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nyheder2019april09

Autism symptoms reduced nearly 50% two years after fecal transplant

In a new study, 'Long-term benefit of Microbiota Transfer Therapy in Autism Symptoms and Gut Microbiota,' published in Scientific Reports, Arizona State University researchers Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown, Ph.D., James Adams, Ph.D, and lead author Dae-Wook Kang, Ph.D, demonstrate long-term beneficial effects for children diagnosed with ASD through a revolutionary technique known as Microbiota Transfer Th

7h

Humane Society Successfully Campaigns to End Pesticide Test on Dogs

After the release of an undercover investigation, Corteva Agrisciences announces it will release 36 beagles for rehoming.

8h

Alarmerende ny opgørelse: Pesticider i fire ud af ti vandboringer

I 41,1 procent af de danske drikkevandsboringer er der påvist pesticider eller nedbrydningsprodukter, viser ny opgørelse fra Geus. Det er langt flere end i tidligere målinger, og stigningen skyldes, at vandværkerne undersøger for flere stoffer.

17h

Virtual reality offers benefits for Parkinson's disease patients

Researchers are reporting early success with a new tool to help people with Parkinson's disease improve their balance and potentially decrease falls with high-tech help: virtual reality. After practicing with a virtual reality system for six weeks, people with Parkinson's disease demonstrated improved obstacle negotiation and balance along with more confidence navigating around obstacles in their

3min

Tweeting their own horn: Author self-promotion on Twitter increases research dissemination

Researchers have presented a new study that aimed to determine the effect of authors' self-promotion on the social media site, Twitter, in regards to the dissemination of their research.

3min

Shrinking the carbon footprint of a chemical in everyday objects

Chemical engineers have devised an alternative approach to synthesizing epoxides, a type of chemical that is found in many products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals and textiles. Their approach could reduce the greenhouse gas emissions produced by current manufacturing techniques.

3min

Single-cell sequencing reveals landscape of immune cell subtypes in lung cancer tumors

Single-cell sequencing reveals 25 subpopulations of myeloid cells, a poorly understood family of immune cells, in lung cancer tumors. Many subpopulations are similar across humans and mice, supporting the use of mouse models in immunotherapy research. Findings set stage to assess myeloid cells as targets for new or improved immunotherapies.

3min

Measurement of semiconductor material quality is now 100,000 times more sensitive

Engineers have developed a tool to provide quantitative feedback on material quality, with particular applications in optoelectronic devices.

3min

New to college? Spend some time alone

Seeking solitude — for the right reasons — can be good for first-year college students, research suggests.

3min

Progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine

A research team has determined how several antibodies induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers, block infection of cells grown in the laboratory. They then used this information to develop novel vaccine candidates that, in animals, elicited potent anti-EBV antibody responses that blocked infection of cell types i

3min

A new way of finding compounds that prevent aging

Researchers have developed a new method for identifying compounds that prevent aging. The method is based on a new way of determining age in cultured human cells. Using the method, the researchers found a group of substances that they predict to rejuvenate human cells, and that extend the lifespan and improve the health of the model organism C. elegans.

3min

Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology

A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. Researchers came together to examine better ways of detecting the great apes in the Bornean forest canopy, by using drones fitted with thermal-imaging cameras.

3min

Explosive Research: Some Asteroids May Have Had Volcanoes

Space Volcanoes Metallic asteroids — giant balls of iron sailing through the cosmos — may have once harbored epic space volcanoes, new research suggests. As these asteroids solidified from molten iron, liquid trapped at the core may have erupted outward, according to a study published Monday in the journal Geophysical Research Letters . The research is pretty metal, yes — but it also shines new l

13min

New model accurately predicts harmful space weather

A new, first-of-its-kind space weather model reliably predicts space storms of high-energy particles that are harmful to many satellites and spacecraft orbiting in the Earth's outer radiation belt. A paper recently published in the journal Space Weather details how the model can accurately give a one-day warning prior to a space storm of ultra-high-speed electrons, often referred to as "killer" el

18min

Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants

Whether we know it or not, enzymes play a role in a range of everyday products, from orange juice to denim jeans. Using his innovative plant-based platform and a new startup company, researchers are transforming how these enzymes are made, resulting in cheaper and more environmentally friendly products.

22min

In Congressional Hearing on Hate, the Haters Got Their Way

YouTube even had to disable comments on the House Judiciary Committee’s livestream of the hearing because it filled up with so much filth.

23min

Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants

Whether we know it or not, enzymes play a role in a range of everyday products, from orange juice to denim jeans. Using his innovative plant-based platform and a new startup company, researchers are transforming how these enzymes are made, resulting in cheaper and more environmentally friendly products.

25min

Proton therapy shows efficacy, low toxicity in large cohort of children with high-risk neuroblastoma

Researchers analyzed the largest cohort to date of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT), finding both that proton therapy was effective at reducing tumors and demonstrated minimal toxicity to surrounding organs.

25min

All things could be part of the Internet of Things with new RFID system

Frying pans, pill bottles, yoga mats, coffee cups and countless other nonelectronic objects could be turned into a network of Internet of Things sensors with a new RFID-based technology.

25min

Ovarian cancer patients undertested for mutations that could guide clinical care

Fewer than a quarter of breast cancer patients and a third of ovarian cancer patients diagnosed between 2013 and 2014 in two states underwent genetic testing for cancer-associated mutations, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and several other organizations.

26min

Here’s How Streaming Music Is Killing the Planet

Against the Stream The transition to streaming has made listening to recorded music more affordable than ever before. But it’s also killing that planet, according to a study published by researchers from the University of Glasgow and the University of Oslo on Monday — dwarfing the environmental toll of the golden age of physical media. Apples to Apples To make sure they were comparing apples to a

28min

It Took 10 Million Years for Biodiversity to Recover From Dino-killing Impact

Some 66 million years ago, a city-sized asteroid struck off the coast of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, killing 75 percent of life on Earth, including the non-avian dinosaurs. The space rock left a roughly 100-mile-wide crater and destroyed global ecosystems. Now, a new study shows that it took more than 10 million years of evolution before biodiversity recovered. And the scientists behind the study

28min

U.S. senators introduce social media bill to ban 'dark patterns' tricks

Two U.S. senators introduced a bill on Tuesday to ban online social media companies like Facebook Inc and Twitter Inc from tricking consumers into giving up their personal data.

33min

Why Giant Tortoise Sex Became the Basis of a Key 'Game of Thrones' Sound Effect

No, that's not a real dragon purring in the background of "Game of Thrones"; it's just a giant male tortoise moaning.

34min

Futurism Cartoon Water Futures

The post Futurism Cartoon Water Futures appeared first on Futurism .

35min

Whitening Strips Alter Proteins in Teeth

Hydrogen peroxide in whitening treatments penetrates enamel and dentin, and alters tooth proteins. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

40min

The Heroin Hearse in the Overdose Capital of America

“Inject Heroin. Reject Life.” These stark words are scrawled across the side of Dwayne Wood’s hearse, which he drives daily through the streets of Huntington, West Virginia. His message is not subtle, but in the overdose capital of America, Wood simply won’t beat around the bush. “People may turn their nose up at us and think our approach is inappropriate,” Wood says in Ryan Buckley’s short docum

42min

43min

Tweeting their own horn: Author self-promotion on Twitter increases research dissemination

Researchers from the University of Toronto presented a new study at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok that aimed to determine the effect of authors' self-promotion on the social media site, Twitter, in regards to the dissemination of their research.

47min

Brazil's Researchers Criticize Budget Freeze

Scientists have attacked the government's spending policies after it locked down nearly half of the money that had been allocated for science funding.

50min

‘Dr. Seuss’s Garden’ Yields a Deep-Sea Discovery, but It Already Faces Threats

Researchers said Tuesday they had found two new species of coral in undersea canyons off New England, an area where ocean temperatures are expected to increase sharply because of global warming.

50min

Teeth whitening products can harm protein-rich tooth layer

Americans spend more than a billion dollars on teeth whitening products each year. Although these products can make smiles brighter, new research shows that they might also be causing tooth damage.

53min

Melatonin's heart protective effects not related to its antioxidant properties

Although melatonin does improve the outcomes of induced heart attacks in rats, those improvements are not the result of its antioxidant effect, new research finds.

53min

Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth

Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to researchers.

53min

These Rocks Look Like They Could Topple at Any Moment. They Hold 1,000 Years of Earthquake Secrets.

Stacks of perfectly balanced large rocks in Israel's Negev Desert appear to defy gravity, but a good shake could send them tumbling. So, researchers are examining them to learn about earthquakes that have struck this region over the past millennium.

59min

You probably need more vitamins, but pills won't cut it

Health A new study confirms that you need to get nutrition from real food, not supplements. A new study out this week in the Annals of Internal Medicine demonstrates that while we absolutely need vitamins (we would literally die without some of them), taking…

59min

Boeing orders and deliveries tumble as Max jet is grounded

Orders and deliveries of Boeing's 737 Max plunged in the first quarter as the plane was grounded around the world following a second deadly crash.

1h

Wipes labeled as 'flushable' wreak havoc on household plumbing and municipal sewers

Thinking twice about what you flush away may help you save money, and the environment. Today, Ryerson University released a new report on the first ever test of single-use wipes against rigorous criteria for flushability. The report, entitled Defining "Flushability" for Sewer Use, comes out of Ryerson's Flushability Lab at Ryerson Urban Water, and includes the testing of 101 single-use products, o

1h

How ‘Old Town Road’ Transforms the Listener

The last time country music produced the most popular song in America was 2005, when American Idol catapulted Carrie Underwood’s “Inside Your Heaven” to the peak of the Hot 100. Nashville’s drought at pop’s top will continue this week, technically, even though Ariana Grande’s reigning No. 1 was overtaken by a banjo-laden song about horses, cowboys, and porches. That song, Lil Nas X’s “Old Town Ro

1h

Shrinking the carbon footprint of a chemical in everyday objects

The biggest source of global energy consumption is the industrial manufacturing of products such as plastics, iron, and steel. Not only does manufacturing these materials require huge amounts of energy, but many of the reactions also directly emit carbon dioxide as a byproduct.

1h

Substituting healthy plant proteins for red meat lowers risk for heart disease

Diets that replaced red meat with healthy plant proteins led to decreases in risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a new study. The study is the first meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials examining the health effects of red meat by substituting it for other specific types of foods.

1h

Can flipping coins replace animal experiments?

Instead of repeating an experiment in a mouse model of disease in their laboratory, researchers used a coin toss to confirm whether a drug protects the brain against a stroke.

1h

Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning

Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study.

1h

Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly

Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature?

1h

Graphene coating could help prevent lithium battery fires

Researchers report that graphene — wonder material of the 21st century — may take the oxygen out of lithium battery fires.

1h

Marijuana for morning sickness? It's not great for baby's brain

With a growing number of states legalizing recreational or medical marijuana, more women are using the drug during pregnancy, in part due to its reported ability to relieve morning sickness. A new study, conducted in rats, sheds light on how cannabis exposure affects the brain of a developing fetus.

1h

Combining opioids and marijuana may be advantageous for pain sufferers

Researchers report combining cannabinoids with morphine did not significantly increase impulsivity or memory impairment in a study conducted in rhesus monkeys. The findings suggest using opioids and marijuana together could offer a safe way to cut opioid dosage among patients suffering from pain and thereby reduce their risk of becoming addicted to opioids.

1h

MIT Prof: It’s More Likely We’re Living in a Simulation Than Not

Simulation Hypothesis In a new interview , MIT researcher Rizwan Virk told Digital Trends that, in his estimation, we’re probably living in a simulation. “I would say it’s somewhere between 50 and 100 percent,” he told the site. “I think it’s more likely that we’re in simulation than not.” The Matrix During the interview, Virk outlined ideas from his new book, “The Simulation Hypothesis,” which d

1h

Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants

The jeans you wear, the orange juice you drink, the laundry detergent you use: None would be possible without the activity of enzymes. Currently the enzymes used in industry are produced through an expensive, laborious process, requiring cold storage. But an innovative new approach, ushered in by research from Penn's School of Dental Medicine, is opening up a whole new way of making these valuable

1h

Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants

The jeans you wear, the orange juice you drink, the laundry detergent you use: None would be possible without the activity of enzymes. Currently the enzymes used in industry are produced through an expensive, laborious process, requiring cold storage. But an innovative new approach, ushered in by research from Penn's School of Dental Medicine, is opening up a whole new way of making these valuable

1h

Measurement of semiconductor material quality is now 100,000 times more sensitive

The enhanced power of the new measuring technique to characterize materials at scales much smaller than any current technologies will accelerate the discovery and investigation of 2-D, micro- and nanoscale materials.

1h

1h

The Old English Verse 'Beowulf' Was Likely Written by a Single Author

"The sword sweat blood, while the warrior rejoiced."

1h

Industrial 3D printing goes skateboarding

Plastic pulled from the waste stream can find new use with the Gigabot X, an open source industrial 3D printer. A team from Michigan Tech shows how three Gigabot-printed sporting goods — skateboard decks, kayak paddles and snowshoes — can help burgeoning makerspaces and fab labs economically sustain their 3D printing centers.

1h

What Barr Told Congress About the Mueller Report

The long-awaited Mueller report will be out “within a week,” Attorney General William Barr assured impatient lawmakers in a hearing on Tuesday. Exactly how much of the book-length document either the public or Congress will be able to see, however, remains a mystery. The attorney general made his first appearance before Congress since he sent his four-page letter read ’round the world on March 24

1h

Scientists Are Trying to Figure Out How to Grow Grapes on Mars

Vino Veritas Scientists led by the Georgian Space Research Agency say they’re figuring out how to build the first winery on Mars. The wine itself is secondary, though it would certainly liven things up on Mars, to developing a technique that could let future Martian farmers grow all sorts of crops, according to a press release — an important step to sustainable off-world settlements . “In the dis

1h

Number of nonsmokers with COPD on the rise

The global burden of COPD is high, and prevalence of nonsmokers with COPD has been increasing. In a study to be presented at CHEST Congress Thailand 2019, researchers in Nagpur, India, sought to describe the characteristics of nonsmoking patients with COPD and to determine associated comorbidities and exposures.

1h

Measurement of semiconductor material quality is now 100,000 times more sensitive

UT Austin engineers have developed a tool to provide quantitative feedback on material quality, with particular applications in optoelectronic devices.

1h

Cancer-killing combination therapies unveiled with new drug-screening tool

UC San Francisco scientists have designed a large-scale screen that efficiently identifies drugs that are potent cancer-killers when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone. The effort, a cross-disciplinary collaboration between UCSF researchers, is described in a study published April 9 in the journal Cell Reports.

1h

Single-cell sequencing reveals landscape of immune cell subtypes in lung cancer tumors

Single-cell sequencing reveals 25 subpopulations of myeloid cells, a poorly understood family of immune cells, in lung cancer tumors. Many subpopulations are similar across humans and mice, supporting the use of mouse models in immunotherapy research. Findings set stage to assess myeloid cells as targets for new or improved immunotherapies.

1h

New model accurately predicts harmful space weather

A new, first-of-its-kind space weather model reliably predicts space storms of high-energy particles that are harmful to many satellites and spacecraft orbiting in the Earth's outer radiation belt.

1h

Chickens stand sentinel against mosquito-borne disease in Florida

To learn where mosquitoes are transmitting certain viruses, Florida officials deploy chickens and test them for antibodies to the pathogens.

1h

Salmonella can hijack immune cells to spread around the body

Salmonella bacteria can use immune cells as vehicles to escape from the gut. They control them by changing the way the cells react to electrical signals

1h

Flying cars will only be eco-friendly if we use them right

Environment The future of the commute could get a little greener. The flying air taxis of the near future, which can both hover like helicopters and glide like airplanes, might be more energy efficient than you’d think—provided you…

1h

How Dangerous Is It to Be a Bird in Your City? Buildings Kill Hundreds of Millions a Year

A new study shows how efforts to prevent migrating birds from flying into skyscrapers and other brightly lit buildings could be honed.

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Novel NSF initiative seeks nimble scientists to create better tools to tackle societal problems. But act now

First cohort of pilots aims for rapid, tangible results; initial applications due 15 April

2h

Bio-Rad Introduces Isotype-Specific Secondary Antibodies

Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of its isotype-specific secondary antibodies. This new range of recombinant monoclonal antibodies, directed against the three main mouse isotypes: IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b, offer improved signal detection and specificity in imaging, ELISA, flow cytome

2h

Yahoo reaches revised $117.5 million data breach settlement

Yahoo has reached a revised settlement agreement with millions of people who had their personal information stolen in high-profile data breaches in 2013 and 2014.

2h

A jaunt by airborne ‘car’ can save on greenhouse gases

A jaunt by airborne ‘car’ can save on greenhouse gases A jaunt by airborne ‘car’ can save on greenhouse gases, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01135-4 Over longer distances, a single-passenger flying car produces fewer emissions than does a petrol-powered vehicle on the roads.

2h

Life could be evolving right now on nearest exoplanets

Rocky, Earth-like planets orbiting our closest stars could host life, according to a new study that raises the excitement about exoplanets.

2h

Are brown dwarfs failed stars or super-planets?

Brown dwarfs fill the 'gap' between stars and the much smaller planets. But how they originate has yet to be fully explained. Astronomers may now be able to answer that question. They discovered that the star v Ophiuchi in the Milky Way is being orbited by two brown dwarfs, which in all probability formed along with the star from a gas and dust disk.

2h

Proton therapy shows efficacy, low toxicity in large cohort of children with high-risk neuroblastoma

Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania analyzed the largest cohort to date of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT), finding both that proton therapy was effective at reducing tumors and demonstrated minimal toxicity to surrounding organs.

