Search Posts

nyheder2019april07

The Plan to Save the Rhino With a Cervix-Navigating Robot

To perform IVF on the white rhino, researchers are developing a special robot to navigate the females' complex cervixes and deposit an embryo.

1h

Time-reversal violation may explain abundance of matter over antimatter, physicist says

Why does the observable universe contain virtually no antimatter? Particles of antimatter have the same mass but opposite electrical charge of their matter counterparts. Very small amounts of antimatter can be created in the laboratory. However, hardly any antimatter is observed elsewhere in the universe.

5h

Study shows dogs can accurately sniff out cancer in blood

Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans', making them highly sensitive to odors we can't perceive. A new study has shown that dogs can use their highly evolved sense of smell to pick out blood samples from people with cancer with almost 97 percent accuracy. The results could lead to new cancer-screening approaches that are inexpensive and accurate without being invasive.

5h

Poacher Killed by Elephant and Eaten by Lions in South Africa

A gruesome death in South Africa's Kruger National Park highlights the dangers and cruelties of the black market in rhinoceros horn.

now

Watch Google’s AI Make Trump Sing Eurythmics’ “Sweet Dreams”

Cursed Karaoke Another AI-generated video of Trump singing karaoke has made its way to YouTube. If you’re a regular reader of Futurism, you may have spotted a previous video in which YouTuber “Coding Elite” used an AI algorithm built by Google engineers to make Trump sing Eminem’s “Lose Yourself.” Our article about the song received critical acclaim, such as one Facebook comment that read “I want

5min

The Next Walking Dead Spin-Off Will Star 2 Women as First Generation Zombie Slayers

We knew AMC was planning more spin-offs of its hit zombie series, The Walking Dead, but considering the main show is still chugging along, and the first spin-off Fear the Walking Dead is as …

5min

Cold plasma can kill 99.9% of airborne viruses, U-M study shows

Dangerous airborne viruses are rendered harmless on-the-fly when exposed to energetic, charged fragments of air molecules, University of Michigan researchers have shown.

5min

Study: Some woodpeckers imitate a neighbor's plumage

In the first global test of the idea, scientists have found evidence that some woodpeckers can evolve to look like another species of woodpecker in the same neighborhood.

5min

How a bacterium feeds an entire flatworm

In the sandy bottom of warm coastal waters lives Paracatenula—a small worm that has neither mouth, nor gut. Nevertheless, it lacks nothing thanks to Riegeria, the bacterium that fills most of the body of the tiny worm. Riegeria looks after its host—it is farmer, quartermaster and cook all in one. A research team researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology has now deciphered

5min

A New European Political Bloc Wants to Dismantle Europe

MILAN—An Italian, a German, a Dane, and a Finn gathered here on Monday to launch a new continent-wide alliance of far-right and right-wing parties that they hope will remake Europe. Their message was one of defending national borders, stopping illegal immigration, combatting Islamic terrorism—and little else. They dubbed their new group the European Alliance of People and Nations, yet beyond thei

15min

After millennia of allergy treatments, here's what actually works

Health Pollen counts are rising. Learn to cope. Throughout history, pollen has taken the fun out of spring for many. In modern times, however, medical science has identified practices and treatments that help.

16min

TGen review links gene with the most common liver cancer

In an article published in the scientific journal Cancers, researchers at the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, provide the first summary of the experimental evidence supporting the AKR1B10 enzyme as a promising therapeutic target for Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), based on a review of more than 50 studies published since this gene was first identifie

19min

New DNA 'shredder' technique goes beyond CRISPR's scissors

An international team has unveiled a new CRISPR-based tool that acts more like a shredder than the usual scissor-like action of CRISPR-Cas9. The new approach, based on Type I CRISPR-Cas3, is able to wipe out long stretches of DNA in human cells with programmable targeting, and has been shown to work in human cells for the first time.

19min

How a New Cancer 'Vaccine' Fights Tumors Throughout the Body

A new cancer "vaccine" that's injected directly into a single tumor can trigger the immune system to attack cancer cells throughout the body, a small new study suggests.

31min

Should teachers be fired for nude pics from their past?

Math teacher Lauren Miranda was fired from her Long Island school when a topless selfie surfaced. Miranda had only shared the photo with her ex-boyfriend, who is also a teacher in the school district. She's suing the school for $3 million as well as getting her job back, citing gender discrimination. None Chalk it up to the recurring "blame the woman" sentiment one gender has endured for eons. On

33min

Noninvasive Brain Stimulation Turns Back Clock on Memory

The approach temporarily improved the performance of older adults on memory tasks to be on par with people in their 20s.

33min

Treatment turns tumors into cancer vaccine factories

Researchers have developed a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy, injecting immune stimulants directly into a tumor to teach the immune system to destroy it and other tumor cells throughout the body.

34min

Novel 5-minute workout improves blood pressure, may boost brain function

Five minutes daily of Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training lowers blood pressure, improves vascular health, boosts fitness and sharpens memory, according to preliminary results presented this week at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando.

41min

Researchers remove harmful hormones from Las Vegas wastewater using green algae

A common species of freshwater green algae is capable of removing certain endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from wastewater, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Las Vegas. In a new study published in the journal Environmental Pollution, DRI researchers Xuelian Bai, Ph.D., and Kumud Acharya, Ph.D., explore the potential for use of a species of freshwater green

41min

Researchers discover new technique to test for viral infections

A team of researchers at Colorado State University has developed technology that can detect small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood.

41min

Rwandans Commemorate 25 Years Since Genocide

On April 7, 1994, long-standing tensions between Rwanda’s majority Hutu population and Tutsi minority erupted into mass slaughter, following the killing of Rwanda’s President Juvenal Habyarimana. Over the next 100 days, more than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed by members of the Hutu majority, in massacres carried out across the country by members of the army, militias, and civilian

41min

Kirstjen Nielsen Shows Why It’s Impossible to Restrain Trump

Since November 2016, there’s been a running argument among those who are skeptical of Donald Trump but not implacably opposed to his presidency: Should they go into the system and try to restrain the president’s worst impulses, for the good of the nation? Or should they remain on the outside, and avoid the scarlet “C” of collaboration? Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen’s firing on S

41min

Robots created with 3D printers could be caring for those in golden years

Researchers have developed a new design method to create soft robots that may help in caregiving for elderly family members.

48min

Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes

Psychologists used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time.

48min

Is it genetic code or postal code that influence a child's life chances?

Most children inherit both their postal code and their genetic code from their parents. But if genetic factors influence where families are able to live and children's health and educational success, improving neighborhoods may not be enough. Latest research provides new insights into the highly debated question of whether the neighborhoods that children live in influence their health and life cha

48min

Bacton cliffs: RSPB warns birds 'could be killed' by netting

North Norfolk Council has put nets up at Bacton to encourage birds to nest further along the coast.

56min

Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior

A machine learning model can reproduce the swarming behaviour of locusts.

1h

New technique cuts AI training time by more than 60 percent

Computer science researchers have developed a technique that reduces training time for deep learning networks by more than 60 percent without sacrificing accuracy, accelerating the development of new artificial intelligence (AI) applications.

1h

Too much of a good thing? High doses of vitamin D can lead to kidney failure

A 54-year-old man, after returning from a trip to Southeast Asia where he spent much of his holiday sunbathing, showed increased levels of creatinine, suggesting kidney damage or malfunction. After referral to a kidney specialist and further testing, it was discovered that he had been prescribed high doses of vitamin D by a naturopath, who recommended a dose of 8 drops every day. Over 2 ½ years, t

1h

Spying on cells' eating habits could aid cancer diagnosis

Scientists have developed a new imaging technology to visualize what cells eat, which could aid the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer.

1h

These molecules could trap viruses inside a cell

Viruses are often used as vehicles for delivery in gene therapy because they're engineered not to damage the cell once they get there, but neglecting to consider how the virus will exit the cell could have consequences.

1h

Study shows dogs can accurately sniff out cancer in blood

Dogs have smell receptors 10,000 times more accurate than humans', making them highly sensitive to odors we can't perceive. A new study has shown that dogs can use their highly evolved sense of smell to pick out blood samples from people with cancer with almost 97 percent accuracy. The results could lead to new cancer-screening approaches that are inexpensive and accurate without being invasive.

1h

Insight into use of critical care resources

A study has found wide variation in the use of different hospital units — intensive care or general medical units — to deliver a type of advanced respiratory support called noninvasive ventilation.

1h

Identifying the grass pollen that gets up your nose

Scientists could be a step closer to providing more precise pollen forecasts to people who live with asthma or hay fever. This follows the first results of a major three-year project to analyze airborne grass pollen. For the first time, one season's grass pollens have been analyzed using high-tech metabarcoding. The team have now begun investigating links between certain pollen types and those day

1h

Pediatric telemedicine visits may increase antibiotic overprescribing

Children with acute respiratory infections were prescribed antibiotics more often during direct-to-consumer telemedicine visits than during in-person primary care appointments or urgent care visits, according to new research.

1h

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions

It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research links the lag to something different: evolution.

1h

International team decodes the durum wheat genome

An international consortium has sequenced the entire genome of durum wheat — the source of semolina for pasta, a food staple for the world's population.

1h

Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?

In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population. Wouldn't it be incredibly useful if we had a crystal ball to show us what are the best strategies available to increase crop yields? A team of scientists have just developed exactly that: a dynamic model that predicts which photosynthetic manipulations to plants will boost the yields of wheat

1h

uliCUT&RUN maps protein binding on chromatin in single cells and single embryos

Originally adapted in 2017, CUT&RUN has since been successfully applied to populations of more than 1,000 cells. Hainer and Fazzio sought to further adapt this technology and in this paper describe, for the first time, the genome-wide mapping of factor occupancy from single cells and individual pre-implantation mouse embryos

1h

Online tool encourages healthy weight gain during pregnancy

Excessive weight gain during pregnancy increases the risk of obesity in both mothers and babies. To avoid dangerous gestational weight gain, it is important to identify effective tools for behavior change. A new study appearing in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, found online diet goal-setting helped women achieve healthy weight gain if they started the study

1h

Moneyball advantage peters out once everyone's doing it: Rotman paper

Sixteen years after author Michael Lewis wrote the book Moneyball, every Major League Baseball (MLB) team uses the technique. But a new study shows that while the tool can help a club create a stronger team — at a lower cost — it loses its edge once everyone's on to it.

1h

Red Carpet brings the theater home for the one percent

“Every product I can think of has a luxury version,” Fred Rosen thought to himself, “Why not movies?”

