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nyheder2019april10

Astronomers deliver first photo of black hole

Astronomers on Wednesday unveiled the first photo of a black hole, one of the star-devouring monsters scattered throughout the Universe and obscured by impenetrable shields of gravity.

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Working together as a 'virtual telescope,' observatories around the world produce first direct images of a black hole

An international team of over 200 astronomers has captured the first direct images of a black hole. They accomplished this remarkable feat by coordinating the power of eight major radio observatories on four continents, to work together as a virtual, Earth-sized telescope.

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'Cthulhu' fossil reconstruction reveals monstrous relative of modern sea cucumbers

An exceptionally preserved fossil from Herefordshire in the UK has given new insights into the early evolution of sea cucumbers, according to an article published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.Paleontologists from the UK and USA created a 3D computer reconstruction of the 430-million-year-old fossil and identified it as a new species. They named it Sollasina cthulhu due to its resemb

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Revealed: a black hole the size of the solar system

Einstein again proved correct in world-first image across 55 million light-years. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Obeticholic acid improves liver fibrosis and other histological features of NASH

A prespecified interim analysis of the ongoing Phase 3 REGENERATE study has confirmed that obeticholic acid (OCA) is effective in the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with liver fibrosis.

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Autoimmune diseases of the liver may be triggered by exposure to an environmental factor

Investigators from a large population-based study conducted in northern England have suggested that exposure to a persistent, low-level environmental trigger may have played a role in the development of autoimmune diseases of the liver within that population.

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HIV-infected individuals at high risk of NAFLD and progressive liver disease

The increasing burden and risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated with HIV infection have today been highlighted in two studies presented at The International Liver Congress™ 2019 in Vienna, Austria.

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High rates of liver disease progression and mortality observed in patients with NAFLD/NASH

Two independent national studies have reported high rates of liver disease progression and mortality among patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NAFLD/NASH).

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Author Correction: Regulation of volatile and non-volatile pheromone attractants depends upon male social status

Author Correction: Regulation of volatile and non-volatile pheromone attractants depends upon male social status Author Correction: Regulation of volatile and non-volatile pheromone attractants depends upon male social status, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41666-4 Author Correction: Regulation of volatile and non-volatile pheromone attractants depends upon male social st

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Publisher Correction: Grassland dynamics in response to climate change and human activities in Xinjiang from 2000 to 2014

Publisher Correction: Grassland dynamics in response to climate change and human activities in Xinjiang from 2000 to 2014 Publisher Correction: Grassland dynamics in response to climate change and human activities in Xinjiang from 2000 to 2014, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41390-z Publisher Correction: Grassland dynamics in response to climate change and human activitie

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Publisher Correction: Maximizing Electrokinetic Energy Conversion via the Intersecting Asymptotes Method

Publisher Correction: Maximizing Electrokinetic Energy Conversion via the Intersecting Asymptotes Method Publisher Correction: Maximizing Electrokinetic Energy Conversion via the Intersecting Asymptotes Method, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41669-1 Publisher Correction: Maximizing Electrokinetic Energy Conversion via the Intersecting Asymptotes Method

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Author Correction: Quantifying uncertainties of sandy shoreline change projections as sea level rises

Author Correction: Quantifying uncertainties of sandy shoreline change projections as sea level rises Author Correction: Quantifying uncertainties of sandy shoreline change projections as sea level rises, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41667-3 Author Correction: Quantifying uncertainties of sandy shoreline change projections as sea level rises

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Author Correction: Systematic in vivo evaluation of the time-dependent inflammatory response to steel and Teflon insulin infusion catheters

Author Correction: Systematic in vivo evaluation of the time-dependent inflammatory response to steel and Teflon insulin infusion catheters Author Correction: Systematic in vivo evaluation of the time-dependent inflammatory response to steel and Teflon insulin infusion catheters, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40316-z Author Correction: Systematic in vivo evaluation of th

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Publisher Correction: Coupling Multi Angle Light Scattering to Ion Exchange chromatography (IEX-MALS) for protein characterization

Publisher Correction: Coupling Multi Angle Light Scattering to Ion Exchange chromatography (IEX-MALS) for protein characterization Publisher Correction: Coupling Multi Angle Light Scattering to Ion Exchange chromatography (IEX-MALS) for protein characterization, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41391-y Publisher Correction: Coupling Multi Angle Light Scattering to Ion Excha

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Author Correction: Essential oils sensory quality and their bioactivity against the mosquito Aedes albopictus

Author Correction: Essential oils sensory quality and their bioactivity against the mosquito Aedes albopictus Author Correction: Essential oils sensory quality and their bioactivity against the mosquito Aedes albopictus , Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41665-5 Author Correction: Essential oils sensory quality and their bioactivity against the mosquito Aedes albopictus

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Author Correction: Tibio-Femoral Contact Force Distribution is Not the Only Factor Governing Pivot Location after Total Knee Arthroplasty

Author Correction: Tibio-Femoral Contact Force Distribution is Not the Only Factor Governing Pivot Location after Total Knee Arthroplasty Author Correction: Tibio-Femoral Contact Force Distribution is Not the Only Factor Governing Pivot Location after Total Knee Arthroplasty, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41668-2 Author Correction: Tibio-Femoral Contact Force Distributio

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White Americans’ diets are particularly bad for the planet

Environment Science shouldn't overlook sociology. White Americans may be committing more food-related offenses than under seasoned chicken: Their diets produce more greenhouse gases than those of other racial and ethnic…

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Cthulu-like creature crawled the depths of ancient oceans

Researchers have identified a 430 million-year-old fossil as a new species related to living sea cucumbers. They named the creature Sollasina cthulhu , after HP Lovecraft’s tentacled monster, Cthulhu. The creature had 45 tentacle-like tube feet, which it used to crawl along the ocean floor and capture food — and was small, about the size of a large spider. Scientists found it in the Herefordshire

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The First Black Hole Photo, Facebook Changes, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Get Ready to Gravel

What We’re Following Today It’s Wednesday, April 10. ‣ President Donald Trump held a campaign fundraiser in San Antonio, Texas, where he once again argued for a southern border wall. ‣ The Texas Tech Health Sciences Center medical school signed an agreement with the Trump administration to no longer factor race into admissions decisions , resolving a 2004 complaint against the school’s use of aff

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Arctic and Antarctic Sea Ice: How Are They Different?

We often get questions from readers about Earth’s sea ice in the Arctic and the Antarctic, and the differences between those areas. Arctic sea ice has declined over the past five decades, while Antarctic sea ice has increased, and then declined. Why do they behave differently? How They’re Different The primary difference between the Arctic and Antarctica is geographical. The Arctic is an ocean, c

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Fossils Are Filling Out the Human Family Tree

The more fossils we find, the more we learn that many kinds of humans have lived on Earth.

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If You Want to Protect Online Privacy, You Need to Hit the Data Brokers Where It Hurts

Most people assume hackers and data breaches are the biggest threat to their online privacy . And while both are certainly a big problem, your digital information is at risk from a much more insidious threat. In fact, if your personal information is floating around on the web, the vast majority of it probably came straight from you. Every time you buy something online, create a new account, or ev

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The Israeli Moon Lander Is About to Touch Down

Lunar Lander If all goes according to plan, Israel will earn a place in history on Thursday as the fourth nation ever to land a spacecraft on the Moon — and unlike any craft that came before it, this Moon lander was privately funded. Beresheet is the work of SpaceIL , a nonprofit Israeli space company. On Feb. 21, the company launched its $100 million spacecraft on a journey to the Moon aboard a

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Where will flooded fields best replenish groundwater?

Overpumping in California's Central Valley has depleted groundwater storage capacity and caused the land to sink. A new model based on remote sensing data could help zero in on where water managers can replenish aquifers by flooding fields.

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Low cholesterol linked to higher risk of bleeding stroke in women

Lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduces the risk of heart attacks and stroke, with an ideal value below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). But can it be too low? A new study finds that women who have levels of LDL cholesterol 70 mg/dL or lower may be more than twice as likely to have a hemorrhagic stroke than women with LDL cholesterol levels from 100 to 130 mg/dL.

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Protein pileup affects social behaviors through altered brain signaling

Scientists have discovered that when a normal cellular cleanup process is disrupted, mice start behaving in ways that resemble human symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. They found that loss of normal autophagy influences how brain cells react to inhibitory signals from each other and contributes to the behavioral changes. This intricate signaling pathway could be a new th

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Unusual phenomenon in clouds triggers lightning flash

In a first-of-its-kind observation, researchers have documented a unique event that occurs in clouds before a lightning flash happens. Their observation, called 'fast negative breakdown,' documents a new possible way for lightning to form and is the opposite of the current scientific view of how air carries electricity in thunderstorms.

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Archaeologists identify first prehistoric figurative cave art in Balkans

Archaeologist have revealed the first example of Paleolithic figurative cave art found in the Balkan Peninsula.

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A new species of early human is discovered in the Philippines

Homo sapiens were not as lonely as once thought

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Experimental PET scan detects abnormal tau protein in brains of living former NFL players

Using an experimental positron emission tomography (PET) scan, researchers have found elevated amounts of abnormal tau protein in brain regions affected by chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in a small group of living former National Football League (NFL) players with cognitive, mood and behavior symptoms.

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Releasing an immune system brake could help patients with rare but fatal brain infection

The anti-cancer drug pembrolizumab has shown promise in slowing or stopping the progression of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a typically fatal infection of the brain caused by the JC virus (JCV). This finding comes from a small-scale study by scientists at National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health. The study appea

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Gutless worms rely on handouts from internal microbes

Gutless worms rely on handouts from internal microbes Gutless worms rely on handouts from internal microbes, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01147-0 Paracatenula worms store their energy in a peculiar ‘battery’: bacteria that dwell in the worms themselves.

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The Perplexing Physics of Imaging a Black Hole

Why is it so difficult to see a black hole? What is a radio wave image anyway? Here's the science behind the first-ever "picture" of a black hole.

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Intel Releases Specs for Its Optane+QLC NAND H10 Memory

Intel has detailed more specifications of its H10 Memory Solution, which combines QLC NAND and Optane on the same M.2 card. The post Intel Releases Specs for Its Optane+QLC NAND H10 Memory …

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Scientists Release First Photo of a Black Hole

Scientists Release First Photo of a Black Hole We have now seen what we thought was unseeable, team says. blackholepicture_artist.jpg An artist's rendering of the black hole at the center of the Messier 87 galaxy. Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information) Space Wednesday, April 10, 2019 – 16:45 Catherine

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Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries

Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury.

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The protein p38gamma identified as a new therapeutic target in liver cancer

Activation of the protein p38gamma is essential for the development of the main type of liver cancer, which affects more than 1 million people worldwide every year.

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Wonder material: Individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time

Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made in a world first, and they could revolutionize electronics and fast-charging battery technology. Since the isolation of 2-dimensional phosphorene, which is the phosphorus equivalent of graphene, in 2014, more than 100 theoretical studies have predicted that new and exciting properties could emerge by producing narrow 'ribb

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Experimental drug delivers one-two punch to vision loss

In studies with lab-grown human cells and in mice, researchers have found that an experimental drug may be twice as good at fighting vision loss as previously thought.

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New species of early human found in the Philippines

Researchers have uncovered the remains of a new species of human in the Philippines, proving the region played a key role in hominin evolutionary history.

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Evolution from water to land led to better parenting

The evolution of aquatic creatures to start living on land made them into more attentive parents, says new research on frogs.

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Nurses use FDNY geospatial mapping of opioid overdoses to inform clinical practice in real time

Nurse practitioners and nursing students can use local, real-time maps of opioid overdoses to inform their clinical work with adolescents in community health settings, finds new research.

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Breast milk analyses show new opportunities for reducing risk of childhood obesity

The composition of breast milk in normal weight mothers differs from that of overweight mothers, and variations in small molecule metabolites found in breast milk are possible risk factors for childhood obesity.

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New FDA rule cracks down on compounded drug ingredients, alarming CAM practitioners

The FDA recently issued a final rule, several years in the making, establishing criteria for determining which substances can be used in compounded drugs. Naturopaths and fringe medical practitioners have exploited decades of FDA inattention to create what is, in effect, a shadow drug manufacturing industry which operates free of the Food, Drug & Cosmetics Act’s (FD&C Act) safety and efficacy requ

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Amazon's growing ties to oil industry irks some employees

Amazon is getting cozy with the oil industry—and some employees aren't happy about it.

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Too many pets are packing on too many pounds

Pets make us healthier. They can raise our spirits, extend our lives, lower our blood pressure and make us more active, research shows.

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Some People Are Exceptionally Good at Predicting the Future

Super-Forecasters Some people have a knack for accurately predicting the likelihood of future events. Y ou might even be one of these “super-forecasters” and not know it — but now there’s an easy way to find out. BBC Future has teamed up with UK-based charity Nesta and forecasting services organization Good Judgement on the “ You Predict the Future ” challenge. The purpose is to study how individ

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Too many pets are packing on too many pounds

Pets make us healthier. They can raise our spirits, extend our lives, lower our blood pressure and make us more active, research shows.

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Yahoo to pay $117.5M in latest settlement of massive breach

Nearly 200 million people who had sensitive information snatched from their Yahoo accounts will receive two years of free credit-monitoring services and other potential restitution in a legal settlement valued at $117.5 million.

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Seeing is believing: Four lessons of the new black hole image

Black holes are cosmic prisons, where nothing escapes, not light or even data. But lots did come out of Wednesday's first image of the shadowy edge of a supermassive black hole. Here are four things we learned:

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Mars' Methane Mystery Deepens with New Spacecraft Data

The European Space Agency's ExoMars spacecraft failed to find any traces of methane on the Red Planet during its hunt from April to August of 2018. This goes directly against recent positive reports of methane by ESA's own Mars Express spacecraft and NASA's Curiosity rover, which both saw methane in 2013. ExoMars has a sensitive detector that can pick up just one-tenth the amount of methane that M

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An Odd Eye Injury Caused a Man's Iris to 'Collapse'

This isn't some kind of special contact lens. It's the result of a painful eye injury.

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The heartland always a place of global connection, not isolation, author says

A persistent heartland myth paints the rural and small town Midwest as local, insular, isolationist—the ultimate national safe space, walled off from the rest of the world," says University of Illinois historian Kristin Hoganson.

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How Did Astronomers Capture the First-Ever Close-Up of a Black Hole?

Radio telescopes all over the world joined together to make this picture during a few clear days in early 2017. So, why are we just now seeing the image?

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Charge all your devices with the pocket-sized GOSPACE SuperCharger

USB, USB-C and Qi wireless charging for $44.99. Charge all your devices with the pocket-sized GOSPACE SuperCharger that lets you charge via USB, USB-C and Qi wireless charging for $44.99.

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Yukon warmest it has been in 13,600 years

A study uses new research techniques to reveal alarming information about climate change in Canada's north. A study confirms that recent climate warming in the central Yukon region has surpassed the warmest temperatures experienced in the previous 13,600 years, a finding that could have important implications in the context of current global warming trends.

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Marrying two types of solar cells draws more power from the sun

Simple tandem design uses perovskite layer to feed photons to silicon cell

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Research reveals how the most common ALS mutation dooms cells

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have cracked the mystery surrounding the most common genetic cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease. The research suggests possible new approaches to diagnosis and treatment of the lethal disorder.

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Biochemical switches identified that could be triggered to treat muscle, brain disorders

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have found that the enzymes ULK1 and ULK2 play a key role in breaking down cell structures called stress granules, whose persistence leads to toxic buildup of proteins that kill muscle and brain cells. Such buildup is central to the pathology of three related diseases: inclusion body myopathy (IBM), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemp

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New York City makes measles vaccine mandatory following spike in cases

Residents in parts of New York City will be required to get the measles vaccine or face a fine of $1,000. New York City has reported more than 280 measles cases since an outbreak struck an ultra-Orthodox Jewish community last fall. Nationally, there have been more than 460 measles cases so far in 2019. None Residents in select parts of New York City will be required to get vaccinated for measles

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Low cholesterol linked to higher risk of bleeding stroke in women

Lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol reduces the risk of heart attacks and stroke, with an ideal value below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). But can it be too low? A new study finds that women who have levels of LDL cholesterol 70 mg/dL or lower may be more than twice as likely to have a hemorrhagic stroke than women with LDL cholesterol levels from 100 to 130 mg/dL.

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William Barr Sends Troubling Signals Ahead of Mueller Report Release

Attorney general William Barr will have tremendous sway over how much of the Mueller report the public can see. Right now, it doesn't look promising.

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New Species of Early Human Is Even Smaller Than the 'Hobbit'

The ancient bones and teeth of a previously unknown human relative — one that was even smaller than the so-called Hobbit — have been discovered deep in a cave on an island in the Philippines.

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Photos: Newfound Ancient Human Relative Discovered in Philippines

The newfound hominin Homo luzonensis lived about 67,000 years ago in what is now the Philippines.

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Monkeys Genetically Edited to Mimic Human Brain Development

Rhesus monkeys engineered to express a human gene reportedly show delayed brain development and better short-term memory. Fellow scientists are raising ethical red flags.

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Amazon Is Fighting South American Govs to Control “.Amazon” Domains

Ongoing Battle The deadline has passed for Amazon and a coalition of eight governments in South America to settle a seven-year dispute over the coveted “.amazon” top-level domain. Both groups want dibs, and neither Amazon nor the countries through which the iconic river runs have agreed to various compromises, according to BBC News . Above all else, the dispute highlights how Amazon has become po

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Here’s where Israel will land on the moon this Thursday

Beresheet about to become 21st craft to make soft landing on moon Israel joins China in restarting the 'race to the moon' Interactive map shows timeline, origin and locations of all lunar landings Four countries on the moon Beresheet is the first word in the Hebrew Bible, often translated as "In the beginning" (or 'Genesis'). It's also the name of an unmanned Israeli spacecraft that is scheduled

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How to Disclose a Mental Health Issue

Should you tell your best friend? Your date? Your impatient boss? This week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen walks you through this tough decision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Homo luzonensis': Ny menneskeart opdaget i filippinsk grotte

Knogler fundet i en filippinsk grotte har vist sig at være fra en ukendt menneskeart.