2h

Shrinking the carbon footprint of a chemical in everyday objects

MIT chemical engineers have devised an alternative approach to synthesizing epoxides, a type of chemical that is found in many products, including plastics, pharmaceuticals and textiles. Their approach could reduce the greenhouse gas emissions produced by current manufacturing techniques.

2h

All things could be part of the Internet of Things with new RFID system

Frying pans, pill bottles, yoga mats, coffee cups and countless other nonelectronic objects could be turned into a network of Internet of Things sensors with a new RFID-based technology from the University of Michigan.

2h

Novel study creates new metric to illustrate disadvantaged areas nationwide

Ohio, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia have the highest disparity between opioid-related deaths and access to treatment providers for opioid use disorder (OUD) in the U.S. That finding comes from a first-of-its-kind research study.

2h

To lower childhood obesity, don't sugarcoat the facts about sweet drinks

A new study at Columbia University suggests that giving pregnant women and new mothers the facts about the health risks of drinking sugary beverages may help reduce childhood obesity.

2h

Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants

Whether we know it or not, enzymes play a role in a range of everyday products, from orange juice to denim jeans. Using his innovative plant-based platform and a new startup company, the University of Pennsylvania's Henry Daniell and colleagues are transforming how these enzymes are made, resulting in cheaper and more environmentally friendly products.

2h

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A Jetsons future? Assessing the role of flying cars in sustainable mobility

In the 1960s animated sitcom 'The Jetsons,' George Jetson commutes to work in his family-size flying car, which miraculously transforms into a briefcase at the end of the trip.

2h

Empathy and cooperation go hand in hand

Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a team shows that the act of taking another person's perspective — a form of empathy — supports the persistence of cooperation and altruism.

2h

Bionics: Electric view in murky waters

When dealing with disasters or searching for objects, robots or drones with cameras are usually used. However, conventional cameras are of rather limited use in murky, dark water, such as in a sewage pipe or a lake that is cloudy with sediment. Zoologists have developed a special camera for such operating conditions: modeled on the African elephantnose fish (Gnathonemus petersii), it supplies 'ele

2h

Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents

A new study shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed. Researchers studied the impact of a 50-minute delay in high school start times in one of the largest school districts in the US.

2h

New Therapy Transforms Tumors Into “Cancer Vaccine Factories”

Trained to Kill By injecting immune stimulants directly into cancerous tumors, researchers from Mount Sinai say they’ve transformed the growths into “cancer vaccine factories” that produce cancer-killing immune cells — and their approach was so successful in fighting one type of cancer that they’re already testing it on two others. The treatment starts with the injection of two immune stimulants

2h

Teens face health and safety risks exploring sex online

Teens spend hours every day on internet-connected devices, where limitless opportunities to explore sexuality online. These opportunities don't come without big risks, though. A researcher from Michigan State University found that online sexual experiences can predict whether they become victims of sexual assault one year later.

2h

Can flipping coins replace animal experiments?

Instead of repeating an experiment in a mouse model of disease in their laboratory, researchers in Berlin, Germany used a coin toss to confirm whether a drug protects the brain against a stroke, as reported in their paper publishing April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology

2h

Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning

Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study publishing on April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yaohui Sun and Alex Mogilner of New York University and colleagues.

2h

Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly

Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature?

2h

US Measles Cases Continue to Climb Toward Record High

So far this year, 465 infections have been reported, with numbers approaching their highest since measles returned to the country.

2h

Research on communication with completely paralyzed patients prompts misconduct investigation

Critic raises questions about statistical methods used to evaluate brain responses of people in completely locked-in states

2h

Perfectly preserved dinosaur skin found in Korea

Paleontologists are used to finding dinosaur bones and tracks. But remnants of soft tissue, like muscles or skin, are rare and often not well preserved. A very small percentage of tracks – much …

2h

Mountain Glaciers Are Major Contributors to Rising Seas

They are as big a source of sea level rise as the Greenland Ice Sheet and larger than Antarctica — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2h

Substituting healthy plant proteins for red meat lowers risk for heart disease

Diets that replaced red meat with healthy plant proteins led to decreases in risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Purdue University. The study is the first meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials examining the health effects of red meat by substituting it for other specific types of foods.

2h

Spontaneous current constriction in threshold switching devices

Spontaneous current constriction in threshold switching devices Spontaneous current constriction in threshold switching devices, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09679-9 Today the phenomenon underlying threshold switching of Oxide-based resistive memories is an unresolved debate. Here, the authors report that the TaOx-based conductive filament formation, the current density

2h

Competitive endogenous RNA is an intrinsic component of EMT regulatory circuits and modulates EMT

Competitive endogenous RNA is an intrinsic component of EMT regulatory circuits and modulates EMT Competitive endogenous RNA is an intrinsic component of EMT regulatory circuits and modulates EMT, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09649-1 Competitive endogenous RNAs help to regulate biological processes by regulating miRNA activity levels. Here the author show TGFBI acts as

2h

Mapping vaccination coverage to explore the effects of delivery mechanisms and inform vaccination strategies

Mapping vaccination coverage to explore the effects of delivery mechanisms and inform vaccination strategies Mapping vaccination coverage to explore the effects of delivery mechanisms and inform vaccination strategies, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09611-1 The success of vaccination programs depends largely on the mechanisms used in vaccine delivery. Here, the authors ev

2h

1H NMR is not a proof of hydrogen bonds in transition metal complexes

1 H NMR is not a proof of hydrogen bonds in transition metal complexes 1 H NMR is not a proof of hydrogen bonds in transition metal complexes, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09625-9 1 H NMR is not a proof of hydrogen bonds in transition metal complexes

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iFISH is a publically available resource enabling versatile DNA FISH to study genome architecture

iFISH is a publically available resource enabling versatile DNA FISH to study genome architecture iFISH is a publically available resource enabling versatile DNA FISH to study genome architecture, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09616-w DNA FISH allows for the visual analysis of chromosomal organisation in individual cells. Here the authors present iFISH, an open-source re

2h

Interfering trajectories in experimental quantum-enhanced stochastic simulation

Interfering trajectories in experimental quantum-enhanced stochastic simulation Interfering trajectories in experimental quantum-enhanced stochastic simulation, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-08951-2 Quantum devices should allow simulating stochastic processes using less memory than classical counterparts, but only if quantum coherence is maintained through multiple steps

2h

Efficient allelic-drive in Drosophila

Efficient allelic-drive in Drosophila Efficient allelic-drive in Drosophila , Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09694-w Gene-drives use CRISPR-Cas9 to be transmitted in a super-Mendelian fashion. Here the authors develop an allelic-drive for selective inheritance of a desired allele.

2h

Measurement of carrier lifetime in micron-scaled materials using resonant microwave circuits

Measurement of carrier lifetime in micron-scaled materials using resonant microwave circuits Measurement of carrier lifetime in micron-scaled materials using resonant microwave circuits, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09602-2 A method for measuring carrier dynamics in micron-scale optoelectronic materials based on time-resolved microwave reflection is reported. Compared t

2h

Tre naturfænomener, der kan peppe din Instagram op

En pink sø, nordlys og himlen i ét med jorden. Naturen har masser af Instagram-venlige fænomener.

2h

Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning

Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study publishing on April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yaohui Sun and Alex Mogilner of New York University and colleagues. The discovery reveals a new mechanism underlying the toxicity of this common foo

2h

Can flipping coins replace animal experiments?

Instead of repeating an experiment in a mouse model of disease in their laboratory, researchers in Berlin, Germany used a coin toss to confirm whether a drug protects the brain against a stroke, as reported in their paper publishing April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.

2h

Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly

Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature? New research publishing April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS

2h

Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning

Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study publishing on April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yaohui Sun and Alex Mogilner of New York University and colleagues. The discovery reveals a new mechanism underlying the toxicity of this common foo

2h

Can flipping coins replace animal experiments?

Instead of repeating an experiment in a mouse model of disease in their laboratory, researchers in Berlin, Germany used a coin toss to confirm whether a drug protects the brain against a stroke, as reported in their paper publishing April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.

2h

Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly

Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature? New research publishing April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS

2h

Chinese Authorities Want to Ban Crypto Mining

Mine No More China’s crackdown on cryptocurrency may soon extend to mining — and the impact could reach across the globe. In China, the National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) is tasked with studying the nation’s economy and guiding its future development — in part by listing industries it wants to encourage, restrict, or discontinue. On Monday, the agency shared a proposed revision of

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These 'eggs' are spying on whooping cranes to boost survival

Scientists are using fake eggs to spy on whooping cranes in hopes of learning why some chicks die in the egg, while others hatch.

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These 'eggs' are spying on whooping cranes to boost survival

Scientists are using fake eggs to spy on whooping cranes in hopes of learning why some chicks die in the egg, while others hatch.

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SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Prepares for First Commercial Liftoff Wednesday

SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy will launch on its first commercial flight tomorrow. The rocket launch was postponed from early April due to unspecified concerns, and then postponed again just this week due to weather. But Wednesday has a clear forecast with an 80% probability of a launch, so odds are good the mission will proceed. The launch window opens at 6:35am EDT. Falcon Heavy is a modified version of

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20 percent off projectors and other deals to watch

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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IVF corals can take the heat of a warmer world

Researchers have bred corals to make them better able to cope with our changing climate—rising sea temperatures and increased acidity. They’re now growing in experimental field conditions on the Great Barrier Reef, to see if they can also thrive in the wild. “Most corals in the wild are living at the very top of their survival limit in terms of temperature,” says Madeleine van Oppen, an Australia

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Chicago is Making Teens Wear Ankle Monitors That Record Audio

Walkie Talkie Courtrooms in Chicago are ordering teens awaiting trial to wear ankle monitors that not only constantly track them with GPS but also let probation officers call them at any time. While judges defend the monitors as a way to enforce probation, the monitors have legal experts up in arms over the all-but-unrestricted access they grant into the lives and goings-on of minors caught up in

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Can Biopics See Beyond Male Genius?

Toward the end of the first episode of Fosse/Verdon , the dancer Gwen Verdon (Michelle Williams) has finally flown to Munich at the beseeching of her husband, the choreographer and director Bob Fosse (Sam Rockwell). Fosse is directing the film adaptation of Cabaret , starring Liza Minnelli as a nightclub entertainer in Weimar Berlin, but things are going awry: The shoot is behind schedule, the co

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Thomas Kuhn Wasn't So Bad

A former student of the influential philosopher defends him against filmmaker Errol Morris’s “character assassination.” — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Do Leaders Impact Our Definition of Responsibility?

What happens when our sense of responsibility breaks down? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Physics tip sheet: APS April Meeting

This tip sheet highlights interesting presentations from the upcoming 2019 APS April Meeting in Denver — a major international meeting that features talks and presentations about discoveries in astrophysics, particle physics, energy research and many other areas of modern physics. The meeting runs from Saturday, April 13 through Tuesday, April 16 at the Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, located at

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Qualcomm's new mid-range Snapdragon 730G targets mobile gamers

Qualcomm on Tuesday unveiled a new range of mobile processors for mid-range devices. Of particular interest is the new Snapdragon 730G, an iteration designed specifically with gamers in mind.

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Facebook tweaks tools for remembering dead friends

Facebook says it will use artificial intelligence to help find profiles of people who have died, so their friends and family members won't get, for instance, painful reminders about their birthday.

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Young entrepreneur aims to send 3-D-printed rockets to space

To see Tim Ellis hunched over his laptop, alone in a room at a major space industry conference in Colorado, you can hardly imagine that he might be the next Elon Musk.

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New HIV vaccine could expose latent virus and kill it

Using immune cells in an innovative way, scientists just got closer to developing an HIV vaccine that could make antiretroviral drugs a thing of the past.

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The Oldest Ice on Earth May Be Hiding 1.5 Miles Beneath Antarctica

European scientists looking for some of the oldest ice on the planet have homed in on a particular spot in Antarctica.

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3D Ultrasound gives clinicians clearer picture to treat gynaecological cancer

By transforming a conventional ultrasound probe, already found in most clinics, the technology can provide a 360-degree, three-dimensional view of surgical tools and surrounding tissue and organs. It provides a clearer and more accurate picture in the operating room for clinicians who need to precisely insert needles into the tumour for a procedure called interstitial brachytherapy, a type of targ

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Researchers prove Leonardo Da Vinci was ambidextrous

Researchers at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence have proved what was suspected for a long time: that Renaissance genius Leonardo Da Vinci was able to write, draw and paint with both hands.

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Clues emerge in 'missing' ocean plastics conundrum

It's a puzzle that has perplexed scientists for years: humanity dumps millions of tonnes of plastics into the world's oceans annually, yet only a tiny fraction remains visible on the surface.

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Physicists Scramble to Understand the Extreme Crystals Hiding Inside Giant, Alien Planets

Planetary scientists are calling on mineral physicists to help them figure out the strange chemistry going on inside super-Earths and mini-Neptunes.

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You can help name the largest unnamed world in the solar system

A dwarf planet known only as 2007 OR10 is about to get a proper name after more than a decade – and the public can help decide what we call it

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Risk of ‘thousand-year’ rains could double for US states

Risk of ‘thousand-year’ rains could double for US states Risk of ‘thousand-year’ rains could double for US states , Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01130-9 Climate warming is raising the risk of rainfall intense enough to strain dams and other infrastructure.

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Facebook tweaks tools for remembering dead friends

Facebook says it will use artificial intelligence to help find profiles of people who have died, so their friends and family members won't get, for instance, painful reminders about their birthday.

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How artificial intelligence can help in the fight against human trafficking

The crime of human trafficking—defined by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as modern-day slavery that "involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act—is notoriously difficult to prosecute.

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Life could be evolving right now on nearest exoplanets

Excitement about exoplanets skyrocketed when rocky Earth-like planets were discovered orbiting in the habitable zone of some of our closest stars – until hopes for life were dashed by the high levels of radiation bombarding those worlds.

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New Quantum Device Can “Generate All Possible Futures”

submitted by /u/drsleep007 [link] [comments]

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Grapes on Mars? Georgia winemakers aiming high

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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NASA imagery shows winds tearing Tropical Cyclone Wallace

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Wallace being sheared apart from strong northwesterly winds. Clouds from Wallace stretched far inland over a well-known wilderness area.

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Criminal justice system should be cautious when approaching risk assessment

Imagine a parole board trying to figure out whether a previously convicted person eligible for parole poses a future threat to the community.

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Too hungry to learn—new research provides food for thought

Food insecurity—that is, limited access to sufficient safe and nutritious food at home—negatively impacts on the learning ability of adolescents in India, new research shows.

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Roku saves you from signing into accounts on a new device

Roku is about to make life much easier if you're tired of signing into all your accounts when you get a new media player. It's releasing a Roku OS 9.1 update that, among …

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Study gives new insight into how climate change is transforming Virginia's barrier islands

A new study of Virginia's barrier islands off the coast of the Eastern Shore provides a fundamental understanding of how barrier islands will change in the near future amid a warming climate, sea-level rise and storm events such as hurricanes and nor'easters.

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Graphene coating could help prevent lithium battery fires

Lithium batteries are what allow electric vehicles to travel several hundred miles on one charge. Their capacity for energy storage is well known, but so is their tendency to occasionally catch on fire—an occurrence known to battery researchers as "thermal runaway." These fires occur most frequently when the batteries overheat or cycle rapidly. With more and more electric vehicles on the road each

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JUUL electronic cigarette products linked to cellular damage

Little is known about the potential health effects of JUUL e-cigarette products that have recently risen in popularity, especially among adolescents. The FDA has a growing concern about this uptick in their use because these electronic cigarettes deliver nicotine. A research team led by UC Riverside and Portland State University has now found that nicotine concentrations are higher in JUUL electro

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How artificial intelligence can help in the fight against human trafficking

Code 8.7, a two-day conference, brought together computer science researchers and technologists with policy experts, law enforcement officials, activists and survivors involved in the fight against human trafficking.

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Near-simultaneous admissions may affect mortality and length of stay in the ICU

A strain in ICU capacity has been linked to adverse patient outcomes. New research to be presented at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand suggests that near-simultaneous ICU admissions are frequent and may also have an adverse effect on patient outcomes. Researchers conducted an observational study of patients admitted to an academic adult ICU of a tertiary medical center. Over the five-year period of th

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Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction

A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according tonew research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers.

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NASA launches two rockets studying auroras

NASA successfully launched the Auroral Zone Upwelling Rocket Experiment or AZURE mission on April 5 from the Andøya Space Center in Norway.

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Using bacteria to protect roads from deicer deterioration

Tiny bacteria could soon be chipping in to keep roads from chipping away in the winter, according to Drexel University researchers who are looking into new ways to make our infrastructure more resilient.

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Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction

A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according tonew research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers.

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Promising treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome fails large trial

Rituximab has been found to be worse than a placebo at alleviating the symptoms of CFS or ME, suggesting that antibodies aren’t to blame for the condition

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How Margaret Dayhoff Brought Modern Computing to Biology

The pioneer of bioinformatics modeled Earth’s primordial atmosphere with Carl Sagan and made a vast protein database still used today

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Genetic breakthrough on tropical grass could help develop climate-friendly cattle farms

Cattle are a mainstay for many smallholders but their farms are often on degraded lands, which increases cattle's impact on the environment and lowers their production of milk and meat. Researchers at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have shown that Brachiaria grass species can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle and increase productivity—and breeding improved varie

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Evidence: Inspirational augmented reality apps can improve brand attitude

More and more companies are using Augmented Reality Marketing to interact with customers. Augmented Reality Marketing is a strategic concept that uses Augmented Reality (i.e. the Integration of digital information or objects into the subject's perception of the physical world), often in combination with other media, to expose, articulate, or demonstrate consumer benefits to achieve organizational

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Genetic breakthrough on tropical grass could help develop climate-friendly cattle farms

Cattle are a mainstay for many smallholders but their farms are often on degraded lands, which increases cattle's impact on the environment and lowers their production of milk and meat. Researchers at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have shown that Brachiaria grass species can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle and increase productivity—and breeding improved varie

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Daily briefing: The periodic table would be better upside down

Daily briefing: The periodic table would be better upside down Daily briefing: The periodic table would be better upside down, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01153-2 The classic table gets turned on its head, the month’s best science images and the return of cancer’s magic bullet.