1h

Glaciers have lost more than 9 trillion tons of ice since 1961

Glaciers lost more than 9 trillion tons (that’s 9,625,000,000,000 tons) of ice between 1961 and 2016, according to new research. The loss led to a 27-millimeter increase in global sea levels over this period, researchers found. Alaska glaciers were the largest contributors, followed by melting ice fields in Patagonia and glaciers in the Arctic regions. Glaciers in the European Alps, the Caucasus

1h

Prisons Are Replacing Visits With Expensive, Grainy Video Calls

Expensive Convenience Several American prisons are replacing in-person visitation with video call services. Now, instead of traveling to a prison to visit an inmate, friends and family will have to pay by the minute to chat via a grainy and outdated video feed, Ars Technica reports . Prisons switching to the service market the service as a convenience, but they stand to profit from a measure that

1h

Dogs Can Sniff out Cancer With Nearly 97% Accuracy, Says Study

Dr. Dog Researchers across the globe are experimenting with ways to use artificial intelligence and other high-tech means to detect cancer. At the same time, one startup in Florida is taking a decidedly low-tech approach to the problem by turning over the task of sniffing out cancer to dogs — and the animals, the company says, are surprisingly good at it. Smell Test On Monday, Florida’s BioScentD

1h

Oklahoma! Gets a Dark, Brilliant Remake

This article contains spoilers for the Daniel Fish production of Oklahoma! In 1979, during the opening of a smash-hit revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma! , the New York Times drama critic Walter Kerr walked up the aisle at intermission and noticed that everyone in the audience was beaming. “Some were smiling because they remember,” he wrote . “The others were smiling because they will.

1h

1minute Tips For Memorising

submitted by /u/powerfulminds– [link] [comments]

1h

Brazil's government freezes nearly half of its science spending

Brazil's government freezes nearly half of its science spending Brazil's government freezes nearly half of its science spending, Published online: 08 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01079-9 The decision could derail multi-million-dollar research projects such as the Sirius synchrotron.

1h

Banned pesticides in Europe's rivers

Tests of Europe's rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides — including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU.

1h

Psychiatry: Multigene test predicts depression risk

An international team has found a genetic score that reliably predicts the risk, severity and age of onset of depression in young people. The study also confirms a history of childhood abuse as a risk factor.

1h

New findings on the effect of Epsom salt: Epsom salt receptor identified

A team of scientists has identified the receptor responsible for the bitter taste of various salts. These include medically used Epsom salt. The discovery helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which Epsom salt affects the heart or gut.

1h

Advances in deep brain stimulation could lead to new treatments

A new article suggests that recent advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease could lead to treatments for conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and depression. The authors of the article argue that bi-directional electrodes which can both stimulate and record from deep brain structures — known as closed-loop DBS — could have a

1h

Stillbirth threefold increase when sleeping on back in pregnancy

Research has shown that pregnant women can lower the risk of stillbirth by sleeping on their side and NOT on their back.

1h

Breaking down Beowulf

Using a statistical approach known as stylometry, which analyzes everything from the poem's meter to the number of times different combinations of letters show up in the text, a team of researchers found new evidence that Beowulf is the work of a single author.

1h

Beer and fodder crop has been deteriorating for 6,000 years

The diversity of the crop sorghum, a cereal used to make alcoholic drinks, has been decreasing over time due to agricultural practice. To maintain the diversity of the crop and keep it growing farmers will need to revise how they manage it.

1h

New pathways for sustainable agriculture

Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature.

1h

Revolutionary camera allows scientists to predict evolution of ancient stars

For the first time scientists have been able to prove a decades old theory on stars thanks to a revolutionary high-speed camera.

1h

What most attracts us to a tourist destination? Attractions, culture and gastronomy

Tourists' expectations when visiting a particular place are related to several features of the chosen destination: culture, architecture, gastronomy, infrastructure, landscape, events, shopping, etc. These features attract people to the destination and contribute to the overall experience of the trip. As a whole, they are crucial aspects of the destinations and have a profound influence on their s

1h

Decline in physical activity often starts as early as age 7

Overall physical activity starts to decline already around the age of school entry. While the proportion of physically inactive individuals rises with age there still are groups of people who manage to increase their physical activity level in adulthood and old age.

1h

Specific criteria needed for different types of myeloma

When our plasma cells start producing a single cancer-causing protein rather than an array of antibody-like proteins to protect us, it's one of two arms of the Y-shaped protein that's likely to blame.

1h

The World’s 10 Largest Economies in 2030

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

1h

Daily briefing: Award-winning photos of scientists at work

Daily briefing: Award-winning photos of scientists at work Daily briefing: Award-winning photos of scientists at work, Published online: 08 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01143-4 Your #ScientistAtWork winners, tackling a long-standing bias in cancer research and the stealthy spread of drug-resistant fungi.

1h

Drug cuts tau tangles to fight dementia in mice

A “druggable” mechanism of tau protein pathology could lead to new treatment for some of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases. For the millions of people at risk for frontotemporal dementia and a host of other such conditions including Alzheimer’s disease, this could signal a shift toward significant management of symptoms or outright prevention of certain diseases. “We’re super excite

1h

Patients harboring E. coli with highly resistant MCR-1 gene found In NYC hospital

A team of investigators has identified a cluster of four patients harboring Escherichia coli carrying a rare antibiotic resistance gene, mcr-1. That gene renders the microbe resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of last resort against some multidrug-resistant infections. Three of those patients showed no symptoms, raising the risk of spread.

1h

Intestinal helminths boost fat burning: Japanese investigators show how

Intestinal infection with helminths — a class of worm-like parasites — prevented weight gain in laboratory mice on a high-fat diet. The helminths did so by boosting populations of bacteria that produce compounds that trigger increased energy consumption in the mice.

1h

Researchers find brain molecular features associated with years of education

A study led by a team from the University of Barcelona identified greater cortical thickness in the frontal lobe in a group of old people with high levels of education. The study of the molecular architecture revealed these areas feature a relative overexpression of gene families involved in the synaptic transmission and the activation of the immune response. Results may explain how high levels of

1h

Migraine-linked protein exhibits sex-specific pain effects

A protein implicated in the development of migraine symptoms caused pain responses in female rodents, but not in males, when introduced into the meninges, potentially helping to explain why migraine is three times more common in women than men.

1h

How education may stave off cognitive decline

Prefrontal brain regions linked to higher educational attainment are characterized by increased expression of genes involved in neurotransmission and immunity, finds a study of healthy older adults published in JNeurosci. The identified genes and molecular pathways could provide insight into factors that help keep the brain sharp in old age.

1h

Migraine neurobiology linked to prevalence in females

Low doses of a peptide known for decades to be involved in migraine trigger pain responses in female but not male rodents, according to a new research published in JNeurosci. This finding may help explain why migraine is more common in women than men.

1h

Behavioral ecology: Personalities promote adaptability

Bold great tits lay their eggs earlier when under threat, the shy ones put it off. Such personality differences help maintain the biological variation essential for the survival of populations, as biologists have now shown.

1h

The UK’s online laws could be the future of the internet—and that’s got people worried

While they’re a welcome warning to big tech, some fear that if the implementation is botched they could easily lead to censorship.

1h

Geneticist Sydney Brenner, Who Made a Tiny Worm a Scientific Legend, Has Died

The Nobel-prizewinning biologist pioneered the use of C. elegans as an animal model — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

France begins debating digital tax, defying US ire

French lawmakers on Monday began debating a new tax on digital giants such as Facebook and Apple that has angered the United States, with Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire boasting that France was proud to be in the vanguard of such a move.

1h

Iron volcanoes may have erupted on metal asteroids

Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space. As if that's not strange enough, scientists now think that as the metal cooled and solidified, volcanoes spewing liquid iron could have erupted through a solid iron crust onto the surface of the asteroid.

1h

Tax incentives target poor neighborhoods but leave communities behind

Lawmakers often tout pro-gentrification tax incentives such as the new federal "opportunity zone" tax incentive—the tax break offered to developers in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017—as tools to promote capital investment in poor neighborhoods.

1h

Testing how well water disinfectants damage antibiotic resistance genes

Each year at least 2 million Americans are infected with bacteria that cannot be treated with antibiotics, and at least 23,000 of these people die, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

1h

Declassified U2 spy plane images reveal bygone Middle Eastern archaeological features

In the 1950s and early '60s, with the Cold War at its peak, the United States flew U2 spy planes across Europe, the Middle East, and central eastern Asia, taking images of interesting military targets. Though the missions typically connected Point A to Point B, say an air field and an important city, in many cases the camera kept recording between those spots, capturing thousands of photos of the

1h

The secret of volcanic flows’ deadly speed

The secret of volcanic flows’ deadly speed The secret of volcanic flows’ deadly speed, Published online: 08 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01145-2 Hot mixture of rock and ash slides on thin layer of air.

1h

Here’s what scientists think a black hole looks like

Astronomers may have imaged a black hole for the first time, capping decades of calculations of how they ought to appear

1h

Beyoncé's New Film 'Homecoming' Is Headed to Netflix

The movie launches April 17. In other news, AMC just ordered another 'Walking Dead' spinoff.

1h

Okänd interaktion kopplat till vissa cancersjukdomar

– Nu vet vi vilka mekanismer vi ska rikta strålkastaren mot i den fortsatta forskningen, säger Pierre Åman, professor i tumörbiologi på Sahlgrenska akademin vid Göteborgs universitet, och korresponderande författare bakom en publicering i tidskriften EMBO Reports. Sarkom omfattar ett hundratal olika cancersjukdomar som uppstår i skelettet eller kroppens mjukdelar, exempelvis fett, bindväv, muskle

1h

Woolly mammoths and Neanderthals may have shared genetic traits

A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the genetic profiles of two extinct mammals with African ancestry—woolly mammoths, elephant-like animals that evolved in the arctic peninsula of Eurasia around 600,000 years ago, and Neanderthals, highly skilled early humans who evolved in Europe around 400,000 years ago—shared molecular characteristics of adaptation to cold environments.

1h

Scientific computing in the cloud gets down to Earth

In a groundbreaking effort, seismology researchers have conducted a continent-scale survey for seismic signatures of industrial activity in the Amazon Web Services commercial cloud (AWS), then rapidly downloaded the results without storing raw data or needing a local supercomputer.

1h

NASA-NOAA satellite finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Wallace

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Wallace, off the coast of Western Australia.

1h

Hate incidents are notoriously underreported; now, there's an app for that

The Federal Bureau of Investigation is responsible for tracking hate crimes across the country, but the data are notoriously unreliable. Despite the FBI recording an all-time high in hate-motivated incidents in 2017 (the most recent year's statistics available) the number is likely much higher. Low reporting from victims to police and inconsistent reporting from police to federal authorities have

1h

Woolly mammoths and Neanderthals may have shared genetic traits

A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the genetic profiles of two extinct mammals with African ancestry—woolly mammoths, elephant-like animals that evolved in the arctic peninsula of Eurasia around 600,000 years ago, and Neanderthals, highly skilled early humans who evolved in Europe around 400,000 years ago—shared molecular characteristics of adaptation to cold environments.