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China Is Trying to Scrub Bikinis and Smoking From the Internet

Cleaning Cyberspace On Monday, the South China Morning Post published a story about the content moderation operations at Inke, one of China’s largest live-streaming companies. The piece offers a rare glimpse at how China’s private sector helps facilitate government censorship . In some cases, that means flagging streams of people smoking or wearing bikinis — content that would likely seem fairly

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How to Disclose a Mental Health Issue

Should you tell your best friend? Your date? Your impatient boss? This week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen walks you through this tough decision — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny människoart kan ha upptäckts

I en grotta på ön Luzon i Filippinerna har man hittat fossila rester av vad som misstänks vara en ny människoart. Det handlar om tänder och ben från tre individer som levde för minst 50 000 år sedan, skriver Washington Post.

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SpaceX's Falcon Heavy launch has a lot riding on it—here's how to watch

Space All eyes are on Florida's Space Coast. NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has vocalized the possibility that the agency might partner with SpaceX and use the Falcon Heavy to launch its Orion missions to the…

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Where will flooded fields best replenish groundwater?

Overpumping in California's Central Valley has depleted groundwater storage capacity and caused the land to sink. A new model based on remote sensing data could help zero in on where water managers can replenish aquifers by flooding fields.

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Democrats want feds to target the 'black box' of AI bias

Congress is starting to show interest in prying open the "black box" of tech companies' artificial intelligence with oversight that parallels how the federal government checks under car hoods and audits banks.

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Facebook ordered to pay 30,000 euros in France over 'abusive' usage terms

A French court has ordered Facebook to pay 30,000 euros ($34,000) over "abusive" terms-of-use agreements that people had to accept in order to access their social media accounts, the consumer group which filed the lawsuit said Wednesday.

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Ridding space of old satellites and debris

With constellations of thousands of telecommunication mini satellites expected to orbit Earth in the near future, the risk of space-debris collisions will grow. For Nobu Okada, it's an opportunity.

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Uber seeks $10 bn IPO, scales back value target: report

Uber is seeking to raise some $10 billion in what would be the largest stock offering of the year, with details coming this week, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.

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Battle for space more stealth than Star Wars

At tens of thousands of kilometers above the Earth, a Russian satellite slowly approached the French-Italian satellite Athena-Fidus in October 2017, a move France later denounced as "an act of espionage."

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Falcon Heavy, SpaceX’s Giant Rocket, to Launch With Large Satellite

It’s the most powerful rocket now available on Earth, and it has not flown since its spectacular test launch in 2018.

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Facebook cracks down on groups spreading harmful information

Facebook said Wednesday it is rolling out a wide range of updates aimed at combatting the spread of false and harmful information on the social media site—stepping up the company's fight against misinformation as it faces growing outside pressure.

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New quantum material could warn of neurological disease

What if the brain could detect its own disease? Researchers have been trying to create a material that "thinks" like the brain does, which would be more sensitive to early signs of neurological diseases such as Parkinson's.

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‪Black hole breakthrough: Event Horizon Telescope's landmark image ‬

submitted by /u/FubarFuturist [link] [comments]

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Living transplant donors need long-term monitoring, too

While organ transplant recipients receive continual care as the end-stage treatment to their condition, attention also should be given to living donors, who can suffer from hypertension, diabetes and other disorders after donation, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

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Is maternal vaccination safe during breastfeeding?

In light of the continuing anti-vaccination movement, a provocative new article provides a comprehensive overview of the potential risks of vaccinating breastfeeding women.

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Study finds noncompete clauses affect how employees behave, to benefit of employers

Gjergji Cici of the KU School of Business co-authored a study that is among the first to see how noncompete clauses influence those work under them, instead of the debate about their role in economic development or profits.

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Race Car Drivers Are Definitely Athletes

Race Car Drivers Are Definitely Athletes Drivers’ bodies overheat, their hearts race, and they face extreme G-forces. Race Car Drivers Are Definitely Athletes Video of Race Car Drivers Are Definitely Athletes Sports Wednesday, April 10, 2019 – 13:15 Chris Gorski, Editor (Inside Science) – David Ferguson, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Michigan State University, talks about what it’s lik

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A rich British stout is dissected with a virtual ‘scalpel’

A rich British stout is dissected with a virtual ‘scalpel’ A rich British stout is dissected with a virtual ‘scalpel’, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01132-7 Variation on nuclear magnetic resonance allows chemists to assess complex mixtures without destroying them.

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You might not need a mammogram until you turn 50

Health The American College of Physicians updated its guidelines for the still controversial screening test. The American College of Physicians updated its recommendations for mammograms this week, changing the starting age for screening mammograms from age 40 to 50. However,…

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Roboticists induce artificial metabolism in synthetic DNA

Chinese team makes step forward in bio-mimicking machines. Drew Turney reports.

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Captured carbon could convert to chemical feedstock

Australian research looks to use rather than store emitted carbon dioxide. Andrew Masterson reports.

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So where did the Mars methane go?

The most sensitive search to date for the gas that might signal life on the Red Planet draws a blank.

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'Dismantling cancer' reveals weak spots

Research has thrown up 600 new cancer vulnerabilities and each could be the target of a drug.

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Why Is the First-Ever Black Hole Photo an Orange Ring?

Researchers' data showed the black hole at the heart of the galaxy Messier 87 (M87).

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SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Prepares for First Commercial Liftoff Tonight

Editor's Note: This story has been updated from a previous version. SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy will likely launch on its first commercial flight today. The rocket launch was postponed from early April due to unspecified concerns, and then postponed again just this week due to weather. But Wednesday has a clear forecast with an 80 percent probability of a launch, so odds are good the mission will procee

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Fossils Reveal A New Species of Ancient Human in the Philippines

At the northern tip of the Philippine island of Luzon lays Callao Cave, an expansive, seven-chamber limestone warren. Researchers report today they have uncovered the bones of a now-extinct, previously unknown human species near the far end of the first chamber. The discovery adds to growing evidence that human evolution and dispersal out of Africa is much more complicated than scientists once tho

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Termination of USDA's Toxoplasmosis Lab Concerns Parasitologists

Some researchers say the abrupt end of the program will hobble the fight against a common parasite.

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College-Admissions Hysteria Is Not the Norm

Every year at this time, headlines reveal once again what everyone already knows: America’s top institutions are selective—very. Harvard took a record-low 4.5 percent of the applicants to its 2023 class. Yale accepted 5.9 percent , the same as the University of Chicago . These numbers—albeit wild—are outliers, representing an almost-negligible slice of the United States’ higher-education ecosyste

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Tiny Bees Fed On a Woman’s Tears—But Nature Gets Worse

Bee stings hurt like hell, but there’s reason to consider yourself lucky if a venomous prick is the worst you’ve suffered from bees. Last week, Taiwan’s CTS news channel reported that a 29-year-old woman had gone out for a walk in the mountains and returned home with eye pain that wouldn’t go away. The next day, an ophthalmologist pulled four bees—all still alive—from under her right eyelid. It m

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Microsoft worked with Chinese military university on artificial intelligence

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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House Endorses Net Neutrality, but the Outlook Remains Dim

The House voted largely along party lines to restore the FCC's net neutrality rules, but the measure faces opposition in the Senate and a likely veto by President Trump.

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3 Huge Questions the Black Hole Image Didn't Answer

Almost nothing in the black hole image surprised astrophysicists. These are the three biggest mysteries it left unsolved, and two questions it did answer.

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Undersea Robots Are Helping Save the Great Barrier Reef

RoboStork A team of Australian scientists built an underwater robot that can deliver larval coral to the Great Barrier reef, where they hope it will help restore the reef to some of its former glory, before it was ravaged by climate change. The delivery drone, LarvalBot, is a more hospitable version of the underwater drone that has previously been used to hunt and kill off the coral’s predators —

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These flower mites may avoid pesticides by hiding out in a rose’s internal organs

The pests hide deep within the flowers, making them difficult to combat

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Physical activity prepares neurons to regenerate in case of spinal cord injury

The influence of an active lifestyle on the regenerative capacity of the peripheral nervous system, that is, the set of cranial and spinal nerves that control motor and sensory functions, is described here for the first time, explains Ángel Barco, who has led the participation of the Institute of Neurosciences UMH-CSIC, in Alicante, in this international study.

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Dartmouth researchers offer new insights into how maternal immunity impacts neonatal HSV

Findings from a Dartmouth-led study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, are offering new insights into neonatal herpes, its impact on developing nervous systems, and how newborns can be protected from the disease. In this innovative study, investigators were able to measure not only mortality but also neurological consequences of infection in mice who acquired the virus.

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When do male and female differences appear in the development of beetle horns

The male Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus, living on Japan's main island has big horns, which are used as weapons when it fights other males for females. As such, researchers are accordingly looking for the mechanism that creates these horns. To this end, a research team at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan has identified sex-determining genes for this beetle, and

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Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries

Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury.

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Human activities shift dominant tree-fungi pairing in North America

The dominant type of tree-fungi pairing found in North American forests has shifted during the past three decades, in response in human activities such as increased nitrogen deposition and fire suppression, as well as climate change.

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How a once friendly bacteria evolved into a hospital-infecting strain in Wisconsin

A genetic study of an outbreak of Enterococcus faecalis — a leading cause of drug-resistant bacterial infections — in a hospital has revealed how the organism became resistant to new antibiotics and adapted to infect the human bloodstream.

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Protein pileup affects social behaviors through altered brain signaling

Scientists at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) have discovered that when a normal cellular cleanup process is disrupted, mice start behaving in ways that resemble human symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. They found that loss of normal autophagy influences how brain cells react to inhibitory signals from each other and contributes to the behavioral changes. This i

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YouTube TV's monthly price has been raised from $40 to $50

YouTube's Sling TV and PlayStation Vue competitor, aptly named YouTube TV, has given customers a pretty good value so far. For a mere $35/month, subscribers used to get access to unlimited DVR …

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Netflix is in talks to acquire its first movie theater

The theater in question is the historic Egyptian Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California. As Deadline outlines, the acquisition would put Netflix in good standing with the local …

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An Exit Chute from the Universe: The Story of a Historic Effort to Image a Black Hole

After more than a decade of effort, a global network of radio telescopes has revealed the first-ever picture of an enigmatic hole in spacetime — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Context-specific modulation of intrinsic coupling modes shapes multisensory processing

Intrinsically generated patterns of coupled neuronal activity are associated with the dynamics of specific brain states. Sensory inputs are extrinsic factors that can perturb these intrinsic coupling modes, creating a complex scenario in which forthcoming stimuli are processed. Studying this intrinsic-extrinsic interplay is necessary to better understand perceptual integration and selection. Here

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VPS4 triggers constriction and cleavage of ESCRT-III helical filaments

Many cellular processes such as endosomal vesicle budding, virus budding, and cytokinesis require extensive membrane remodeling by the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT-III). ESCRT-III protein family members form spirals with variable diameters in vitro and in vivo inside tubular membrane structures, which need to be constricted to proceed to membrane fission. Here, we s

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Nanoscale magnetic imaging of ferritins in a single cell

The in situ measurement of the distribution of biomolecules inside a cell is one of the important goals in life science. Among various imaging techniques, magnetic imaging (MI) based on the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond provides a powerful tool for the biomolecular research, while the nanometer-scale MI of intracellular proteins remains a challenge. Here, we use ferritin as a demonstrat

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Mechanistic insights into the SNARE complex disassembly

NSF ( N -ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor) and α-SNAP (α–soluble NSF attachment protein) bind to the SNARE (soluble NSF attachment protein receptor) complex, the minimum machinery to mediate membrane fusion, to form a 20S complex, which disassembles the SNARE complex for reuse. We report the cryo-EM structures of the α-SNAP–SNARE subcomplex and the NSF-D1D2 domain in the 20S complex at 3.9- and 3.

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GABARAPs dysfunction by autophagy deficiency in adolescent brain impairs GABAA receptor trafficking and social behavior

Dysfunctional mTOR signaling is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear what molecular mechanisms and pathogenic mediators are involved and whether mTOR-regulated autophagy continues to be crucial beyond neurodevelopment. Here, we selectively deleted Atg7 in forebrain GABAergic interneurons in adolescent mice and unexpectedly f

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Structure and mechanisms of sodium-pumping KR2 rhodopsin

Rhodopsins are the most universal biological light-energy transducers and abundant phototrophic mechanisms that evolved on Earth and have a remarkable diversity and potential for biotechnological applications. Recently, the first sodium-pumping rhodopsin KR2 from Krokinobacter eikastus was discovered and characterized. However, the existing structures of KR2 are contradictory, and the mechanism o

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Targeting dePARylation selectively suppresses DNA repair-defective and PARP inhibitor-resistant malignancies

While poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) plays an important role in DNA repair, the role of dePARylation in DNA repair remains elusive. Here, we report that a novel small molecule identified from the NCI database, COH34, specifically inhibits poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the major dePARylation enzyme, with nanomolar potency in vitro and in vivo. COH34 binds to the catalytic domain of

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A pan-coronavirus fusion inhibitor targeting the HR1 domain of human coronavirus spike

Continuously emerging highly pathogenic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) remain a major threat to human health, as illustrated in past SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV outbreaks. The development of a drug with broad-spectrum HCoV inhibitory activity would address this urgent unmet medical need. Although previous studies have suggested that the HR1 of HCoV spike (S) protein is an important target site for inhibit

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Shifts in dominant tree mycorrhizal associations in response to anthropogenic impacts

Plant-fungal symbioses play critical roles in vegetation dynamics and nutrient cycling, modulating the impacts of global changes on ecosystem functioning. Here, we used forest inventory data consisting of more than 3 million trees to develop a spatially resolved "mycorrhizal tree map" of the contiguous United States. We show that abundances of the two dominant mycorrhizal tree groups—arbuscular m

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Prepatterning of Papilio xuthus caterpillar camouflage is controlled by three homeobox genes: clawless, abdominal-A, and Abdominal-B

Color patterns often function as camouflage to protect insects from predators. In most swallowtail butterflies, younger larvae mimic bird droppings but change their pattern to mimic their host plants during their final molt. This pattern change is determined during the early fourth instar by juvenile hormone (JH-sensitive period), but it remains unclear how the prepatterning process is controlled

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Transient activation of the UPRER is an essential step in the acquisition of pluripotency during reprogramming

Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into pluripotent stem cells using the Yamanaka transcription factors. Reprogramming requires both epigenetic landscape reshaping and global remodeling of cell identity, structure, basic metabolic processes, and organelle form and function. We hypothesize that variable regulation of the proteostasis network and its influence upon the protein-folding environment wi

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Principles of genome folding into topologically associating domains

Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chromosome folding within cell nuclei is essential to determine the relationship between genome structure and function. The recent application of "chromosome conformation capture" techniques has revealed that the genome of many species is organized into domains of preferential internal chromatin interactions called "topologically associating domains" (TA

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A Photo Visit to Mount Fanjing

Mount Fanjing, or Fanjingshan, is part of the Wuling mountain range in southwestern China’s Guizhou province . Named as a UNESCO World Heritage Site last year, the mountain is home to a conservation area, a nature reserve, and a number of Buddhist temples—it has been considered a sacred site for centuries. Two of these temples sit atop a lonely spire called the New Golden Summit, or Red Clouds Go

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When Gut Bacteria Betray Their Hosts

For three decades, the deadly bacteria sat in cold storage. Normally, Enterococcus faecalis lives harmlessly in the human gut. One particular strain, however, caused a series of strangely persistent infections at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in the 1980s. These E. faecalis found their way into patients’ blood and grew resistant to antibiotics. Patients started to die. The outb

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Danske forskere: Billede af sort hul er begyndelsen på en ny æra

Billedet bekræfter sorte hullers eksistens og kan give os ny viden om, hvordan tyngdekraften fungerer.

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An Exit Chute from the Universe: The Story of a Historic Effort to Image a Black Hole

After more than a decade of effort, a global network of radio telescopes has revealed the first-ever picture of an enigmatic hole in spacetime — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Cancer-killing combination therapies unveiled with new drug-screening tool

Scientists have designed a large-scale screen that efficiently identifies drugs that are potent cancer-killers when combined, but only weakly effective when used alone.

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Greener, more efficient natural gas filtration

Researchers have developed a new polymer membrane that can dramatically improve the efficiency of natural gas purification, while reducing its environmental impact.

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Using bacteria to protect roads from deicer deterioration

Special bacteria that help form limestone and marble could soon have a new job on a road crew. Recent research shows how the bacteria, called Sporosarcina pasteurii, can be used to prevent the road degradation caused by ice-melting salt.

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Fuel cell advance a breath of fresh air for

In an advance that could help lead the way toward longer-lived green energy devices, engineers have revealed new insights about the chemical reactions that power fuel cells.

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New state of matter: Elements can be solid and liquid at same time

Scientists have discovered a new state of physical matter in which atoms can exist as both solid and liquid simultaneously.

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Cells of the Immune System (Brittany Anderton)

https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/cells-immune-system Brittany Anderton provides an overview of the major cells of the human immune system. The immune system is responsible for fighting infection and disease. It is comprised of many specialized cell types, all which work together to keep people healthy. In this short video, Dr. Brittany Anderton introduces the cells of the immune system. She co

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Google Will Now Let You Use Your Android Phone as a Physical Security Key

By now you should know that two-factor authentication is a vital and necessary component of good security hygiene. That said, the most common ways of getting 2FA codes usually involve text messages …

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Amazon's new $89 Kindle has everything most readers need

Gadgets Just be careful if you read in the tub. The entry-level Kindle got an upgrade.