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New to college? Spend some time alone

Seeking solitude — for the right reasons — can be good for first-year college students, research suggests.

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Too hungry to learn — new research provides food for thought

Food insecurity — that is, limited access to sufficient safe and nutritious food at home — negatively impacts on the learning ability of adolescents in India, new research shows.

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Researchers explain signals of CpG 'traffic lights' in DNA

A research team featuring bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has identified reliable markers of gene activity. The discovery has potential for future applications in clinical practice. The findings are reported in BMC Genomics.

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Are brown dwarfs failed stars or super-planets?

Brown dwarfs fill the 'gap' between stars and the much smaller planets. But how they originate has yet to be fully explained. Astronomers from Heidelberg University may now be able to answer that question. They discovered that the star ν Ophiuchi in the Milky Way is being orbited by two brown dwarfs, which in all probability formed along with the star from a gas and dust disk.

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Graphene coating could help prevent lithium battery fires

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering report that graphene — wonder material of the 21st century — may take the oxygen out of lithium battery fires.

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Study gives new insight into how climate change is transforming Virginia's barrier islands

A new study of Virginia's barrier islands off the coast of the Eastern Shore provides a fundamental understanding of how barrier islands will change in the near future amid a warming climate, sea-level rise and storm events such as hurricanes and nor'easters.

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'Clean' perfume – should you worry about what’s in your fragrance?

Michelle Pfeiffer’s new line claims to be free of so-called ‘toxic’ substances. But what are they? Here’s what you need to know about your favourite scents The world is, we seem to be warned by so many articles, full of chemicals that may give us cancer, nerve damage and maybe worse. Now perfume is feared as potential poison. And so comes the idea of “clean perfume” – much like clean eating, or c

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New Quantum Device Can “Generate All Possible Futures”

Superposition A team of scientists say they’ve built a quantum computer that generates a superposition of all possible futures the computer could experience. The research , published Tuesday in Nature Communications , describes how this quantum system could help futuristic artificial intelligence learn much faster than it can today — and it could mean quantum computers are finally becoming practi

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Algorithms for parole can have serious bias problems

The risk assessment tools decision makers in the criminal justice system use to help determine the fate of people accused or convicted of crimes can have problems that reinforce bias. Robert Werth, a senior lecturer in sociology in Rice University’s School of Social Sciences, reviewed research on various methods for assessing risk among accused or convicted criminals. The research appears in Soci

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A jaunt by airborne ‘car’ can save on greenhouse gases

A jaunt by airborne ‘car’ can save on greenhouse gasesA jaunt by airborne ‘car’ can save on greenhouse gases, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01135-4Over …

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How to Understand the Image of a Black Hole

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Deciphering the Mystery of Joy Division

The approach to Joy Division is forbidding. This band comes sealed in a myth of monumental severity, outside rock and roll to some degree, its achievement arrested at the point of maximum force by the suicide, in 1980, of singer Ian Curtis. Reading the fragmentary testimonies in This Searing Light, The Sun and Everything Else , Jon Savage’s oral history of Joy Division, I was put in mind of “Cold

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Life could be evolving right now on nearest exoplanets

Rocky, Earth-like planets orbiting our closest stars could host life, according to a new study that raises the excitement about exoplanets.

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Criminal justice system should be cautious when approaching risk assessment

Imagine a parole board trying to figure out whether a previously convicted person eligible for parole poses a future threat to the community. Every day, in scenarios like this, decisionmakers in the criminal justice system use risk assessment tools in that help them determine the fate of people accused or convicted of crimes. But those decisionmakers need to be aware that the tools they're using c

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The anxiety of exposure

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics (Perm), in collaboration with an American colleague, confirmed the theory that impostor syndrome fully mediates the link between perfectionism and psychological distress.

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How Much the Public Knows about Science, and Why It Matters

A new survey shows that it varies dramatically by education, race and ethnicity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Much the Public Knows about Science, and Why It Matters

A new survey shows that it varies dramatically by education, race and ethnicity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Photographing All 2,000 Miles of the US-Mexico Border

America's border communities are politically and culturally diverse, but they agree on one thing: A border wall is a terrible idea.

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Andrew Yang wants to tax Silicon Valley to fund universal basic income plan

Andrew Yang is a 2020 Democratic presidential candidate whose key campaign promise is to give every American adult $12,000, regardless of their current income. Yang said his universal basic income plan could be funded by a value-added tax levied on tech companies. Yang's proposal has no shortage of critics, but he maintains that his UBI program would grow the economy by trillions of dollars. None

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These trendy, intense workouts increase injury risk

People who do high-intensity interval training are at greater risk for injury, especially in the knees and shoulders, research finds. These workouts, which combine aerobic exercising, weight lifting, and calisthenics at maximum capacity, followed by periods of recovery, have been getting more popular over the past decade. They promise an efficient way to reach fitness goals in less time. The stud

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Researchers Use CRISPR “Shredder” on Human DNA for First Time

DNA Shredder CRISPR-Cas9 allows researchers to make very precise cuts in DNA. But precise cuts aren’t always needed, because sometimes it makes more sense to splice up an entire sequence of DNA — and now researchers have a CRISPR tool that can do just that. “Cas9 is a molecular scissor that goes where you want it and snips once,” University of Michigan researcher Yan Zhang said in a press release

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Vitamins from Food — Not Supplements — Linked with Longer Life

Certain vitamins and minerals are linked with a lower risk of early death, but only if the nutrients come from food, not supplements.

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Slack integrates Office 365 tools into its platform

A lot of companies (Engadget included) rely on Slack to get things done, and in recent times the "MSN Messenger for the workplace" has integrated a whole bunch of apps into …

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Forcing a smile for customers linked with more drinking after work

Employees who force themselves to smile and be happy in front of customers — or who try to hide feelings of annoyance — may be at risk for heavier drinking after work, according to researchers.

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Pin-sized sensor could bring chemical ID to smartphone-sized devices

Engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a spectrometer so small and simple that it could integrate with the camera of a typical cellphone without sacrificing accuracy.

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Lung cancer treatments vary among the Asian communities

A study from the University of Southern California, Keck School of Medicine, sought to examine possible health disparities in the treatment of lung cancer within the Asian community in the US. In this study, rates of recommended care for non-small cell lung cancer were compared among patients in the Asian community. The authors concluded that practice patterns within different Asian ethnicities va

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Researchers Rethink the Ancestry of Complex Cells

Our planet formed a little over 4.5 billion years ago, and if the most recent estimates are correct, it wasn’t long before life arose. Not much is known about how that happened because it’s maddeningly difficult to investigate. It’s also proved tough to study what happened next, during the first billions of years of evolution that followed, when the main domains of life emerged. A particularly ve

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Go ahead. Try this at home.

There are so many ways to engage in Citizen Science Day on April 13. Participate in any SciStarter affiliate project to earn a personalized certificate. Start with the Stall Catchers Megathon, a gamified, online inter-generational game to accelerate research on Alzheimer's! Join the virtual SciStarter Megathon team or organize or join an in-person Megathon meet-up. Find all you need on CitizenScie

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Flying cars could be greener than electric ones in some circumstances

If flying cars ever get off of the ground they could be slightly more energy efficient than electric cars over long distances

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Autism symptoms reduced nearly 50 percent two years after fecal transplant

In a new study, researchers demonstrate long-term beneficial effects for children diagnosed with ASD through a revolutionary fecal transplant technique known as microbiota transfer therapy (MTT).

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Engineers develop concept for hybrid heavy-duty trucks

Researchers have devised a new way of powering heavy-duty trucks that could drastically curb pollution, increase efficiency, and reduce or even eliminate their net greenhouse gas emissions.

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'Electron shuttle' protein plays key role in plant cell-wall construction

Scientists studying plant cell walls have discovered details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component. The protein acts as a targeted 'electron shuttle,' delivering the 'fuel' that drives the construction of one specific lignin building block. Controlling the flow of electrons by modifying shuttle proteins could be a new strategy for guiding plants to make desired

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High-tech tissue study reveals which cells drive a painful food allergy

An eight-year hunt for the cells that drive the extreme childhood food allergy eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) has identified a potential new way to treat the disease while also raising questions about a dietary supplement often taken to reduce bowel inflammation.

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Fuel cell advance a breath of fresh air for future power alternative

In an advance that could help lead the way toward longer-lived green energy devices, engineers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have revealed new insights about the chemical reactions that power fuel cells.

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Using bacteria to protect roads from deicer deterioration

Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew. Recent research from Drexel University's College of Engineering shows how the bacteria, called Sporosarcina pasteurii, can be used to prevent the road degradation caused by ice-melting salt.

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New method for evaluating cancer risk of chemicals is quick, precise, inexpensive

Researchers from Boston University Schools of Medicine (BUSM) and Public Health have developed and evaluated a fast, accurate and cost-effective approach to assessing the carcinogenicity of chemicals — that is, whether exposure to a chemical increases a person's long-term cancer risk. As a result, they have generated one of the largest toxicogenomics datasets to date, and have made the data and r

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NASA imagery shows winds tearing Tropical Cyclone Wallace

Visible imagery from NASA's Terra satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Wallace being sheared apart from strong northwesterly winds. Clouds from Wallace stretched far inland over a well-known wilderness area.

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Greener, more efficient natural gas filtration

MIT researchers have developed a new polymer membrane that can dramatically improve the efficiency of natural gas purification, while reducing its environmental impact.

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Graphic cigarette warning labels can deter some sales

More than 100 countries have regulations mandating that cigarette packages have graphic warning labels, but the strategy has been blocked in the US by legal actions. A new study that simulated the convenience store shopping experience shows that such labels may discourage some smokers from buying another package of cigarettes.

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Researchers discover neural patterns key to understanding disorders such as PTSD

Researchers have identified for the first time an imbalance in a key neural pathway between the amygdala and hippocampus that explains how some people reactivate negative emotional memories. The finding could help scientists unlock new ways to treat psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder.

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Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents

A new study to be presented at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed. Researchers from Farwaniya Hospital in Kuwait and Boston Children's Hospital studied the impact of a 50-minute delay in high school start times in one of the largest school districts in the US.

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Empathy and cooperation go hand in hand

Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a University of Pennsylvania-led team shows that the act of taking another person's perspective — a form of empathy — supports the persistence of cooperation and altruism.

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A new way of finding compounds that prevent aging

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new method for identifying compounds that prevent aging. The method is based on a new way of determining age in cultured human cells and is reported in a study in the journal Cell Reports. Using the method, the researchers found a group of substances that they predict to rejuvenate human cells, and that extend the lifespan and improve

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Cell death may be triggered by 'hit-and-run' interaction

A 'hit-and-run' interaction between two proteins could be an important trigger for cell death, according tonew research from Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers.The researchers investigated the chain of events that activates the protein BAX, which is a crucial driverof apoptosis, the major form of cell death. Addressing a long-standing question in the field, theydiscovered that BAX is acti

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Famous cancer-fighting gene also protects against birth defects

New research has revealed how the famous tumour suppressor gene p53 is surprisingly critical for development of the neural tube in female embryos.

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NIH researchers make progress toward Epstein-Barr virus vaccine

A research team led by scientists from NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) has determined how several antibodies induced by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpesvirus that causes infectious mononucleosis and is associated with certain cancers, block infection of cells grown in the laboratory. They then used this information to develop novel vaccine candidates that, in

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A Jetsons future? Assessing the role of flying cars in sustainable mobility

In the 1960s animated sitcom 'The Jetsons,' George Jetson commutes to work in his family-size flying car, which miraculously transforms into a briefcase at the end of the trip.

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High-dose vitamin D shows benefit in patients with advanced colorectal cancer

Results of a small clinical trial suggest that supplementing chemotherapy with high doses of vitamin D may benefit patients with metastatic colorectal cancer by delaying progression of the disease, say scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

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Many nurse practitioners cannot provide medications to treat opioid addiction

At least six states with high opioid abuse rates also have strong work restrictions that hinder nurse practitioners (NPs) in prescribing medication that can help treat the problem, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco. These states, and others with restrictive scopes of practice for NPs, should reform their regulations to take full advantage of the health care workforce in addre

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Conservationists clash over ways forward despite sharing 'core aims', study finds

Latest research reveals rifts within global conservation movement while confirming support for aims underpinning it.

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Study reports on bacterial STIs among men using PrEP

This study, which included nearly 3,000 mostly gay and bisexual men in Australia who received daily HIV preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), reports on the association of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) by describing diagnoses of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis among the men and behavioral risk factors.

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We don't "move on" from grief. We move forward with it | Nora McInerny

In a talk that's by turns heartbreaking and hilarious, writer and podcaster Nora McInerny shares her hard-earned wisdom about life and death. Her candid approach to something that will, let's face it, affect us all, is as liberating as it is gut-wrenching. Most powerfully, she encourages us to shift how we approach grief. "A grieving person is going to laugh again and smile again," she says. "They

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cybrexa therapeutics unveils rucaparib as fda- and ema-approved parp inhibitor in lead candidate cbx-11, which demonstrates synergistic efficacy with chemotherapy without compounded toxicity

Cybrexa Therapeutics Unveils Rucaparib as FDA- and EMA-Approved PARP Inhibitor in Lead Candidate CBX-11, Which Demonstrates Synergistic Efficacy with Chemotherapy Without Compounded ToxicityTumor-selective CBX-11 allows full dose co-administration with chemotherapy, enabling synergistic efficacy in HRD negative tumors Poster presentation today during AACR Annual Meeting 2019

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Climate change is putting this invasive species to good use

Environment The pros and cons of these common reeds are complicated. Despite its bad reputation, Phragmites provides many benefits that are generally unknown and unappreciated.

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Facebook Will Stop Suggesting You Invite Dead People to Events

Friends Forever Facebook is overhauling how it handles dead people’s profiles. For instance, it’ll no longer recommend that you invite the departed to events like barbecues and concerts. A new blog post by Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg describes a number of changes that are meant to give deceased users’ legacy contacts — who essentially act as executors of their accounts — more control over how pe

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Digital Music Better For The Environment Than Vinyl Or CDs? Guess Again

Somewhere in a landfill there sits a pile of broken records, busted cassette tapes, and scratched up CDs. To some extent, these are all relics of the past (vinyl is making a comeback, though), …

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These Instruments Can Create Pressure Thousands of Times Higher Than the Bottom of the Ocean

These Instruments Can Create Pressure Thousands of Times Higher Than the Bottom of the Ocean Super high-pressure experiments take science to extremes. High Pressure.jpg Image credits: RAF-YYC via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Physics Tuesday, April 9, 2019 – 09:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) — If the filmmaker and explorer James Cameron had opened the hatch of hi

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Wolves return to Netherlands after 140 years

Ecologists have data showing female has settled and males in area may lead to mating.

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Danmarks mikroorganismer kortlægges i Microflora Danica

DNA i realtime: Men ny database vil vi med det samme kunne identificere bakterier.

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The future contains flying taxis

Modelling finds airborne vehicles are economic for long journeys and multiple passengers. Neil Dowling reports.

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Conservationists clash over ways forward despite sharing 'core aims', study finds

The first large-scale study of the views held by those working to protect the natural world has found agreement on the goals of conservation—but substantial disagreement on how to move towards them.

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Teen series continue to feature stereotyped characters that perpetuate gender differences

A study has sought to identify and analyse adolescents' favourite kind of character in Spanish teen series. Teen series are fictional and feature characters that specifically target teenagers and a younger audience. The work by the researchers María José Masanet, of the Department of Communication at UPF, and Maddalena Fedele, of Ramon Llull University, was published in Palabra Clave in April.

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Genetic breakthrough on tropical grass could help develop climate-friendly cattle farms

Researchers at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT) have shown that Brachiaria grass species can reduce greenhouse gas emissions from cattle and increase productivity — and breeding improved varieties can potentially augment the environmental and economic benefits. A breakthrough on Brachiaria's complex genome may make breeding much more efficient, and potentially increase the

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Scientists create molecular tool to remove toxic protein from neuronal models of dementia

Harnessing a probe used to image the brain in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease and related forms of dementia, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Massachusetts General Hospital have successfully cleared patient-derived brain cells of an abnormal protein associated with dementia and other neurogenerative disorders.

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Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH

New research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that many cell wall enzymes that were previously considered 'redundant' are actually specialists that ensure maximal growth across different environments. Further, these specialist enzymes were found to increase E. coli's resistance to antibiotics at low pH conditions, such as those found in the GI tract or urinary tract — raising conc

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Proof Without Words

The sum of squares — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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IBM's new AI does something amazing: it learns from "memories"

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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New research about biodiversity reveals the importance of climate on today's abundance of life

Biodiversity Natural history museum paleontologists in Copenhagen and Helsinki have succeeded in mapping historical biodiversity in unprecedented detail. For the first time, it is possible to compare the impact of climate on global biodiversity in the distant past—a result that paints a gloomy picture for the preservation of present-day species richness. The study has just been published in the pr

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New research about biodiversity reveals the importance of climate on today's abundance of life

Biodiversity Natural history museum paleontologists in Copenhagen and Helsinki have succeeded in mapping historical biodiversity in unprecedented detail. For the first time, it is possible to compare the impact of climate on global biodiversity in the distant past—a result that paints a gloomy picture for the preservation of present-day species richness. The study has just been published in the pr

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The research of Samara scientists will help to explain how building material for planets appears in the universe

The research of samara scientists will help to explain how building material for planets appears in the universe.