1h

We Might See the First-Ever Photo of a Black Hole This Week

We can't see black holes, but a project called the Event Horizon Telescope might be on the verge of producing the first-ever photo of one. Researchers have teased a "groundbreaking result" this week. The post We Might See the First-Ever Photo of a Black Hole This Week appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Game of Thrones theme song recreated using old computer hardware

As you’ve likely heard by now, HBO’s hit medieval fantasy epic is entering its final season this weekend.

2h

Scientists reverse memory decline using electrical pulses

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

2h

Neurodevelopment of 2-month-old infants shows effect of maternal stress

A study of 70 mothers and their infants suggests that the impact of maternal stress on neurodevelopment is detectable by electroencephalography (EEG) at 2 months of age. The team of investigators, co-led by Pat Levitt, Ph.D., of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, and Charles A. Nelson, Ph.D., of Boston Children's Hospital, published their findings in JAMA Pediatrics on April 8, 2019.

2h

Testing how well water disinfectants damage antibiotic resistance genes

A UW team tested how well current water and wastewater disinfecting methods affect antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial DNA. While these methods work well to deter bacterial growth, they had varied success in either degrading or deactivating a representative antibiotic resistance gene.

2h

Iron volcanoes may have erupted on metal asteroids

Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space. As if that's not strange enough, scientists now think that as the metal cooled and solidified, volcanoes spewing liquid iron could have erupted through a solid iron crust onto the surface of the asteroid.

2h

Study reveals early molecular signs of high-risk pregnancy

Women who have healthy pregnancies tend to show distinct changes in the activities of immune genes starting early in pregnancy, while women who have complicated pregnancies tend to show clear departures from that pattern, according to a new study from a team led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and Hospital for Special Surgery.

2h

Tax incentives target poor neighborhoods but leave communities behind

The development of place-based investment tax incentives such as opportunity zones can be explained as a predictable result of the 'pro-gentrification legal, business and political environment that produced them,' said Michelle D. Layser, a professor of law at Illinois.

2h

NASA-NOAA satellite finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Wallace

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Wallace, off the coast of Western Australia.

2h

Declassified U2 spy plane images reveal bygone Middle Eastern archaeological features

By analyzing thousands of declassified images from Cold War-era U2 spy missions, Emily Hammer of the University of Pennsylvania and Jason Ur of Harvard University discovered archaeological features like prehistoric hunting traps, 3,000-year-old irrigation canals, and hidden 60-year-old marsh villages. They also created an online tool that allows other researchers to identify and access the photos

2h

Patient shielding provides negligible benefits while increasing risks

A new study published in the April 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) makes the case for why it is time to abandon the practice of patient shielding in radiology.

2h

Coal's Days in Navajo Country Are Numbered

The Navajo Nation’s shift away from coal and toward renewables is a test case for a wider U.S. transition — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Geneticist Sydney Brenner, Who Made a Tiny Worm a Scientific Legend, Has Died

The Nobel-prizewinning biologist pioneered the use of C. elegans as an animal model — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Michael Bennet Says Cancer Has Persuaded Him to Run for President

NASHUA, N.H.—Some people respond to being told that they have cancer with tears, or by scaling back plans. Michael Bennet responded to his prostate-cancer diagnosis, announced last week, by planning trips here to New Hampshire and to Iowa on Monday, redoubling his interest in a presidential campaign few observers right now say they see any path for. The Colorado senator told me that his own healt

2h

Mind: To Improve Memory, Tune It Like an Orchestra

A noninvasive technique shows promise in improving the working memory of older adults. But, the scientists note, “Do not try this at home!”

2h

Q&A: Orchids Bloom in Thousands of Forms. But Why?

Each species of orchid is designed to attract a specific pollinator. The genes that make that possible are highly adaptable, scientists say.

2h

Unlock Your Brain’s Full Potential with This Award-Winning Speed Reading Course

It probably comes as no surprise that people who possess high levels of reading efficiency tend to be more successful in both business and academics. After all, knowledge is power, and the ability to process and retain knowledge through speed reading is an invaluable skill. Unfortunately, for many people, improving reading efficiency is easier said than done. Luckily, there are methods you can us

2h

Meet the People Fighting Back Against Militarized Killer Robots

Kill The Bots After winning the Nobel Prize for getting anti-personnel landmines banned, activists Jody Williams and Mary Wareham are leading the charge against killer robots. The two women are pushing back against the common narrative that autonomous soldiers and killer drones are an inevitable product of technological progress, according to a new profile in The Guardian . “It’s men getting hard

2h

Off-the-shelf smart fabric helps athletic coaching and physical therapy

A welcome advancement to enhance performance and rehabilitation as baseball season heats up.

2h

Relationship benefits can be seen in your eyes

BYU psychology professor Wendy Birmingham's lab used an infrared camera that measured pupil width to track people's response to stressful events in real-time.

2h

Robots created with 3D printers could be caring for those in golden years

Purdue University researchers have developed a new design method to create soft robots that may help in caregiving for elderly family members.

2h

New study exonerates refined grains

A study published this week in Advances in Nutrition, a peer-reviewed medical journal from the American Society of Nutrition, boldly substantiates that refined grains have gotten a bad rap. Extensive analyses of the existing body of published studies show that refined grain consumption is not associated with any of the chronic diseases to which it usually is attributed. This study illustrates that

2h

Woolly mammoths and Neanderthals may have shared genetic traits

A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the genetic profiles of two extinct mammals with African ancestry — woolly mammoths and Neanderthals — shared molecular characteristics of adaptation to cold environments.

2h

Investment firm buys Gizmodo sites and The Onion

A private equity firm said Monday it was acquiring Gizmodo Media Group as well as the satirical news site The Onion for an undisclosed amount from New York-based Univision Communications.

2h

The Scientist Who Cooks Up the Skies of Faraway Worlds

In 2004, Sarah Hörst found herself at a crossroads. She was about to finish her bachelor’s degree at the California Institute of Technology and had decided to take a break from school. Not only did she feel burned out, she couldn’t decide whether she wanted to pursue a career studying Earth’s own climate or the mysteries surrounding distant planets. She knew that climate change was important, but

2h

70 percent off Sylvania lighting products and other dazzling deals happening today

Gadgets Bring on the discounts. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

2h

2h

Telemedicine tied to more antibiotics for kids, study finds

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

2h

Netanyahu Brought Nationalism to the 21st Century

JERUSALEM—From character assassinations against opponents to dog-whistle politics, from criticizing the media to undermining law and order, the nationalist-populist playbook was pioneered by one leader perhaps more so than any other. He has been feted by President Donald Trump. Brazil’s new right-wing leader, Jair Bolsonaro, paid him a visit in March. The Italian politician Matteo Salvini, the an

2h

An EEG to assess a baby's developmental risk?

Does exposure to stress early in life affect a baby's brain development, and is there a way to single out babies who might benefit from early intervention? A two-center study led by Boston Children's Hospital, published today in JAMA Pediatrics, used brain EEGs to begin to get at these questions in an objectively measurable way.

2h

Experts issue new recommendations for the diagnosis & treatment of maternal sepsis

Experts in high-risk pregnancies issue new recommendations related to the diagnosis and treatment of sepsis during pregnancy and the postpartum period.

2h

Text messages show promise as next step for improving heart health in China

Motivational text messages are a well-liked, feasible new way to provide additional support to Chinese patients with heart disease, reports a preliminary study by researchers at Yale and in China. However, the study did not prove that these targeted text messages led to an improvement in blood pressure control amongst the recipients, the intended outcome.

2h

This Dead Exoplanet Core Could Be a Preview of Earth’s Future

Astronomers have spotted a distant star system that could offer a preview of Earth's future. It's a white dwarf star with a destroyed planetary core spinning around it. The post This Dead Exoplanet Core Could Be a Preview of Earth’s Future appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

The Secret Sauce for Environmental Problem Solving

Its collaboration—but that only works when it’s voluntary, not imposed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Melting glaciers causing sea levels to rise at ever greater rates

Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise. Glaciers alone lost more than 9,000 billion tons of ice since 1961, raising water levels by 27 millimeters, an international research team has now found.

2h

Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives

The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. Two new studies reveal more about how this glue achieves its strong sticking power and flexibility, insights that could be used to create better medical adhesives.

2h

Antioxidants protect cells from harmful water contaminant

Antioxidants such as vitamin C could help reduce harmful effects from hexavalent chromium, according to a new study performed with human cells. The contaminant, which is often produced by industrial processes, was featured in the biographical movie Erin Brockovich.

2h

Did you solve it? 24 hour puzzle people

The solutions to today’s puzzles Earlier today I set you four Masyu puzzles from the 24 Hour Puzzle Championship. Click here for a printable sheet of the puzzles . The solutions are: Continue reading…

2h

Deadly “Super Fungus” Could Be the Beginning of a Global Epidemic

Antifungal Resistance Bacteria’s ability to develop antibiotic resistance is well known — but it turns out fungi are also evolving to withstand modern medicine. Now one such fungus is cropping up in hospitals all across the globe and killing half the people who contract it within 90 days, according to an alarming story by The New York Times — raising concerns about a new global epidemic. Global T

3h

OHIO study: Acetaminophen can reduce positive empathy for others

A new study by an Ohio University faculty member showed that acetaminophen limited positive empathy a person has for others while taking it.

3h

Disclosure law has improved nurse staffing in New Jersey, Rutgers study finds

A New Jersey law requiring hospitals and nursing homes to publicly report the number of patients per nurse has led to better staffing ratios, a Rutgers study finds.The study, which appears in the journal Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice, is the first to evaluate the effectiveness of the public reporting requirement. It found that since the law went into effect in 2008, the number of patients p

3h

Performance-enhancing drugs may increase risk of teen cocaine abuse, impair fertility

Performance-enhancing steroid use could increase the risk of cocaine use and addiction in teens, according to a new rodent study. The combination of these drugs could also impair fertility in young women.

3h

Dietary supplement boosts cognitive function in vegetarians

Vegetarians who take the dietary supplement creatine may enjoy improved brain function, according to a new study.

3h

New computer-aided model may help predict sepsis

Can a computer-aided model predict life-threatening sepsis? A model developed in the UK that uses routinely collected data to identify early symptoms of sepsis shows promise.