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Everything you need to know about the first black hole image

Space and physics reporter Leah Crane answers New Scientist readers’ questions on the first ever images of a black hole from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT)

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Largest dust storm on Mars ever recorded may reveal why it's so dry

The same dust storm on Mars that killed the Opportunity rover is helping us understand how the planet became so inhospitable

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New species of human discovered in a cave in the Philippines

An analysis of ancient bones has revealed a previously unknown human species named Homo luzonensis that lived in the Philippines 50,000 years ago

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Automakers Plan for Their Worst Nightmare: Regulatory Chaos After Trump’s Emissions Rollback

The matter is increasingly urgent because the Trump administration is said to have settled on the details of its rollback plan, which would quite likely split the American auto market.

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A Gas Could Hint at Signs of Life on Mars. Why Hasn’t a New Spacecraft Found It?

Two spacecraft have detected methane in the Martian air. But the Trace Gas Orbiter, with more sensitive instruments, has come up empty.

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Matter: An Ancient Human Species Is Discovered in a Philippine Cave

Archaeologists in Luzon Island have turned up the bones of a distantly related species, Homo luzonensis, further expanding the human family tree.

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'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2D materials

Engineers use 'deep learning' techniques to speed up simulations of novel two-dimensional materials to understand their characteristics and how they're affected by high temperature and radiation.

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New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction

Researchers have created an electron microscopy technique termed 'cryoAPEX' that accurately tracks membrane proteins in a well-preserved cell.

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Walmart Is Rolling Out Floor-Cleaning Robots in 1,500 Stores

Clean Many Robots Walmart is about to bring worker robots to a third of its stores. Of the corporation’s 4,600 U.S. locations, 1,500 are about to start using floor-cleaning custodial robots and 300 will use the bots to spot empty shelves, according to The Wall Street Journal . It’s a move that could save human employees a lot of time, but also one that signals that Walmart considers sees human em

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From Earthrise to the black hole: astronomy's most famous images

Photographs from history that capture humanity’s exploration of the heavens Continue reading…

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Astronomers reveal first-ever picture of a black hole – video

Scientists working on the Event Horizon Telescope project have produced an image of the "unseeable", capturing the world's first picture of a black hole. It took nearly two years for 200 researchers and a network of eight radio telescopes spanning the globe to make the breakthrough, which was previously thought impossible Black hole picture captured for first time in space breakthrough Continue r

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Ancient Bones And Teeth Found In A Philippine Cave May Rewrite Human History

Islands in Southeast Asia were clearly important in the evolution of early humans, say scientists who have turned up 50,000-year-old remains of what they suspect is a previously unknown human species. (Image credit: Callao Cave Archaeology Project)

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Astronomers Capture Historic First Photo of Black Hole

It took a team of more than 200 astronomers to pull this off, along with eight massive radio telescopes organized into the "Event Horizon Telescope" or ETH. This is an opportunity for scientists to test some of the most complex predictions of general relativity. The post Astronomers Capture Historic First Photo of Black Hole appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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New quantum material could warn of neurological disease

A new material automatically 'listens' to the brain, leading to more sensitive electronics that could detect neurological disease sooner.

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New species of early human found in the Philippines

An international team of researchers have uncovered the remains of a new species of human in the Philippines, proving the region played a key role in hominin evolutionary history.

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New cancer drug targets accelerate path to precision medicine

In one of the largest studies of its kind, researchers used CRISPR technology to disrupt every gene in 300 cancer models from 30 cancer types and discover thousands of key genes essential for cancer's survival. Scientists developed a system to rank 600 drug targets that show the most promise for drug development.The results accelerate the development of targeted cancer treatments and bring researc

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Wonder material: Individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time

Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made by UCL researchers in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology.Since the isolation of 2-dimensional phosphorene, which is the phosphorus equivalent of graphene, in 2014, more than 100 theoretical studies have predicted that new and exciting properties could emerge by prod

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The protein p38gamma identified as a new therapeutic target in liver cancer

Activation of the protein p38gamma is essential for the development of the main type of liver cancer, which affects more than 1 million people worldwide every year.

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SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket poised for first commercial launch

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy rocket is poised for its first commercial space launch Wednesday, carrying a Saudi satellite operated by Arabsat, a year after sending founder Elon Musk's red Tesla roadster into orbit as a test.

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Fossils Reveal A New Species of Ancient Human in the Philippines

At the northern tip of the Philippine island of Luzon lays Callao Cave, an expansive, seven-chamber limestone warren. Researchers report today they have uncovered the bones of a now-extinct, …

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Skeptical Science at EGU 2019 – blogging from day to day

Just like last year , I travelled to Vienna to participate in the General Assembly of the European Geoscience Union (EGU) held from April 8 to 12. Different to 2018, I'll (try to) add to this blog on a daily basis, recounting what happened during each day as time allows. So please, remember to check back every once in a while to see any updates! I'll use the comment thread to highlight updates. A

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Researchers Find a New Ancient Human Species in the Philippines

Researchers Find a New Ancient Human Species in the Philippines Fossils from 50,000-67,000 years ago represent Homo luzonensis, discovered in a cave on the island of Luzon. Cave-image.jpg Callao Cave, Luzon Island, The Philippines Image credits: Callao Cave Archaeology Project Culture Wednesday, April 10, 2019 – 13:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — In a jungle cave in the Philip

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These bones belong to a new species of human

These bones belong to a new species of human These bones belong to a new species of human, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01150-5 The remains, found on an island in the Philippines, suggest that Homo luzonensis was under 1.2 metres tall.

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Zapping Elderly People’s Brains Supercharges Their Working Memory

Memory Games Stimulating the brains of elderly people with electrical currents allowed them to perform just as well on a memory test as people in their 20s — a sign that researchers may have found a noninvasive way to turn back the hands of time when it comes to human memory. “It’s opening up a whole new avenue of potential research and treatment options,” researcher Rob Reinhart said in a press

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'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2D materials

Engineers use 'deep learning' techniques to speed up simulations of novel two-dimensional materials to understand their characteristics and how they're affected by high temperature and radiation.

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New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction

Researchers have created an electron microscopy technique termed 'cryoAPEX' that accurately tracks membrane proteins in a well-preserved cell.

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Birds' surprising sound source

Birds, although they have larynges, use a different organ to sing. Called a syrinx, it's a uniquely avian feature. Now, a team that brings together physics, biology, computation and engineering finds that the syrinx confers an advantage: by sitting so low in the airway, the syrinx can produce sound with very high efficiency.

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Uber launches electric bikes, scooters in Paris

US ride-hailing group Uber said Wednesday that it would start deploying electric bikes and scooters for rent on Paris streets as soon as this week, joining a crowded market which city officials have vowed to rein in.

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New species of ancient human unearthed in the Philippines

Island-dwelling Homo luzonensis may have been a small-bodied tree climber

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Ny människosläkting hittad i grotta

Den första ledtråden kom år 2007. Ett fotben påträffades under utgrävningar Callao-grottan på den norra delen av Filippinernas största ö Luzon. Fotbenet – som är 67 000 år gammalt – blev det äldsta direkta belägget för att en okänd medlem ur vårt eget släkte Homo tagit sig till Filippinerna. Nu rapporterar forskare från Frankrike, Filippinerna och Australien att de hittat ytterligare ett dussin fo

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No detection of methane on Mars from early ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter observations

No detection of methane on Mars from early ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter observations No detection of methane on Mars from early ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter observations, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1096-4 Highly sensitive measurements of the atmosphere of Mars with the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter do not detect any methane over a range of latitudes in both hemispheres, in cont

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The bone marrow microenvironment at single-cell resolution

The bone marrow microenvironment at single-cell resolution The bone marrow microenvironment at single-cell resolution, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1104-8 The transcriptional landscape of cell populations of the mouse bone marrow microenvironment, mapped at single-cell resolution, reveals cellular heterogeneity in this niche as well as substantial transcriptional remode

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Correlations detected in a quantum vacuum

Correlations detected in a quantum vacuum Correlations detected in a quantum vacuum, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01083-z A vacuum as described by quantum mechanics is perhaps the most fundamental but mysterious state in physics. The discovery of correlations between electric-field fluctuations in such a vacuum represents a major advance.

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Production of phosphorene nanoribbons

Production of phosphorene nanoribbons Production of phosphorene nanoribbons, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1074-x Phosphorene nanoribbons are produced in liquids through the intercalation of black phosphorous crystals with lithium ions, enabling the search for predicted exotic states and applications of these nanoribbons.

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Lethal clues to cancer-cell vulnerability

Lethal clues to cancer-cell vulnerability Lethal clues to cancer-cell vulnerability, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01086-w Cancer cells often have mutations in anticancer genes that make their survival dependent on other genes. The gene-editing approach CRISPR–Cas9 offers a way to identify such vulnerabilities.

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Mars methane hunt comes up empty, flummoxing scientists

Mars methane hunt comes up empty, flummoxing scientists Mars methane hunt comes up empty, flummoxing scientists, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01093-x Trace Gas Orbiter spacecraft did not find the gas in red planet’s atmosphere during its first months of operation.

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Associating HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein structures with states on the virus observed by smFRET

Associating HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein structures with states on the virus observed by smFRET Associating HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein structures with states on the virus observed by smFRET, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1101-y Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging of conformational states of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers on intact virus an

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Martian dust storm impact on atmospheric H2O and D/H observed by ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

Martian dust storm impact on atmospheric H 2 O and D/H observed by ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter Martian dust storm impact on atmospheric H 2 O and D/H observed by ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1097-3 High-resolution measurements of Martian atmospheric dust, water and semiheavy water, obtained by the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter during a global dust s

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Developmental origin, functional maintenance and genetic rescue of osteoclasts

Developmental origin, functional maintenance and genetic rescue of osteoclasts Developmental origin, functional maintenance and genetic rescue of osteoclasts, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1105-7 Multinucleated osteoclasts required for normal bone development and tooth eruption in the mouse originate from embryonic erythro-myeloid progenitors and are maintained after bir

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Podcast: Heart failure and vacuum field fluctuations

Podcast: Heart failure and vacuum field fluctuations Podcast: Heart failure and vacuum field fluctuations, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01183-w Hear the latest in science, brought to you by Benjamin Thompson and Charlotte Stoddart.

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p38γ is essential for cell cycle progression and liver tumorigenesis

p38γ is essential for cell cycle progression and liver tumorigenesis p38γ is essential for cell cycle progression and liver tumorigenesis, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1112-8 The stress-activated kinase p38γ has a role in regulating entry into the cell cycle; in the liver, it can induce cellular proliferation during regeneration and promote the development of hepatocell

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Electric field correlation measurements on the electromagnetic vacuum state

Electric field correlation measurements on the electromagnetic vacuum state Electric field correlation measurements on the electromagnetic vacuum state, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1083-9 Electro-optic detection in a nonlinear crystal is used to measure coherence properties of vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and deduce the spectrum of the ground state

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Prioritization of cancer therapeutic targets using CRISPR–Cas9 screens

Prioritization of cancer therapeutic targets using CRISPR–Cas9 screens Prioritization of cancer therapeutic targets using CRISPR–Cas9 screens, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1103-9 In a screen of 324 human cancer cell lines and utilising a systematic target prioritization framework, the Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase is shown to be a synthetic lethal target in tum

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WRN helicase is a synthetic lethal target in microsatellite unstable cancers

WRN helicase is a synthetic lethal target in microsatellite unstable cancers WRN helicase is a synthetic lethal target in microsatellite unstable cancers, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1102-x Depletion of the DNA helicase WRN induced double-stranded DNA breaks, and promoted apoptosis and cell cycle arrest selectively in cancers with microsatellite instability, indicating

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A magnetar-powered X-ray transient as the aftermath of a binary neutron-star merger

A magnetar-powered X-ray transient as the aftermath of a binary neutron-star merger A magnetar-powered X-ray transient as the aftermath of a binary neutron-star merger, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1079-5 Observations of an X-ray transient associated with a galaxy at redshift 0.738 suggest that the X-ray transient is powered by a millisecond magnetar and that it is the

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A new species of Homo from the Late Pleistocene of the Philippines

A new species of Homo from the Late Pleistocene of the Philippines A new species of Homo from the Late Pleistocene of the Philippines, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1067-9 Homo luzonensis, a new species of Homo from the Callao Cave in the Philippines from the Late Pleistocene epoch, is described.

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Previously unknown human species found in Asia raises questions about early hominin dispersals from Africa

Previously unknown human species found in Asia raises questions about early hominin dispersals from Africa Previously unknown human species found in Asia raises questions about early hominin dispersals from Africa, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01019-7 Excavations in southeast Asia have unearthed a previously unreported hominin species named Homo luzonensis. The discover

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Transposon molecular domestication and the evolution of the RAG recombinase

Transposon molecular domestication and the evolution of the RAG recombinase Transposon molecular domestication and the evolution of the RAG recombinase, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1093-7 Identification of the changes that converted a transposase to a recombinase sheds light on the evolution of the vertebrate adaptive immune system.

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Conformation of the native HIV-1 envelope protein raises questions for vaccine design

Conformation of the native HIV-1 envelope protein raises questions for vaccine design Conformation of the native HIV-1 envelope protein raises questions for vaccine design, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01085-x The HIV-1 envelope protein is the target of antibodies that neutralize the virus. A fresh look into the conformational states of this protein relaunches the quest

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A mouse model for the most common form of heart failure

A mouse model for the most common form of heart failure A mouse model for the most common form of heart failure, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00983-4 A mouse model that replicates the clinical features of the most common form of heart failure opens a window on the mechanisms underlying this disease, and could help scientists to explore future therapies.

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Visualization of clustered protocadherin neuronal self-recognition complexes

Visualization of clustered protocadherin neuronal self-recognition complexes Visualization of clustered protocadherin neuronal self-recognition complexes, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1089-3 Clustered protocadherin ectodomains spontaneously assemble to form a zipper-like lattice of alternating cis and trans interactions at membrane contact sites, which probably represen

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Nitrosative stress drives heart failure with preserved ejection fraction

Nitrosative stress drives heart failure with preserved ejection fraction Nitrosative stress drives heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1100-z iNOS-driven dysregulation of the IRE1α–XBP1 pathway leads to cardiomyocyte dysfunction in mice and recapitulates the systemic and cardiovascular features of human heart failure with preserv

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New hominin species, asteroid explosion and Sydney Brenner dies

New hominin species, asteroid explosion and Sydney Brenner dies New hominin species, asteroid explosion and Sydney Brenner dies, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01097-7 The week in science: 5–11 April 2019.

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Facebook Is Changing News Feed (Again) to Stop Fake News

The social media giant debuted new features and tools to help in its Sisyphean fight against misinformation and abuse on Facebook, Instagram, and Messenger.

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New species of ancient human discovered in Philippines cave

Homo luzonensis fossils found in Luzon island cave, dating back up to 67,000 years A new species of ancient human, thought to have been under 4ft tall and adapted to climbing trees, has been discovered in the Philippines, providing a twist in the story of human evolution. The specimen, named Homo luzonensis , was excavated from Callao cave on Luzon island in the northern Philippines and has been

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New human species found in Philippines

There's a new addition to the family tree: an extinct species of human that's been found in the Philippines.

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The best place for a bird's voice box is low in the airway, researchers find

All air-breathing vertebrates have a larynx—a structure of muscles and folds that protects the trachea and, in many animals, vibrates and modulates to produce a stunning array of sounds.

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Nye målinger øger mystikken: Er der methan på Mars?

PLUS. Nasa har for nylig berettet, at der er methan på Mars. ESA siger: Nej, det er der ikke, baseret på de nyeste og mest præcise målinger

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A new hominid species has been found in a Philippine cave, fossils suggest

Cave fossils found in the Philippines come from a newly discovered member of the human lineage, researchers say

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New fossil human relative found in the Philippines

Small and with archaic traits, Homo luzonensis lived on an island more than 50,000 years ago. Dyani Lewis reports.

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Methane on Mars: opposite results in studies just days apart

Different instruments bring contradictory findings in search for possible bio-signature. Richard A Lovett reports.

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New Species of Human, Homo luzonensis, Identified in the Philippines

Thirteen hominin bones found in a cave are so unique that archaeologists have determined they stem from a distinct hominin species, although others question whether the researchers have enough evidence.

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The best place for a bird's voice box is low in the airway, researchers find

All air-breathing vertebrates have a larynx—a structure of muscles and folds that protects the trachea and, in many animals, vibrates and modulates to produce a stunning array of sounds.

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New species of early human found in the Philippines

An international team of researchers have uncovered the remains of a new species of human in the Philippines, proving the region played a key role in hominin evolutionary history.

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Wonder material—individual 2-D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time

Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made by UCL researchers in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology.

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NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Wallace dissipating

Tropical Cyclone Wallace was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead. Wallace was located off the northwestern coast of Western Australia.

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Nurses use FDNY geospatial mapping of opioid overdoses to inform clinical practice in real time

Nurse practitioners and nursing students can use local, real-time maps of opioid overdoses to inform their clinical work with adolescents in community health settings, finds new research from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing.

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Research underscores value of cognitive training for adults with mild cognitive impairment

Researchers at the Center for BrainHealth®, part of The University of Texas at Dallas, combined two non-pharmacological interventions for adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): eight sessions of Strategic Memory Advanced Reasoning Training (SMART), a cognitive training program shown to improve reasoning and ability to extract bottom-line messages from complex information; and Transcranial Di

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NASA-NOAA satellite sees Tropical Cyclone Wallace dissipating

Tropical Cyclone Wallace was dissipating in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead. Wallace was located off the northwestern coast of Western Australia.