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Study: Medication treatment reduces arrests among people with opioid use disorder

When it comes to addressing the national opioid crisis, most of the research has focused on the physical health risks faced by people with opioid use disorder, such as overdose and infectious disease. For the first time, a University of Massachusetts Amherst public health scientist studied the impact of treating opioid use disorder on the risk for arrest and incarceration, comparing the effects of

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Shining lasers on mouse brains sheds light on cells central to Alzheimer's, schizophrenia

Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia are some of the most common brain disorders and have been associated with problems in cells that contain a type of protein, called parvalbumin.

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Digital technology shows promise in supporting nonspecialists to deliver mental health care in low- and middle-income countries

Text messaging, mobile apps, and other digital technologies are being used in innovative ways to support nonspecialist health workers in increasing access to mental health care in low- and middle-income countries (LIMCs), according to a narrative review in the March/April issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Evidence: Inspirational augmented reality apps can improve brand attitude

More companies are using augmented reality marketing (ARM) to interact with customers. ARM is a strategic concept that uses AR (integration of digital information or objects into the subject's perception of the physical world) to demonstrate consumer benefits to achieve organizational goals. A recent study indicates that one of the main barriers to the use of AR as a marketing tool is a solid unde

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Lack of access to antibiotics is a major global health challenge

In a new report, titled 'Access Barriers to Antibiotics' (available April 11, 2019) researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy conducted stakeholder interviews in Uganda, India, and Germany, and literature reviews to identify key access barriers to antibiotics in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. The report makes several recommendations proposing action on R&D, stre

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EU: Facebook changes terms to show it makes money from data

Facebook has changed the fine print in its terms of service to clearly explain to users that it makes money by using their data, the European Commission said Tuesday.

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The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity is found

Russian physicist Viktor Lakhno from Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, RAS considers symmetrical bipolarons as a basis of high-temperature superconductivity. The theory explains recent experiments in which a superconductivity was reached in lanthanum hydride LaH10 at extra-high pressure at nearly room temperature. The results of the study are published in Physica C: Superconductivity and i

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New to college? Spend some time alone

Seeking solitude—for the right reasons—can be good for first-year college students, research suggests. How young adults manage to navigate the stressful transition to college has long-term implications for their academic performance and ability to stick with their studies. Research has shown that one frequent pitfall during this transition period from high school to college is social isolation. L

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This compact and cheap lidar could steer small autonomous vehicles

Researchers in Sweden have developed cheaper, lighter and more efficient lidar technology that could pave the way for smaller autonomous craft such as drones and robots, and help enable better profitability in the vehicle industry.

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Negative ideas about sexting encourage unwanted distribution of photos

Sexting is 'not done.' That's a widely shared opinion. It's considered as unwise and even dangerous to make and share sexual photos or videos of yourself. If a photo leaks, the photographer is quickly blamed. But instead of preventing the unwanted distribution of sexual material, this approach actually worsens the problem. This was shown in a research report by Marijke Naezer (Radboud University)

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What makes the Impossible Burger look and taste like real beef?

People eat animals that eat plants. If we just eliminate that middle step and eat plants directly, we would diminish our carbon footprint, decrease agricultural land usage, eliminate health risks associated with red meat and alleviate ethical concerns over animal welfare. For many of us, the major hurdle to executing this plan is that meat tastes good. Really good. By contrast, a veggie burger tas

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Simultaneous heatwaves caused by anthropogenic climate change

Without the climate change caused by human activity, simultaneous heatwaves would not have hit such a large area as they did last summer. This is the conclusion of researchers at ETH Zurich based on observational and model data.

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Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH

Scientists long puzzled over why bacteria contain so many "redundant" enzymes. Why make several molecules that do the same job, interchangeably, when it would be much more efficient to make just one?

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Specialist enzymes make E. coli antibiotic resistant at low pH

Scientists long puzzled over why bacteria contain so many "redundant" enzymes. Why make several molecules that do the same job, interchangeably, when it would be much more efficient to make just one?

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Novel membrane material removes more impurities without the need for toxic solvents

Natural gas and biogas have become increasingly popular sources of energy throughout the world in recent years, thanks to their cleaner and more efficient combustion process when compared to coal and oil.

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How to feed the world and preserve the environment

Farmers bear much of the burden for growing the food to feed billions of people as the world's population continually trends upward.

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Solcreme eller ansigtscreme med SPF? Sådan beskytter du dig bedst i forårssolen

Selvom solcremen og ansigtscremen har samme faktor, er der forskel.

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The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet's climate history

Scientists want to drill a 1.5 million year old ice core in Antarctica. An analysis of the climate data stored in the ice should contribute to a better understanding of the alternation between warm and cold periods.

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Meet Blue, the low-cost, human-friendly robot designed for AI

Researchers have created a new low-cost, human friendly robot named Blue, designed to use recent advances in artificial intelligence and deep reinforcement learning to master intricate human tasks, all while remaining affordable and safe enough that every AI researcher could have one. The team hopes Blue will accelerate the development of robotics for the home.

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Volunteer birdwatching survey shows effects of temperatures on population of Jays

A study has used data collected by volunteer bird watchers to study how the importance of wildlife habitat management for British birds depends on changing temperatures.

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Regionsforhandler vil gøre praksislægers honorering mere rimelig

Bo Libergren (V), der skal lede de forestående overenskomstforhandlinger med de praktiserende læger, er klar til at gøre det mere økonomisk fordelagtigt at være læge for landets tungeste patienter. Men pengene skal som udgangspunkt tages fra andre læger.

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Short daily walks ward off disability in older adults

Just one hour of brisk walking a week staves off disability in older adults with arthritis pain, or aching or stiffness in a knee, hip, ankle, or foot, research finds. “This is less than 10 minutes a day for people to maintain their independence. It’s very doable,” says lead author Dorothy Dunlop, professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “This minim

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Genome assembly of pasta wheat leads to new insights for modern wheat breeding

Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum) is the basic commodity for the production of pasta, as this cereal plant yields grains with the necessary high content of gluten proteins. An international collaboration spearheaded by Italian researchers has now fully sequenced and assembled the genome of the durum wheat cultivar 'Svevo.'

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The mechanism of high-temperature superconductivity is found

Russian physicist Viktor Lakhno from Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, RAS considers symmetrical bipolarons as a basis of high-temperature superconductivity. The theory explains recent experiments in which a superconductivity was reached in lanthanum hydride LaH10 at extra-high pressure at nearly room temperature. The results of the study are published in Physica C: Superconductivity and i

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Researchers reveal novel therapeutic strategy for ALS

Researchers from the Institute of Neuroscience and their collaborators revealed a new cellular mechanism for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggested a novel therapeutic strategy targeting the RNA degradation pathway, and identified an asthma drug as a potential medication for ALS.

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Bionics: Electric view in murky waters

When dealing with disasters or searching for objects, robots or drones with cameras are usually used. However, conventional cameras are of rather limited use in murky, dark water, such as in a sewage pipe or a lake that is cloudy with sediment. Zoologists at the University of Bonn have developed a special camera for such operating conditions: modeled on the African elephantnose fish (Gnathonemus p

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ESMO drives EU-level action to tackle shortages of essential medicines

Shortages of essential cancer medicines have a direct impact on patient care across Europe. To ensure that this issue remains a top priority on the EU policy agenda, ESMO — the leading European professional organisation for medical oncology, collaborated with the European Parliament to organise a cross-partisan event entitled 'Shortages of Inexpensive, Essential Medicines: Calling for Tangible Po

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Towards new indicators of vulnerability to psychotic disorders

The decision-making processes of healthy subjects with sub-clinical psychotic episodes are altered in a way that is similar to what happens in subjects with schizophrenia. This is the key result of a study conducted by SISSA Neuroscience and Society Laboratory in association with the Zayed University of Dubai, recently published on Scientific Reports. The research has examined, for the first time,

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High-strength MRI tracks MS progression

The development of scars, or lesions, in the brain's cortical gray matter is a powerful predictor of neurological disability for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new study. Researchers said that the findings suggest a role for ultra-high-field-strength MRI in evaluating the progression of MS.

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Prepare for Robocall Hell, Where Scam Bots Pretend to Be Your Mom

Call Hating Robocalls are on the rise , with nearly a third of all phone calls now made by automated dialing machines programmed to play a prerecorded message if someone answers. Now, experts are predicting that the annoying calls are destined for a high-tech — and highly disturbing — next level of evolution: scammers using voice-mimicking AIs to make their pre-recorded messages sound like your f

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Study cancer survivors

Study cancer survivors Study cancer survivors, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01095-9 More and more people are living for years after treatment. Researchers should look for ways to identify and ease the long-term effects.

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Airbus v. Boeing at the WTO: Only the lawyers win

The tit-for-tat legal battle between Airbus and Boeing at the World Trade Organization could, after 15 years, be fairly described as epic.

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Paris orders 800 new electric buses to fight smog

Paris' public transport operator on Tuesday said it had ordered up to 800 electric buses to take to the streets of the French capital to replace diesel versions and fight smog in the build up to the 2024 Olympics.

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Uber Jumps into electric scooters in Europe

Global ride-hailing giant Uber on Tuesday launched in Madrid its first electric kick scooter rental service in Europe through its subsidiary Jump.

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What is a black hole? Searching for what can't be seen

Massive, ravenous, powerful beyond measure -– physicists are convinced that black holes exist, even if no one has directly observed one.

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Facebook, Google face House hearing on white nationalism

Executives from Google and Facebook are facing Congress Tuesday to answer questions about their role in the spread of hate crimes and the rise of white nationalism in the U.S.

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A zap can make 70-year-olds remember stuff like they’re 20

Electrostimulation can improve the working memory of people in their 70s so that their performance on memory tasks is indistinguishable from that of 20-year-olds, according to new research. Working memory is the part of the mind where consciousness lives, the part that is active whenever we make decisions, reason, recall our grocery lists, and (hopefully) remember where we left our keys. Working

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Steam Hardware Survey Shows GPU Gains for AMD, Mixed Turing Results

Another month, another Steam Hardware Survey report. Mixed news for Turing relative to Pascal and some modest upside for AMD. The post Steam Hardware Survey Shows GPU Gains for AMD, Mixed Turing Results appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Here’s Why Everyone’s so Excited About the Black Hole Image

Big Release On Wednesday morning, astronomers from the Event Horizon Telescope, a collaborative network of telescopes and astronomy research facilities around the world, are expected to release the first ever pictures of the supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Accompanying it will be a picture of an even larger black hole in the Virgo constellation. In the past, images of black h

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What Exactly Is a Black Hole Event Horizon (and What Happens There)?

The event horizon is the threshold around the black hole where the escape velocity surpasses the speed of light. Here's what that means.

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Netgear's Four New Wi-Fi 6 Wireless Routers Supercharge Home Networks With Blazing Fast Speeds

Netgear on Tuesday announced four new high-end Wi-Fi 6 wireless routers for increasingly connected homes. The expanded lineup arrives as households see an increasing number of gadgets vie for …

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Firefox Tests Browser Fingerprint And Crypto Mining Blocking

Mozilla continues to build more tracking protection for its Firefox internet browser. The company has revealed that it’s testing a new anti-tracking feature which will no longer allow …

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Blue Is a New Low-Cost Force-Controlled Robot Arm from UC Berkeley

Designed to safely perform human-scale tasks, Blue will cost $5k and help accelerate research towards useful home robots

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Researchers reveal more than dozen wild bee species declining in Northeast

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.

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EU: Facebook changes terms to show it makes money from data

Facebook has changed the fine print in its terms of service to clearly explain to users that it makes money by using their data, the European Commission said Tuesday.

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Researchers reveal more than dozen wild bee species declining in Northeast

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.

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First machine-generated book published

Springer Nature published its first machine-generated book, compiled using an algorithm developed by researchers from Goethe University. This collaboration broke new ground with the first machine-generated book to be published by a scholarly publisher.

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Lille undervandsdrone skal finde de store fisk

Rungsted-virksomheden Atlas Maridan samarbejder med DTU-forsker om udviklingen af en drone, der selv kan finde fiskestimer og hjælpe fiskebåde i hverdagen.

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The Need That Democrats Aren’t Addressing

We may be the better part of two years away from the next presidential election, but the central Democratic narrative of the coming campaign has already come into clear focus. Democrats are poised to employ a two-pronged strategy. First, they’ll speak to the electorate’s festering personal anger with President Donald Trump. Second, they’ll promise a bevy of new benefits, including some combinatio

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Watch These Robots Do Tasks You Thought Were Simple (But for Them Are Pretty Hard)

Robots have been masters of manufacturing at speed and precision for decades, but give them a seemingly simple task like stacking shelves, and they quickly get stuck. That’s changing, though, as engineers build systems that can take on the deceptively tricky tasks most humans can do with their eyes closed. Boston Dynamics is famous for dramatic reveals of robots performing mind-blowing feats that

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Hunt on for iron volcanoes on metallic asteroids

Two teams conclude some asteroids once spewed molten metal, as NASA prepares to investigate. Andrew Masterson reports.

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India’s dual battle with diseases of affluence and poverty

Economic growth loads diabetes and obesity onto a health system already battling gut disease and malnutrition. Biplab Das reports.

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Cool roofs reduce urban heat; green ones, not so much

UK study finds low-tech colour fix pays big dividends during hot days. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Australia has more large, scary spiders than previously thought

Researchers identify four new venomous species.

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Mapping cellular diversity by looking for common topics of gene control

A Belgian team of computational biologists led by Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) has developed a new bioinformatics method called cisTopic. Inspired by text-mining methods, cisTopic helps scientists to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the differences in gene regulation across and within the cells in our body by looking for common topics. In a new publication in Nature Methods, Aerts and hi

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New research about biodiversity reveals the importance of climate on today's abundance of life

Natural history museum paleontologists in Copenhagen and Helsinki have succeeded in mapping historical biodiversity in unprecedented detail. For the first time, it is now possible to compare the impact of climate on global biodiversity in the distant past — a result that paints a gloomy picture for the preservation of present-day species richness. The study has just been published in the prestigi

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Study explores how technology can help prompt positive memories for people with depression

A team of human-computer interaction researchers from Lancaster University and Trinity College Dublin, have through in-depth interviews with experts in neuropsychology and cognitive behavioral therapies, found that most existing technologies related to supporting memory impairments are focused on 'episodic' impairments, which are closely associated with conditions such as dementia.

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Bionics: Electric view in murky waters

When dealing with disasters or searching for objects, robots or drones with cameras are usually used. However, conventional cameras are of rather limited use in murky, dark water, such as in a sewage pipe or a lake that is cloudy with sediment. Zoologists at the University of Bonn have now developed a special camera for such operating conditions: Modeled on the African elephantnose fish (Gnathonem

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Study sheds light on major disease in roses

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Beltsville, Maryland and their colleagues have discovered why a mite is causing extensive damages to the nation's $250-million-a-year rose industry and why it's so hard to detect and control. It seems the mite hides deep in the flower's internal organs.

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Plant diversity increases insect diversity

The more plant species that grow in grasslands and forests, the more insect species that find a habitat there. However, the presence of more plant species not only increases the number of insect species, but also the number of insect individuals. Simultaneously, animal diversity is not only determined by plant diversity, but also by the physical structure of the plant communities. These are the re

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Wild Bill’s Greenhorn Goes Missing | Deadliest Catch

Aboard the Summer Bay, Wild Bill and crew discover they’re missing 18-year-old greenhorn Griffin. Catch the New Season of DEADLIEST CATCH Tuesday April 9, 9p on Discovery. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.face

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Bionics: Electric view in murky waters

When dealing with disasters or searching for objects, robots or drones with cameras are usually used. However, conventional cameras are of rather limited use in murky, dark water, such as in a sewage pipe or a lake that is cloudy with sediment. Zoologists at the University of Bonn have now developed a special camera for such operating conditions: Modeled on the African elephantnose fish (Gnathonem

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Despite good progress, 100% low-carbon energy is still a long way off for the UK

In the past ten years the UK's electricity mix has changed dramatically. Coal's contribution has dropped from 40 percent to 6 percent. Wind, solar power and hydroelectric plants now generate more electricity than nuclear power stations, thanks to rapid growth. Demand for electricity has also fallen, reducing the country's dependence on fossil fuels. Thanks to these three factors, the carbon intens

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Backpackers are worried about using mobile devices in Ghana

Backpacking emerged in the 1970s as a low cost form of travel that allowed particularly young people to explore the world without spending too much money.

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Study sheds light on major disease in roses

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Beltsville, Maryland and their colleagues have discovered why a mite is causing extensive damages to the nation's $250-million-a-year rose industry and why it's so hard to detect and control. It seems the mite hides deep in the flower's internal organs.

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The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet's climate history

A European research consortium, in which the University of Bern is involved in, wants to drill a 1.5 million year old ice core in Antarctica. An analysis of the climate data stored in the ice should contribute to a better understanding of the alternation between warm and cold periods.

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Plant diversity increases insect diversity

The more plant species that grow in grasslands and forests, the more insect species that find a habitat there. However, the presence of more plant species not only increases the number of insect species, but also the number of insect individuals. Simultaneously, animal diversity is not only determined by plant diversity, but also by the physical structure of the plant communities. These are the re

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New quick-fix wrap can repair and reinforce existing structures

By protecting concrete pillars with a ready-to-stick wrap developed by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and JTC, existing structures can be easily repaired and reinforced to extend their lifespan. This new technology is especially useful for urban cities to rehabilitate aging infrastructure, including buildings and bridges that may have developed issues such as cracks an

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First birth after robot-assisted uterus transplant

A boy 48 centimeters long, weighing 2900 grams, is the first baby born after the technological shift on uterine transplantation. The birth, with the planned cesarean delivery (C-section), took place on Monday April 8th and the whole family is doing fine.

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New state of matter: Elements can be solid and liquid at same time

Scientists have discovered a new state of physical matter in which atoms can exist as both solid and liquid simultaneously.