3h

The Secret Sauce for Environmental Problem Solving

Its collaboration—but that only works when it’s voluntary, not imposed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Electrical Stimulation Makes Old Brains Act Young Again

A short session of brain zapping can reverse some of the effects of aging in older adults, a new study suggests.

3h

Eating well is still a luxury for many people

Today, more are dying around the world from diet-related factors than from smoking

3h

3h

3h

3h

'Alien' Lights in Norway Were a NASA Test, Not an Extraterrestrial Visit

'Alien' lights in Norway were a NASA mission, not an extraterrestrial visit.

3h

Justin Trudeau Falls From Grace

The depressing squalor of the Trump era has created in liberal Americans a gnawing hunger for leaders to admire. Foreign leaders are especially likely to set liberal hearts aflutter, because they are farther away and their flaws less visible. Of all these alternative “leaders of the free world,” it is perhaps Canada’s Justin Trudeau who has enjoyed the most attention. He proclaims himself a femin

3h

When an older person’s brain waves are in sync, memory is boosted

A brain stimulation treatment that nudges older people’s brain waves into sync could lead to noninvasive therapies for dementia and other disorders.

3h

Nassim Taleb’s Case Against Nate Silver Is Bad Math – Facts So Romantic

Nassim Nicholas Taleb has overplayed his hand this time and is left looking, well, klueless. Photograph by Salzburg Global Seminar / Flickr Since the midterm elections, a feud has been raging on Twitter between Nate Silver, founder of FiveThirtyEight, and Nassim Nicholas Taleb, hedge-fund-manager-turned-mathematical-philosopher and author of The Black Swan . It began, late last year, with Silver

3h

New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA

Chemical engineers have synthesized a biologically-derived metal-organic framework on which the hydrogen bonding that forms the DNA double helix can be mimicked and studied like never before.

3h

Breakthrough in knowledge of how some sarcomas arise

The origin of certain cancers in the sarcoma group is associated with a hitherto unknown interaction among different proteins. Findings now being presented create the opportunity to test new treatments of these forms of sarcoma.

3h

Behavioral ecology: Personalities promote adaptability

Bold great tits lay their eggs earlier when under threat, the shy ones put it off. Such personality differences help maintain the biological variation essential for the survival of populations, as Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists have now shown.

3h

Mass. General study provides insight into use of critical care resources

A study by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found wide variation in the use of different hospital units — intensive care or general medical units — to deliver a type of advanced respiratory support called noninvasive ventilation.

3h

Exploiting metabolic differences to optimize SSRI dosing in adolescents

In a simulated study, exposure to and maximum blood concentrations of two selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) — commonly used to treat anxiety and depression in adolescents — differed depending on whether the teens modeled were poor, normal, rapid, or ultra-rapid metabolizers of the SSRIs.

3h

Expected Soon: First-Ever Photo of a Black Hole

Have astronomers finally recorded an image of a black hole? The world will know on Wednesday.

3h

The Diagnosis Is Alzheimer’s. But That’s Probably Not the Only Problem.

Most people with dementia have a number of brain abnormalities, not just Alzheimer’s disease. The finding is forcing scientists to rethink the search for treatments.

3h

The Fiery Physics of Volcano Flows

The Fiery Physics of Volcano Flows Researchers find that hot ash, lava, boulders and gas can rush from a volcano at high speeds on a cushion of air. VolcanicAsh.jpg Pyroclastic flow from the Soufriere Hills Volcano in Montserrat, January 2010 Image credits: Photovolcanica.com/ Shutterstock Earth Monday, April 8, 2019 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — Volcanos can sometimes

3h

New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA

Chemical engineers have synthesized a biologically-derived metal-organic framework on which the hydrogen bonding that forms the DNA double helix can be mimicked and studied like never before.

3h

Observing a molecule stretch and bend in real-time

An international study has observed the bending and stretching of a triatomic molecule with combined attosecond and picometer resolution.

3h

Sonos partners with Ikea for new Symfonisk-brand lamp and bookshelf speakers

Your new speakers from Ikea could have Sonos built-in.

3h

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions

It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for …

3h

Are Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez redefining socialism in the U.S.?

Socialism is shaping up to be 2020's hot-button issue. Recent polls show that Republicans and Democrats hold very different definitions of what socialism is and those definitions have changed dramatically over time. Politicians will naturally use the definition that speaks to their bases, but lacking an understanding of the opposing side's viewpoint will further partisan divide. None Socialism is

3h

The emergent landscape of the mouse gut endoderm at single-cell resolution

The emergent landscape of the mouse gut endoderm at single-cell resolution The emergent landscape of the mouse gut endoderm at single-cell resolution, Published online: 08 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1127-1 The emergent landscape of the mouse gut endoderm at single-cell resolution

3h

These molecules could trap viruses inside a cell

Viruses are often used as vehicles for delivery in gene therapy because they're engineered not to damage the cell once they get there, but neglecting to consider how the virus will exit the cell could have consequences.

3h

Scientists review influenza vaccine research progress and opportunities

In a new series of articles, experts in immunology, virology, epidemiology, and vaccine development detail efforts to improve seasonal influenza vaccines and ultimately develop a universal influenza vaccine. The 15 articles are part of a supplement in the April 15 issue of the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part o

3h

New pathways for sustainable agriculture

Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg.

3h

Decline in physical activity often starts as early as age 7

Overall physical activity starts to decline already around the age of school entry. While the proportion of physically inactive individuals rises with age there still are groups of people who manage to increase their physical activity level in adulthood and old age.

3h

Specific criteria needed for different types of myeloma

When our plasma cells start producing a single cancer-causing protein rather than an array of antibody-like proteins to protect us, it's one of two arms of the Y-shaped protein that's likely to blame.

3h

Advances in deep brain stimulation could lead to new treatments

A new paper published in Nature Reviews Neurology suggests that recent advances in deep brain stimulation (DBS) for Parkinson disease could lead to treatments for conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Gilles de la Tourette syndrome and depression. The authors of the paper argue that bi-directional electrodes which can both stimulate and record from deep brain structures — known

3h

Healthy diet helps older men maintain physical function

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examines the role of a healthy diet and finds that this highly modifiable factor can have a large influence on maintaining physical function, lowering the likelihood of developing physical impairment by approximately 25 percent.

3h

New technique cuts AI training time by more than 60 percent

Computer science researchers have developed a technique that reduces training time for deep learning networks by more than 60 percent without sacrificing accuracy, accelerating the development of new artificial intelligence (AI) applications.

3h

Resistosome illuminates plant disease resistance mechanisms

In a recent study, a team led by scientists at Tsinghua University (TU) and the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology (IGDB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) solved the first structures of a full-length plant NLR protein and uncovered previously unknown mechanisms of this important class of immune receptors.

3h

LDAIR, a lncRNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response

Biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology and the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) at Nagoya University have discovered that long non-coding RNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response in medaka fish. The results of this study were reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

3h

Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?

In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population. Wouldn't it be incredibly useful if we had a crystal ball to show us what are the best strategies available to increase crop yields? A team of scientists have just developed exactly that: a dynamic model that predicts which photosynthetic manipulations to plants will boost the yields of wheat

3h

High rate of sex before age 13 among boys from metropolitan areas

Using information from two national surveys, researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Guttmacher Institute have found that in some metropolitan areas, more than a quarter of young, African American men reported having sexual intercourse before age 13, and for about 45 percent of them, the sex was either unwanted or experienced with "mixed feelings."

3h

Quashing the resistance: MicroRNA regulates drug tolerance in subset of lung cancers

Relapse of disease following conventional treatments remains one of the central problems in cancer management, yet few therapeutic agents targeting drug resistance and tolerance exist. New research conducted at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that a microRNA mediates drug tolerance in lung cancers with a specific mutation. The findings, published today in Nature Met

3h

Pollen detectives work to predict asthma and hay fever

The presence of different strains of grass pollen in the atmosphere can help predict when hay fever and asthma could strike, a study involving a University of Queensland researcher has found.

3h

Renewables are a better investment than carbon capture for tackling climate change

Solar panels and wind turbines coupled with energy storage offer a better hope for tackling climate change than trying to capture carbon from fossil fuel power stations, according to new research published by Nature Energy. New research shows that resources that would be spent on developing and installing carbon capture technologies would be better invested in creating more solar panels and wind t

3h

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions

It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research led by the University of Texas at Austin links the lag to something different: evolution.

3h

International team decodes the durum wheat genome

An international consortium has sequenced the entire genome of durum wheat — the source of semolina for pasta, a food staple for the world's population,

3h

Estimates of emergency department visits for suicide attempts, thoughts among kids, teens

Many children with suicide attempts/suicidal thoughts present to emergency departments (EDs). An analysis of US ED data from 2007 to 2015 estimates annual visits almost doubled from 580,000 to 1.12 million for suicide attempts/suicidal thoughts by children ages 5 to 18 years. As a proportion of all pediatric encounters in EDs, suicide attempts/suicidal thoughts increased from 2.17 percent in 2007

3h

How common is sex for boys before age 13?

Researchers combined data from two US surveys to examine how common it is for boys to have sex before they turn 13. The study included data from nearly 20,000 male high school students and about 7,700 other males between the ages of 15 to 24. Overall, 7.6 percent of the male high school students and 3.6 percent of the other males reported having sexual intercourse before age 13.

3h

Difficulty in middle age performing activities of daily living associated with adverse outcomes

Vital to quality of life and health for older adults is the ability to perform activities of daily living: bathing, dressing, eating, using the toilet, transferring locations to get in bed or sit in a chair, and walking across a room. This study looked at whether difficulty in performing ADLs (called functional impairment) in middle age was associated with increased risk of hospitalization, admiss

3h

Identifying the grass pollen that gets up your nose

Scientists could be a step closer to providing more precise pollen forecasts to people who live with asthma or hay fever. This follows the first results of a major three-year project to analyze airborne grass pollen. For the first time, one season's grass pollens have been analyzed using high-tech metabarcoding. The team have now begun investigating links between certain pollen types and those day

3h

Revolutionary camera allows scientists to predict evolution of ancient stars

For the first time scientists have been able to prove a decades old theory on stars thanks to a revolutionary high-speed camera.

3h

Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers

A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense. Scientists have long suspected that this was connected to the slowdown of a key Atlantic Ocean current system that today once again is slowing. A new study of sediments from the Atlantic bottom directly links this slowdown with a massive b

3h

Global study shows exotic species are a complex threat

Researchers disentangle the effects of introduced species on the marine environment.

3h

Melting glaciers causing sea levels to rise at ever greater rates

Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise. Glaciers alone lost more than 9,000 billion tons of ice since 1961, raising water levels by 27 millimeters, an international research team under the lead of the University of Zurich have now found.

