation that exploit taxonomy distances, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09583-2 Information on protein sequence variability and conservation can be leveraged to identify functionally important regions. Here, the authors develop new conservation measures

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Mosaic pattern formation in exfoliated graphene by mechanical deformation

Mosaic pattern formation in exfoliated graphene by mechanical deformation Mosaic pattern formation in exfoliated graphene by mechanical deformation, Published online: 05 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09489-z Owing to its atomic thinness, graphene is susceptible to wrinkles and folds. Here, the authors demonstrate controlled wrinkle formation in graphene under uniaxial tension and show that t

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Ancient Egyptian sarcophagus to be opened on live TV this weekend

The show is called Expedition Unknown : Egypt Live and it airs Sunday, April 7, at 8 p.m. E.T. The undisclosed site is reported to have produced multiple ancient artifacts. It might be little more than a media spectacle, but some say that's not a problem as long as it gets people interested in the preservation of ancient artifacts. None A team of archaeologists and other specialists in Egypt plan

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Sah: Medical guidelines may be biased, overly aggressive

Dr. Sunita Sah practiced general medicine for several years in the United Kingdom's National Health Service. When she came to the United States, she noticed something strange. The U.K. guidelines for tests such as mammograms and colon cancer screenings drastically differed from those in the U.S. – even though they were based on the same medical evidence.

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The carbon offset market: Leveraging forest carbon's value in the Brazilian Amazon

As companies seek and are required to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, the world's carbon markets are expanding. A government-run program in the Amazon rainforest in northwestern Brazil transforms forest carbon value into public wealth by focusing on labor rather than land rights. In the Brazilian state of Acre, some of the revenue from carbon credits is distributed to rural laborers and fam

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Quantum Computers Could Go Mainstream Sooner than We Think

submitted by /u/zexterio [link] [comments]

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Google pushes 'sponsored content' to some Android TV devices

Owners of certain Android TV devices including Sony smart TVs, Nvidia Shield, and Xiaomi Mi Box 3 have noticed ads appearing on the home screen according to XDA Developers. The ads seemed to …

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Boeing dealing with second software problem on troubled jet

Boeing has found another software issue that needs fixing on its 737 Max jets, and the discovery explains why the aircraft maker is delaying its schedule for getting the planes back in the air.

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Older adults with blood cancers: How they fare

Recently, a team of researchers examined older adults who have cancer to see whether their ability to manage daily activities was linked to staying alive longer. The team published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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A VR Model of Auschwitz Helps Catch Nazis

In the years following World War II, Reinhold Hanning had enjoyed a relatively normal life in Germany. He looked on as many of his superiors during wartime, including high-ranking Nazi Party officials stationed at Auschwitz, were convicted in the Nuremberg trials from 1945 to 1949 for their crimes against humanity. But Hanning, a former SS guard, was not considered a high-profile war criminal, so

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Public gets to take free ride in self-driving car in Detroit

Members of the public are getting the chance to take a free ride in a self-driving car as part of an effort to clear up confusion about the technology.

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Scientists release most detailed map of Teton quake fault

Scientists have completed the most detailed map yet of one of North America's most spectacular geologic faults with the hope of providing a better understanding of the earthquake risk at a popular vacation destination.

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Shell hit with Dutch climate lawsuit

Climate marchers handed in a lawsuit to Shell's headquarters in the Netherlands on Friday aimed at forcing the oil giant to meet targets in the Paris accord.

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Unjamming the genome after DNA damage: A gene regulatory multi-tool has yet another function

A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA.

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Unjamming the genome after DNA damage: A gene regulatory multi-tool has yet another function

A protein complex that is involved in nearly every step in the regulatory control of gene expression in cells has now been shown also to play a key role in clearing potential traffic jams in the production of RNA.

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Should Kids Be Required to Take Internet Ed?

submitted by /u/NJRFilms [link] [comments]

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New tools and strategies for tuberculosis diagnosis, care, and elimination: A PLOS Medicine special

This week, publication of a special issue on tuberculosis (TB) begins in PLOS Medicine, advised by guest editors Richard Chaisson of Johns Hopkins University, Claudia Denkinger of the University of Heidelberg, and Mark Hatherill of the South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Institute.

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Anti-inflammatory drugs ineffective for prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have known for decades that inflammation accompanies Alzheimer's disease brain lesions. Several early studies suggested that Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs could help avoid the disease. After clinical trials showed that NSAIDs don't help patients who already have AD symptoms, doctors wondered whether these drugs could still be helpful to people who were at risk of developing the

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Racial disparities continue for black women seeking heart health care

Postmenopausal black women with heart attack or coronary heart disease experienced significantly lower treatment rates than Hispanic or white women.Overall, treatment rates for heart attack and coronary heart disease increased over two decades but treatment rates did not significantly improve for black women.

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Here's Why This Man Had a Giant White Mass on His Eyeball

The unusual eye problem was the result of an extremely rare lesion on the man's eyeball.