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Breast milk analyses show new opportunities for reducing risk of childhood obesity

The composition of breast milk in normal weight mothers differs from that of overweight mothers, and variations in small molecule metabolites found in breast milk are possible risk factors for childhood obesity.

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Sauron's Eye or Brexit metaphor? Tweets joke about black hole image

Social media users had fun with the landmark first blurry image of distant phenomenon Black hole picture captured for first time in space breakthrough It has been described as seeing the unseeable and considered a significant milestone in human understanding of the universe. But the first ever image of a black hole is also – as noted by rather a lot of social media users – slightly underwhelming.

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Germany to mull carbon tax as part of national climate pact

Germany's environment minister says the government will discuss introducing a carbon tax as part of its national plan to curb climate change.

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Unknown human relative discovered in Philippine cave

Unknown human relative discovered in Philippine cave Unknown human relative discovered in Philippine cave, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01152-3 Bone fragments reveal a short-statured species — which researchers have named Homo luzonensis — that lived more than 50,000 years ago.

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Birds' surprising sound source

Birds, although they have larynges, use a different organ to sing. Called a syrinx, it's a uniquely avian feature. Now, a team that brings together physics, biology, computation and engineering finds that the syrinx confers an advantage: by sitting so low in the airway, the syrinx can produce sound with very high efficiency.

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Scientists from NUST MISIS create a super-fast robot microscope to search for dark matter

Researchers from the National University of science and technology MISIS (NUST MISIS, Moscow, Russia) and the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN, Naples, Italy) have developed a simple and cost-effective technology that allows increasing the speed of the automated microscopes (AM) by 10-100 times. The microscopes' speed growth will help scientists in many fields: medicine, nuclear physic

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'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2D materials

Rice University engineers use 'deep learning' techniques to speed up simulations of novel two-dimensional materials to understand their characteristics and how they're affected by high temperature and radiation.

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'Deep learning' casts wide net for novel 2-D materials

Scientists are discovering new two-dimensional materials at a rapid pace, but they don't always immediately know what those materials can do.

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Archaeologists identify first prehistoric figurative cave art in Balkans

An international team, led by an archaeologist from the University of Southampton and the University of Bordeaux, has revealed the first example of Palaeolithic figurative cave art found in the Balkan Peninsula.

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How scientists took first picture of a black hole

The FT's Clive Cookson explains how astronomers saw 'the unseeable'

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Google DLP Makes It Easier to Safeguard Sensitive Data Troves

Google's Data Loss Prevention tool finds and redacts sensitive data in the cloud. A new user interface makes now makes it more broadly accessible.

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Researchers find unusual phenomenon in clouds triggers lightning flash

In a first-of-its-kind observation, researchers from the University of New Hampshire Space Science Center have documented a unique event that occurs in clouds before a lightning flash happens. Their observation, called "fast negative breakdown," documents a new possible way for lightning to form and is the opposite of the current scientific view of how air carries electricity in thunderstorms.

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What The Event Horizon Telescope Reveals About Galaxy M87

A massive international collaboration of researchers has released the first-ever direct image of the hellish environment surrounding a supermassive black hole. As part of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) project, the team used a global array of telescopes to probe the fiery disk of material swirling around the gargantuan black hole at the center of the galaxy M87. The results confirm that the hot

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Water that never freezes

Can water reach minus 263 degrees Celsius without turning into ice? Yes it can, say researchers, if it is confined in nanometer-scale lipid channels.

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Daily briefing: Chemistry is the fastest path to a Nobel prize

Daily briefing: Chemistry is the fastest path to a Nobel prize Daily briefing: Chemistry is the fastest path to a Nobel prize, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01188-5 Chemists produce their Nobel-winning work later in life, but have the shortest wait to win. Plus: The first-ever image of a black hole and how to tackle difficult conversations about ethics.

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The best air fryers—and why your friends love them so much

Gadgets Crisp up frozen food without turning on the oven. Your pal with an air fryers can't stop talking about it. You'll admit you're curious, but who has the money and room for another single-use kitchen appliance? And if you…

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What the Sight of a Black Hole Means to a Black Hole Physicist

At this historic moment, the world has paused to take in the sight of humanity’s first image of the strangest phenomenon in the known universe, a remarkable legacy of the general theory of relativity: a black hole. I am moved not just by the image; overwhelmingly I am moved by the significance of sharing this experience with strangers around the globe. I am moved by the image of a species looking

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Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave

For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. These inscriptions reveal evidence of secluded ceremonial activities at a time of crisis for the Cherokee, who were displaced from their ancestral lands and sent westward on the Trail of Tears in the 1830s.

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Ready, set, go: Scientists evaluate novel technique for firing up fusion-reaction fuel

To capture and control on Earth the fusion reactions that drive the sun and stars, researchers must first turn room-temperature gas into the hot, charged plasma that fuels the reactions. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), scientists have conducted an analysis that confirms the effectiveness of a novel, non-standard way for starting up plasma in fut

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New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction

Researchers at Purdue University have created an electron microscopy technique termed 'cryoAPEX' that accurately tracks membrane proteins in a well-preserved cell.

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VA's process for determining TBI in veterans seeking disability compensation examined in new report

The US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) should expand the requirement in its disability compensation process regarding who can diagnose traumatic brain injury (TBI) to include any health care professional with pertinent and ongoing brain injury training and experience, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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UNH researchers find unusual phenomenon in clouds triggers lightning flash

In a first-of-its-kind observation, researchers from the University of New Hampshire Space Science Center have documented a unique event that occurs in clouds before a lightning flash happens. Their observation, called 'fast negative breakdown,' documents a new possible way for lightning to form and is the opposite of the current scientific view of how air carries electricity in thunderstorms.

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Research shows evidence of impulsive behavior in nonsuicidal self-injury

Are young adults who harm themselves more at risk for suicide? New research suggests there could be a connection under specific conditions associated with negative emotions.

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Archaeologists identify first prehistoric figurative cave art in Balkans

An international team, led by an archaeologist from the University of Southampton and the University of Bordeaux, has revealed the first example of Paleolithic figurative cave art found in the Balkan Peninsula.

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How flying cars could help in the fight against climate change

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Tesla Says Autopilot Is Statistically Safer Than a Human Driver

Good News/Bad News Tesla’s latest quarterly safety data report is a mixed bag of good and bad news. According to the report, which Tesla released this week, crashes involving the company’s vehicles are on the rise. Not great. However, when Autopilot is engaged, Teslas are less likely to get into crashes, signaling that human drivers may benefit from an artificial intelligence safety boost. And ev

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Novel strategy hits 'reset button' for disease-causing genetic duplications

Scientists have developed a strategy for editing and repairing a particular type of genetic mutation associated with microduplications using CRISPR/Cas9 and a seldom-used DNA repair pathway. This approach to programmable gene editing overcomes prior inefficiencies in gene correction.

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Ready, set, go: Scientists evaluate novel technique for firing up fusion-reaction fuel

Article describes analytical confirmation that transient CHI, a novel device for starting up fusion plasmas, can achieve startup in future compact fusion facilities.

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Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave interpreted

For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. These inscriptions reveal evidence of secluded ceremonial activities at a time of crisis for the Cherokee, who were displaced from their ancestral lands and sent westward on the Trail of Tears in the 1830s.

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How scientists saw the 'invisible'—and captured the first image of a black hole

Space The Event Horizon Telescope peered into the Messier 87 galaxy. Scientists with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) announced Wednesday that they’ve successfully imaged the event horizon of a supermassive black hole at the heart of the…

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House passes bill to restore 'net neutrality' rules

The House has passed bill Wednesday to restore Obama-era "net neutrality" rules, but the legislation faces slim odds of making it through the Republican-controlled Senate.

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US praises German 5G standards as Huawei battle simmers

The top U.S. diplomat for cybersecurity policy on Wednesday praised Germany's draft security standards for next generation mobile networks, which he said could effectively shut out China's Huawei.

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A Deep Dive into Deep Learning

A personal journey to understand what lies beneath the startling powers of advanced neural networks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Water that never freezes

Can water reach minus 263 degrees Celsius without turning into ice? Yes it can, say researchers, if it is confined in nanometer-scale lipid channels.

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Simultaneous heatwaves caused by anthropogenic climate change

Without the climate change caused by human activity, simultaneous heatwaves would not have hit such a large area as they did last summer.

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Higher lead in topsoil boosts probability of cognitive difficulties in 5-year-old boys

Researchers sought to estimate the effects of exposure to lead in topsoil on the cognitive ability of 5-year-olds in the United States. The study found that higher lead in topsoil significantly increases the probability that 5-year-old boys will have cognitive difficulties but does not seem to affect 5-year-old girls. The researchers found the adverse effects in boys even in U.S. counties where th

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Microbes in household dust can break down harmful chemicals

A new study indicates that the microbes we track into buildings — the microscopic bacteria and other microorganisms that thrive on our skin and outdoors — can help break down harmful chemicals in household dust.

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New research reveals climate change secrets hidden in the Yukon permafrost

A study from U of T Mississauga uses new research techniques to reveal alarming information about climate change in Canada's north. A study published in Nature Communications confirms that recent climate warming in the central Yukon region has surpassed the warmest temperatures experienced in the previous 13,600 years, a finding that could have important implications in the context of current glob

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Adenosine kinase deficiency makes liver more susceptible to carcinogen

A new study has shown that reduced adenosine kinase expression in the liver can make it more susceptible to carcinogenic damage and the development of liver cancer.

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Astronomers capture first image of a black hole

Researchers from the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) announced a breakthrough today in several coordinated international press conferences: they have successfully captured the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole. It is located at the center of the neighboring galaxy M87. The results are published in a series of papers in the current issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

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International astronomers reveal first image of event horizon of super-massive black hole

Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe including one at National Science Foundation in Washington, D.C., an international team of astronomers including a team from the University of Massachusetts Amherst reveal that they have succeeded in unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

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Sexual behavior may influence gut microbiome

A person's sexual behavior could affect their microbiome and immune system, potentially elevating their risk of HIV infection, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

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Novel strategy hits 'reset button' for disease-causing genetic duplications

Scientists at UMass Medical School have developed a strategy for editing and repairing a particular type of genetic mutation associated with microduplications using CRISPR/Cas9 and a seldom-used DNA repair pathway. Described in Nature, this approach to programmable gene editing overcomes prior inefficiencies in gene correction.

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Ready, set, go: Scientists evaluate novel technique for firing up fusion-reaction fuel

Article describes analytical confirmation that transient CHI, a novel device for starting up fusion plasmas, can achieve startup in future compact fusion facilities.

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Cherokee Wrote Backward Messages in Cave to Speak to the Spirit World

Nearly 200 years ago, Cherokee gathered inside a cave in Alabama and, using their newly minted alphabet, wrote ceremonial messages onto the walls and ceiling, a new study finds.

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A Deep Dive into Deep Learning

A personal journey to understand what lies beneath the startling powers of advanced neural networks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Chinese Scientists Gene-Hacked Super Smart Human-Monkey Hybrids

Big Brain For the first time, scientists have used gene-editing techniques to make monkey brains more humanlike. The monkeys, rhesus macaques, got smarter — they had superior memories to unaltered monkeys, according to recently-published research that’s kicked off a fiery debate among ethicists about how far scientists should be able to take genetic experimentation. Cognitive Gap The team of Chin

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Hot People Are Stressful

In 2010, when I was 24 years old, I endured six straight months of recurring strep-throat infections before I finally got the green light to get my tonsils out. Midway through a round of antibiotics, I hauled myself into my new specialist’s office unshowered and wearing gym clothes I had collected from my floor, sweaty and rapidly losing any remaining will to sit upright. So I was not prepared fo

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Caregiving not as bad for your health as once thought, study says

For decades, articles in research journals and the popular press alike have reported that being a family caregiver takes a toll on a person's health, boosting levels of inflammation and weakening the function of the immune system. Now, after analyzing 30 papers on the levels of immune and inflammatory molecules in caregivers, researchers say the link has been overstated and the association is extr

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Hurricane Harvey provides lessons learned for flood resiliency plans

Scientists used satellite data to map the Houston-Galveston area impacted by Hurricane Harvey to understand why the flooding was so severe and widespread.

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How much nature is lost due to higher yields?

The exploitation of farmland is being intensified with a focus to raising yields. The degree to which yields actually increase as a result and the extent of the simultaneous loss of biological diversity have to date been under-researched factors. An international team of scientists has now evaluated data from worldwide research in which both yield and biodiversity were examined before and after in

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Falling levels of air pollution drove decline in California's tule fog

The Central Valley's heavy wintertime tule fog — known for snarling traffic and closing schools — has been on the decline over the past 30 years, and falling levels of air pollution are the cause, says a new study. The findings help explain the puzzling decades-long rise and fall in the number of 'fog days' affecting the region over the past century.

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Half-hearted: New insight into why the heart doesn't develop properly in some children

Investigators have found evidence that the gene Ccdc117 supports the rapid growth of precursor cells needed for proper development of right-sided heart structures. It does so by promoting transfer of iron-sulfur compounds to enzymes crucial for DNA replication and repair. Silencing Ccdc117 impedes cell growth, which may prevent heart structures from developing properly.

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Human iPSC-derived MSCs from aged individuals acquire a rejuvenation signature

The use of primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is fraught with ageing-related shortfalls such as limited expansion and early senescence. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived MSCs (iMSCs) have been shown to be a useful clinically relevant source of MSCs that circumvent these agiing-associated drawbacks.

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Astronom: ”Ett av de största astronomiska samarbeten som gjorts”

Idag presenterades den första bilden någonsin på ett svart hål. SVT Vetenskap ställde några frågor till Kirsten Kraiberg Knudsen, professor i astronomi vid Chalmers tekniska högskola, om vad detta betyder.

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The Galaxy A80 has three reversible cameras and no notch – CNET

The first phone with Samsung's New Infinity display slides apart and rotates its cameras when it's selfie time.

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Longevity Myth Busting – Aubrey de Grey

submitted by /u/Buck-Nasty [link] [comments]

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Researchers interpret Cherokee inscriptions in Alabama cave

For the first time, a team of scholars and archaeologists has recorded and interpreted Cherokee inscriptions in Manitou Cave, Alabama. These inscriptions reveal evidence of secluded ceremonial activities at a time of crisis for the Cherokee, who were displaced from their ancestral lands and sent westward on the Trail of Tears in the 1830s.

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Water that never freezes

Can water reach minus 263 degrees Celsius without turning into ice? Yes it can, say researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, if it is confined in nanometre-scale lipid channels.

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In Quantum Games, There’s No Way to Play the Odds – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog. These games combine quantum entanglement, infinity and impossible-to-calculate winning probabilities. But if researchers can crack them, they’ll reveal deep mathematical secrets. Photograph by Everett Collection / Shutterstock In the 1950s, four mathematically minded U.S. Army soldiers used primitive electronic calculators to wor

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How will flying cars affect the environment?

Flying cars, formally known as electric vertical takeoff and landing aircraft, or VTOLs, may not be suitable for short trips, researchers report. However, VTOLs—which combine the convenience of vertical takeoff and landing like a helicopter with the efficient aerodynamic flight of an airplane—could play a niche role in sustainable mobility for longer trips, according to the study. Several compani

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Astronomers Capture First-Ever Image of a Supermassive Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope reveals the silhouette of a black hole at the center of a galaxy 55 million light-years away

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A dust-up: Microbes interact with harmful chemicals in dust

A new study indicates that the microbes we track into buildings–the microscopic bacteria and other microorganisms that thrive on our skin and outdoors–can help break down harmful chemicals in household dust.

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Higher lead in topsoil boosts probability of cognitive difficulties in 5-year-old boys

Researchers sought to estimate the effects of exposure to lead in topsoil on the cognitive ability of 5-year-olds in the United States. The study found that higher lead in topsoil significantly increases the probability that 5-year-old boys will have cognitive difficulties but does not seem to affect 5-year-old girls. The researchers found the adverse effects in boys even in U.S. counties where th

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Simultaneous heatwaves caused by anthropogenic climate change

Without the climate change caused by human activity, simultaneous heatwaves would not have hit such a large area as they did last summer. This is the conclusion of researchers at ETH Zurich based on observational and model data.

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Caregiving not as bad for your health as once thought, study says

For decades, articles in research journals and the popular press alike have reported that being a family caregiver takes a toll on a person's health, boosting levels of inflammation and weakening the function of the immune system. Now, after analyzing 30 papers on the levels of immune and inflammatory molecules in caregivers, Johns Hopkins researchers say the link has been overstated and the assoc

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Association between household workload, career dissatisfaction for physician moms

This study used data from an online survey of about 1,700 physician mothers to examine how responsibilities at home are associated with career dissatisfaction and whether that differs by specialty. Nearly all of the physician mothers were partnered or married and 27 percent were in procedural specialties (defined as all surgical specialties, anesthesiologists, gastroenterologists and obstetricians

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Discovery of a host mRNA that inhibits immune functions of antiviral protein RIG-I

This study shows that, upon HCV infection, mRNA of selenoprotein P (SeP), a secretory protein produced primarily in the liver, binds to and inhibits the action of RIG-I, an antiviral protein, thus regulating innate immunity. RIG-I-mediated induction of interferon production is repressed by SeP mRNA, a host mRNA, affecting its antiviral activity. These results should lead to further elucidation of

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New imaging reveals previously unseen vulnerabilities of HIV

Imagine that HIV is a sealed tin can: if you opened it, what would you find inside? An international team led by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Tufts University School of Medicine, and the University of Melbourne think they know. For the first time, they have visualized what the 'open can' of the human immunodeficiency virus looks like, revealing a pre

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PSN Online ID Changes Available Now In U.S.