3h

Earth's recovery from mass extinction could take millions of years

Recovering from mass extinction has a 'speed limit,' say researchers, with gradual patterns of ecosystem redevelopment and speciation.

3h

Is it genetic code or postal code that influence a child's life chances?

Most children inherit both their postal code and their genetic code from their parents. But if genetic factors influence where families are able to live and children's health and educational success, improving neighborhoods may not be enough. Latest research at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of California at Irvine, provides new insights into the highly debated

3h

Breaking down Beowulf

Using a statistical approach known as stylometry, which analyzes everything from the poem's meter to the number of times different combinations of letters show up in the text, a team of researchers found new evidence that Beowulf is the work of a single author.

3h

Beer and fodder crop has been deteriorating for 6,000 years

The diversity of the crop sorghum, a cereal used to make alcoholic drinks, has been decreasing over time due to agricultural practice. To maintain the diversity of the crop and keep it growing farmers will need to revise how they manage it.

3h

Mount Sinai researchers develop treatment that turns tumors into cancer vaccine factories

Researchers at Mount Sinai have developed a novel approach to cancer immunotherapy, injecting immune stimulants directly into a tumor to teach the immune system to destroy it and other tumor cells throughout the body.

3h

Hundreds of cab drivers protest Uber in Warsaw

Hundreds of taxi drivers on Monday blocked downtown Warsaw in protest over a Polish draft law they see as favourable to ride-sharing app Uber as well as over US support for the American firm.

3h

New commentary on the famous 'Warning to Humanity' paper brings up global inequalities

By pointing out the western lifestyle is not "the norm and end goal of societal evolution", the research team of Dr. Mohsen Kayal (University of Perpignan, France) contributes to the debate on the urgency of achieving sustainability, as ignited by the largely publicised article "World Scientists' Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice" published in BioScience in 2017. Their Response paper in the ope

3h

Immune cells fighting blood cancer visualized for the first time

When cancer escapes the immune system, our defenses are rendered powerless and are unable to fight against the disease. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR T cells) represent a promising immunotherapy strategy, developed with the aim of tackling tumors head-on. But the occurrence of relapse in some patients remains a challenge. Scientists have now identified the precise function of CAR T cells

3h

Climate change impacts peatland CO2 gas exchange primarily via moisture conditions

A new study suggests that peatland CO2 exchange is more strongly influenced by drying than warming as such, and that soil moisture may be critical to determining whether fen ecosystems are able to adapt to a changing climate.

3h

A mysterious E. coli outbreak has infected 72 people and counting

Health The CDC is on the case, but it's a hard bacterium to trace. We’ve all just barely forgotten about the great American lettuce contamination of 2018, in which we were forced to forgo romaine over Thanksgiving, and now another E. …

3h

Beowulf the work of single author, research suggests

Debate over whether poem was written by multiple authors or one has raged for years Beowulf, the epic poem of derring-do and monsters, was composed by a single author, research suggests, pouring cold water on the idea it was stitched together from two poems. One of the most famous works in Old English, Beowulf tells of the eponymous hero who defeats the monster Grendel and his mother, thereby res

3h

'Hovercraft effect' may explain deadly speed of volcanic gas clouds

Superheated gases and rock fragments can reach speeds of up to 400mph by travelling on cushion of air, say scientists Crouched figures, a child with its mother, a dog writhing on its back – the harrowing plaster casts of the dead of Pompeii reveal that when the end came in AD79, it was as swift as it was final. Caught in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius, many died when buildings collapsed under hea

3h

Scientists reverse memory decline using electrical pulses

Working memory of older group temporarily improves to match younger group in study A decline in memory as a result of ageing can be temporarily reversed using a harmless form of electrical brain stimulation, scientists have found. The findings help explain why certain cognitive skills decline significantly with age and raise the prospect of new treatments. Continue reading…

3h

Hot rubble from volcanoes races over land on a carpet of air bubbles

Clouds of rocks and gas known as pyroclastic flows spew out of volcanoes and race over land at terrifying speeds, skating on an air pocket beneath the rubble

3h

AI could monitor farms from space to look for illegal pollution

AI can find farms from space. The technique is being used to monitor some farms in Europe and may eventually be able to flag those that break the law

3h

Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection

Roboticists have developed a robot named 'Romu' that can autonomously drive interlocking steel sheet piles into soil. The structures that it builds could function as retaining walls or check dams for erosion control, and, according to computer simulations, the robot could be deployed in swarms to help protect threatened areas that are flooded or extremely arid more effectively.

3h

Current methods may inadequately measure health impacts from oil, natural gas extraction

Measurements of hazardous air pollutant concentrations near oil and natural gas extraction sites have generally failed to capture levels above standard health benchmarks; yet, the majority of studies continue to find poor health outcomes increasing as distance from these operations decreases.

3h

First airline switching whole fleet to electric airplanes

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

3h

3h

Artificial intelligence: What the tech can do today

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

3h

3h

Why Self-Driving Cars DON'T Just CRASH

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

3h

Electrical stimulation gives memory boost to elderly

Targeted current helps older people perform as well in tests as those in their 20s

3h

New Standard Performance Ultra-Low Temperature Freezers Designed to Meet the Most Demanding Needs of Research and Clinical Laboratories

Thermo Scientific Standard Performance ULT freezers offer uncompromised performance for secure, sustainable and cost-efficient cold storage

3h

Deadly Volcanic Flows Glide on Their Own Cushion of Air

The discovery helps explain why pyroclastic flows can travel so far, so fast — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

In Chinese Schools, Brain-Reading Headbands Measure Student Focus

No Rest Chinese schools are taking extreme measures to make sure that students are paying attention. Over the past few months, several schools have made students wear a headband that measures the brain’s electrical activity to track whether students are focused at any given moment, The Next Web reports . It’s a jarring level of high tech discipline in the classroom — and one that seems like it’s

3h

New commentary on the famous 'Warning to Humanity' paper brings up global inequalities

By pointing out the western lifestyle is not 'the norm and end goal of societal evolution', a research team contributes to the debate on the urgency of achieving sustainability, as ignited by the largely publicised article 'World Scientists' Warning to Humanity: A Second Notice' (2017). Their Response paper in the open-access journal Rethinking Ecology cautions that not considering inequalities in

4h

Stillbirth threefold increase when sleeping on back in pregnancy

The findings of the new study, published on The Lancet's EClinicalMedicine, will now be incorporated by the NHS into the Saving Babies' Lives care advice information for pregnant women

4h

Negative pressure wound therapy: manufacturer data provided later allow benefit conclusion

Hint and indication of benefit for primary and secondary wound healing, respectively. But studies still concealed. Comments on preliminary report 'primary wound healing' possible until April 29, 2019.

4h

Amorphous materials will be used in medical and industrial applications

In this particular paper, Dr. Mokshin's group studied the influence of supercooling on the structure and morphology of the crystalline nuclei arising and growing within a liquid metallic film.

4h

Anti-inflammatory medicine can have a beneficial effect on depression

Research carried out by the national psychiatry project iPSYCH shows that arthritis medicine can have a beneficial effect on symptoms of depression.

4h

Zapping elderly brains with electricity improves short-term memory—for almost an hour

Study suggests out-of-sync brain waves help drive cognitive aging

4h

From spinal cord injury to recovery

Spinal cord injury disconnects communication between the brain and the spinal cord, disrupting control over part of the body. Studying the mechanisms of recovery, a researcher found that a specific type of neuronal feedback from sites below the injury plays a crucial role during early recovery and for maintaining regained motor functions.

4h

Discovery of a restriction factor for hepatitis B virus

Hepatitis B is a viral liver infection that can lead to acute or chronic conditions. Although there is a vaccine that offers protection against the virus, current treatments which prevent the virus from replicating are not curative for infected individuals. Scientists have demonstrated that a cellular protein is capable of acting as a restriction factor for the hepatitis B virus by degrading the v

4h

Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research

Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results. Projects to understand simple social behaviors like name recognition in cats may give clues to how we humans became social. Both humans and cats have evolved through the process of self-domestication, where the population rewards certain traits that then become increasingly common in

4h

High-capacity transmission over multi-core fiber link with 19-core optical amplifier

Scientists report a record SDM transmission experiment using multi-core fiber amplifier. Fully decoded optical data transmission of 715 Tb/s was achieved over a distance of 2,009 km in 19-core cladding pumped erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) amplified MCF link using coded polarization division multiplexed (PDM) –16 quadrature-amplitude modulation (QAM) of 345 carriers over the C and L band in

4h

Ikea and Sonos Symfonisk Range Includes a Speaker That’s a Lamp

This release marks the first set of products in a collaboration where scale meets sound.

4h

Global glacier mass changes and their contributions to sea-level rise from 1961 to 2016

Global glacier mass changes and their contributions to sea-level rise from 1961 to 2016 Global glacier mass changes and their contributions to sea-level rise from 1961 to 2016, Published online: 08 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1071-0 The largest collection so far of glaciological and geodetic observations suggests that glaciers contributed about 27 millimetres to sea-level rise from 1961 to

4h

How deadly, fast-moving flows of volcanic rock and gas cheat friction

Mixtures of hot volcanic rock and gas called pyroclastic flows travel so far by gliding on air, a new study suggests.

4h

Pollen detectives work to predict asthma and hay fever

The presence of different strains of grass pollen in the atmosphere can help predict when hay fever and asthma could strike, a study involving a University of Queensland researcher has found.

4h

Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?

In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population. Wouldn't it be incredibly useful if we had a crystal ball to show us what are the best strategies available to increase crop yields?

4h

International team decodes the durum wheat genome

An international consortium has sequenced the entire genome of durum wheat—the source of semolina for pasta, a food staple for the world's population, according to an article published today in Nature Genetics.

4h

Global study shows exotic species are a complex threat

When species are introduced by humans into marine habitats, they can disrupt their new environment, according to a study at KAUST, which also identified key species for conservation efforts to focus on.

4h

Beer and fodder crop has been deteriorating for 6,000 years

The diversity of the crop Sorghum, a cereal used to make alcoholic drinks, has been decreasing over time due to agricultural practice. To maintain the diversity of the crop and keep it growing farmers will need to revise how they manage it.

4h

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions

It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research led by The University of Texas at Austin links the lag to something different: evolution.

4h

Amazon may be gearing up to take on Apple's AirPods, report says

Amazon may be getting ready to spread its might yet again. The newest target: Apple's AirPods.

4h

Revolutionary camera allows scientists to predict evolution of ancient stars

For the first time scientists have been able to prove a decades old theory on stars thanks to a revolutionary high-speed camera.

4h

Pollen detectives work to predict asthma and hay fever

The presence of different strains of grass pollen in the atmosphere can help predict when hay fever and asthma could strike, a study involving a University of Queensland researcher has found.