15h

Sydney Brenner, pioneer of molecular biology, dies at 92

The Nobel laureate made pioneering discoveries about DNA and RNA

15h

Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization

In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress.

15h

A girl with measles exposed 200 people to the virus in a single ER

Health Hospitals are often the perfect place to spread infection. Emergency rooms are busy places. You should need no more proof of that than the fact that at least 200 patients have been exposed to measles by a single child in the…

15h

Battery Power’s Latest Plunge in Costs Threatens Coal, Gas

submitted by /u/zexterio [link] [comments]

15h

Boeing Confirms Additional Problems With Boeing 737 Max Flight Controls

Boeing has acknowledged a second problem with the Boeing 737 Max 8's flight control systems. This is why the fix's delivery date has been pushed back for weeks. The post Boeing Confirms Additional Problems With Boeing 737 Max Flight Controls appeared first on ExtremeTech .

15h

“The Mice Became Smarter”: New Treatment Restores Aging Brains

Antibodies for Algernon Scientists at Stanford University say they’ve devised antibodies that block a specific gene related to brain aging — and that it’s giving old mice the cognitive prowess of younger ones. “The mice became smarter,” senior author Tony Wyss-Coray said in a statement . “Blocking [the gene] CD22 on their microglia restored their cognitive function to the level of younger mice. C

15h

Evolutionary changes played a crucial role in industrialization

In a study of 200 years of pre-industrial Quebecois genealogical history, researchers found that fertility-related changes in natural selection during the pre-industrial era paved the way for economic and technological progress.

15h

Rainforest conservation in Peru must become more effective

A few years ago, the Peruvian government launched a program to protect the rainforest. However, an analysis shows that its effect is small. But the researchers also have good news: Three measures could probably significantly increase effectiveness.

15h

Mutation stands in the way of healthy blood cell maturation

In a new study, researchers have learned how a specific genetic mutation affects the maturation of blood cells in mouse models. Leukemia patients often have a mutation in this gene, often seen before the disease sets in. The researchers are working on a strategy for treating the mutation.

15h

Robots to autocomplete Soldier tasks

Smart phones autocorrect in texting, search engines autocomplete queries, and mapping applications redirect navigation in real-time to avoid slowed traffic. These ubiquitous AI-based technologies adapt to everyday needs and learn user habits by focusing on making the algorithm better, but researchers want to enhance AI by providing more information about the intent of the user.

15h

Tailoring lactation education to the cultural needs of orthodox Jewish families

In a new article published in The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, nurse researchers examine Orthodox Jewish practices related to the provision of human milk and breastfeeding for a sick newborn.

15h

Peruvian fossils yield a four-legged otterlike whale with hooves

A newly discovered species of ancient whale unearthed in Peru split time between land and sea.

15h

Cats Perk Up at the Sound of Their Own Names

The familiar word elicits a twitch of the ears or swish of the tail, suggesting felines can distinguish their names from other words.

16h

Sydney Brenner, mRNA Discoverer, Dies

One of the foremost molecular biologists of the 20th century, the Nobel laureate established C. elegans as a model organism, mapping its genes and development.

16h

Photos of the Week: Straw Kongs, Reindeer Races, Yosemite Rainbow

A polar-bear cub in Germany, a “silly walk” parade in Hungary, mail delivery by boat in Germany, presidential campaigning in Texas, a jet suit in New York, a welcoming sea lion in Japan, the Ching Ming Festival in Hong Kong, protests on the U.S.-Mexico border, storm damage in Nepal, water shortages in Venezuela, and much more

16h

Improving 3D-printed prosthetics and integrating electronic sensors

Scientists have made inroads in integrating electronic sensors with personalized 3D-printed prosthetics.

16h

Going with the flow: How fecal bacteria spread in streams

Little research has been conducted into the spread and distribution of fecal bacteria in rivers and, above all, into their input from the surrounding landscape. Researchers have now developed an indicator-based model that can be used to assess the dynamics of fecal bacteria such as E. coli on the basis of hydrological processes in the landscape and the connectivity of streams.

16h

One way T cell function may fail in cancer

Researchers have discovered a mechanism by which one type of immune cell, CD8+ T cells, can become dysfunctional, impeding its ability to seek and kill cancer cells.

16h

Ready, steady, go: Steps in plant immune receptor activation

Two landmark studies provide unprecedented structural insight into how plant immune receptors are primed — and then activated — to provide plants with resistance against microbial pathogens.

16h

Robots to autocomplete Soldier tasks

Smart phones autocorrect in texting, search engines autocomplete queries, and mapping applications redirect navigation in real-time to avoid slowed traffic. These ubiquitous AI-based technologies adapt to everyday needs and learn user habits by focusing on making the algorithm better, but researchers want to enhance AI by providing more information about the intent of the user.

16h

The Tricky Ethics of Google's Cloud Ambitions

Google trails Amazon and Microsoft in selling cloud services to other companies, but its efforts to catch up may be hindered by its own ethics policies.

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