The Sony PS4 has been around for several years and has sold a massive number of units since launch, easily besting the Xbox One in total sales. The PS4 is nearing the end of its reign as Sony’s …

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Tech Allows Archaeologists to Uncover Without Destruction

Tech Allows Archaeologists to Uncover Without Destruction New tools are creating a trend in archaeology research: excavation without digging. RockArtPXRF.JPG A portable X-ray device can help scientists study rock art without touching it. Image credits: Courtesy of Shumla Archaeological Research and Education Center Culture Wednesday, April 10, 2019 – 11:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Sc

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Mandatory pre-season guidelines reduce heat illness among high school football players

Researchers have found strong evidence that rates of heat-related illnesses, such as heat cramps and heat strokes, were reduced by half in states that had mandated guidelines to reduce exertional heat illness among high school football players. This is one of the first studies examining the effectiveness of state-mandated guidelines for reducing exertional heat illness among high school football p

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Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity

Researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats.

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Active ingredient of aconite root against peripheral neuropathic pain is identified as neoline

Aconite root is used in East Asian traditional medicines to treat pain. Since its toxicity, it is used after heat-processing for detoxifying. The present study revealed that processed aconite root could relief neuropathic pain in murine peripheral neuropathy model induced by oxaliplatin, paclitaxel, or partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (Seltzer model), and identified that its active ingredient

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Diet rich in animal protein is associated with a greater risk of early death

A diet rich in animal protein and meat in particular is not good for the health, a new study finds, providing further backing for earlier research evidence. Men who favored animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a greater risk of death in a 20-year follow-up than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein.

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A new molecule to fight type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

A new molecule -EPB-53-, could help fight type 2 diabetes and the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. According to a new study, the EPB-53 molecule increases levels of the FGF21 hormone, a biological factor playing a determining role in the control of diabetes and obesity.

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Kirstjen Nielsen’s Job Prospects Are Probably Pretty Slim

Last May, Kirstjen Nielsen found herself doing what so many officials in the Trump administration had done before her: navigating rumors that she was soon to be fired. Illegal border crossings were on the rise, and the president was angry. At the time, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly was able to calm him down and reassure him of Nielsen’s competence . But the rumors persisted through the sp

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The Old Thrills of Game of Thrones Might Be Gone for Good

This story contains spoilers for all seven seasons of Game of Thrones . So here we are: Seven seasons and 67 episodes of Game of Thrones are in the rear-view mirror. Only a half a dozen are still ahead of us, with the eighth and final season starting Sunday. Where do things stand? The Night King and his army of the dead have breached the Wall, thanks to a conveniently mislaid and reanimated drago

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Letters: Progressive Policy Proposals ‘Are Not Far Left; They Are Dead Center’

The Democratic Party Is Radicalizing The GOP is hardly the only party that is undergoing some alarming tectonic shifts, Peter Wehner argued recently : “On every front, the Democratic Party is moving left.” To understand this radicalization, he wrote, look to the ascent of Bernie Sanders—“a self-proclaimed socialist”—and the ideas being embraced by leading members of the party, such as Medicare fo

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Giant Antarctic sea spiders weather warming by getting holey

Scientists have wondered for decades why marine animals that live in the polar oceans and the deep sea can reach giant sizes there, but nowhere else. University of Hawai'i at Manoa zoology Ph.D. student Caitlin Shishido, with UH researcher Amy Moran and colleagues at the University of Montana, went to Antarctica to test the prevailing theory-the 'oxygen-temperature hypothesis'-that animals living

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Pesticide cocktail can harm honey bees

A recently approved pesticide growing in popularity around the world was developed as a "bee safe" product, designed to kill a broad spectrum of insect pests but not harm pollinators.

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Giant Antarctic sea spiders weather warming by getting holey

Scientists have wondered for decades why marine animals that live in the polar oceans and the deep sea can reach giant sizes there, but nowhere else. University of Hawai'i at Manoa zoology Ph.D. student Caitlin Shishido, with UH researcher Amy Moran and colleagues at the University of Montana, went to Antarctica to test the prevailing theory-the 'oxygen-temperature hypothesis'-that animals living

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Pesticide cocktail can harm honey bees

A recently approved pesticide growing in popularity around the world was developed as a "bee safe" product, designed to kill a broad spectrum of insect pests but not harm pollinators.

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New imaging reveals previously unseen vulnerabilities of HIV

Imagine that HIV is a sealed tin can: if you opened it, what would you find inside? An international team led by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Tufts University School of Medicine, and the University of Melbourne think they know. For the first time, they have visualized what the "open can" of the human immunodeficiency virus looks like, revealing a pre

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The eyes of mammals reveal a dark past

The eyes of mammals reveal a dark past The eyes of mammals reveal a dark past, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01109-6 A popular hypothesis suggests that the mammalian eye developed in the shadow of the dinosaurs.

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How artificial intelligence is helping to prevent blindness

How artificial intelligence is helping to prevent blindness How artificial intelligence is helping to prevent blindness, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01111-y Machine learning is being used to automate the detection of eye diseases.

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Four technologies that could transform the treatment of blindness

Four technologies that could transform the treatment of blindness Four technologies that could transform the treatment of blindness, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01107-8 A decade ago, clinicians had nothing to offer most people affected by retinal degeneration. Breakthroughs in genetics, bionics and stem-cell therapy are changing that.

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Eyes hint at hidden mental-health conditions

Eyes hint at hidden mental-health conditions Eyes hint at hidden mental-health conditions, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01114-9 Eye examinations could enable clinicians to detect early signs of neurological and neuropsychiatric conditions.

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Machine diagnosis

Machine diagnosis Machine diagnosis, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01112-x The medical benefits of bringing artificial intelligence to eye care outweigh the risks, says Aaron Lee.

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Breaking the myopia myth

Breaking the myopia myth Breaking the myopia myth, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01108-7 Pregnancy can affect the eye, but the recommendation that short-sighted women have a caesarean section to protect their vision is outdated and unnecessary.

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A smart solution to vision problems

A smart solution to vision problems A smart solution to vision problems, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01110-z Smartphone apps and peripherals that simplify the diagnosis of sight problems could help doctors to reach billions of people in low-income countries.

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The first image of a black hole: A three minute guide

The first image of a black hole: A three minute guide The first image of a black hole: A three minute guide, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01186-7 See how astronomers took the first ever image of a black hole, at the heart of the galaxy M87.

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Lighting design for better health and well being

Lighting design for better health and well being Lighting design for better health and well being, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01113-w Cleverly designed artificial lighting can sidestep negative effects on the body’s circadian clock, and might even bring health benefits.

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The eye

The eye The eye, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01106-9 People’s reliance on sight gives ophthalmology research a special importance to society.

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Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

Researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.

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Scientists: Next Black Hole Image Will Be Way Clearer

Pale Orange Ring The image of a black hole shared by scientists on Wednesday represents many things. It’s the first-ever direct observation of a black hole’s event horizon, it’s evidence supporting Einstein’s theory of general relativity — and, if we’re being perfectly honest, it’s just straight-up awesome. But the picture — a fuzzy, glowing orange ring — is also kind of fuzzy, like an optometris

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New imaging reveals previously unseen vulnerabilities of HIV

Imagine that HIV is a sealed tin can: if you opened it, what would you find inside? An international team led by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM), Tufts University School of Medicine, and the University of Melbourne think they know. For the first time, they have visualized what the "open can" of the human immunodeficiency virus looks like, revealing a pre

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Norway to ban fur farms by 2025

Norway's government on Wednesday detailed plans to ban fur farms by 2025, offering financial compensation to farmers who blasted it as a "historic betrayal".

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Drawing the Invisible: The Many Ways Artists Have Imagined Black Holes

How do you draw something we've never seen? How artists have taken on the challenge of drawing black holes.

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Home health care can prevent repeat hospital stays

Older adults who receive one to two hours of in-home physical therapy are up to 82 percent less likely to face hospital readmission 60 days after discharge, research finds. For the study, which appears in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association , researchers examined the impact of specific services in Medicare-certified home health care (HHC) programs, such as physical therapy,

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Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

Researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.

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Astronomers capture first image of a black hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

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Uber Elevate: Will Be Same Cents Per Mile In Air As On Roads!

Uber Elevate: Will Be Same Cents Per Mile In Air As On Roads Uber Elevate means business when it comes to electric vertical take-off & landing (eVTOL) urban air mobility (UAM) solutions. Recently, Uber Elevate quoted that eVTOL air miles would cost the same as what Uber charges on the road. And with Airbus UAM’s outlook that the market will be around $50 billion by 2030, the company surely want

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More than a strip of paint needed to keep cyclists safe

Research published in the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention today shows that marked on-road bicycle lanes and parked cars reduce the distance that motorists provide when passing cyclists.

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Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity

University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats.

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At Last, a Black Hole's Image Revealed

The Event Horizon Telescope captures one of the universe’s most mysterious objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wearable tech that helps you navigate by touch | Keith Kirkland

Keith Kirkland is developing wearable tech that communicates information using only the sense of touch. He's trying to figure out: What gestures and vibration patterns could intuitively communicate ideas like "stop" or "go"? Check out his team's first product, a navigation device for the blind and visually impaired, and learn more about the entirely new "haptic language" he's creating to power it.

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Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity

University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats.

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At Last, a Black Hole's Image Revealed

The Event Horizon Telescope captures one of the universe’s most mysterious objects — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Seven Ways Cannabis Legalization Will Make the Future Better

High Times In the United States, marijuana used to have a bad reputation. Now, more than two out of every three people in the United States support legalizing cannabis, and state laws are reflecting that shift in opinion. Medical marijuana is currently legal in 33 states plus Washington, D.C., and in 10 of those states and the nation’s capital, adults over the age of 21 can legally buy marijuana

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Giant Antarctic sea spiders weather warming by getting holey

Scientists have wondered for decades why marine animals that live in the polar oceans and the deep sea can reach giant sizes there, but nowhere else. Zoologists went to Antarctica to test the prevailing theory — the 'oxygen-temperature hypothesis' — that animals living in extreme cold can grow to giant sizes because their metabolisms are very slow.

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New study finds higher C-section infection risk for mothers on Medicaid

The risk of surgical site infection following cesarean delivery is higher among Medicaid-insured women when compared to women who were privately insured, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal for the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) study found that mothers delivering via ce

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Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity

University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats.

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Mandatory preseason guidelines reduce heat illness among high school football players

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and partners have found strong evidence that rates of heat-related illnesses, such as heat cramps and heat strokes, were reduced by half in states that had mandated guidelines to reduce exertional heat illness among high school football players. This is one of the first studies examining the effectiveness of state-mandated guidelines f

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Empathy is the secret ingredient that makes cooperation – and civilization – possible

Human societies are so prosperous mostly because of how altruistic we are. Unlike other animals, people cooperate even with complete strangers. We share knowledge on Wikipedia, we show up to vote, and we work together to responsibly manage natural resources.

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The World’s First Black Hole Image Vindicates Einstein’s Theory

Black Hole Fun On Wednesday, the team behind the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) made history by sharing the first ever image of a black hole — a snapshot of the event horizon of a supermassive black hole in the M87 galaxy. To accomplish that extraordinary feat, they had to surmount countless technical hurdles — it was the equivalent to counting the dimples on a golf ball in Los Angeles from New Yo

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Empathy is the secret ingredient that makes cooperation – and civilization – possible

Human societies are so prosperous mostly because of how altruistic we are. Unlike other animals, people cooperate even with complete strangers. We share knowledge on Wikipedia, we show up to vote, and we work together to responsibly manage natural resources.

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New study finds countries with more rights for LGB people enjoy higher GDP per capita

Research on 45 years of legal and economic data for 132 countries by international team shows the addition of one right for LGB people is associated with over $2000 in GDP per capita

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Publisher Correction: Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects

Publisher Correction: Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects Publisher Correction: Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1143-1 Publisher Correction: Attachment of the blastoderm to the vitelline envelope affects gastrulation of insects

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Author Correction: Spatially resolved steady-state negative capacitance

Author Correction: Spatially resolved steady-state negative capacitance Author Correction: Spatially resolved steady-state negative capacitance, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1106-6 Author Correction: Spatially resolved steady-state negative capacitance

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An Extraordinary Image of the Black Hole at a Galaxy’s Heart

At the darkest points in the universe, their boundaries perilous and invisible, space warps. In a black hole, the force of gravity is so strong that anything that comes near, whether a puff of cosmic dust or an entire blazing star, is swallowed and devoured. The light sinks past a point of no return and into an unknown realm that can only be imagined. Black holes sound like an invention of scienc

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Mapping Armaggedon: Earth's looming tsunamis and mega-quakes

As villagers along the Sunda Strait were finishing their meals on the evening of 22 December last year, they had no idea of the cataclysmic event that awaited them.

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When people downsize to tiny houses, they adopt more environmentally friendly lifestyles

Interest is surging in tiny homes – livable dwelling units that typically measure under 400 square feet. Much of this interest is driven by media coverage that claims that living in tiny homes is good for the planet.

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Evolution from water to land led to better parenting

The evolution of aquatic creatures to start living on land made them into more attentive parents, says new research on frogs led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

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Check it out: The first image of a black hole

Astronomers have taken the first direct image of a black hole. By connecting radio telescopes across five continents into one Earth-sized virtual telescope, they managed to resolve the shadow of a supermassive black hole, a prediction of Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. Black holes have been the realm of science fiction and abstract textbook diagrams for more than a century. No one had ev

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Active ingredient of aconite root against peripheral neuropathic pain is identified as neoline

Aconite root is used in East Asian traditional medicines to treat pain. Since its toxicity, it is used after heat-processing for detoxifying. The present study revealed that processed aconite root could relief neuropathic pain in murine peripheral neuropathy model induced by oxaliplatin, paclitaxel, or partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (Seltzer model), and identified that its active ingredient

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Pesticide cocktail can harm honey bees

A series of tests conducted over several years by scientists at UC San Diego have shown for the first time that Sivanto, developed by Bayer CropScience AG and first registered for commercial use in 2014, could pose a range of threats to honey bees depending on seasonality, bee age and use in combination with common chemicals such as fungicides.

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Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

Researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.

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Giant Antarctic sea spiders weather warming by getting holey

Scientists have wondered for decades why marine animals that live in the polar oceans and the deep sea can reach giant sizes there, but nowhere else. University of Hawai'i at Manoa zoology Ph.D. student Caitlin Shishido, with UH researcher Amy Moran and colleagues at the University of Montana, went to Antarctica to test the prevailing theory — the 'oxygen-temperature hypothesis' — that animals l

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More than a strip of paint needed to keep cyclists safe

On-road marked bicycle lanes are not the optimal solution to keeping cyclists safe, new research by Monash University has found.

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Evolution from water to land led to better parenting

The evolution of aquatic creatures to start living on land made them into more attentive parents, says new research on frogs led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

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Identification of lymph node cells that may play important roles in immune tolerance

Aire-expression in the thymus is crucial in immune tolerance by eliminating auto-reactive T cells; insufficient elimination causes autoimmune disorders. Aire was thought to be expressed only in the thymus but recently Aire-expression in peripheral lymph nodes was revealed. We identify the cells expressing Aire in lymph nodes, 0.01% of lymph node cells, to be ILC3-like cells using Aire-reporter mic

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First ever image of a black hole: A CNRS researcher had simulated it as early as 1979

The first real image of a black hole, obtained by the international network of EHT telescopes and published on April 10, 2019 in Astrophysical Journal Letters, shows the extraordinary accuracy of the world's very first simulation of a black hole 40 years earlier by Jean-Pierre Luminet, then a young researcher at the CNRS.

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Experimental drug delivers one-two punch to vision loss

In studies with lab-grown human cells and in mice, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found that an experimental drug may be twice as good at fighting vision loss as previously thought.

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New guideline decreases breast cancer re-operation rates

A UBC medical student has determined that a new surgical guideline is making a difference for breast cancer patients. Alex Monaghan, a second-year Southern Medical Program (SMP) student at UBC Okanagan, recently completed a study using patient data from BC Cancer-Kelowna. His research compared re-operation rates for breast cancer patients before and after a new surgical guideline was introduced fi

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Evolution from water to land led to better parenting

The evolution of aquatic creatures to start living on land made them into more attentive parents, says new research on frogs led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

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Event Horizon Telescope Releases Humanity's First Ever Black Hole Image

On Wednesday, astronomers revealed the first image ever taken of a black hole, bringing a dramatic conclusion to a decades-long effort. The iconic image offers humanity its first glimpse at the gas and debris that swirl around its event horizon, the point beyond which material disappears forever. A favorite object of science fiction has finally been made real on screen. Their target was a nearby g

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The Event Horizon Telescope: How It Works

A black hole isn't an easy thing to photograph. The famously inscrutable objects are so dense that even light can’t escape their vicinity. By definition, they are invisible. So when the Event Horizon Telescope team released the first image of a black hole, what they really released is an image of the black hole’s event horizon — the minimum distance from the black hole’s center where gravity is st

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Inside The Event Horizon Telescope's Quixotic Quest to Image a Black Hole

Trying to take a picture of a black hole — an object that is, by definition, invisible—sounds like an exercise in futility. But for decades, theoreticians suspected it may just be possible to get a detailed view of a black hole’s perimeter, right up to the edge of the event horizon, the fabled point of no return. And a core group of astronomers spent years trying to turn that prediction into reali

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Amazon's cashier-free 'Go' stores will start accepting cash to address 'discrimination' concerns

Amazon's vision of a cash and cashier-free future has gone reasonably well so far, but there's a slight hitch in the company's plans now. As some states have begun to consider (or have already …

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Where's the bus? UW student's new web tool tracks transit through the Seattle region

Have you ever run to a bus stop just in time for its scheduled arrival only to end up waiting for the bus to show up?