4h

Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?

In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population. Wouldn't it be incredibly useful if we had a crystal ball to show us what are the best strategies available to increase crop yields?

4h

Is it genetic code or postal code that influence a child's life chances?

Most children inherit both their postal code and their genetic code from their parents. But if genetic factors influence where families are able to live and children's health and educational success, improving neighborhoods may not be enough. Latest research at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of California at Irvine, provides new insights into the highly debated

4h

Breaking down Beowulf: Statistical technique finds evidence that Old English poem had a single author

It's been a towering landmark in the world of English literature for more than two centuries, but Beowulf is still the subject of fierce academic debate, in part between those who claim the epic poem is the work of a single author and those who claim it was stitched together from multiple sources.

4h

Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers

A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense. Scientists have long suspected that this was connected to the slowdown of a key Atlantic Ocean current system that today once again is slowing. A new study of sediments from the Atlantic bottom directly links this slowdown with a massive b

4h

International team decodes the durum wheat genome

An international consortium has sequenced the entire genome of durum wheat—the source of semolina for pasta, a food staple for the world's population, according to an article published today in Nature Genetics.

4h

Melting glaciers causing sea levels to rise at ever greater rates

Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise. Glaciers alone have lost more than 9 trillion tons of ice since 1961, raising water levels by 27 millimeters, an international research team under the lead of the University of Zurich has now found.

4h

Global study shows exotic species are a complex threat

When species are introduced by humans into marine habitats, they can disrupt their new environment, according to a study at KAUST, which also identified key species for conservation efforts to focus on.

4h

Beer and fodder crop has been deteriorating for 6,000 years

The diversity of the crop Sorghum, a cereal used to make alcoholic drinks, has been decreasing over time due to agricultural practice. To maintain the diversity of the crop and keep it growing farmers will need to revise how they manage it.

4h

Evolution imposes 'speed limit' on recovery after mass extinctions

It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but research led by The University of Texas at Austin links the lag to something different: evolution.

4h

Så får du bättre minne med elektricitet

En mössa med elektroder utanpå huvudet kan ge äldre människor lika bra arbetsminne som folk i tjugoårsåldern. Strömmen stärker samarbetet mellan olika delar av hjärnan, enligt en ny studie.

4h

4h

Deadly Volcanic Flows Glide on Their Own Cushion of Air

The discovery helps explain why pyroclastic flows can travel so far, so fast — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4h

Check the map for your county’s traffic-asthma link

Childhood asthma cases in the US attributable to traffic-related air pollution dramatically decreased over a 10-year period, according to a new study. Researchers detail the findings in a first-of-its-kind, county-by-county interactive heat map and city-by-city table . “This is the first time a study has estimated the national childhood asthma incidents attributable to different ambient air pollu

4h

How to lead a conversation between people who disagree | Eve Pearlman

In a world deeply divided, how do we have hard conversations with nuance, curiosity, respect? Veteran reporter Eve Pearlman introduces "dialogue journalism": a project where journalists go to the heart of social and political divides to support discussions between people who disagree. See what happened when a group that would have never otherwise met — 25 liberals from California and 25 conservat

4h

Official stats mask shark and ray species caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas

A new study reveals that 97 per cent of the sharks and rays caught and brought to market domestically by fleets from the European, North African and Middle Eastern countries that surround the Mediterranean and Black seas are not reported by species.

4h

Insecurities may drive people to save more

When people feel that their own good impressions of themselves are at risk, they may try to increase their savings, according to new research.

4h

Could eating garlic reduce aging-related memory problems?

Consuming garlic helps counteract age-related changes in gut bacteria associated with memory problems, according to a new study conducted with mice. The benefit comes from allyl sulfide, a compound in garlic known for its health benefits.

4h

Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection

Roboticists have developed a robot named 'Romu' that can autonomously drive interlocking steel sheet piles into soil. The structures that it builds could function as retaining walls or check dams for erosion control, and, according to computer simulations, the robot could be deployed in swarms to help protect threatened areas that are flooded or extremely arid more effectively.

4h

Current methods may inadequately measure health impacts from oil, natural gas extraction

Measurements of hazardous air pollutant concentrations near oil and natural gas extraction sites have generally failed to capture levels above standard health benchmarks; yet, the majority of studies continue to find poor health outcomes increasing as distance from these operations decreases.

4h

Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy

Researchers have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. The model suggests that the origin of a broad range of empathetic responses lies in cognitive simulation.

4h

3D facial analysis could help identify children with rare conditions

Rare and genetic conditions can show up in children’s faces – a 3D face mapping tool could help diagnose them more quickly

4h

Coping is Not Created Equal: A Woman’s Military Experience

Human beings have always been resilient creatures. Whether we realize it or not, we possess the ability to adapt to various situations and survive them, often without even noticing how we managed it. Unfortunately, that does not always mean that the ways we adapt and what our coping mechanisms are can be healthy or particularly beneficial to us, whether in a short-term situation or in the long ru

4h

The U.S. Escalates Even Further Against Iran—To What End?

Updated at 2:35 p.m. ET. The Trump administration added another layer to its “maximum pressure” campaign against Iran when it declared the country’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps a “Foreign Terrorist Organization”—an escalation that exposes to U.S. criminal prosecution anyone supporting the most powerful security services of the Iranian government. “This unprecedented step, led by the Departm

4h

Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior

A machine learning model can reproduce the swarming behaviour of locusts — collaborative research project between the Universities of Konstanz and Innsbruck

4h

Psychiatry: Multigene test predicts depression risk

An international team led by Munich-based researchers has found a genetic score that reliably predicts the risk, severity and age of onset of depression in young people. The study also confirms a history of childhood abuse as a risk factor.

4h

What most attracts us to a tourist destination? Attractions, culture and gastronomy

Tourists' expectations when visiting a particular place are related to several features of the chosen destination: culture, architecture, gastronomy, infrastructure, landscape, events, shopping, etc. These features attract people to the destination and contribute to the overall experience of the trip. As a whole, they are crucial aspects of the destinations and have a profound influence on their s

4h

Gene editing for recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

A group of researchers from the Biomedical Research Networking Centre on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Research Center for Energy, Environmental and Technology (CIEMAT), and the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Fundación Jiménez Díaz (IIS-FJD) have led a study which demonstrates the viability of a gene editing strategy for recessive dystrophic epidermoly

4h

Banned pesticides in Europe's rivers

Tests of Europe's rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides—including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU.

4h

Herlev Hospital under pres: Betongulv mangler bæreevne

Et storstilet byggeprojekt på Herlev Hospital er økonomisk presset og bliver yderligere seks måneder forsinket efter en række byggefejl.

4h

Prøv at gentænke din kalender i praksis

Vi skal have flere praktiserende læger, jo – og så har jeg med de nuværende muligheder kunnet skabe mere luft i min hverdag ved at omorganisere min praksis. Jeg er gladere, end jeg har været længe.

4h

Tiden sårer alle læger, men læger den også alle sår?

Så længe dommer og anklager er samme enhed og der ingen ankemuligheder findes, kan tilliden ikke genoprettes.

4h

Med School Cadaver's Heart Was In the Right Place (But Her Other Organs Weren't)

This unusual condition went undetected during the woman's lifetime.

4h

Food additive may inhibit the flu vaccine

New research in mice links a common food preservative to an altered immune response that possibly hinders flu vaccines. Tert-butylhydroquinone, or tBHQ, is found in several food products including cooking oils, frozen meats (especially fish), and processed foods like chips and crackers. Products don’t always have to include the additive on ingredient lists. “If you get a vaccine, but part of the

4h

Editorial: Protect California's environmental legacy from Trump's onslaughts

California's native species and its precious water resources are in serious need of some Trump insurance.

4h

Mars One Candidates Aren't Giving Up On Going (HBO)

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

4h

Follow up to the commercialization of Vegan Shrimp derived from Algae,

tldr; in less than 3 years they are now a commercial product Floored by this lifehack posted today (not for the squeamish) on preparing shrimp – I was curious on how the vegan shrimp concept I read on this sub a few years ago is doing ( the article – the words shrimp loaf stuck in my brain) – holy crap, its already on the market (video created in Jan 2019) Really promising that they can soon

4h

4h

Why AI assistants can’t be robots (for now)

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

4h

Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection

Along developed riverbanks, physical barriers can help contain flooding and combat erosion. In arid regions, check dams can help retain soil after rainfall and restore damaged landscapes. In …

4h

Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives

The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. Two new studies reveal more about how this glue achieves its strong sticking power and flexibility, …

4h

EU unveils ethics guidelines for artificial intelligence

The European Union presented ethics guidelines Monday as it seeks to promote its own artificial intelligence sector, which has fallen behind developments in China and the United States.

4h

Hands On With Adobe’s New Content-Aware Tools for Video, Other NAB Updates

Adobe has released its annual volley of new audio and video editing features in time for NAB. We take a close look at the most interesting additions. The post Hands On With Adobe’s New Content-Aware Tools for Video, Other NAB Updates appeared first on ExtremeTech .

4h

Beer seems better if we think a guy made it

Gender stereotyping significantly affects the way we evaluate products, according to new research. A new study finds that in traditionally male-oriented markets—beers, power tools, or automobile parts, for instance—goods women make can stack up pretty negatively. Imagine you’re reading the label of a craft beer. Among the notes you see the name of the brewer: Jane. Does knowing a woman made this

4h

New findings on the effect of Epsom salt — Epsom salt receptor identified

A team of scientists headed by Maik Behrens from the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has identified the receptor responsible for the bitter taste of various salts. These include medically used Epsom salt. The discovery helps to elucidate the physiological mechanisms by which Epsom salt affects the heart or gut.The team has now published the findings

4h

Banned pesticides in Europe's rivers

Tests of Europe's rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides — including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU.

4h

Scientists compared ways of drug delivery to malignant tumors

A team of biologists from Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University and Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod) analyzed available methods of targeted drug delivery to malignant tumors. Individual approaches to cancer therapy limit the influence of drugs on healthy tissues and reduce side effects. The results of the study were published in the Cancers journal. The research was supported by a

4h

Body donor's rare anatomy offers valuable lessons

Rose Marie Bentley apparently lived 99 years without knowing she had a rare condition called situs inversus with levocardia, meaning her liver, stomach and other abdominal organs were transposed right to left, but her heart remained on the left side of her chest. Oregon Health & Science University faculty will present a scientific poster on Bentley's unusual anatomy at the 2019 American Associatio

4h

Do we really own our digital possessions?