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Læger, nok er nok – lad os samles 6. juni

Vi læger kan ikke længere sidde med hænderne i skødet – vi foreslår, at alle læger i landet torsdag 6. juni 2019 tager fri fra praksis og hospitalsklinikker og mødes for at diskutere, hvad pokker vi skal gøre for igen at kunne komme til at passe vores arbejde.

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Nationella minoriteter reduceras till symboler

Den svenska historien är brokig, mångfasetterad och skapad av människor med olika bakgrund. Enligt de nationella kulturmiljömålen ska en mångfald av kulturmiljöer vårdas för framtiden. I två forskningsprojekt har Göteborgs universitet undersökt hur medarbetare på museer och länsstyrelser uppmärksammar och hanterar spåren i landskapet efter de fem nationella minoriteterna: romer, sverigefinnar, to

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Climate change poses security risks, according to decades of intelligence reports

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections A series of authoritative governmental and nongovernmental analyses over more than three decades lays a strong foundation for concern over climate change implications for national security. Most recently, the national intelligence community – including the Central Intelligence Agency, National Security Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and ot

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Recovering lead, plastic, and sulphuric acid from used automobile batteries

Lead is a poisonous metal and a significant environmental pollutant. An important source of waste is the lead used in car batteries. Research published in Progress in Industrial Ecology, An International Journal shows how lead, scrap plastic, and sulfuric acid from used car batteries might be retrieved based on a mathematical reverse logistics network model.

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What most attracts us to a tourist destination? Attractions, culture and gastronomy

Tourists' expectations when visiting a particular place are related to several features of the chosen destination: culture, architecture, gastronomy, infrastructure, landscape, events, shopping and others. These features attract people to the destination and contribute to the overall experience of the trip. As a whole, they are crucial aspects of the destinations and have a profound influence on t

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These simple navigating tools could save you when GPS can’t

Gadgets A map and the tools you need to read it could get you home safe—no charging required. You don't need to follow the stars or the sunset to navigate when the GPS isn't available.

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How business students, future executives link sustainability and global strife

The global business environment has become increasingly turbulent, with international alliances and trading blocs fragmenting, extreme political candidates gaining popularity, climate change intensifying, all as the growth of developing economies declines and civil instability grows in many regions.

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Evidence of pair-density wave (PDW) in spin-valley locked systems

The isolation of graphene more than a decade ago transformed the landscape of condensed-matter physics, as the single-atom-thick, two-dimensional material exhibited high crystal and electronic quality to represent a conceptually new class of quantum materials. Physicists and engineers have since explored a vast family of two-dimensional crystals known as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) in

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The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet's climate history

A European research consortium, in which the University of Bern is involved in, wants to drill a 1.5 million year old ice core in Antarctica. An analysis of the climate data stored in the ice should contribute to a better understanding of the alternation between warm and cold periods.

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First birth after robot-assisted uterus transplant

A boy 48 centimeters long, weighing 2900 grams, is the first baby born after the technological shift in the Swedish world-leading research on uterine transplantation. The birth, with the planned cesarean delivery (C-section), took place on Monday April 8th and the whole family is doing fine.

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New findings on the effect of Epsom salt—Epsom salt receptor identified

A team of scientists headed by Maik Behrens from the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has identified the receptor responsible for the bitter taste of various salts. These include Epsom salt, which has medical uses. The discovery elucidates the physiological mechanisms by which Epsom salt affects the heart or gut. The team has now published their find

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Michael Tomasello: What makes humans human?

In his new book, Becoming Human, (Harvard University Press, 2019) Michael Tomasello brings together more than two decades of his research on what makes humans unique. The book builds on Tomasello's work studying young children's development, and on the psychological processes that set young children apart from human's closest living relatives, the great apes.

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A detailed eucalypt family tree helps us see how they came to dominate Australia

Eucalypts dominate Australia's landscape like no other plant group in the world.

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Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach

Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI have published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq).

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Mapping cellular diversity by looking for common topics of gene control

A Belgian team of computational biologists led by Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) has developed a new bioinformatics method called cisTopic. Inspired by text-mining methods, cisTopic helps scientists to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the differences in gene regulation across and within the cells in our body by looking for common topics. In a new publication in Nature Methods, Aerts and hi

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Using artificial intelligence to understand collective behavior

Professor Thomas Müller and Professor Hans Briegel have been carrying out research on a machine learning model for several years that differs significantly from alternative artificial intelligence (AI) learning models. The philosopher from Konstanz and the theoretical physicist from the University of Innsbruck have integrated methods of philosophical action theory and quantum optics. Their "Projec

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A detailed eucalypt family tree helps us see how they came to dominate Australia

Eucalypts dominate Australia's landscape like no other plant group in the world.

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New wasps named after biscuits and Doctor Who aliens

University of Adelaide researchers were inspired by everything from chocolate biscuits and Doctor Who aliens when choosing names for 10 new species of wasps.

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Lab tests of blu e-vapor show no evidence of damage to human lung cells

New peer reviewed research commissioned by Imperial Brands was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of blu e-vapor on human airway tissue, compared with conventional cigarette smoke.In the in-vitro study, the impact of e-vapor — from both flavoured and unflavoured e-liquid – on human airway tissue was similar to fresh air. In contrast, exposure to conventional cigarette smoke r

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UNH researchers reveal more than dozen wild bee species declining in Northeast

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.

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Over-the-counter antioxidant mix improved vascular health in some heart failure patients

A combination of over-the-counter antioxidants shows promise for mitigating some damaging effects of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), a new study reports. The research, which will be presented today at the American Physiological Society's (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando, Fla., is the first to evaluate the efficacy of antioxidants to improve vascu

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Teeth whitening products can harm protein-rich tooth layer

Americans spend more than a billion dollars on teeth whitening products each year. Although these products can make smiles brighter, new research shows that they might also be causing tooth damage.

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Combining opioids and marijuana may be advantageous for pain sufferers

Researchers report combining cannabinoids with morphine did not significantly increase impulsivity or memory impairment in a study conducted in rhesus monkeys. The findings suggest using opioids and marijuana together could offer a safe way to cut opioid dosage among patients suffering from pain and thereby reduce their risk of becoming addicted to opioids.

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Marijuana for morning sickness? It's not great for baby's brain

With a growing number of states legalizing recreational or medical marijuana, more women are using the drug during pregnancy, in part due to its reported ability to relieve morning sickness. A new study, conducted in rats, sheds light on how cannabis exposure affects the brain of a developing fetus.

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Study suggests 'rest is best' for carpal tunnel and similar injuries

In a new study conducted in rats, researchers found a four-week period of rest was nearly as effective as an experimental drug at reducing discomfort and regaining function after an injury from repeated moderate-strain activity. The findings are relevant to treating common musculoskeletal disorders caused by overuse, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, tendinitis, tendinosis and low back pain.

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Melatonin's heart protective effects not related to its antioxidant properties

Although melatonin does improve the outcomes of induced heart attacks in rats, those improvements are not the result of its antioxidant effect, new research finds. The study comparing antioxidant activity and heart protection will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2019 in Orlando.

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Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach

Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI have published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq).

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Mapping cellular diversity by looking for common topics of gene control

A Belgian team of computational biologists led by Stein Aerts (VIB-KU Leuven) has developed a new bioinformatics method called cisTopic. Inspired by text-mining methods, cisTopic helps scientists to gain insight into the mechanisms underlying the differences in gene regulation across and within the cells in our body by looking for common topics. In a new publication in Nature Methods, Aerts and hi

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Biomass analysis: The key to success for your biorefinery process

Celignis founder Dr. Daniel Hayes discovered that although feedstock composition was a critical factor for the success of biomass transformation processes, precise data was missing for a wide range of feedstocks. To address this issue, and avoid future problems in conversion processes, companies used to subcontract laboratories to chemically analyse biomass samples. This process is time consuming

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Biomass analysis: The key to success for your biorefinery process

Celignis founder Dr. Daniel Hayes discovered that although feedstock composition was a critical factor for the success of biomass transformation processes, precise data was missing for a wide range of feedstocks. To address this issue, and avoid future problems in conversion processes, companies used to subcontract laboratories to chemically analyse biomass samples. This process is time consuming

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New findings on the effect of Epsom salt—Epsom salt receptor identified

A team of scientists headed by Maik Behrens from the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich has identified the receptor responsible for the bitter taste of various salts. These include Epsom salt, which has medical uses. The discovery elucidates the physiological mechanisms by which Epsom salt affects the heart or gut. The team has now published their find

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New fossil evidence claims first discovery of taro in Maori gardens

The first discovery of Polynesian taro grown in Māori gardens in the 1400s can be claimed by an archaeological research project on Ahuahu-Great Mercury Island.

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What makes somebody change their mind about Brexit? | Andre Spicer

Leading Brexiter voice Peter Oborne has done a U-turn, showing that even locked-in beliefs have a tipping point “It’s nearly three years since I, along with 17. 4 million other Britons, voted for Brexit. Today I have to admit that the Brexit project has gone sour.” So began the Daily Mail columnist Peter Oborne’s widely shared piece on why he changed his mind about Brexit . The article stood out b

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Police stops unintentionally increase criminal behavior in black and Latino youths

Juan Del Toro, doctoral candidate in NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development finds that Black and Latino adolescent boys who are stopped by police report more frequent engagement in delinquent behavior thereafter.

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Forget smart cities (for a minute), we need to talk about smart farms

There's a lot of talk about digital technology and smart cities, but what about smart farms? Many of us still have a romantic view of farmers surveying rolling hills and farm kids cuddling calves, but our food in Canada increasingly comes from industrial-scale factory farms and vast glass and steel forests of greenhouses.

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01103-y How Nature reported the opening of the children’s gallery at the London Science Museum in 1969, and a strange memory problem from 1919.

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Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros

Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility. They compared the gut microbiome of two rhinoceros species to investigate whether the gut microbes metabolize dietary phytoestrogens, which appear to play a role in infertility.

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New pathways for sustainable agriculture

Hedges, flowering strips and other semi-natural habitats provide food and nesting places for insects and birds in agricultural landscapes. This also has advantages for agriculture: bees, flies, beetles and other animal groups pollinate crops and control pest insects in adjacent fields.

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Researchers use shear forces to create self-assembled supramolecular hydrogel

A team of researchers at Southern University of Science and Technology in China has found a way to use shear forces to create a self-assembled supramolecular hydrogel from a sol. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the researchers describe how they created their hydrogel and some of its properties.

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Gas dynamics in a nearby protostellar binary system studied with ALMA

An international team of astronomers used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to investigate gas dynamics in a nearby young protostellar binary known as IRAS 16293−2422. Results of the observations, presented in a paper published March 29, provide more insights into the evolutionary status of this system.

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Porcupine Barbs For Better Wound Healing

Surgeons would love to find a replacement for surgical staples — one that doesn't aggravate wounds on the way in and out. Bioengineers think they've found the right model — a porcupine's quill. (Image credit: Lindsay Wildlife Experience)

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How societal attitudes, political rhetoric affect immigrants' health

For immigrants to the United States, the current political climate, and debates over issues such as a border wall, become part of the environment that influences their health, according to a new University of Washington study.

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Most adults dying prematurely of natural causes did not seek medical help, report reveals

About two-thirds of the adults dying prematurely from natural causes did not seek medical help within the 30 days preceding their death, reported forensic researchers from The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and the Harris County Institute of Forensic Sciences (IFS).

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Police stops unintentionally increase criminal behavior in black and Latino youths

New research by NYU Steinhardt doctoral candidate Juan Del Toro finds that Black and Latino adolescent boys who are stopped by police report more frequent engagement in delinquent behavior thereafter. The study also demonstrates that police stops have a negative impact on the adolescents' psychological well-being.

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Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros

Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility. They compared the gut microbiome of two rhinoceros species to investigate whether the gut microbes metabolize dietary phytoestrogens, which appear to play a role in infertility.

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New pathways for sustainable agriculture

Hedges, flowering strips and other semi-natural habitats provide food and nesting places for insects and birds in agricultural landscapes. This also has advantages for agriculture: bees, flies, beetles and other animal groups pollinate crops and control pest insects in adjacent fields.

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Researchers working to prevent sexual harassment in scientific field settings

Scientists involved in a field campaign are away from their normal routines, offices and universities, including the support mechanisms available if sexual harassment or other inappropriate behaviors occur. Three Colorado State University researchers are examining the prevalence of sexual harassment in field-based research as part of a National Science Foundation-supported study.

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New research sheds light on the best ways to stay engaged at work

Employees who have the ability to shape their own role, work collaboratively with their colleagues, and participate in mindfulness activities are more likely to stay engaged at work, new research led by Curtin University has found.

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Bacteria that oxidizes methane found in common soil

A team of researchers with members from Norway, Austria, Russia and Germany has found a kind of bacteria that oxidizes methane. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their findings and suggest their work could lead to progress in combating global warming.

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Mechanism to form influenza A virus discovered

The influenza A virus is known to form new strains every year. These strains are the result of small variations occurring at the level of the genome, which cause the virus to change and become unfamiliar to the immune system. A new study by Maria João Amorim's team, from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science, now reveals where the genomes of the influenza A virus are assembled inside infected cells.

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The Loopy Secrets of How Charging Cables Work

Your phone charger and USB cables look like they're single cords, but don't be fooled: Unwrap any cable and you'll find multiple wires inside.

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Facebook Rolls Out More Features for Dead People

When you die, Facebook wants your profile to become a place for grieving friends and family to gather online.

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Antarctica’s iceberg graveyard could reveal the ice sheet’s future

Drilling deep into the seafloor beneath Antarctica’s “Iceberg Alley” could reveal new clues about how quickly the continent has melted in the past.

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Mechanism to form influenza A virus discovered

The influenza A virus is known to form new strains every year. These strains are the result of small variations occurring at the level of the genome, which cause the virus to change and become unfamiliar to the immune system. A new study by Maria João Amorim's team, from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science, now reveals where the genomes of the influenza A virus are assembled inside infected cells.

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U.S. wants a crewed mission to the moon in five years – but can and should that be done?

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing and a significant turning point in world history. The Israeli robotic mission Beresheet has just arrived in lunar orbit, with a scheduled landing on April 11 – making Israel the fourth country to land on the surface of the moon. It follows China's exciting first ever landing on the moon's far side in January.

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More than 90% of glacier volume in the Alps could be lost by 2100

New research on how glaciers in the European Alps will fare under a warming climate has come up with concerning results. Under a limited warming scenario, glaciers would lose about two-thirds of their present-day ice volume, while under strong warming, the Alps would be mostly ice free by 2100.

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Norway Is Walking Away From Billions of Barrels of Oil

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

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Smart styrning av trafikljusen minskar köerna

Gustav Nilsson vid institutionen för reglerteknik, LTH, har utvecklat en teori för hur man kan mäta och styra köerna med kameror i realtid. Det är billigare och mer funktionellt än dagens magnetdetektorer, som endast känner av plåten hos en bil som passerar och inte bilkön i sin helhet. Dessutom måste detektorerna grävas ner, vilket medför kostnader. Trafikköer är ett växande problem. 2014 orsaka

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Making and Measuring Multivalency

Here’s an unusual paper that’s studying receptor behavior on cell surfaces by use of atomic force microscopy. (Here’s the SI file , which is free to access). The authors took the marketed VEGF inhibitor vandetanib (VD6474) and attached it through linkers to the AFM tip, and then scanned around the surface of live human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) sitting on a test surface. Using a t

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The biggest change to manhood? Equal parenting.

The biggest example of a change in men's gendered behavior in recent years is the transformation of fatherhood. Nowadays, the definition of manhood has increasingly included being a present, and good caregiver. Women have historically been burdened with childcare and housework. So much so that they usually longer off time off for parental leave. Also, they're the ones tending to take off work if

8h

Fearless sea urchins stripping underwater forests

A new study led by The University of Western Australia and the Centre of Advanced Studies of Blanes in Spain has found that sea urchins' fear of predators plays a key role in the health of underwater forests, which are declining globally.

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Researchers provide new method to boost clean energy research

Electrochemical energy systems—processes by which electrical energy is converted to chemical energy—are at the heart of establishing more efficient generation and storage of intermittent energy from renewable sources in fuel cells and batteries.

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Fearless sea urchins stripping underwater forests

A new study led by The University of Western Australia and the Centre of Advanced Studies of Blanes in Spain has found that sea urchins' fear of predators plays a key role in the health of underwater forests, which are declining globally.

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Damage estimates of particulate matter air pollution reported in study

A team of researchers including University of New Mexico economics professor Andrew Goodkind is addressing the deadly problem of particulate matter air pollution in the U.S. and how to best mitigate it.

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Spotted lanternflies found to be flyers, not gliders

The spotted lanternfly is not a strong or frequent flyer, weaknesses that may hinder its ability to travel long distances by air, according to researchers.

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Studies of fossil teeth reveal another Pleistocene ape species from Southeast Asia

Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientists were able to document an additional fossil ape species in the Senckenberg hominid collection. The new species had already been described in 1950 as Meganthropus palaeojavanicus by Gustav Heinrich Ralph von Koenigswald, the founder of Senckenberg's paleoanthropological department, but at the time it was interpreted as a prehistoric human.

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Squid team finds high species diversity off Kermadec Islands, part of stalled marine reserve proposal

Squids and octopuses could be considered the "parrots of the ocean". Some are smart, and many have complex behaviours. And, of course, they have strange, bird-like beaks.

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Projection system to study insect vision could lead to new navigational aids

Development of a virtual reality-like projection system to study insect vision could eventually provide the U.S. Air Force with a new type of navigation system.