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New CRISPR Method Can Edit Over 13,000 Spots in a Single Cell

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Demographic Decline Is the Real Threat to the U.S.

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First-ever photograph of a black hole

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Den första bilden av ett svart hål

Nu kan vi för första gången få se hur ett verkligt svart hål ser ut – eller rättare sagt hur det ser ut där ett svart hål kröker rumtiden och påverkar både materia och ljus i sin närhet. Bilden visar det svarta hålet i mitten av galaxen M87. Det är sex miljarder gånger tyngre än vår egen sol och befinner sig 50 miljoner ljusår bort. Tidigare har alla bilder av svarta hål varit simuleringar eller r

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Hurricane Harvey provides lessons learned for flood resiliency plans

Hurricane Harvey made landfall on Aug. 25, 2017, then stalled over Texas for three days as a tropical storm. The category-four storm claimed 80 lives, displaced multitudes of people, and damaged more than 80,000 homes.

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Harsh radiation no barrier to life on nearby exoplanets

Modelling suggests that proximity to host stars doesn’t rule out life emerging. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Researchers trap 16 futures in a single superposition

Prototype hints at new directions for AI development. Andrew Masterson reports.

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The women behind the satellite

Archive photo reveals strong and talented women in STEM half a century ago.

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New CRISPR Method Can Edit Over 13,000 Spots in a Single Cell

Dr. George Church, the legendary godfather of synthetic biology, just made another push towards massively editing life’s base code. Since the inception of gene editing, long before the CRISPR revolution, scientists have struggled with simultaneously altering multiple spots on a genome. This difficult feat, dubbed multiplex editing, challenges both scientists and their genomic toolkit: the edits h

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What Is a Black Hole? Here’s Our Guide for Earthlings

Welcome to the place of no return — a region in space where the gravitational pull is so strong that not even light can escape it. This is a black hole.

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A New Way to Detect Parkinson’s—by Smell

Discovery of odorous markers for neurodegenerative disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kidney disease triggers cognitive impairment, even in early stages

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a systemic condition. It also impacts upon other organ systems and in recent years much attention has focussed specifically on the link between the kidneys and the heart. There is also an association between brain dysfunction and kidney disease; new data shows that even mild CKD correlates with impairment of cognitive function. A new revie

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Scientists improve cycling performance of Al-based batteries with high areal density cathode

A research team led by Prof. TANG Yongbing and Dr. ZHANG Miao at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology promoted an inactive (Cu) and active (Al) codeposition strategy, which could improve the cycling performance of Al-based batteries with a high areal density cathode.

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Diet rich in animal protein is associated with a greater risk of death

A diet rich in animal protein and meat in particular is not good for the health, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland finds, providing further backing for earlier research evidence. Men who favoured animal protein over plant-based protein in their diet had a greater risk of death in a 20-year follow-up than men whose diet was more balanced in terms of their sources of protein. The fi

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Manipulating the crystallization and assembly of materials in solution by Marangoni flow

Scientists developed a general strategy to control the crystal growth and material assembly by manipulating the fluid flow in solution. By heating from the evaporation side to build an inverted temperature gradient, a stable single Marangoni vortex was formed in the wedge-shaped region near the gas-liquid-solid three-phase contact line, which can then guide the growth and patterning of materials.

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Falling levels of air pollution drove decline in California's tule fog

The Central Valley's heavy wintertime tule fog — known for snarling traffic and closing schools — has been on the decline over the past 30 years, and falling levels of air pollution are the cause, says a new study by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley. The findings help explain the puzzling decades-long rise and fall in the number of 'fog days' affecting the region over the pas

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Stability improvement under high efficiency — next stage development of perovskite solar cells

This review summarizes the state-of-the-art progress on the improvement of device stability and discusses the directions for future research, providing an overview of the current status of the research on the stability of PSCs and guidelines for future research.

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Sig Reveals He Had a Second Heart Attack | Deadliest Catch

Captain Sig Hansen gathers the Northwestern crew to reveal he had a second heart attack during the offseason. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/D

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Privacy 'poisoning' poses threat to companies using blockchain

A new type of cyberattack that can render blockchain technology unusable may become a major headache for organizations that depend on it.

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How to keep from getting lost in the wilderness

DIY We've got your roadmap to outdoor success right here. Anyone can get lost in the wilderness. But if you hit the trail with the right tools, a clear plan, and a little extra know-how, you’ll be able to find your way back to…

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How scientists took the first picture of a black hole

Here’s how scientists connected eight observatories across the world to create one Earth-sized telescope in order to create an image of a black hole.

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A New Way to Detect Parkinson’s—by Smell

Discovery of odorous markers for neurodegenerative disease — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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First ever real image of a black hole revealed

Researchers at the Event Horizon Telescope have released the first ever picture of a black hole

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The First Black Hole Picture Has Finally Been Revealed

The Event Horizon Telescope has captured a photo of a supermassive black hole at the center of M87, a galaxy 54 million light-years away.

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Black hole pictured for first time — in spectacular detail

Black hole pictured for first time — in spectacular detail Black hole pictured for first time — in spectacular detail, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01155-0 T he Event Horizon Telescope’s global network of radio dishes has produced the first direct image of a black hole and its event horizon.

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Her er det: Første foto af et sort hul

Første blik i mørket: Et sort monsterhul i en galakse 53 mio. lys år herfra. Et foto af det sorte hul i Mælkevejen må vente lidt endnu.

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Astronomers release first image of a black hole

Network of radio telescopes creates view of an object 53m light years from Earth

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The black hole is out!

Imaging it didn't come easy.

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Nordic countries call for global treaty on ocean plastic pollution

In a major step forward in the fight against marine plastic pollution, Nordic governments have become the first in the world to formally call for a global treaty to tackle the plastic crisis in our oceans.

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Image: Cold plasma tested on ISS

Low-temperature plasma – electrically charged gas – that was originally tested aboard the International Space Station is now being harnessed to kill drug-resistant bacteria and viruses that can cause infections in hospital.

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Israel’s Right-Wing Majority

If Israel holds elections in the year 2029, you might do well to bet on the right-wing Likud Party. Benjamin Netanyahu will probably no longer be prime minister by then—he faces an uphill battle to be prime minister a year from now , considering criminal charges are likely to be brought against him. On Wednesday morning, however, Bibi celebrated his fourth consecutive electoral victory and his fi

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Tiny traces of neonicotinoid pesticides impair insects' ability to spot predators

Traces of neonicotinoid pesticides can impair a flying insect's ability to spot predators and avoid collisions with objects in their path.

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Green roofs could reduce indoor air pollution

Green roofs — roofs that are planted with vegetation — may improve the indoor air quality of commercial buildings by cutting the amount of ozone coming into the buildings from the outside, according to new research.

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Reducing greenhouse gases while balancing demand for meat

Humans' love for meat could be hurting the planet. Many of the steps involved in the meat supply chain result in greenhouse gas emissions. But a new international study evaluates several strategies that could reduce these environmental effects.

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Disney publishes first full-length trailer for The Lion King remake

Walt Disney Studios on Wednesday published a new trailer for Jon Favreau’s remake of the 1994 classic animated film The Lion King. This time around, Disney is relying on photorealistic computer …

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Human iPSC-derived MSCs from aged individuals acquire a rejuvenation signature

The use of primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is fraught with ageing-related shortfalls such as limited expansion and early senescence. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived MSCs (iMSCs) have been shown to be a useful clinically relevant source of MSCs that circumvent these agiing-associated drawbacks.

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New algorithm optimizes quantum computing problem-solving

Tohoku University researchers have developed an algorithm that enhances the ability of a Canadian-designed quantum computer to more efficiently find the best solution for complicated problems, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Scientists find self-healing catalyst for potential large-scale use in hydrogen production

Researchers working within NCCR MARVEL have discovered a self-healing catalyst that can be used to release hydrogen through the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. The catalyst, SION-X, is based on the abundant mineral Jacquesdietrichite, is sustainable, air stable and can be easily regenerated, stored and handled. These characteristics mean that it may offer significant advantages over

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How much nature is lost due to higher yields?

The exploitation of farmland is being intensified with a focus to raising yields. The degree to which yields actually increase as a result and the extent of the simultaneous loss of biological diversity have to date been under-researched factors. An international team of scientists led by the UFZ has now evaluated data from worldwide research in which both yield and biodiversity were examined befo

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MOFs can sense and sort troublesome gases

Fluorinated metal-organic frameworks make excellent materials for selective sensing and removal of toxic gases.

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Hurricane Harvey provides lessons learned for flood resiliency plans

ASU scientists used satellite data to map the Houston-Galveston area impacted by Hurricane Harvey to understand why the flooding was so severe and widespread. The results of their study have been recently published in the journal Remote Sensing of Environment.

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Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness

An international team of life scientists has identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness — a severe disease transmitted by the bite of an infected, blood-sucking tsetse fly, which is common in Sub-Saharan Africa. The disease is fatal if untreated. Tens of millions of people in 36 countries are at risk. There is no vaccine, and conventional drug treatments are not very e

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A new molecule to fight type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

A new molecule -EPB-53-, could help fight type 2 diabetes and the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. According to a new study, the EPB-53 molecule increases levels of the FGF21 hormone, a biological factor playing a determining role in the control of diabetes and obesity.

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Half-hearted: New insight into why the heart doesn't develop properly in some children

Investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina have found evidence that the gene Ccdc117 supports the rapid growth of precursor cells needed for proper development of right-sided heart structures. It does so by promoting transfer of iron-sulfur compounds to enzymes crucial for DNA replication and repair. Silencing Ccdc117 impedes cell growth, which may prevent heart structures from deve

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Researchers develop new vaccine against deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Saudi Arabia and Canada developed a potent and safe vaccine that protects against the deadly Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS. The findings recently were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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New dimension to coral research

For the first time, international researchers have mapped the network of bacteria on coral reefs. They write about it in Nature Communications (9 April). Professor by special appointment Nicole de Voogd (Naturalis Biodiversity Center & Institute of Environmental Sciences) and two of her Ph.D. students co-authored the publication.

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Falling levels of air pollution drove decline in California's tule fog

The Central Valley's heavy wintertime tule fog – known for snarling traffic and closing schools—has been on the decline over the past 30 years, and falling levels of air pollution are the cause, says a new study by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley.

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Where can flooded fields help replenish groundwater?

In California, the amount of water exiting aquifers under the state's most productive farming region far surpasses the amount of water trickling back in. That rampant overdraft has caused land across much of the region to sink like a squeezed out sponge, permanently depleting groundwater storage capacity and damaging infrastructure.

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Some piezoelectric materials may be 'fakes'

Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) is the most widespread technique for characterising piezoelectric properties at the nanoscale, i.e., for determining the ability of some materials to generate electricity when subjected to mechanical stress and deforming in response to a voltage. Piezoelectricity is used in a wide variety of applications, including pregnancy ultrasounds, injection motors, senso

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New dimension to coral research

For the first time, international researchers have mapped the network of bacteria on coral reefs. They write about it in Nature Communications (9 April). Professor by special appointment Nicole de Voogd (Naturalis Biodiversity Center & Institute of Environmental Sciences) and two of her Ph.D. students co-authored the publication.

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Data show how American mothers balance work and family

Almost 70% of American mothers with children under 18 work for pay.

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3-D-printed propeller blade opens the way to eco-friendly shipping

To make the European maritime industry more competitive globally, innovative materials are needed to improve ships' performance and make them more environment friendly. In recent years, other industries have made a lot of progress in this area. However, the maritime sector is lagging behind in the adoption of advanced materials that have a smaller environmental footprint and are less costly and ea

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Scientists unveil historic first image of a black hole

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The first picture of a black hole opens a new era of astrophysics

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First ever picture of black hole released

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Taxonomy for Sale to the Highest Bidder

With more than 27,000 species at risk of extinction, auctioning off naming rights seems like a fairly harmless way to increase public awareness and raise much-needed funding for wildlife conservation efforts. But some taxonomists worry about the potential for overly commercial or offensive names.

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IT'S HERE: The First-Ever Close-Up of a Black Hole

The Event Horizons Telescope has produced its first image, and it's a stunner

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How agile project management can work for your research

How agile project management can work for your research How agile project management can work for your research, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01184-9 Laura Pirro outlines an approach that could increase output and improve motivation.

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Despite more violent crimes, it's safer to be a cop today than 50 years ago

There is no doubt that policing is a dangerous profession. But is it safer to be a cop today than it was 50 years ago? Yes, according to a study that analyzed police officer deaths (felonious and non-felonious) in the United States from 1970 to 2016. The study represents one of the most comprehensive assessments of the "dangerousness" of policing to date and provides an important historical contex

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The first ever picture of a black hole

Astronomers have taken the first ever picture of a black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy.

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Sensation: Kæmpeteleskop har taget det første billede af et sort hul

Forskere har sensationelt taget et foto af det sorte hul i centrum af vores nabogalakse Messier 87.

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Bakteriell hjärnhinneinflammation kan behandlas utan antibiotika

Vårt immunförsvar har flera viktiga försvarsspelare att koppla in när en infektion drabbar det centrala nervsystemet. När forskarna studerade vad som sker när en av dessa försvarsspelare, de vita blodkroppar som kallas neutrofiler, griper in vid bakteriell hjärnhinneinflammation, meningit, fann de en möjlig behandlingsstrategi som inte involverar antibiotika. Vid en infektion tar sig neutrofilern

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Tiny traces of neonicotinoid pesticides impair insects' ability to spot predators

Traces of neonicotinoid pesticides can impair a flying insect's ability to spot predators and avoid collisions with objects in their path, new research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Vibrational Modes, For Real

I suppose I deserve this one. Some years ago on the blog, I wrote about my days in grad school having to learn about symmetries and vibrational spectroscopy. Sparingly has that knowledge come in handy since then, but the course is still a vivid memory for me, since that’s the clearest example I had yet faced in a classroom of having hit the limits of what I knew. I’d never been exposed to symmetr

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Tiny traces of neonicotinoid pesticides impair insects' ability to spot predators

Traces of neonicotinoid pesticides can impair a flying insect's ability to spot predators and avoid collisions with objects in their path, new research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) shows.

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Solar-powered cup brews better brine treatments

A new distillation device can better recycle contaminants produced by a desalination plant to dramatically reduce waste.

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Samlet lægeflok i Aarhus: Urimeligt sparekrav

Overlæger og yngre læger på Aarhus Universitetshospital ser med stor alvor på beslutningen om et 'urimeligt sparekrav', skriver de i et brev til ledelsen.

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Why More Couples Are Getting Married by a Friend

In November, Alex Lynn, 26, will marry her fiancé, Alex Tignor, 27. The officiant for their wedding will be none other than their close friend, who is also named Alex. “To have someone so important to us be the person who pronounces us husband and wife will make our ceremony all the more special and meaningful,” Lynn says. This three-Alex wedding will be one of a growing number of marriage ceremo

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SpaceX Plans First-Ever Commercial Falcon Heavy Launch Tonight

Following a last-minute delay, SpaceX expects to launch the Arabsat-6A from NASA's historic Pad 39A this evening. The post SpaceX Plans First-Ever Commercial Falcon Heavy Launch Tonight appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Astronomers capture first image of a black hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) — a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration — was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

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Despite more violent crimes, it's safer to be a cop today than 50 years ago

Dangers of policing have dramatically declined since 1970 with a 75 percent drop in police officer line-of-duty deaths. In the context of nearly 50-year monthly trends, the study also shows a statistically significant decline in felonious killings of police following the Ferguson effect and Michael Brown's death in 2014, which directly contradicts the war on cops' theory.

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Cancer: Central role of cell 'skeleton' discovered

All cells possess a cytoskeleton which allows them to move and maintain their shape. However, scientists recently showed that a part of this cytoskeleton called branched actin is also essential to cell proliferation. This mechanism could nevertheless represent a therapeutic target to fight certain types of cancer. Inhibiting the formation of branched actin, for example, prevents the growth of a ty

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Scientists Just Released the First-Ever Image of a Black Hole

What Am I Looking At? For the first time, we can directly observe a black hole as it sucks light and matter beyond the point of no return. On Wednesday, an international coalition of scientists that came together to form the Event Horizon Telescope — more on that later — announced via livestream that they had captured direct images of a supermassive black hole in the M87 galaxy. These images sign

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Predictive policing is tainted by 'dirty data,' study finds

A new study from New York University School of Law and NYU's AI Now Institute concludes that predictive policing systems run the risk of exacerbating discrimination in the criminal justice system if they rely on "dirty data."

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This is the first ever photo of a black hole

The scientists behind it spent a decade using a virtual telescope the size of Earth to create this historic image.

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Aging gracefully: Study identifies factors for healthy memory at any age

Neuroscientists have identified different factors for maintaining healthy memory and for avoiding memory decline in those over age 55, according to a new study. The results have implications for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease through targeted early intervention efforts.

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How severe drought influences ozone pollution

From 2011 to 2015, California experienced its worst drought on record, with a parching combination of high temperatures and low precipitation. Drought conditions can have complicated effects on ozone air quality, so to better understand the process, researchers have analyzed data from two ozone-polluted cities before, during and after the California drought.

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Se världens första bild på ett svart hål

Under onsdagen visade forskarna bakom Event Horizon-teleskopet upp sina ”banbrytande” resultat för första gången. På sex separata presskonferenser världen över visade man upp den första bilden någonsin på ett svart hål.

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For the first time, you can see what a black hole looks like

Global telescope consortium images a supermassive black hole ringed by bright gas

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All you need to know about the history of black holes

From dreaming up black holes to snapping the first picture of one, the history of black holes has had many twists.