Microsoft has announced that it will close the books category of its digital store. While other software and apps will still be available via the virtual shop front, and on purchasers' consoles and devices, the closure of the eBook store takes with it customers' eBook libraries. Any digital books bought through the service – even those bought many years ago – will no longer be readable after July

4h

Image: Mars dust devil detail

Mars may have a reputation for being a desolate world, but it is certainly not dead: its albeit thin atmosphere is still capable of whipping up a storm and, as this image reveals, send hundreds – maybe even thousands – of 'dust devils' scurrying across the surface.

4h

'Swallowing sperm' linked to lower risk of recurring miscarriage, researchers say

A new study finds a relationship between how often women gave their partners oral sex and the number of miscarriages they'd endured. While it demonstrates correlation, the study does not prove causation. The study will undoubtably be the catalyst for further studies into this area. A new study , published in J ournal of Reproductive Immunology on March 27, suggests that woman who more frequently

4h

Official stats mask shark and ray species caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas

Shark and ray species commonly caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas are not being reported in official statistics, new research from the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia shows.

4h

Pinterest sets IPO to raise up to $1.5 billion

Pinterest said Monday it would raise up to $1.5 billion in its stock offering, setting a price range that trims the value of the online visual discovery startup.

4h

Official stats mask shark and ray species caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas

Shark and ray species commonly caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas are not being reported in official statistics, new research from the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia shows.

4h

Adding iron to oceans could increase carbon storage

Massive geoengineering projects could prompt useful plankton blooms. Nick Carne reports.

4h

Sorry, but the Heat Death of the universe is actually the nice option

Dark energy will determine the end of the cosmos, and it won’t it be pleasant, explains astrophysicist Kate Mack.

4h

US youth suicide attempts double in nine years

Emergency department numbers reveal a huge jump in suicide-related visits, especially by children under the age of 11. Andrew Masterson reports.

4h

Big increase in assaults against elderly Americans

Men over 60 are “particularly vulnerable” to violence, researchers find. Andrew Masterson reports.

4h

5 Big Breakthroughs to Anticipate in 3D Printing

Convergence is accelerating disruption. Exponential technologies are colliding into each other, reinventing products, services, and industries. Over the course of my next five blogs, I’m going to summarize key insights from my annual CEO Summit called Abundance360 that takes place every January in Beverly Hills. We’ll look at 3D printing, AI, energy and transportation, VR/AR, and blockchain. Toda

5h

New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA

The field of materials science has become abuzz with "metal-organic frameworks" (MOFs), versatile compounds made up of metal ions connected to organic ligands, thus forming one-, two-, or three-dimensional structures. There is now an ever-growing list of applications for MOF, including separating petrochemicals, detoxing water from heavy metals and fluoride anions, and getting hydrogen or even gol

5h

Coding Is for Everyone—as Long as You Speak English

Code depends on English—for reasons that are entirely unnecessary at a technical level.

5h

Antioxidants protect cells from harmful water contaminant

Antioxidants such as vitamin C could help reduce harmful effects from hexavalent chromium, according to a new study performed with human cells. The contaminant, which is often produced by industrial processes, was featured in the biographical movie Erin Brockovich.

5h

Antioxidants protect cells from harmful water contaminant

Antioxidants such as vitamin C could help reduce harmful effects from hexavalent chromium, according to a new study performed with human cells. The contaminant, which is often produced by industrial processes, was featured in the biographical movie Erin Brockovich.

5h

Air pollution causes chronic health problems – will London's new charge on drivers help?

A new ultra-low emission zone (ULEZ) is being introduced in London, to reduce harmful emissions from traffic and improve air quality. Those who drive polluting vehicles into the city centre will face a daily charge – £12.50 for cars, motorcycles and vans, and £100 for lorries, buses and coaches – on top of the existing congestion charge. By October 2021, the scheme will expand to cover an area 18

5h

Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives

The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. Two new studies reveal more about how this glue achieves its strong sticking power and flexibility, insights that could be used to create better medical adhesives.

5h

Come Fly With Me: Civilian Accidentally Fired From Fighter Ejection Seat

One lucky passenger's dream turned into a nightmare several weeks ago at a French air base. The post Come Fly With Me: Civilian Accidentally Fired From Fighter Ejection Seat appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

BMW, VW, Daimler Accused of Colluding to Block Emissions Controls

The EU has sent a letter to BMW, Daimler, and VW, warning them of a collusion investigation. The three companies are accused of deliberately slowing improved environmental technology and its introduction into market. The post BMW, VW, Daimler Accused of Colluding to Block Emissions Controls appeared first on ExtremeTech .

5h

Observing a molecule stretch and bend in real-time

An international study, led by ICFO, has observed the bending and stretching of a triatomic molecule with combined attosecond and picometre resolution.

5h

Climate change impacts peatland CO2 gas exchange primarily via moisture conditions

A new study led by researchers from the University of Eastern Finland and Natural Resources Institute Finland suggests that peatland CO2 exchange is more strongly influenced by drying than warming as such, and that soil moisture may be critical to determining whether fen ecosystems are able to adapt to a changing climate. The study was recently published in Global Change Biology.

5h

High-capacity transmission over multi-core fiber link with 19-core optical amplifier

The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology and Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd. report a record SDM transmission experiment using multi-core fiber amplifier. Fully decoded optical data transmission of 715 Tb/s was achieved over a distance of 2,009 km in 19-core cladding pumped erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) amplified MCF link using coded polarization division multiplexed (

5h

Discovery of a restriction factor for hepatitis B virus

Hepatitis B is a viral liver infection that can lead to acute or chronic conditions. Although there is a vaccine that offers protection against the virus, current treatments which prevent the virus from replicating are not curative for infected individuals. Scientists at the Institut Pasteur working in collaboration with the CNRS have demonstrated that a cellular protein is capable of acting as a

5h

Vaccine report calls for innovative transformation strategies to increase influenza immunization rates in underserved communities

Sustainable Healthy Communities announced the publication of a summary report in Vaccine, the leading peer-reviewed journal focused on immunization science, urging health systems, providers and community stakeholders to implement evidence-based strategies to address racial disparities in influenza immunization.

5h

From spinal cord injury to recovery

Spinal cord injury disconnects communication between the brain and the spinal cord, disrupting control over part of the body. Studying the mechanisms of recovery, Leuven researcher Aya Takeoka (NERF) found that a specific type of neuronal feedback from sites below the injury plays a crucial role during early recovery and for maintaining regained motor functions.

5h

Immune cells fighting blood cancer visualized for the first time

When cancer escapes the immune system, our defenses are rendered powerless and are unable to fight against the disease. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CAR T cells) represent a promising immunotherapy strategy, developed with the aim of tackling tumors head-on. But the occurrence of relapse in some patients remains a challenge. Scientists at the Institut Pasteur have identified the precise func

5h

Identifying a key player in gut defense development

Scientists have identified a protein critical to the immune system development and antibody production in mice, which could contribute to understanding the gut defense mechanism in infants.

5h

Hello, kitty: Cats recognize their own names, according to new Japanese research

Pet cats can recognize their own names if their names are used regularly by their owners, according to new results by a team of researchers in Japan. Projects to understand simple social behaviors like name recognition in cats may give clues to how we humans became social. Both humans and cats have evolved through the process of self-domestication, where the population rewards certain traits that

5h

Global atlas of kidney health release on April 12 at World Congress of Nephrology

A global study of the burden of kidney disease will be released at the World Congress of Nephrology on Friday, April 12. It will reveal the the impact social, economic and political factors have on access to treatment. More than 2 million people die every year worldwide because of little or no access to dialysis or kidney transplantation.

5h

New technique cuts AI training time by more than 60 percent

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique that reduces training time for deep learning networks by more than 60 percent without sacrificing accuracy, accelerating …

5h

A deep-diving sea snake

Surface-dwelling serpent found in the vasty depths.

5h

This is the first computer-generated genome

Scientists report the world’s first fully computer-generated genome of a living organism. To do so, they used a new method that greatly simplifies the production of large DNA molecules containing many hundreds of genes. They report their work in PNAS . All the genome sequences of organisms known throughout the world are stored in a database belonging to the National Center for Biotechnology Infor

5h

In Bubbles, She Sees a Mathematical Universe

For Karen Uhlenbeck, winner of the Abel Prize for math, a whimsical phenomenon offers a window onto higher dimensions.

5h

Cancer drug shortages result in almost no treatment changes

For the vast majority of cancer drugs experiencing shortages over a seven-year period, a new research study found no statistically significant effect of shortages on chemotherapy treatment.

5h

5h

5h

5h

Volkswagen Begins Level 4 Autonomous Driving Testing In Hamburg

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

5h

An analysis of nearly 4 million pitches shows just how many mistakes umpires make

Baseball is back, and fans can anticipate another season of amazing catches, overpowering pitching, tape-measure home runs – and, yes, controversial calls that lead to blow-ups between umpires and players.

5h

New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA

Chemical engineers at EPFL have synthesized a biologically-derived metal-organic framework on which the hydrogen bonding that forms the DNA double helix can be mimicked and studied like never before.

5h

Satellites used to protect endangered sharks

Earth observation satellites are proving to be valuable tools in protecting rare sharks, say scientists.

5h

Where will Earth's continents go next?

Science I study the motion of the ocean through rocks. Geologist Ross Mitchell is using Earth's history, as it's recorded in rocks, to predict where the continental plates might be going next.

5h

Techathlon podcast: Google's app graveyard, surprising email stats, and the week’s biggest tech news

Technology Play along with our technology game show. Play along with our podcast and learn about the latest technology news.

5h

The replication crisis is good for science

Science is in the midst of a crisis: A surprising fraction of published studies fail to replicate when the procedures are repeated.

5h

Research team expands quantum network with successful long-distance entanglement experiment

Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, Stony Brook University, and DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) are collaborating on an experiment that puts U.S. quantum networking research on the international map. Researchers have built a quantum network testbed that connects several buildings on the Brookhaven Lab campus using unique portable quantum entangleme

5h

When the extreme becomes the norm for Arctic animals

Think of reindeer on Norway's Svalbard archipelago as the arctic equivalent of sloths. It's not a perfect analogy, except that like tropical sloths, Svalbard reindeer move as little as possible to conserve energy.

5h

New biologically derived metal-organic framework mimics DNA

The field of materials science has become abuzz with "metal-organic frameworks" (MOFs), versatile compounds made up of metal ions connected to organic ligands, thus forming one-, two-, or three-dimensional structures. There is now an ever-growing list of applications for MOF, including separating petrochemicals, detoxing water from heavy metals and fluoride anions, and getting hydrogen or even gol

5h

Video: Staying fit in space

Managing the health of astronauts orbiting Earth at 28 000 km/h is a challenge, but how will we equip astronauts to stay healthy and deal with any medical emergencies during missions to the Moon or Mars?