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Researchers witness the emergence of a new gene in the lab

How do new genes appear? For more than a century, researchers have thought that, from time to time, new gene functions evolved after cells accidentally made a copy of one of their existing genes. According to this theory, the 'extra' gene copy could then evolve freely. In this way, it could acquire a new function, while the original gene ensured that the original function was retained. No direct o

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ATLAS experiment measures Higgs boson coupling to top quark in diphoton channel with full Run 2 dataset

In 2018, the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at CERN announced the observation of the production of the Higgs boson in association with a top-quark pair, known as "ttH" production. This result was the first observation of the Higgs boson coupling to quarks. It was followed shortly by the observation of Higgs boson decays to bottom quarks.

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Studies of fossil teeth reveal another Pleistocene ape species from Southeast Asia

Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientists were able to document an additional fossil ape species in the Senckenberg hominid collection. The new species had already been described in 1950 as Meganthropus palaeojavanicus by Gustav Heinrich Ralph von Koenigswald, the founder of Senckenberg's paleoanthropological department, but at the time it was interpreted as a prehistoric human.

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Squid team finds high species diversity off Kermadec Islands, part of stalled marine reserve proposal

Squids and octopuses could be considered the "parrots of the ocean". Some are smart, and many have complex behaviours. And, of course, they have strange, bird-like beaks.

8h

Researchers witness the emergence of a new gene in the lab

How do new genes appear? For more than a century, researchers have thought that, from time to time, new gene functions evolved after cells accidentally made a copy of one of their existing genes. According to this theory, the 'extra' gene copy could then evolve freely. In this way, it could acquire a new function, while the original gene ensured that the original function was retained. No direct o

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Climate change means nearly all glaciers in the Alps may disappear

A study of what will happen to glaciers in the Alps under various climate scenarios suggests they will almost completely disappear if we keep pumping out carbon dioxide

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Driving force of volcanic super-hazards uncovered

Massey volcanologists have discovered the driving force behind superheated gas-and-ash clouds from volcanic eruptions, which may help save lives and infrastructure around the globe.

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Turning the periodic table through 180 degrees for a new perspective

Could turning the periodic table on its head make some important aspects easier to understand and enthuse more people to study chemistry?

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Racism rife at top South African university, says report

Racism rife at top South African university, says report Racism rife at top South African university, says report, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01129-2 University of Cape Town investigation prompted by violent protests rekindles debate about decolonizing the nation’s universities and curricula.

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Confronting the Replication Crisis Could Lead to Better Science

Scientists face increased scrutiny after reports revealed a significant fraction of published studies from certain fields are irreproducible. But the "crisis" could provide motivation for researchers to better their scientific practices and improve their intuition about statistical inference.

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This may be the Apple II of AI-driven robot arms

A new low-cost robot arm that can be controlled using a virtual-reality headset will make it easier to experiment with AI and robotics.

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A guide to the moon's craters, seas, and ghostly shine

Space Excerpt: A Book of the Moon When observing the Moon with the naked eye, the easiest things to spot are the lunar maria. Maggie Aderin-Pocock shows how in her newest book "The Book of the Moon,"…

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More than 90% of glacier volume in the Alps could be lost by 2100

New research on how glaciers in the European Alps will fare under a warming climate has come up with concerning results. Under a limited warming scenario, glaciers would lose about two-thirds of their present-day ice volume, while under strong warming, the Alps would be mostly ice free by 2100. The results, now published in the European Geosciences Union (EGU) journal The Cryosphere, are presented

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A realist takes on quantum mechanics

A realist takes on quantum mechanics A realist takes on quantum mechanics, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01101-0 Graham Farmelo parses Lee Smolin’s takedown of the most successful physics theory ever.

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How should social media platforms combat misinformation and hate speech?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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'Food computers' could be the future of agriculture

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Two-thirds of glacier ice in the Alps 'will melt by 2100'

If emissions continue to rise at current rate, ice will have all but disappeared from Europe’s Alpine valleys by end of century Two-thirds of the ice in the glaciers of the Alps is doomed to melt by the end of the century as climate change forces up temperatures, a study has found. Half of the ice in the mountain chain’s 4,000 glaciers will be gone by 2050 due to global warming already baked in b

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Great Lakes ice cover forecasts: New approach enables local predictions

Highly localized and accurate Great Lakes ice cover forecasts have been demonstrated by researchers at the University of Michigan, and their predictive modeling tool can be adapted for any geographic region.

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Are Plastic Bag Bans Garbage?

A national movement to ban plastic bags is gaining steam, but these restrictions may actually hurt the environment more than help it. Human nature, hard truths, and what kind of bag to use anyway? (Image credit: Fiona Goodall/Getty Images)

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The Death of America’s Frontier Vision

Katherine Lam L ost Children Archive opens as a family prepares for a transnational journey. The man is a sound artist; the woman’s a radio documentarian; the boy is 10; the girl, 5. The man has announced that he has to go to Arizona on a recording quest, and whether he intends to come home again is not clear. The woman is opposed but eventually agrees: They will all drive west until they find wh

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Quantum Acupuncture

In 2017 Chinese scientists published a paper in the journal Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion titled, “ Discussion on quantum entanglement theory and acupuncture .” There are several layers to the erosion of science that this paper represents. Fortunately the paper was recently retracted , for reasons the editors do not make clear. I suspect they were just embarrassed. The first layer I would lik

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More than 90% of glacier volume in the Alps could be lost by 2100

New research on how glaciers in the European Alps will fare under a warming climate has come up with concerning results. Under a limited warming scenario, glaciers would lose about two-thirds of their present-day ice volume, while under strong warming, the Alps would be mostly ice free by 2100. The results, now published in the European Geosciences Union (EGU) journal The Cryosphere, are presented

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Lake Erie's toxic algae blooms: Why is the water turning green?

Since the late 1990s, Lake Erie has been plagued with blooms of toxic algae that turn its waters a bright blue-green. These harmful algae blooms are made up of cyanobacteria that produce the liver toxin microcystin.

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Spotify Tips and Tricks: How to Get More Out of Each Listen

Whether you're a new user of the music streaming service or a playlist pro, these tips will improve your next Spotify session.

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Image of the Day: The Night Life

Researchers use thermal cameras to count orangutans in Malaysian Borneo.

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World-first study finds Merino sheep pregnancy can be detected using wool

Researchers from Western Sydney University have found a new, non-invasive way to detect pregnancy in Merino sheep through the analysis of reproductive hormones in wool.

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In cellular world, strong relationships the key to healing old wounds

Yale scientists with colleagues at University College London have taken the next step towards unravelling how cells work together during wound closure, a question that could be fundamental to determining optimal healing rates after injury or disease.

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Perfectly preserved dinosaur skin found in Korea

Paleontologists are used to finding dinosaur bones and tracks. But remnants of soft tissue, like muscles or skin, are rare and often not well preserved. A very small percentage of tracks – much less than 1% – show skin traces.

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How machine learning can help regulators

How to locate potentially polluting animal farms has long been a problem for environmental regulators. Now, Stanford scholars show how a map-reading algorithm could help regulators identify facilities more efficiently than ever before.

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Empathy and perception of others shapes political ideology, study finds

The way people perceive groups and empathize with others shapes their political ideology, according to a study recently published by researchers affiliated with the University of Arkansas.

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World-first study finds Merino sheep pregnancy can be detected using wool

Researchers from Western Sydney University have found a new, non-invasive way to detect pregnancy in Merino sheep through the analysis of reproductive hormones in wool.

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Researchers outline a new pavement maintenance model that accounts for future uncertainties in cost and deterioration

In 2017, the American Society of Civil Engineer's Infrastructure Report Card gave America's infrastructure an overall grade of a D+. Given that the report found the U.S. had been paying for just half of its infrastructure needs, the low grade unfortunately wasn't surprising.

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New wasps named after biscuits and Doctor Who aliens

University of Adelaide researchers were inspired by everything from chocolate biscuits and Doctor Who aliens when choosing names for 10 new species of wasps.

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New wasps named after biscuits and Doctor Who aliens

University of Adelaide researchers were inspired by everything from chocolate biscuits and Doctor Who aliens when choosing names for 10 new species of wasps.

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LDAIR, a lncRNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response

Biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology and the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) at Nagoya University have discovered that long non-coding RNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response in medaka fish. The results of this study were reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Study upends 'dogma' on malaria drug component

Mosquitoes won't fly anywhere near the sweet wormwood herb (Artemisia annua), so it makes perfect sense that a chemical compound produced by the plant has become the first line of treatment against malaria.

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Glaciers lose 9 trillion tonnes of ice in half a century

When we think of climate change, one of the first things to come to mind is melting polar ice. However, ice loss isn't just restricted to the polar regions. According to research published today, glaciers around the world have lost well over 9000 gigatonnes (nine trillion tonnes) of ice since 1961, raising sea level by 27 mm.

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Astronomers find evidence of a planet with a mass almost 13 times that of Jupiter

In the past three decades, almost 4,000 planet-like objects have been discovered orbiting isolated stars outside the solar system (exoplanets). Beginning in 2011, it was possible to use NASA's Kepler Space Telescope to observe the first exoplanets in orbit around young binary systems of two live stars with hydrogen still burning in their core.

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LDAIR, a lncRNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response

Biologists at the National Institute for Basic Biology and the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) at Nagoya University have discovered that long non-coding RNA regulates seasonal changes in stress response in medaka fish. The results of this study were reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution.

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Observing a molecule stretch and bend in real-time

Being able to watch how molecules bend, stretch, break or transform during chemical reactions requires state-of-the-art instruments and techniques that can observe and track all the atoms within a molecule with high sub-atomic spatial and temporal resolution.

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Lab scientists use radioactive tracers to determine the ages of streamflow

Watersheds store water underground in soils and weathered bedrock. How long it takes for water to flow through the subsurface to feed streams is difficult to measure but important for understanding how watersheds function.

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Fuel cell advance a breath of fresh air for future power alternative

A promising alternative to conventional power plants, solid oxide fuel cells use electrochemical methods that can generate power more efficiently than existing combustion-based generators. But fuel cells tend to degrade too quickly, eating up any efficiency gains through increased cost.

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Jupiter's atmosphere heats up under solar wind

New Earth-based telescope observations show that auroras at Jupiter's poles are heating the planet's atmosphere to a greater depth than previously thought—and that it is a rapid response to the solar wind.

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Study upends 'dogma' on malaria drug component

Mosquitoes won't fly anywhere near the sweet wormwood herb (Artemisia annua), so it makes perfect sense that a chemical compound produced by the plant has become the first line of treatment against malaria.

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Artificial plant mimics leaf to make fuel from sunlight

submitted by /u/InforNow [link] [comments]

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Aphantasia: Ex-Pixar chief Ed Catmull says 'my mind's eye is blind'

Ed Catmull has aphantasia, as do some of the world's best animators at Pixar.

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Domestic violence homicides appear be on the rise—study suggests that guns are the reason

Since the early 1990s, the number of murders had been steadily dropping. Then in 2015, it jumped up, and it continued escalating in 2016 before falling again. What happened? Were those figures an aberration, or are they a worrisome sign of an upward trend?

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Many coastal homes are unprotected from hurricanes and homeowners have no intention of retrofitting, study finds

New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that many coastal homes have significant structural vulnerabilities that leave homeowners and their homes largely unprotected from storms. Additionally, the majority of coastal homeowners have little to no intention of reducing these structural vulnerabilities, even though they live in areas frequently affected by damaging hurricanes and floodin

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Antarctica team to search world's oldest ice for climate change clues

Scientists are setting out to drill for the world’s oldest ice, in a bid to shed light on a dramatic tipping point in the world’s climate 900,000 years ago

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Katter vet vad de heter

De flesta kattägare måste vänja sig vid att bli ignorerade av sitt älskade husdjur med jämna mellanrum. En tröstande tanke kan vara att katten till skillnad från hunden, inte kopplar samman sitt jag med det namn vi valt åt den. Men det är tyvärr fel. Det visar en studie utförd av japanska forskare, publicerad i Scientific reports.

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The Sun Is Spitting Out 'Lava Lamp Blobs' 500 Times the Size of Earth

The blobs are real, they’re chock full of charged particles and they’re heading our way several times each day.

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Study: Trump's 'Repeal and Replace' debate already impacting women's health

Trump recently renewed the repeal and replace battle cry promising to make the 2020 election a referendum on Obamacare. While many speculate about the impacts of a repeal, a new study by John W. Ayers, found the debate is already impacting women's health, namely their contraceptive choices. For instance, public interest in IUDs increased 15% during the week of March 25, 2019, when Trump urged cong

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Så kan lokalproducerat kraftfoder till mjölkkor bli bättre

I takt med att mjölkkobesättningarna blir större har fler gårdar möjlighet att tillverka eget kraftfoder baserat på lokala råvaror, i stället för att köpa färdiga kraftfoderblandningar. Den snabba förändringen i besättningsstorlek under de senaste åren har inneburit flertaliga och stora investeringar i system för konservering och lagring av råvaror till kraftfoder. Många lantbrukare är dock osäkr

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China Considers Ban on Cryptocurrency Mining Because It's a Stupid Waste of Energy

Regulators in China are considering a ban on cryptocurrency mining as an “undesirable” economic activity, according to a government document released Monday.Read more…

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Rethink government with AI

Rethink government with AI Rethink government with AI, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01099-5 Policymakers should harness data to deliver public services that are responsive, efficient and fair, urge Helen Margetts and Cosmina Dorobantu.

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Invisible Middlemen Are Slowing Down American Health Care

Lynn Lear finished her final round of chemotherapy for breast cancer in December. To help keep the cancer from coming back, Lear’s doctor told her about a new medication she could take called Nerlynx. Lear, who is 46, wanted to do everything she could to remain healthy, so she asked her doctor to order the drug for her. Unlike, say, an antibiotic or an antidepressant, a Nerlynx prescription can’t

9h

Meet Blue: The Cheap and Manipulative (in a Good Way) Robot

The tiny price point could launch the robot into research stardom, forging a path to a future in which machines can do just about anything.

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The Weather Channel Flooded Charleston to Make You Care About Climate Change

To show climate change's devastating effects, the Weather Channel used its immersive mixed-reality studio to span centuries.

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The UK's Tech Backlash Could Change the Internet

A British white paper suggests requiring tech giants to remove content that's "harmful," as well as illegal, a far-reaching proposal for a western democracy.

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A Brief History of Porn on the Internet

Pornographers developed many early innovations in internet marketing, like pop-up ads and subscriptions. And women were among the most successful entrepreneurs in the business.

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Was This Famous Revolutionary War Hero Intersex?

Remains in General Pulaski's tomb tell an unexpected and intriguing tale.

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Stargazing T. Rex Gets a 67-Million-Year-Old View of the Night Sky

Even an extremely dead apex predator deserves a beautiful view of the night sky — particularly one that reminds them of home.

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Our brains sculpt each other. So why do we study them in isolation?

Studying individual brains may not be the way to figure out the human mind, a social neuroscientist argues.

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Where Did That Promising Scientist Disappear To?

Family leave policies leave women faculty behind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Where Did That Promising Scientist Disappear To?

Family leave policies leave women faculty behind — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mindre utsläpp där permafrosten tinar

I västra Sibirien finns stora områden med permafrost. Permafrostjordar lagrar stora mängder fryst kol, men ett varmare klimat medför att permafrosten sakta tinar. Då släpper jordarna ut det uråldriga kolet i sjöar och bildar samtidigt nya sjöar, så kallade termokarstsjöar, vilka blir en alltmer vanlig syn i landskapet i regioner med permafrost. Permafrost definieras som ett tillstånd där temperat

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A Geological "Orrery" Could Reveal Planetary Dynamics in Deep Time

Paul Olsen drills into the Earth’s sedimentary record for clues about the evolution of the solar system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Geological "Orrery" Could Reveal Planetary Dynamics in Deep Time

Paul Olsen drills into the Earth’s sedimentary record for clues about the evolution of the solar system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Apple’s 31.6-inch Display Still On Track For 2019

Earlier this year, it was reported that Apple could be launching a new display later this year in the form of a 31.6-inch 6K display. For those wondering about the display, an investor’s …

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Black holes: picturing the heart of darkness

Astronomers are poised Wednesday to unveil the first direct image of a black hole and the surrounding whirlwind of white-hot gas and plasma inexorably drawn by gravity into its ravenous maw, along with the light they generate.

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Germany begins 'largest' return of Aborigine remains

A German museum handed over the remains of an Aboriginal ancestral king to Australia Tuesday in the first of three such ceremonies across Germany this month in what Canberra called a record return.

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Tracking the sources of plastic pollution

Plastic pollution in the world's oceans is now widely recognised as a major global challenge—but we still know very little about how these plastics are actually reaching the sea. A new global initiative, led by the University of Birmingham shows how focussing on rivers and river mouths can yield vital clues about how we might manage this plastic crisis.

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Berømt krypteringsmaskine genskabt på britisk museum

Bidrog til de allieredes sejr under Anden Verdenskrig.

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European researchers to drill for ancient Antarctic ice

A group of 14 European scientific institutions plan to retrieve the world's oldest ice as part of research into past climate change.

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Gut microbiota and phytoestrogen-associated infertility in southern white rhinoceros

Researchers from the San Diego Zoo Global Institute for Conservation Research have found the gut microbiota of the captive southern white rhinoceros may partially explain its infertility. They compared the gut microbiome of two rhinoceros species to investigate whether the gut microbes metabolize dietary phytoestrogens, which appear to play a role in infertility. The researchers show that reproduc

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Meningsmåling: Pensionistkontingent splitter læserne

Skal pensionister betale højere kontingent, så erhvervsaktive medlemmer kan slippe 10 procent billigere? Det kan ing.dk's læsere ikke blive enige om. Nu vil vi gerne høre læsernes holdning til formandsvalget.

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New technique cuts AI training time by more than 60 percent

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Trilobites: How Beetles That Live Underwater Breathe Without a Scuba Tank

When an insect is this small, it seems to be able to get away with an unusual technique for taking in oxygen.