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The first picture of a black hole opens a new era of astrophysics

Astronomers used a network of telescopes around the world to take a picture of the supermassive black hole in the galaxy M87.

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We've found a quicker way to multiply really big numbers

Multiplication of two numbers is easy, right?

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First ever black hole image released

The "monster" black hole is three million times the size of Earth.

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From ruined bridges to dirty air, EPA scientists price out the cost of climate change

By the end of the century, the manifold consequences of unchecked climate change will cost the U.S. hundreds of billions of dollars per year, according to a new study by scientists at the Environmental Protection Agency.

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Reducing greenhouse gases while balancing demand for meat

Humans' love for meat could be hurting the planet. Many of the steps involved in the meat supply chain result in greenhouse gas emissions. But a new international study in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology evaluates several strategies that could reduce these environmental effects.

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How severe drought influences ozone pollution

From 2011 to 2015, California experienced its worst drought on record, with a parching combination of high temperatures and low precipitation. Drought conditions can have complicated effects on ozone air quality, so to better understand the process, researchers have analyzed data from two ozone-polluted cities before, during and after the California drought. They report their results in ACS' journ

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Verizon’s 5G Network Is Here—If You Can Get a Signal

Finding a 5G signal in Verizon’s launch areas in Chicago proved difficult for reviewers from the Verge and CNET.

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Black hole picture captured for first time in space breakthrough

Network of eight radio telescopes around the world records revolutionary image Astronomers have captured the first image of a black hole, heralding a revolution in our understanding of the universe’s most enigmatic objects. The picture shows a halo of dust and gas, tracing the outline of a colossal black hole, at the heart of the Messier 87 galaxy, 55m light years from Earth. Continue reading…

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Aging gracefully: Study identifies factors for healthy memory at any age

University of Alberta neuroscientists have identified different factors for maintaining healthy memory and for avoiding memory decline in those over age 55, according to a new study. The results have implications for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease through targeted early intervention efforts.

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Tiny traces of neonicotinoid pesticides impair insects' ability to spot predators

Traces of neonicotinoid pesticides can impair a flying insect's ability to spot predators and avoid collisions with objects in their path.

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PSU study shows green roofs could reduce indoor air pollution

Green roofs — roofs that are planted with vegetation — may improve the indoor air quality of commercial buildings by cutting the amount of ozone coming into the buildings from the outside, according to new research from Portland State University.

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Gene responsible for toxic metal accumulation in durum wheat identified

University of Alberta biologists identify gene responsible for cadmium accumulation in durum wheat, according to a new study published in Nature Genetics. For humans, consuming cadmium, a toxic metal that accumulates in grain crops, poses serious health risks, including cancer and kidney disease.

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Astronomers to reveal first ever picture of black hole – live

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Earth Sees First Image Of A Black Hole

Every image you've ever seen of a black hole has been a simulation. Until now. "We have seen what we thought was unseeable," said Event Horizon Telescope Director Shep Doeleman. (Image credit: Event Horizon Telescope collaboration et al)

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Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.

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New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction

Membrane proteins play an important role in many biological processes. Studies suggest they're targeted by more than 50% of all modern medicinal drugs. Unfortunately for researchers, determining their structures has been a longstanding challenge because it's difficult to track the protein without damaging the cellular membrane using current techniques. Not anymore.

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Ultrasound aligns living cells in bioprinted tissues

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a technique to improve the characteristics of engineered tissues by using ultrasound to align living cells during the biofabrication process.

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New electron microscopy technique limits membrane destruction

Membrane proteins play an important role in many biological processes. Studies suggest they're targeted by more than 50% of all modern medicinal drugs. Unfortunately for researchers, determining their structures has been a longstanding challenge because it's difficult to track the protein without damaging the cellular membrane using current techniques. Not anymore.

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At the 2-D scale, isotopic composition has unforeseen effects on light emission

Compared to bulk materials, atomically thin materials like transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) offer size and tunability advantages over traditional materials in developing miniature electronic and optical devices. The 2-dimensional TMDs are of particular interest because they have potential applications in energy conversion, electronics and quantum computing. The properties of these materials

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Catching fast changes in excited molecules

It's hard to see certain molecules react. The reaction is just that fast. Until now. A team of scientists devised a way to reveal time- and energy-resolved information on "dark" states of molecules—ones that are normally inaccessible. Their approach? They control the evolution of a highly electronically excited molecule by nonlinear optical methods in the extreme ultraviolet spectrum.

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New algorithm optimizes quantum computing problem-solving

Tohoku University researchers have developed an algorithm that enhances the ability of a Canadian-designed quantum computer to more efficiently find the best solution for complicated problems, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports.

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Pedestrians at crosswalks found to follow the Levy walk process

A team of researchers at the University of Tokyo has found that large numbers of pedestrians meeting in crosswalks tend to follow the Lévy walk process. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group outlines their work observing crowd movement and what they found.

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Study shows green roofs could reduce indoor air pollution

Green roofs – roofs that are planted with vegetation—may improve the indoor air quality of commercial buildings by cutting the amount of ozone coming into the buildings from the outside, according to new research from Portland State University.

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Researchers explain signals of CpG 'traffic lights' in DNA

A research team featuring bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has identified reliable markers of gene activity. The discovery has potential for future applications in clinical practice. The findings are reported in BMC Genomics.

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Sorting out sick from healthy blood cells—physicists discover new effect

In numerous diseases such as malaria or cancer, diseased and healthy blood and body cells differ in their degree of hardness. Now, they can be easily separated from each other by a new physical effect. In the process, flow through microchannels ensure that the cells separate out into streams of harder and softer cells. This has now been discovered by an international research team led by Bayreuth

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Water that never freezes

Can water reach minus 263 degrees Celsius without turning into ice? Yes it can, say researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich, if it is confined in nanometre-scale lipid channels.

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Bee spit and flower oil are inspiring new glues

Researchers are looking at a mixture of bee spit and flower oil to create a bio-inspired glue. Why? Its unique adhesive properties and ability to remain sticky through a range of conditions. Honey bees spend hours each day collecting pollen and packing it into tidy bundles attached to their hind legs. But all of that hard work could instantly be undone during a sudden rainstorm were it not for tw

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Primate guys get to look snazzy or have big testicles

Well-adorned or well-endowed—but not both. Male primates either have large testicles or showy ornaments, report evolutionary biologists. Developing both at the same time may simply take too much energy. Male primates are highly competitive, especially about one thing: fathering offspring. To maximize their chances of passing on their genes, males of many primate species invest heavily in various

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New non-antibiotic strategy for the treatment of bacterial meningitis

With the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, there is a growing need for new treatment strategies against life threatening bacterial infections. Researchers may have identified such an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis, a serious infection that can lead to sepsis.

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Genetic code of WWI soldier's cholera mapped

The oldest publicly available strain of the cholera-causing bacterial species, Vibrio cholerae, has had its genetic code read for the first time. The bacterium was isolated from a British soldier during World War One (WWI) and stored for over 100 years before being revived and sequenced. The results show that this strain is a unique, non-toxigenic strain of V. cholerae that's distantly related to

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CRISPR-based 'allelic drive' allows genetic editing with selective precision and broad implications

Scientists developed a new version of a gene drive that allows the spread of specific, favorable genetic variants, also known as 'alleles,' throughout a population. The new 'allelic drive' is equipped with a guide RNA that directs CRISPR to cut undesired variants of a gene and replace it with a preferred version. Using a word processing analogy, CRISPR-based gene drives allow scientists to edit se

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Abracadabra: London show puts magic props under the spotlight

Tommy Cooper’s fez and Paul Daniels’ saw-in-half box part of display at Wellcome Collection Tommy Cooper’s fez, a gorilla mask used by Derren Brown and a wooden box and saw that Paul Daniels used to saw Debbie McGee in half have gone on display at a museum best known for exploring science and medicine. “It is so macabre,” said artist AR Hopwood of the saw-in-half box. “It looks like a torture dev

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Researchers explain signals of CpG 'traffic lights' in DNA

A research team featuring bioinformaticians from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) has identified reliable markers of gene activity. The discovery has potential for future applications in clinical practice. The findings are reported in BMC Genomics.

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How Twitter helped Trump win the U.S. Elections

New research published today, 9 April, 2019 found a movement of Twitter followers helped President Donald Trump garner support during his election campaign for the 2016 U.S. presidency.

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Testing literacy today requires more than a pencil and paper

Large-scale testing, or what many know as standardized testing, often carries important consequences for students. The results of large-scale tests may be used by schools or policy-makers to make important decisions such as grouping students by ability or assessing how well schools are doing.

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U.S. hit with two billion-dollar disasters so far in 2019

The so-called bomb cyclone that brought heavy snow, blizzard conditions and major flooding to the Midwest in March landed with a resounding meteorological "ka-boom!" and became one of two billion-dollar weather and climate disasters this year.

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Keeping nuclear power safe

Nuclear energy is clean, powerful, affordable, and zero-emission. A new study uses the Canadian Light Source (CLS) at the University of Saskatchewan to help ensure that waste from nuclear power plants remains safe and secure for thousands of years to come.

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Stone Circles Ringed House That May Have Belonged to the Neolithic 'One Percent'

The ancient stone circles around Stonehenge and Avebury in England may have all started with the commemoration of a single Neolithic house.

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Research reveals evidence of climate change in the Yukon permafrost

A new University of Toronto study confirms that recent climate warming in the central Yukon region has surpassed the warmest temperatures experienced in the previous 13,600 years, a finding that could have important implications in the context of current global warming trends.

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Mike Gravel’s Plan to Rock the Democratic Primary

It’s hard to pick the strangest thing about Mike Gravel’s campaign for president. Is it the candidate’s 88 years of age? His blunt critique of American foreign policy? Or the fact that he refuses to travel anywhere to sell his candidacy? Perhaps it’s that the former senator from Alaska’s campaign manager is a 17-year-old finishing his senior year of high school. Or that the stated goal of the Gra

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Fossilized remains of "Cthulhu" discovered in England

The fossilized remains of Cthulhu have been discovered in England – but it's probably safe to look upon its form without going mad. Palaeontologists have described a new species of extinct …

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Robots to the rescue of the Great Barrier Reef

Scientists use undersea robots and 3-D printing to help coral reefs survive the damaging effects of rising ocean temperatures.

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The aging face of homelessness in North American cities

In Vancouver last month, more than 400 volunteers walked around, carrying clipboards and wearing bright yellow buttons that read "Homeless Count." They were out on the streets or in shelters asking homeless people to complete brief surveys for the city's annual Homeless Count co-ordinated by the Homelessness Services Association of B.C. (HSABC).

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Women's labour force transformation dates back to the Great Depression

The Great Depression, which spanned the 10 years following the stock market crash of 1929, led to severe conditions in several developed countries at a time when there was no social safety net. This triggered a massive entry of women into the labour force and, for the first time in history, many of them remained in their jobs after marriage in order to help put bread on their family's table.

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Dolphins who help fishermen found to also hang out together between meals

A team of researchers with members from Brazil, South Africa and the U.S. has found an example of homophily among dolphins who work together with fishermen in Brazil for the mutual benefit of both. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the dolphins and what they found.

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Dolphins who help fishermen found to also hang out together between meals

A team of researchers with members from Brazil, South Africa and the U.S. has found an example of homophily among dolphins who work together with fishermen in Brazil for the mutual benefit of both. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of the dolphins and what they found.

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Danske Regioner: Psykiatri skal fylde mere under lægeuddannelsen

I et nyt udspil foreslår Danske Regioner at forlænge KBU’en med et halvt år for at give psykiatrien en mere fremtrædende rolle i den enkelte læges uddannelsesforløb. Forslaget skal være med til at afhjælpe specialets store rekrutteringsudfordringer, lyder det.

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How to biohack your cells to fight cancer

submitted by /u/Moncef10 [link] [comments]

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Reducing greenhouse gases while balancing demand for meat

Humans' love for meat could be hurting the planet. Many of the steps involved in the meat supply chain result in greenhouse gas emissions. But a new international study in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology evaluates several strategies that could reduce these environmental effects.

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How severe drought influences ozone pollution

From 2011 to 2015, California experienced its worst drought on record, with a parching combination of high temperatures and low precipitation. Drought conditions can have complicated effects on ozone air quality, so to better understand the process, researchers have analyzed data from two ozone-polluted cities before, during and after the California drought. They report their results in ACS' journ

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Origin of band gaps in 3d perovskite oxides

Origin of band gaps in 3 d perovskite oxides Origin of band gaps in 3 d perovskite oxides, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09698-6 It is often stated that first principles studies of transition metal oxides require dynamically correlated methods to correctly produce gap formation, magnetism and structural distortions. Varignon et al. show instead that static correlations a

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Ultra-fast photodetectors based on high-mobility indium gallium antimonide nanowires

Ultra-fast photodetectors based on high-mobility indium gallium antimonide nanowires Ultra-fast photodetectors based on high-mobility indium gallium antimonide nanowires, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09606-y The application of ternary nanowires (NWs) in optoelectronics has been hindered by difficulties in producing high quality NWs on silicon substrates. Here, the autho

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Lung cancer deficient in the tumor suppressor GATA4 is sensitive to TGFBR1 inhibition

Lung cancer deficient in the tumor suppressor GATA4 is sensitive to TGFBR1 inhibition Lung cancer deficient in the tumor suppressor GATA4 is sensitive to TGFBR1 inhibition, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09295-7 The tumor suppressor GATA4 is frequently epigenetically silenced in lung cancer. In this study, Gao et al. demonstrate that GATA4 regulates the expression of TGFB

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Perovskite nickelates as bio-electronic interfaces

Perovskite nickelates as bio-electronic interfaces Perovskite nickelates as bio-electronic interfaces, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09660-6 Functional materials that act as bio-sensing media when interfaced with complex bio-matter are attractive for health sciences and bio-engineering. Here, the authors report room temperature enzyme-mediated spontaneous hydrogen transf

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Multimodal interference-based imaging of nanoscale structure and macromolecular motion uncovers UV induced cellular paroxysm

Multimodal interference-based imaging of nanoscale structure and macromolecular motion uncovers UV induced cellular paroxysm Multimodal interference-based imaging of nanoscale structure and macromolecular motion uncovers UV induced cellular paroxysm, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09717-6 Methods to track molecular motion in eukaryotic cells mostly rely on fluorescent lab

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A CRISPR-Cas9 delivery system for in vivo screening of genes in the immune system

A CRISPR-Cas9 delivery system for in vivo screening of genes in the immune system A CRISPR-Cas9 delivery system for in vivo screening of genes in the immune system, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09656-2 The use of functional genomics in primary immune cells has been limited by inefficient vector delivery and risk of perturbing cell states. Here the authors present CHimer

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Dimensional crossover in a layered ferromagnet detected by spin correlation driven distortions

Dimensional crossover in a layered ferromagnet detected by spin correlation driven distortions Dimensional crossover in a layered ferromagnet detected by spin correlation driven distortions, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09663-3 Exploring lattice distortions from magnetic short-range ordering (SRO) facilitates the understanding of magnetic long-range ordering (LRO). Here

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Multicolor multiscale brain imaging with chromatic multiphoton serial microscopy

Multicolor multiscale brain imaging with chromatic multiphoton serial microscopy Multicolor multiscale brain imaging with chromatic multiphoton serial microscopy, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09552-9 Multicolour images are difficult to acquire with large-scale microscopy approaches. Here the authors present a microtome-assisted microscope capable of trichromatic two-pho

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'Cthulhu' fossil reconstruction reveals monstrous relative of modern sea cucumbers

An exceptionally preserved fossil from Herefordshire in the UK has given new insights into the early evolution of sea cucumbers. Paleontologists from the UK and USA created a 3D computer reconstruction of the 430-million-year-old fossil and identified it as a new species. They named it Sollasina cthulhu due to its resemblance to monsters from the Cthulhu universe created by author H.P. Lovecraft.

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The weirdest things we learned this week: Blood-thirsty Bambi and 12-foot-tall birds

Science Our editors scrounged up some truly bizarre facts. What’s the weirdest thing you learned this week? Well, whatever it is, we promise you’ll have an even weirder answer if you listen to PopSci’s hit podcast.

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Siren sounds on nuclear fallout embedded in melting glaciers

Radioactive fallout from nuclear meltdowns and weapons testing is nestled in glaciers across the world, scientists said Wednesday, warning of a potentially hazardous time bomb as rising temperatures melt the icy residue.

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Amerikanere trækker sig: Danmark overtager vigtige målestationer til klimaforskning

PLUS. Danmark har overtaget driften af 58 målestationer i Grønland, der bruges til klimaforskning verden over. På sigt håber Styrelsen for Dataforsyning og Effektivisering, at målestationerne kan bruges til blandt andet at forbedre vejrmodeller og navigation i de arktiske egne.

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Cyclone Idai's death toll now above 1,000 in southern Africa

The death toll from the cyclone that ripped into southern Africa last month is now above 1,000, while the number of cholera cases among survivors has risen above 4,000.

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Creating sustainable bioplastics from electricity-eating microbes

Electricity harvested from the sun or wind can be used interchangeably with power from coal or petroleum sources. Or sustainably produced electricity can be turned into something physical and useful. Researchers in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have figured out how to feed electricity to microbes to grow truly green, biodegradable plastic, as reported in the Journal of Indu

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Image of the Day: Tiny Targets

Beads filled with bacterial colonies indicate which antimicrobial compounds are working.

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A billion dots of light

A billion dots of light A billion dots of light, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01105-w Evolution in action.

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Noisy Quantum Computers Could Be Good for Chemistry Problems

Opinion: Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum devices produce errors. And in a field like chemistry, errors could be a feature, not a bug.