5h

When the extreme becomes the norm for Arctic animals

Think of reindeer on Norway's Svalbard archipelago as the arctic equivalent of sloths. It's not a perfect analogy, except that like tropical sloths, Svalbard reindeer move as little as possible to conserve energy.

5h

Comparing Compound Collections

A common question – well, it should be a common question, anyway – is “How do I make sure that this compound collection is a useful one to screen?” There are alternative forms that come down to the same issues – if you’re putting together a new focused screening set, what should be in it? What’s the minimum set you need to cover mechanism-of-action space with validated small-molecule probes? Is s

5h

Læger: Ventetidsgarantier giver ikke nogen mening

Udrednings- og behandlingsretten på 30 dage spænder ben for den lægefaglige ledelse, viser en ny rundspørge. Men garantien er en succes, og den piller vi ikke ved, understreger sundhedsminister.

5h

Modeling biomimetic collagen-ligand interactions to understand intrafibrillar mineralization

Living organisms form biological minerals during biomineralization, where inorganic elements can selectively deposit on specific organic macromolecules under precise control. The process can be divided into biocalcification or biosilicification based on the inorganic component, with collagen used as a universal template. During intrafibrillar mineralization, collagen matrices that are destined for

5h

5h

Modeling biomimetic collagen-ligand interactions to understand intrafibrillar mineralization

Living organisms form biological minerals during biomineralization, where inorganic elements can selectively deposit on specific organic macromolecules under precise control. The process can be divided into biocalcification or biosilicification based on the inorganic component, with collagen used as a universal template. During intrafibrillar mineralization, collagen matrices that are destined for

5h

Toxic neighborhoods and social mobility

How much does growing up in a healthy and cohesive community, or lack thereof, contribute to later long-term economic and social success in adulthood? Quite a lot, it would seem. Two Harvard sociologists, Robert Manduca and Robert J. Sampson, sought to better understand the relationships at play among environment, community, poverty, race, violence and social mobility in their paper, "Punishing an

5h

Britain takes aim at social media bosses in world first

Britain will make social media bosses personally liable for harmful content and shut down offending platforms under a government action plan published Monday—the first of its kind anywhere.

5h

Nepal expedition to remeasure height of Everest: Officials

Nepal is sending a team of government-appointed climbers up Mount Everest to remeasure its height, officials said Monday, hoping to quash persistent speculation that the world's tallest mountain has shrunk.

5h

Study of multiple sclerosis patients shows 18 percent misdiagnosed

A recent study found that nearly 18 percent of patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis before being referred to two major Los Angeles medical centers for treatment actually had been misdiagnosed with the autoimmune disease. The investigators found that many patients who came to the medical centers with a previous diagnosis of MS did not fulfill the criteria for that diagnosis, and spent an aver

5h

Cancer drug shortages result in almost no treatment changes, USC study finds

For the vast majority of cancer drugs experiencing shortages over a seven-year period, a new USC research study found no statistically significant effect of shortages on chemotherapy treatment.

5h

Current methods may inadequately measure health impacts from oil, natural gas extraction

Measurements of hazardous air pollutant concentrations near oil and natural gas extraction sites have generally failed to capture levels above standard health benchmarks; yet, the majority of studies continue to find poor health outcomes increasing as distance from these operations decreases.

5h

Laying the ground for robotic strategies in environmental protection

Roboticists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering has developed a robot named 'Romu' that can autonomously drive interlocking steel sheet piles into soil. The structures that it builds could function as retaining walls or check dams for erosion control, and, according to computer simulations, the robot could be deployed in swarms to help protect threatened areas that ar

5h

Official stats mask shark and ray species caught in the Mediterranean and Black seas

A new study reveals that 97 per cent of the sharks and rays caught and brought to market domestically by fleets from the European, North African and Middle Eastern countries that surround the Mediterranean and Black seas are not reported by species.

5h

Researchers identify early indicators of pregnancy complications in lupus patients

A study of pregnant women with systemic lupus erythematosus has identified early changes in the RNA molecules present in the blood that could be used to determine the likelihood of them developing preeclampsia. The study, which will be published April 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, may also help researchers develop treatments to prevent other pregnancy complications associated with lup

5h

Insecurities may drive people to save more

When people feel that their own good impressions of themselves are at risk, they may try to increase their savings, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

5h

Antioxidants protect cells from harmful water contaminant

Antioxidants such as vitamin C could help reduce harmful effects from hexavalent chromium, according to a new study performed with human cells. The contaminant, which is often produced by industrial processes, was featured in the biographical movie Erin Brockovich.

5h

Slug glue reveals clues for making better medical adhesives

The Dusky Arion slug produces a defensive glue that fouls the mouthparts of any would-be predator. Two new studies reveal more about how this glue achieves its strong sticking power and flexibility, insights that could be used to create better medical adhesives.

5h

Could eating garlic reduce aging-related memory problems?

Consuming garlic helps counteract age-related changes in gut bacteria associated with memory problems, according to a new study conducted with mice. The benefit comes from allyl sulfide, a compound in garlic known for its health benefits.

5h

Dietary supplement boosts cognitive function in vegetarians

Vegetarians who take the dietary supplement creatine may enjoy improved brain function, according to a new study. The research will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.

5h

Performance-enhancing drugs may increase risk of teen cocaine abuse, impair fertility

Performance-enhancing steroid use could increase the risk of cocaine use and addiction in teens, according to a new rodent study. The combination of these drugs could also impair fertility in young women. The research will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla.

5h

The Death of an Adjunct

A bald eagle in flight is elegance to behold. The sudden, violent flaps of its wings are broken by sublime extension as it locks onto a breeze and glides. Occasionally, 10 blocks north of the George Washington Bridge in Manhattan, you can spot a bald eagle overhead in Fort Tryon Park. There, Thea Hunter could often be counted among the bird’s admirers—typically while walking her dog, Cooper, a bl

5h

New Standard Performance Ultra-Low Temperature Freezers Designed to Meet the Most Demanding Needs of Research and Clinical Laboratories

Thermo Scientific Standard Performance ULT freezers offer uncompromised performance for secure, sustainable and cost-efficient cold storage

5h

More dolphins die in Aegean Sea, group suspects navy drills

A Greek marine conservation group says a "very unusual" increase in Aegean Sea dolphin deaths in recent weeks may be linked to Turkish naval exercises in the area.

5h

Spacewalking astronauts tackle battery, cable work

Spacewalking astronauts are tackling battery and cable work outside the International Space Station.

5h

More dolphins die in Aegean Sea, group suspects navy drills

A Greek marine conservation group says a "very unusual" increase in Aegean Sea dolphin deaths in recent weeks may be linked to Turkish naval exercises in the area.

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

5h

Poisons flow in toxic levels through the veins of great white sharks, new study shows

Great white sharks—one of the ocean's most fearsome apex predators—thrive with toxic levels of poisons flowing in their veins, according to a new study by OCEARCH.

5h

Poisons flow in toxic levels through the veins of great white sharks, new study shows

Great white sharks—one of the ocean's most fearsome apex predators—thrive with toxic levels of poisons flowing in their veins, according to a new study by OCEARCH.

5h

Climate change impacts peatland carbon dioxide gas exchange primarily via moisture conditions

Northern peatlands store approximately one third of global soil carbon, namely around 500 gigatons. Because the peatland carbon cycling is largely controlled by partly anaerobic soil conditions, the carbon stored in these soils is extremely vulnerable to climate warming that is expected to reduce soil moisture and therefore increase soil aeration. Understanding the interactions between warming and

5h

New study explains why drinking alcohol causes the munchies

New research in mice suggests that a shared circuit in the brain could be one reason why heavy drinking and high-fat 'junk food' cravings go hand in hand.

6h

Too many airplane systems rely on too few sensors

The apparent connection between fatal airplane crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia centers around the failure of a single sensor. I know what that's like: A few years ago, while I was flying a Cessna 182-RG from Albany, New York, to Fort Meade, Maryland, my airspeed indicator showed that I was flying at a speed so slow that my plane was at risk of no longer generating enough lift to stay in the air.

6h

Renewable technology prices and decarbonization

The great advantage of fossil fuels over renewable energy is that the sun doesn't always shine and the wind doesn't always blow and these "intermittent" sources of energy may not be reliable enough to power our economy. This missing link is energy storage and the good news is that the price of batteries is coming down. So too are the prices of solar and wind power. According to a report by Bloombe

6h

A new view on a very old problem: Evolution of the photochemical reaction centers

Growing evidence suggests that the unique molecular engines that drive photosynthesis arose only once during Earth's history. All the diverse reaction centers—packets of proteins and pigments—in plants, algae, and certain bacteria appear to have evolved from a single ancestral structure. Researchers compared the most recently available structures. They developed new hypotheses that explain reactio

6h

Researchers develop high-resolution, high-sensitivity proximity capacitance imaging sensor

A fingerprint can serve as identification to access locked doors and more, but current scanners can be duped with fake or even similar fingerprints. That may change soon, thanks to a collaborative research team based in Japan.

6h

Another scandal: Facebook user data reportedly at risk again

In what seems like a broken record, Facebook is facing another scandal related to the transparency of its user data.

6h

Personalities promote adaptability

Bold great tits lay their eggs earlier when under threat, the shy ones put it off. Such personality differences help maintain the biological variation essential for the survival of populations, as LMU biologists have now shown.

6h

A new view on a very old problem: Evolution of the photochemical reaction centers

Growing evidence suggests that the unique molecular engines that drive photosynthesis arose only once during Earth's history. All the diverse reaction centers—packets of proteins and pigments—in plants, algae, and certain bacteria appear to have evolved from a single ancestral structure. Researchers compared the most recently available structures. They developed new hypotheses that explain reactio

6h

Personalities promote adaptability

Bold great tits lay their eggs earlier when under threat, the shy ones put it off. Such personality differences help maintain the biological variation essential for the survival of populations, as LMU biologists have now shown.

6h

New Zealand official calls Facebook 'morally bankrupt'

New Zealand's official privacy watchdog on Monday described Facebook as "morally bankrupt" and suggested his country follow neighboring Australia's lead by making laws that could jail executives …

6h

Cleaner, safer rocket fuel could still have plenty of power

It may be possible to create rocket fuel that is cleaner and safer than fuels commonly used today—but still just as effective, according to a new study. The new fuels use simple chemical “triggers” to unlock the energy of one of the hottest new materials, a class of porous solids known as metal-organic frameworks, or MOFs, made up of clusters of metal ions and an organic molecule called a linker.

6h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


CAPTCHA Image
Reload Image