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Björnen sover på hemligheter om hälsan

Björnen som enligt folktro lämnar sitt idé på Tiburtiusdagen, reser sig efter ett halvårs inaktivitet och är genast redo för hårt fysiskt arbete. En så inaktiv människa hade aldrig överlevt. Långt innan det blev vår hade personen drabbats av åkommor som diabetes, njursvikt, hjärt- och kärlsjukdomar, benskörhet och muskelförtvining. Nu försöker forskarna lista ut hur björnen bär sig åt. Är det kan

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LIGO has spotted another gravitational wave just after turning back on

One week after LIGO switched back on, it has already detected the gravitational waves from another pair of merging black holes, marking the beginning of a new era of gravitational wave astronomy

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How Andrea Cerutti molested and defiled Journal of Immunology

Spain is where dishonest research gets rewarded, with awards, grants and media fame. No wonder the New York-based immunologist Andrea Cerutti opened a second lab in Barcelona.

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Twitter goes after spam with an obvious fix

To fight spam, Twitter is dramatically reducing the number of accounts users can follow each day.

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Troubled Countries Can’t Keep People From Leaving

Making good on previous threats, President Donald Trump recently declared an end to aid to El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala, blaming the three governments for failing to stop the flow of their citizens to the United States. “They have ALL been taking U.S. money for years,” he tweeted , “and doing ABSOLUTELY NOTHING for us.” If his public statements are any guide, Trump appears to believe that

10h

It Wasn’t ‘Verbal Blackface.’ AOC Was Code-Switching.

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has been accused of a lot, but the latest charge is especially piquant. Apparently, the new representative of some of the most multiethnic neighborhoods in the United States has engaged in “verbal blackface.” The supposed offense occurred when she spoke to the Reverend Al Sharpton’s National Action Network last week and sprinkled some elements of Black Engl

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Why Trump Is Serious About Herman Cain

A couple of months back, President Donald Trump privately told aides that he was ready to make a surprise announcement and that he would shake up the nation’s central bank with an unconventional pick for the governing board: Herman Cain, best known for an ill-fated presidential bid. They suggested he hold back. Cain faced sexual-harassment allegations when he ran, in 2012. One aide told Trump tha

10h

Obama’s Presidential Library Is Already Digital

As the highly anticipated Obama Presidential Library in Chicago morphed into the Obama Presidential Center —without a place to hold the records of his administration—reactions ranged from slight confusion to rote dismissiveness. “ The Obama Presidential Library That Isn’t ” led the coverage in The New York Times . Philip Terzian complained in an op-ed in the Washington Examiner that what was prop

10h

Elizabeth Warren Had Charisma, and Then She Ran for President

Charisma comes from the Greek word for “divine gift,” and back in 2015, political commentators thought Elizabeth Warren had a lot of it. Vox called the senator from Massachusetts “a more charismatic campaigner than [Hillary] Clinton.” Roll Call said Clinton couldn’t “match Warren’s charisma, intensity or passion.” The polling firm Rasmussen called Warren “Bernie Sanders with charisma.” That was t

10h

Vagthund sætter alle supersygehusene under lup

Rigsrevisionen varsler større undersøgelse af byggeprojekterne på Danmarks supersygehuse, efter at flere problemer er kommet frem i lyset.

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USA trækker i land: Kræver ikke længere et tysk forbud mod Huawei

Amerikanske embedsmænd er angiveligt tilfredse med Tysklands sikkerhedsstandarder.

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Munk’s sonic blunder

Munk’s sonic blunder Munk’s sonic blunder, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01142-5 Munk’s sonic blunder

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Don’t let damage to wetlands cancel out the benefits of hydropower

Don’t let damage to wetlands cancel out the benefits of hydropower Don’t let damage to wetlands cancel out the benefits of hydropower, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01140-7 Don’t let damage to wetlands cancel out the benefits of hydropower

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Sex is a biological variable — in the brain too

Sex is a biological variable — in the brain too Sex is a biological variable — in the brain too, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01141-6 Sex is a biological variable — in the brain too

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Dams: weigh pros and cons case by case

Dams: weigh pros and cons case by case Dams: weigh pros and cons case by case, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01137-2 Dams: weigh pros and cons case by case

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Mechanism to form influenza A virus discovered

A new study by Maria João Amorim's team, from the Gulbenkian Institute of Science, now reveals where the genomes of the influenza A virus are assembled inside infected cells. The results will be published this week in the journal Nature Communications and may contribute to therapies that prevent or combate new strains of influenza viruses.

11h

Identifying regions that would most benefit from an innovative strategy against malaria

An analysis led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' identifies African regions where ivermectin administration to livestock would have the greatest impact on malaria transmission. The results, published in Scientific Reports, point to West Africa, below the Sahel, where malaria prevalence is very high.

11h

Animal-assisted therapy improves social behavior in patients with brain injuries

Animal-assisted therapy can foster social competence in patients with brain injuries and increase their emotional involvement during therapy. These were the findings of a clinical trial conducted by psychologists from the University of Basel and published in the journal Scientific Reports.

11h

Researchers develop quantum device to generate all possible futures simultaneously

A team of researchers from Griffith University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), have constructed a prototype quantum device that can generate all possible futures in a simultaneous quantum superposition. The work is featured in a forthcoming paper in the journal Nature Communications.

11h

EU udstikker retningslinjer for kunstig intelligens

Syv retningslinjer skal ifølge EU sikre udvikling af troværdige AI-systemer

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Helping-Like Behaviour in Mice Towards Conspecifics Constrained Inside Tubes

Helping-Like Behaviour in Mice Towards Conspecifics Constrained Inside Tubes Helping-Like Behaviour in Mice Towards Conspecifics Constrained Inside Tubes, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42290-y Helping-Like Behaviour in Mice Towards Conspecifics Constrained Inside Tubes

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Perfusion-ventilation CT via three-material differentiation in dual-layer CT: a feasibility study

Perfusion-ventilation CT via three-material differentiation in dual-layer CT: a feasibility study Perfusion-ventilation CT via three-material differentiation in dual-layer CT: a feasibility study, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42330-7 Perfusion-ventilation CT via three-material differentiation in dual-layer CT: a feasibility study

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Direct measurement of the mechanical properties of a chromatin analog and the epigenetic effects of para-sulphonato-calix[4]arene

Direct measurement of the mechanical properties of a chromatin analog and the epigenetic effects of para -sulphonato-calix[4]arene Direct measurement of the mechanical properties of a chromatin analog and the epigenetic effects of para -sulphonato-calix[4]arene, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42267-x Direct measurement of the mechanical properties of a chromatin analog an

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Significant THz absorption in CH3NH2 molecular defect-incorporated organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite thin film

Significant THz absorption in CH 3 NH 2 molecular defect-incorporated organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite thin film Significant THz absorption in CH 3 NH 2 molecular defect-incorporated organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite thin film, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42359-8 Significant THz absorption in CH 3 NH 2 molecular defect-incorporated organic-inorganic hybrid perovsk

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Using sensory discrimination in a foraging-style task to evaluate human upper-limb sensorimotor performance

Using sensory discrimination in a foraging-style task to evaluate human upper-limb sensorimotor performance Using sensory discrimination in a foraging-style task to evaluate human upper-limb sensorimotor performance, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42086-0 Using sensory discrimination in a foraging-style task to evaluate human upper-limb sensorimotor performance

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Broadband MIR harvester using silicon nanostructures

Broadband MIR harvester using silicon nanostructures Broadband MIR harvester using silicon nanostructures, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42022-2 Broadband MIR harvester using silicon nanostructures

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The free energy landscape of the oncogene protein E7 of human papillomavirus type 16 reveals a complex interplay between ordered and disordered regions

The free energy landscape of the oncogene protein E7 of human papillomavirus type 16 reveals a complex interplay between ordered and disordered regions The free energy landscape of the oncogene protein E7 of human papillomavirus type 16 reveals a complex interplay between ordered and disordered regions, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41925-4 The free energy landscape of t

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Entrainment of Lymphatic Contraction to Oscillatory Flow

Entrainment of Lymphatic Contraction to Oscillatory Flow Entrainment of Lymphatic Contraction to Oscillatory Flow, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42142-9 Entrainment of Lymphatic Contraction to Oscillatory Flow

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Fiat betaler Tesla for at undslippe milliardbøder fra EU

Fiats biler sviner for meget. Men ved at trække andres grønne elbiler ind under firmaets CO2-regnskab, ser resultatet pludselig pænere ud.

11h

Tracking the sources of plastic pollution

Plastic pollution in the world's oceans is now widely recognized as a major global challenge — but we still know very little about how these plastics are actually reaching the sea. A new global initiative, led by the University of Birmingham shows how focusing on rivers and river mouths can yield vital clues about how we might manage this plastic crisis.

12h

Tunge landbrugsmaskiner ødelægger små veje

Landbruget drømmer om tilladelse til at køre tunge landbrugsmaskiner på mindre veje. Men især bæltekøretøjer kan ødelægge asfalten.

12h

ULEZ: London is cleaning up its dirty air but what about other cities?

London's Ultra Low Emission Zone, introduced this week, is targeting drivers of diesel cars in an effort to protect people's health. If it succeeds, the rest of the UK could do the same

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NASA's method of paying for its giant rocket belongs in the Apollo era

Contracts that leave NASA meeting all the extra development costs for its Space Launch System make no sense when firms like SpaceX offer fixed-price flights

12h

Islam spelar stor roll i amerikansk hip-hop

Hip-hopen har gett, och ger fortfarande, röst åt svaga och utsatta grupper i det amerikanska samhället. Och många av dagens religiösa uttryck är populärkulturella. I ljuset av detta blir kombinationen hip-hop och islam genast mer förståelig och betydelsefull. Anders Ackfeldt argumenterar i sin avhandling, Islamic Semiotic Resources in US Hip-Hop Culture, för att muslimer såväl som icke-muslimer h

12h

Machine-learning techniques used to accurately predict battery life

Machine-learning techniques used to accurately predict battery life Machine-learning techniques used to accurately predict battery life, Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01138-1 Highly reliable methods for predicting battery lives are needed to develop safe, long-lasting battery systems. Accurate predictive models have been developed using data collected from batteries earl

12h

The Comeback of Trumpeter Swans

Restoration efforts in Ontario, Canada, have helped a once-vanquished population to flourish. And they have been sighted in new habitats in the United States, too.

12h

You’re Covered in Fungi. How Does That Affect Your Health?

Following extensive study of the body’s bacterial occupants, researchers are turning to how our fungal residents may contribute to inflammatory bowel diseases and other maladies.

12h

Ancient shipwreck to be made accessible to divers in Greece

Near the northern Greek island of Alonissos lies a remarkable ancient shipwreck: the remains of a massive cargo ship that changed archaeologists' understanding of shipbuilding in antiquity.

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Should Electric Vehicle Drivers Pay a Mileage Tax?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Google drone deliveries cleared for take-off in Australia

A Google-linked firm will start delivering takeaways and other small items to Canberra residents after the company received approval from aviation watchdogs in Australia on Tuesday.

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Forskere har analyseret 46 år i Arktis: 'Klimaforandringerne er på steroider'

Stigende temperaturer påvirker livet i Arktis markant, viser ny rapport.

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Single cell transcriptomics: A new sequencing approach

Researchers from University of Southern Denmark, Wellcome Sanger Institute and BGI, today published a study in the journal Genome Biology comparing the library preparation and sequencing platforms for single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq).

13h

Retrieving climate history from the ice

In the context of a major European Union project, experts from 14 institutions in 10 European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice, looking for the ideal site to investigate the climate history of the past 1.5 million years. Today, the consortium Beyond EPICA — Oldest Ice (BE-OI), led by Olaf Eisen from the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Rese

13h

Plant diversity increases insect diversity

The more plant species live in grasslands and forests, the more insect species find a habitat there. However, the presence of more plant species does not only increase the number of insect species, but also the number of insect individuals. Simultaneously, animal diversity is not only determined by plant diversity, but also by the physical structure of the plant communities. These results have con

13h

Climate change: European team to drill for 'oldest ice' in Antarctica

The near-3km-long Antarctic ice core should reveal the cause of a key shift in Earth's climate past.

13h

San Diego Zoo says farewell to last 2 giant pandas

The San Diego Zoo is saying goodbye to two big, furry superstars.

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San Diego Zoo says farewell to last 2 giant pandas

The San Diego Zoo is saying goodbye to two big, furry superstars.

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US proposes new tariffs on EU products over Airbus subsidies

The US on Monday threatened to impose tariff counter-measures of up to $11.2 billion on a host of European products in response to subsidies received by aircraft maker Airbus.

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Facebook, Google face widening crackdown over online content

Tech giants like Facebook and Google came under increasing pressure in Europe on Monday when countries proposed stricter rules to force them to block extreme material such as terrorist propaganda and child porn.

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After cyclone ruin, back to square one for Mozambique's Beira

Daviz Simango, mayor of Beira on the Mozambican coast, had worked to shore up the city's climate defences, drawing on World Bank help to build deterrents against rising seas, flooding and storms.

13h

Medical Apartheid

Harriet Washington's book tells the dark history of medical experimentation on black Americans. It also reveals broader problems of inequality, poor science, and human failures.

13h

Pearls of wisdom: Japan's cultured farms still glisten

In Japan's picturesque Ago Bay, a couple sits in a little hut picking out oysters from a net, cleaning them carefully one-by-one before replacing them gently back in the water.

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Survival in arid eastern Chad depends on struggle for water

"I've already earmarked a customer for this drum—I need to get a move on!"

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Grapes on Mars? Georgia winemakers aiming high

Georgia is immensely proud of its ancient wine-making tradition, claiming to have been the first nation to make wine. Now it wants to be the first to grow grapes on Mars.

13h

Volunteer birdwatching survey shows effects of temperatures on population of Jays

A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton has used data collected by volunteer bird watchers to study how the importance of wildlife habitat management for British birds depends on changing temperatures.

13h

New algorithm helps to detect and analyze suspicious activity in surveillance footage

New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, could make it easier to track and process suspicious activity in surveillance footage.

14h

Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology

A ground-breaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. Liverpool John Moores University, WWF and HUTAN came together to examine better ways of detecting the great apes in the Bornean forest canopy, by using drones fitted with thermal-imaging cameras.

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Study shows potential for Earth-friendly plastic replacement

The quest to keep plastic out of landfills and simultaneously satisfy the needs of the food industry is filled with obstacles.

14h

Volunteer birdwatching survey shows effects of temperatures on population of Jays

A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton has used data collected by volunteer bird watchers to study how the importance of wildlife habitat management for British birds depends on changing temperatures.

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Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology

A ground-breaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. Liverpool John Moores University, WWF and HUTAN came together to examine better ways of detecting the great apes in the Bornean forest canopy, by using drones fitted with thermal-imaging cameras.

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Coalition announces $10m for endometriosis research and awareness

Women living with crippling pain experience average eight- to nine-year diagnostic delay After allocating $4.7m in 2018 towards a national action plan to tackle endometriosis, the health minister on Tuesday announced a further $10m towards researching and raising awareness about the crippling and chronic menstrual condition. Related: Endometriosis action plan follows decades of lobbying – and suf

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Underwater forests a treasure trove of new drugs

Defensive compounds produced by microbes are a major source of antibiotics and other important medicines. But with resistant bugs appearing faster than potential allies, researchers are taking their search for drug candidates offshore.

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Newly devised static negative capacitor could improve computing

With a little physics ingenuity, scientists have designed a way to redistribute electricity on a small scale, potentially opening new avenues of research into more energy-efficient computing.

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Underwater forests a treasure trove of new drugs

Defensive compounds produced by microbes are a major source of antibiotics and other important medicines. But with resistant bugs appearing faster than potential allies, researchers are taking their search for drug candidates offshore.

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How Android Fought the Chamois Botnet—and Won

The Chamois botnet once infected 20 million Android devices. Here's how Google finally tore it up.

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I'll build your most dystopic 2022 AI product idea?

I'm an Industrial Design student looking to practice my CAD and rendering skills. Please give me your baddest, darkest, and most dystopic idea. submitted by /u/Supawat5 [link] [comments]

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Korean Pop Group ‘BLACKPINK’ Is Breaking YouTube Records

Several years ago, Korean musician Psy launched his “Gangnam Style” video on YouTube where it proceeded to break several YouTube records. Fast forward a few years, it seems that …

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Nature could provide the answer for blindness caused by diabetes, say experts

Mother Nature could have the answer to treating several causes of blindness, according to a ground-breaking study involving scientists from the University of Surrey and the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Eye Institute at Indiana University School of Medicine in the USA.

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Study shows potential for Earth-friendly plastic replacement

New research from The Ohio State University has shown that combining natural rubber with bioplastic in a novel way results in a much stronger replacement for plastic, one that is already capturing the interest of companies looking to shrink their environmental footprints.

16h

High-intensity interval training increases injuries, Rutgers study finds

People who engage in high-intensity interval training are at greater risk for injury, especially in the knees and shoulders, a Rutgers study found.

16h

New algorithm helps to detect and analyze suspicious activity in surveillance footage

New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, could make it easier to track and process suspicious activity in surveillance footage.

16h

Volunteer birdwatching survey shows effects of temperatures on population of jays

A study led by researchers at the University of Southampton has used data collected by volunteer bird watchers to study how the importance of wildlife habitat management for British birds depends on changing temperatures.

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Underwater forests a treasure trove of new drugs

Defensive compounds produced by microbes are a major source of antibiotics and other important medicines. But with resistant bugs appearing faster than potential allies, researchers are taking their search for drug candidates offshore.Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, a new study reveals for the first time that a common species of seaweed, Laminaria ochroleuca, is a rich source of bacteria w

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Astro-ecology: Counting orangutans using star-spotting technology

A groundbreaking scientific collaboration is harnessing technology used to study the luminosity of stars, to carry out detailed monitoring of orangutan populations in Borneo. Liverpool John Moores University, WWF and HUTAN came together to examine better ways of detecting the great apes in the Bornean forest canopy, by using drones fitted with thermal-imaging cameras.

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Blog: Kunstig intelligens – vi løber løbsk ud over stepperne

Udviklingen af kunstig intelligens er det rene Vilde Vesten, og regeringen er ramt af guldfeber. Men det er ikke nok at sige, at vi skal med ud over stepperne, lyder det fra fonden Teknologirådet.

17h

Scientists Fixed People's Working Memory With Simple Electrical 'Zaps' to The Brain

"It's wild to think that we can target the electricity of a brain circuit."

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Newly devised static negative capacitor could improve computing

Researchers have created a permanent static 'negative capacitor,' a device believed to have been in violation of physical laws until about a decade ago.

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Scientists build a machine to generate quantum superposition of possible futures

In the 2018 movie Avengers: Infinity War, a scene featured Dr. Strange looking into 14 million possible futures to search for a single timeline in which the heroes would be victorious. Perhaps he would have had an easier time with help from a quantum computer. A team of researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) and Griffith University in Australia have constructe

17h

Culture of Secrecy Shields Hospitals With Outbreaks of Drug-Resistant Infections

The lack of transparency puts patients at risk, some say. Institutions say disclosure could scare some people away from seeking needed medical care.

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New technique to test for viral infections

Researchers have developed technology that can detect small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Using a small wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair, the researchers developed a sensor that can detect as few as 10 antibody molecules within 20 minutes.

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Nutrients from food, not supplements, linked to lower risks of death, cancer

Researchers have found that adequate intake of certain nutrients from foods — but not supplements — is linked to a reduction in all-cause mortality. There was no association between dietary supplement use and a lower risk of death.

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New intervention doubles quit rate among smokers with severe mental illness

Research has found a dedicated intervention to help people with severe mental illness stop smoking can double quit rates at six months compared to standard care.

18h

Biological changes among invasive species

A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonize new territories and then thrive in them, a new study suggests.

18h

Patient shielding provides negligible benefits while increasing risks

A new study makes the case for why it is time to abandon the practice of patient shielding in radiology.

18h

Testing how well water disinfectants damage antibiotic resistance genes

A team tested how well current water and wastewater disinfecting methods affect antibiotic resistance genes in bacterial DNA. While these methods work well to deter bacterial growth, they had varied success in either degrading or deactivating a representative antibiotic resistance gene.

18h

New technique to test for viral infections

Researchers have developed technology that can detect small amounts of antibodies in a person's blood. Using a small wire that is one-fourth the size of a human hair, the researchers developed a sensor that can detect as few as 10 antibody molecules within 20 minutes.

18h

Declassified U2 spy plane images reveal bygone Middle Eastern archaeological features

By analyzing thousands of declassified images from Cold War-era U2 spy missions, scientists have discovered archaeological features like prehistoric hunting traps, 3,000-year-old irrigation canals, and hidden 60-year-old marsh villages. They also created an online tool that allows other researchers to identify and access the photos for the first time.

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Carbon-negative power generation for China

Researchers have analyzed technical and economic viability for China to move towards carbon-negative electric power generation.

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There’s genius behind how your fingers can bend so easily.

submitted by /u/markchangizi [link] [comments]

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5G can make digital humans look real and turn real people into holograms

submitted by /u/WilliamMiltonCooper [link] [comments]

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A.I. scans for big farms that might be polluters

An algorithm that reads satellite images could help environmental regulators identify potentially polluting agricultural facilities more efficiently than traditional approaches. Researchers figured out a way for machine learning—teaching a computer how to identify and analyze patterns in data—to efficiently locate industrial animal operations and help regulators determine each facility’s environm

20h

The Atlantic Daily: A Tenure Defined by Family Separations

What We’re Following Kirstjen Nielsen’s firing on Sunday should send a message to other members of the Trump administration: Attempting to act as a moderating force on the president is a futile act. Nielsen came into the role of Department of Homeland Security secretary 16 months ago with a decidedly un-Trumpian résumé—she’s a seasoned bureaucrat who has worked on homeland-security issues since t

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Robots Are Becoming An Integral Part Of Surgery, But Are They Worth The Cost?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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LIGO is back and ready to search for more gravitational waves

After more than a year-long hiatus, the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is back online and more sensitive than ever to the tiny ripples in spacetime generated when black holes and dead stars collide. Following numerous upgrades to its lasers, mirrors, and quantum noise filters, LIGO—which consists of twin detectors in Washington and Louisiana—is now about 40 percent mor

21h

Researchers remove harmful hormones from Las Vegas wastewater using green algae

A common species of freshwater green algae is capable of removing certain endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) from wastewater, according to new research. Researchers explored the potential for use of a species of freshwater green algae called Nannochloris to remove EDCs from treated wastewater.

21h

Why the Audi E-tron’s Range Came Up Short

The new electric SUV is yet another with a dispiriting EPA range rating.

21h

Why there’s a recovery ‘speed limit’ after mass extinction

New research links the long lag time in recovery after a mass extinction to evolution. It takes at least 10 million years for life to fully recover after a mass extinction, a speed limit for the recovery of species diversity that is well known among scientists. Explanations for this apparent rule have usually invoked environmental factors, but the new research identifies evolution as another culp

21h

Analysis of 4 Million Pitches Reveals Umps Really Do Suck at Calling Strikes

Baseball is back, and fans can anticipate another season of amazing catches, overpowering pitching, tape-measure home runs – and, yes, controversial calls that lead to blow-ups between umpires …

21h

Use a 'greener' inhaler if you can, patients told

Five doses of some inhalers are the equivalent of a nine-mile car journey, NHS advisory body says.

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Novel 5-minute workout improves blood pressure, may boost brain function

Five minutes daily of Inspiratory Muscle Strength Training lowers blood pressure, improves vascular health, boosts fitness and sharpens memory, according to preliminary results.

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New DNA 'shredder' technique goes beyond CRISPR's scissors

An international team has unveiled a new CRISPR-based tool that acts more like a shredder than the usual scissor-like action of CRISPR-Cas9. The new approach, based on Type I CRISPR-Cas3, is able to wipe out long stretches of DNA in human cells with programmable targeting, and has been shown to work in human cells for the first time.

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Genes linked with the most common liver cancer

Researchers have provided the first summary of the experimental evidence supporting the AKR1B10 enzyme as a promising therapeutic target for Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), based on a review of more than 50 studies published since this gene was first identified and characterized in 1998.

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Some woodpeckers imitate a neighbor's plumage

In the first global test of the idea, scientists have found evidence that some woodpeckers can evolve to look like another species of woodpecker in the same neighborhood.

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Cold plasma can kill 99.9% of airborne viruses

Dangerous airborne viruses are rendered harmless on-the-fly when exposed to energetic, charged fragments of air molecules, researchers have shown.

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Woolly mammoths and Neanderthals may have shared genetic traits

A new study suggests that the genetic profiles of two extinct mammals with African ancestry — woolly mammoths and Neanderthals — shared molecular characteristics of adaptation to cold environments.

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Study offers insight into biological changes among invasive species

A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonise new territories and then thrive in them, a new study by the University of Plymouth suggests.

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Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth

Ancient organic matter of biological origin has been tracked in multiple samples of rock spanning over 2,000 million years of Earth's history, according to UCL researchers.

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World-first study shows Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes

Working with Aboriginal rangers in the Kimberley, University of Sydney biologists have published a study with the first empirical evidence that culturally diverse teams produces better conservation results.

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Five-minute sample processing enhances DNA imaging and analysis

Scientists have developed a fast, simple sample preparation method that enhances imaging of DNA to better analyze its physical properties and interactions.

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Author Correction: Comparative study of the toxicity between three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their UV/Na2S2O8 degradation products on Cyprinus carpio

Author Correction: Comparative study of the toxicity between three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their UV/Na 2 S 2 O 8 degradation products on Cyprinus carpio Author Correction: Comparative study of the toxicity between three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their UV/Na 2 S 2 O 8 degradation products on Cyprinus carpio , Published online: 09 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-018

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Florida python: Massive pregnant snake caught using new approach

Big Cypress national park finds a 17ft snake weighing 140lb and carrying 73 developing eggs.

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Infrared Light Offers a Cooler Way to Defrost

Light tuned to a specific frequency warms ice more than water—which could come in handy for defrosting delicate biological samples. Adam Levy reports.

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What Another Round of Netanyahu Will Mean for American Jews

Benjamin Netanyahu’s main opponents have tried to use an unusual weapon against the longtime prime minister ahead of a defining Israeli election set for Tuesday: They’ve argued that he has damaged the relationship between Israel and diaspora Jews. For some American Jews, the strong alliance between Netanyahu and Donald Trump of the past few years has added stress to their relationship with Israel

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Cross-boundary solutions for wicked weeds

Weed species continue to spread and management costs continue to mount, in spite of best management practices and efforts by research and extension personnel who promote them to land managers, said a weed scientist.

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Five-minute sample processing enhances DNA imaging and analysis

Scientists have developed a fast, simple sample preparation method that enhances imaging of DNA to better analyze its physical properties and interactions.

21h

Study offers insight into biological changes among invasive species

A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonise new territories and then thrive in them, a new study suggests.

21h

World-first study shows Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes

Researchers at the University of Sydney have produced hard data that demonstrates collaborating with Indigenous peoples changed the outcome of a scientific research project. It is the first empirical evidence that culturally diverse teams produce improved results in conservation research.

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Study offers insight into biological changes among invasive species

A remote island in the Caribbean could offer clues as to how invasive species are able to colonise new territories and then thrive in them, a new study suggests.

21h

Tracking records of the oldest life forms on Earth

The discovery provides a new characteristic 'biosignature' to track the remains of ancient life preserved in rocks which are significantly altered over billions of years and could help identify life elsewhere in the Solar System.

21h

World-first study shows Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes

Researchers at the University of Sydney have produced hard data that demonstrates collaborating with Indigenous peoples changed the outcome of a scientific research project. It is the first empirical evidence that culturally diverse teams produce improved results in conservation research.

21h

Weak Electrical Currents Can Restore Working Memory In Older Adults

It’s not just you. As you age, it gets harder to remember the digits of a phone number, or calculate how much tip to leave without resorting to an app. Our so-called "working memory" is responsible for keeping this kind of information at the forefront of the mind. And it fades with age. Now researchers have found that stimulating the brain with weak electrical currents can restore working memory i

21h

A Beautiful Look at a Hostile Planet

One of the great challenges in searching for life on other planets is that we still have so much to learn about life on our own Earth. Amazingly, that is true not only at the micro level of biochemistry and genetic codes, but at the macro level as well. You would think that there would be little left to learn about elephants, bears, penguins, and jaguars–the creatures sometimes lumped together by

21h

The Human Brain Has been Getting Smaller Since the Stone Age

I don’t mean to alarm you, but the average human brain size is shrinking. And we can’t blame reality T.V. or twitter. No, this decline began tens of thousands of years ago. It’s something of a well-known secret among anthropologists: Based on measurements of skulls, the average brain volume of Homo sapiens has reportedly decreased by roughly 10 percent in the past 40,000 years. This reduction is a

21h

Analysis of 4 Million Pitches Reveals Umps Really Do Suck at Calling Strikes

Baseball is back, and fans can anticipate another season of amazing catches, overpowering pitching, tape-measure home runs – and, yes, controversial calls that lead to blow-ups between umpires and players. Home plate umpires are at the heart of baseball; every single pitch can require a judgment call. Yet ask any fan or player, and they’ll tell you that many of these calls are incorrect – errors t

21h

New intervention doubles quit rate among smokers with severe mental illness

Research published in the Lancet Psychiatry has found a dedicated intervention to help people with severe mental illness stop smoking can double quit rates at six months compared to standard care.

22h

An iOS App That Secretly Spies on You, And More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

22h

Megapixels: NASA created these alien clouds to study our atmosphere

Space The plumes are stunning—and scientifically useful. Last Friday, strangely shaped clouds in shades of deep blue and aqua danced over Norway for around half an hour. The alien visuals, set against the more familiar green…

22h

Where did the universe’s antimatter go?

New research digs into the question of why the observable universe contains virtually no antimatter. Particles of antimatter have the same mass but opposite electrical charge of their matter counterparts. Scientists can create very small amounts of antimatter in the laboratory. However, they observe hardly any antimatter elsewhere in the universe. Physicists believe that there were equal amounts

22h

Deadly Fungal 'Superbug' Spreads Worldwide, Alarming Scientists

A news report warns of outbreaks of C. auris at hospitals around the world.

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Infrared Light Offers a Cooler Way to Defrost

Light tuned to a specific frequency warms ice more than water—which could come in handy for defrosting delicate biological samples. Adam Levy reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

A 17-Foot Burmese Python Was Found in Florida. What Was It Even Doing There?

The state has worked hard to decrease its population of Burmese pythons, but the nonnative species is resilient.

23h

Shooting 'Avengers: Endgame' for IMAX required a custom 6K camera

Technology A 6K camera captured more of the super heroes than the screen requires. A modified Arri camera makes the Avengers huge on an IMAX screen.

23h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Department of Job Insecurity

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, April 8. Where’d Everybody Go?: The Department of Homeland Security has lost two of its top officials in just two days. Today, Secret Service Director Randolph “Tex” Alles was ousted, and on Sunday Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen resigned, reportedly under pressure from Donald Trump. The child-separation policy enacted during Nielsen’s tenure shows that not even

23h

Researchers develop first functional targeted inhibitors of peanut allergens

Researchers have effectively prevented the binding of peanut allergens with IgE to suppress the allergic reaction to peanuts using a first-in-class design of allergen-specific inhibitors.

23h

Moneyball advantage peters out once everyone's doing it

Sixteen years after author Michael Lewis wrote the book Moneyball, every Major League Baseball (MLB) team uses the technique. But a new study shows that while the tool can help a club create a stronger team — at a lower cost — it loses its edge once everyone's on to it.

23h

Physically active adults are less inclined to be depressed, say Oxford and Yale researchers

American adults that exercise spend an average of 18 fewer days depressed every year. The large-scale study includes data from over 1.2 million Americans over a five-year period. The researchers note that too much exercise negatively impacts mental health. None Weekends in Los Angeles are dominated by physical activity: hiking, surfing, running, cycling, yoga. It's easy to affix stereotypes to th

23h

A value-based payment system could revolutionize health care as we know it

Value-based health care focuses on tangible improvements in patient care outcomes. The goal is to reduce the per capita cost while improving treatment. Current fee-for-service payment models focus too much on quantity and not quality of care. None Throughout the century, miraculous advances in medicine and scientific breakthroughs have brought the health care profession to a new zenith of excelle

23h

Iron volcanoes may have erupted on metal asteroids

Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space. As if that's not strange enough, scientists now think that as the metal cooled and solidified, volcanoes spewing liquid iron could have erupted through a solid iron crust onto the surface of the asteroid.

23h

Carbon lurking in deep ocean threw ancient climate switch, say researchers

A million years ago, a longtime pattern of alternating glaciations and warm periods dramatically changed, when ice ages suddenly became longer and more intense. Scientists have long suspected that this was connected to the slowdown of a key Atlantic Ocean current system that today once again is slowing. A new study of sediments from the Atlantic bottom directly links this slowdown with a massive b

23h

'Electron shuttle' protein plays key role in plant cell-wall construction

Scientists studying plant cell walls have discovered details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component. The protein acts as a targeted 'electron shuttle,' delivering the 'fuel' that drives the construction of one specific lignin building block. Controlling the flow of electrons by modifying shuttle proteins could be a new strategy for guiding plants to make desired

23h

‘We can’t take another hit like this’: Brazilian scientists lament big budget freeze

If funds remain frozen, funds for scholarship and research could drop by 42% this year

23h

Childhood trauma has lasting effect on brain connectivity in patients with depression

A study found that childhood trauma is linked to abnormal connectivity in the brain in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). The paper shows symptom-specific, system-level changes in brain network connectivity in MDD.

23h

The cost of computation

There's been a rapid resurgence of interest in understanding the energy cost of computing. Recent advances in this 'thermodynamics of computation' are now summarized.

23h

Off-the-shelf smart fabric helps athletic coaching and physical therapy

A welcome advancement to enhance performance and rehabilitation as baseball season heats up.

23h

Nutrient supplements do no good, may do harm

Vitamins from food and pills have different effects, study finds. Samantha Page reports.

23h

Engineers develop concept for hybrid heavy-duty trucks

Researchers at MIT have devised a new way of powering heavy-duty trucks that could drastically curb pollution, increase efficiency, and reduce or even eliminate their net greenhouse gas emissions.

23h

Newly devised static negative capacitor could improve computing

In a new study, researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, together with collaborators in France and Russia, have created a permanent static 'negative capacitor,' a device believed to have been in violation of physical laws until about a decade ago.

23h

'Electron shuttle' protein plays key role in plant cell-wall construction

Scientists studying plant cell walls—structural supports that help plants overcome the downward pull of gravity—have discovered mechanistic details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component. The protein acts as a targeted "electron shuttle," delivering the "fuel" that drives the construction of one specific type of lignin building block.

23h

'Electron shuttle' protein plays key role in plant cell-wall construction

Scientists studying plant cell walls—structural supports that help plants overcome the downward pull of gravity—have discovered mechanistic details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component. The protein acts as a targeted "electron shuttle," delivering the "fuel" that drives the construction of one specific type of lignin building block.

23h

1A Across America: Hurricane Harvey Recovery Tests Faith In Government

We visit Houston to talk to people still recovering from Hurricane Harvey. (Image credit: Andrew Schneider/Houston Public Media)

23h

The Military is Developing Augmented Reality Night Vision Goggles

Combat Overlay The U.S. military is developing night vision goggles that are