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Another Measles Outbreak – Blame Antivaxxers

We are in the midst of record-breaking measles outbreaks. This is the time to push for stronger regulations and to get rid of non-medical exemptions.

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Cave Markings Tell of Cherokee Life in the Years Before Indian Removal

Written in the language formalized by Sequoyah, these newly translated inscriptions describe religious practices, including the sport of stickball

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Creating sustainable bioplastics from electricity-eating microbes

Electricity harvested from the sun or wind can be used interchangeably with power from coal or petroleum sources. Or sustainably produced electricity can be turned into something physical and useful. Researchers in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have figured out how to feed electricity to microbes to grow truly green, biodegradable plastic, as reported in the Journal of Indu

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Scientists invent time-saving technique to show how cells differentiate

Researchers with the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have developed a new "lab-on-a-chip" that can examine thousands of individual live cells over a weeklong period, performing experiments that would take more than 1 million steps in a laboratory.

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Study finds noncompete clauses affect how employees behave, to benefit of employers

The business world has been the center of a hot debate in recent years about noncompete clauses in employment contracts and the effects they have on profits, economic development and other factors. Yet the debaters often overlook how such clauses affect those who work under them: employees. A University of Kansas professor has co-written a study that found noncompete clauses do in fact influence h

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Could you be a super-forecaster?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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GoodDollar in UBI Nordic

Nir Yaacobi, our lead economist, recaps our latest participation at "UBI Nordic" in Oslo – GoodDollar's first conference with the Basic Income Earth Network 🙂 medium.com/gooddollar/gooddollar-introduces-blockchain-potential-at-ubi-nordic-and-receives-warm-welcome-into-community-209eea002016 submitted by /u/GoodDollar [link] [comments]

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Google Search is testing inline before-after date filtering

Google is testing the option to filter search results by specific dates from directly within the search box on mobile and the web. Until now, only Google Search desktop users have been …

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Scientists invent time-saving technique to show how cells differentiate

Researchers with the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have developed a new "lab-on-a-chip" that can examine thousands of individual live cells over a weeklong period, performing experiments that would take more than 1 million steps in a laboratory.

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Transforming the art industry with Blockchain

Sometimes an art forgery is so sophisticated, it fools even the experts. For example, in 2011, Sotheby's brokered a deal for a darkly coloured gentleman's portrait said to be by 17th century painter Frans Hals the Elder. The buyer paid roughly AU$15 million (US$10.9 million). In 2016, amid a string of similar scandals, this work was discovered to be made partially of synthetic paint, making its su

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Image: Astronaut Matthias Maurer training for EVA

ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer practices Space Station repairs in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, USA.

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2019 BMW X5 SUV Review: Best All-Purpose Vehicle for Those With Means

The new X5 does everything well: on-road, off-road, towing 7,200 pounds, driving 500 miles in one day, or taking four adults to dinner. It's the newest midsize SUV and also the best. The post 2019 BMW X5 SUV Review: Best All-Purpose Vehicle for Those With Means appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Four Bees Living in Her Eye, Feeding on Her Tears

An ophthalmologist in Taiwan plucked four live sweat bees from beneath a woman’s swollen eyelid. The tiny insects feed off human sweat and tears.

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New hybrid energy method could fuel the future of rockets, spacecraft for exploration

Graphene, a new material with applications in biomedical technology, electronics, composites, energy and sensors, may soon help send rockets to space.

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Spinout seeks to transform food safety testing

"This is a $10 billion market and everyone knows it." Those are the words of Chris Hartshorn, CEO of a new MIT spinout—Xibus Systems—that is aiming to make a splash in the food industry with their new food safety sensor.

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We could solve the biggest problem in maths in the next decade

Whoever solves the long-standing P versus NP maths problem will win $1 million. Now a poll of computer scientists suggests the solution may be found sooner than expected

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A four-day work week could improve our health and cut carbon emissions

Campaigners want us to reduce our working hours to boost mental health, increase productivity and lower carbon emissions, but is it really that simple?

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The world's largest stone circle started out as a humble ancient home

Radar has uncovered evidence that the huge Avebury monument, near Stonehenge in Wiltshire, UK, once housed a simple dwelling right at its centre

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Scientists synthesize new nanowires to improve high-speed communication

Chinese scientists have synthesized new nanowires with high carrier mobility and fast infrared light (IR) response, which could help in high-speed communication. Their findings were published in Nature Communications on April 10th.

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3-D printing electrically assisted, nacre-inspired structures with self-sensing capabilities

Nacre, also known as mother of pearl is a composite, organic-inorganic material produced in nature in the inner shell layer of molluscs and the outer coating of pearls. The material is resilient and iridescent with high strength and toughness, resulting from its brick-and-mortar-like architecture. Lightweight and strong materials are of interest in materials science due to their potential in multi

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Are brown dwarfs failed stars or super-planets?

Brown dwarfs fill the "gap" between stars and the much smaller planets—two very different types of astronomical objects. But how they originate has yet to be fully explained. Astronomers from Heidelberg University may now be able to answer that question. They discovered that the star ν Ophiuchi in the Milky Way is being orbited by two brown dwarfs, which in all probability formed along with the st

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Google Wing launches first commercial drone delivery service

submitted by /u/Aiken_Drumn [link] [comments]

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Worldwide wayfaring, the human cost of the big thaw, and marine die-offs: Books in brief

Worldwide wayfaring, the human cost of the big thaw, and marine die-offs: Books in brief Worldwide wayfaring, the human cost of the big thaw, and marine die-offs: Books in brief, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01102-z Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week’s best science picks.

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Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness

Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness—a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.

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TV shows for teens continue to feature stereotyped characters that perpetuate gender differences

A recent study has sought to identify and analyse adolescents' favourite kinds of characters in Spanish TV series for teens. The series in the study are fictional and feature characters that specifically target teenagers and a younger audience. The work by the researchers María José Masanet, of the Department of Communication at UPF, and Maddalena Fedele, of Ramon Llull University, was published i

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Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness

Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness—a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.

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NASA's OCO-3 measures how plants grow—and glow

When plants take in too much energy, they don't get fat—they lighten up. They absorb more sunlight than they need to power photosynthesis, and they get rid of the excess solar energy by emitting it as a very faint glow. The light is far too dim for us to notice under normal circumstances, but it can be measured with a spectrometer. Called solar-induced fluorescence (SIF), it's the most accurate si

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NASA demos CubeSat laser communications capability

Two NASA CubeSats teamed up on an impromptu optical, or laser, communications pointing experiment. The laser beam is seen as a brief flash of light close to the center of the focal plane, to the left of Earth's horizon.

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Chinese scientists have put human brain genes in monkeys—and yes, they may be smarter

A quest to understand how human intelligence evolved raises some ethical questions.

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Can We Touch?

Tiffany Field has spent decades trying to get people to touch one another more. Her efforts started with premature babies, when she found that basic human touch led them to quickly gain weight. An initial small study, published in the journal Pediatrics in 1986, showed that just 10 days of “body stroking and passive movements of the limbs” for less than an hour led babies to grow 47 percent faste

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Teaching Evolution to Tibetan Monks

When cultural beliefs clash with science, a little humor and a little humility never hurts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Teaching Evolution to Tibetan Monks

When cultural beliefs clash with science, a little humor and a little humility never hurts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Watch SpaceX Launch a Falcon Heavy on Its First Real Mission

This is the second time SpaceX is flying the Falcon Heavy, the most powerful rocket by a factor of two, but it's the first time it's doing real work.

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What I Learned by Binge-Watching 'Game of Thrones' Backward

This is what happens when an attempt to defeat algorithms turns into a glimpse into the dark soul of humanity.

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New York's Vaccine Order Shows How Health Laws Are Failing Us

The threat of bigger measles outbreaks is turning the political tides, making public health officials more willing to take draconian steps.

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First Cherokee cave inscriptions commemorate ancient lacrosselike game

Charcoal cave etchings also reach out to ancestors

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"Hyperscans" Show How Brains Sync as People Interact

Social neuroscientists ask what happens at the level of neurons when you tell someone a story or a group watches movies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Hyperscans" Show How Brains Sync as People Interact

Social neuroscientists ask what happens at the level of neurons when you tell someone a story or a group watches movies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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"Hyperscans" Show How Brains Sync as People Interact

Social neuroscientists ask what happens at the level of neurons when you tell someone a story or a group watches movies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A revolutionary imaging technique uses a single pixel to fill our terahertz blind spot

Terahertz waves provide a unique view of the world but have always been hard to detect. That looks set to change.

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Kraftfuld malware har inficeret kritisk anlæg igen

Den såkaldte Triton-malware, der angiveligt blev forsøgt brugt mod et saudiarabisk olieraffinaderi, har også været på spil et andet sted, mener sikkerhedsforskere.

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Skraldebiler finder mobilhuller i Viborg

På tre måneders køreture har skraldebiler fundet 7-8 huller i mobildækningen i Viborg Kommune.

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Dozens of Mummified Mice and Birds Found in Ancient Egyptian Tomb

The well-preserved burial chamber was vividly painted with funerary scenes.

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How Bad Can the NYC Measles Outbreak Get?

How much worse could the outbreak get, and how far could it spread?

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Vetenskapsfestivalen 2019

Under årets vetenskapsfestival i Göteborg deltog VoF med inte mindre än åtta programpunkter. Pontus Böckman, föreningens ordförande, inledde med att delta i en paneldebatt lördagen 6/4 tillsammans med Åsa Wikforss och Martin Hultman. Samtalet leddes av vetenskapsjournalisten Torgny Nordin. Det blev ett trevligt och viktigt samtal om faktaresistens och vad man ska göra åt den. […] The post Vetensk

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Trump Goes Beyond Cronyism—To Something Far Worse

If Herman Cain and Stephen Moore are confirmed to the Federal Reserve, it would hardly be the first time that unqualified people ended up in positions of national importance. It is a fact of political life that all governments, of every kind, are infested with hacks and cronies. Indeed, in the United States it is something of a tradition that ambassadors are sent to countries about which they kno

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Pete Buttigieg’s Very Public Faith Is Challenging Assumptions

The mayor of a medium-size midwestern city, Rhodes Scholar, and war veteran who is liturgically conservative and cites Saint Augustine as one of his religious influences is running for president. He’s also a Democrat. He is criticizing the current president, a Republican, for his infidelity and lack of family values. And he’s gay. Sometimes politics unfolds differently than you might expect. What

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Trump’s Border Obsession Is Courting Disaster

It’s hard to understand what’s going on at the Department of Homeland Security right now—and that should be deeply unsettling. President Donald Trump is in the midst of a purge of the department’s senior leadership. On Friday, he abruptly withdrew the nomination of Ronald Vitiello to lead Immigration and Customs Enforcement. On Sunday, he forced out Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen. On Monday, it was S

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On The Atlantic’s May Cover, George Packer Shares an Elegy for the American Century

April 10, 2019 (Washington, D.C.)— In the 1990s, when the diplomat Richard Holbrooke ended a war in the Balkans with the signing of the Dayton Accords, American influence seemed poised to reach new heights. The superpower had brought peace to Bosnia after years of civil war, and the country was poised to build on that success under President Bill Clinton. But instead of leading the world in the d

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There’s No Substitute for Print

Sometime this winter, I performed an experiment: I decided to subscribe to home delivery of a daily newspaper. I am so pleased by the success of this experiment that I can no longer remember why I undertook it, although through my daze of self-satisfaction I am pretty sure that money was involved. A promotional offer probably arrived in the mail—the postal mail, I mean—that was as insanely cheap

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The Artistic Chemistry of Robert Pattinson and Claire Denis

The first image of Claire Denis’s new film, High Life , is an arresting one: a baby, seemingly abandoned on a spaceship. Eventually, her cries are soothed over a loudspeaker by the only other living being on board, a wiry convict named Monte (Robert Pattinson). Together, Monte and the baby make for an unusual pair, and their dynamic throughout the movie is loaded with a sense of danger that gives

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What The Bold Type Gets Right About Workplace Hostility

This article contains spoilers for the Season 3 premiere of The Bold Type. The first time that The Bold Type ’s Jane Sloan (Katie Stevens) meets her soon-to-be boss in the show’s Season 3 premiere, their encounter is a literal wreck. On the Freeform dramedy, which follows the writer and two friends working at the Cosmopolitan -inspired Scarlet magazine , Jane opens her cab door outside the office

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Train students to navigate ethical swamps

Train students to navigate ethical swamps Train students to navigate ethical swamps, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01046-4 A protocol can help with the tricky conversations essential to responsible research conduct, says Mary A. Allen.

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Author of retracted PLOS ONE paper wonders if he was punished for being honest

The stars did not align for a 2016 paper ancient astronomy in the Amazon region after the author discovered errors in his work that the journal deemed fatal to the case, although the author has objected to the retraction. And the author feels as though he was punished for being honest. The article, “Solar-Aligned Pictographs … Continue reading Author of retracted PLOS ONE paper wonders if he was p

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I invested in Facebook. By 2016, I couldn’t stay silent.

Investor Roger McNamee joined Facebook as an early investor when the company was just two years old. In this video, he explains why he went from Facebook supporter to public critic, and why he came to write the book " Zucked: Waking Up to the Facebook Catastrophe ". The next billion dollars Facebook makes means nothing if it doesn't reform its practices, says McNamee. Zucked: Waking Up to the Fac

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Black Hole Picture Revealed for the First Time

Astronomers at last have captured an image of the darkest entities in the cosmos.

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Genterapi kan redde ældres syn

PLUS. Hver sjette dansker rammes af øjensygdommen AMD. Britisk forsøg giver håb for patienter med den AMD-form, som rammer flest.

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Airbus flies into new era with change of CEO

Frenchman Guillaume Faury takes over as CEO of European aerospace giant Airbus on Wednesday, looking to benefit from the current troubles of rival Boeing and limit potential disruption from Brexit and Donald Trump's trade threats.

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Stort Office 365-indkøb i Københavns Kommune lå ubrugt i måneder: Pc'er var for svage til at køre programmet

Et softwareindkøb i Københavns Kommune gik i stå fordi der opstod en række problemer – brugerne skulle uddannnes, der skulle ofte nye pc'er til og der skulle være styre på it-sikkerheden.

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Anak Krakatau: Collapsed volcano's tsunami simulated

A new model illustrates how Anak Krakatau's deadly tsunami spread across the Sunda Strait.

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Folks twittrande viktigt efter terrorattacken på Drottninggatan

I april 2017 körde en lastbil med full hastighet ner för Drottninggatan i Stockholm, fem personer dog och minst 15 skadades. Terrorattacken skakade Sverige och på Twitter öppnade tiotusentals människor, under hashtaggen #openstockholm, upp sina hem till de som behövde skydd. I en ny studie publicerad i den vetenskapliga tidskriften Nordicom Review har Minttu Tikka, forskare vid universitetet i He

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Study identifies danger glacial lakes across Tibetan Plateau

A comprehensive study assesses the flood danger posed by glacial lakes across the Tibetan Plateau.

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A new role for genetics in cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy

A team of investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School finds that genetics may be at play and elucidates rare genetic variants which may influence risk for developing cancer therapy-induced cardiomyopathy.

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New non-antibiotic strategy for the treatment of bacterial meningitis

With the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, there is a growing need for new treatment strategies against life threatening bacterial infections. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen may have identified such an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis, a serious infection that can lead to sepsis. The study is published in Nature Communications.

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Scientists synthesize new nanowires to improve high-speed communication

Scientists from the Institute of Process Engineering, City University of Hong Kong and their collaborators synthesized highly crystalline ternary In0.28Ga0.72Sb nanowires to demonstrate high carrier mobility and fast IR response. The new nanowire could help to improve high-speed communication.

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Metal resistant PGPR lowered Cd uptake and expression of metal transporter genes with improved growth and photosynthetic pigments in Lycopersicon esculentum under metal toxicity

Metal resistant PGPR lowered Cd uptake and expression of metal transporter genes with improved growth and photosynthetic pigments in Lycopersicon esculentum under metal toxicity Metal resistant PGPR lowered Cd uptake and expression of metal transporter genes with improved growth and photosynthetic pigments in Lycopersicon esculentum under metal toxicity, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.10

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Genome sequence analysis of the fairy ring-forming fungus Lepista sordida and gene candidates for interaction with plants

Genome sequence analysis of the fairy ring-forming fungus Lepista sordida and gene candidates for interaction with plants Genome sequence analysis of the fairy ring-forming fungus Lepista sordida and gene candidates for interaction with plants, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42231-9 Genome sequence analysis of the fairy ring-forming fungus Lepista sordida and gene candida

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The nitrogen nutrition potential of arable soils

The nitrogen nutrition potential of arable soils The nitrogen nutrition potential of arable soils, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42274-y The nitrogen nutrition potential of arable soils

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First Trimester Circulating MicroRNA Biomarkers Predictive of Subsequent Preterm Delivery and Cervical Shortening

First Trimester Circulating MicroRNA Biomarkers Predictive of Subsequent Preterm Delivery and Cervical Shortening First Trimester Circulating MicroRNA Biomarkers Predictive of Subsequent Preterm Delivery and Cervical Shortening, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42166-1 First Trimester Circulating MicroRNA Biomarkers Predictive of Subsequent Preterm Delivery and Cervical Sho

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An Invertible Mathematical Model of Cortical Bone’s Adaptation to Mechanical Loading

An Invertible Mathematical Model of Cortical Bone’s Adaptation to Mechanical Loading An Invertible Mathematical Model of Cortical Bone’s Adaptation to Mechanical Loading, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42378-5 An Invertible Mathematical Model of Cortical Bone’s Adaptation to Mechanical Loading

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Lipid normalization and stable isotope discrimination in Pacific walrus tissues

Lipid normalization and stable isotope discrimination in Pacific walrus tissues Lipid normalization and stable isotope discrimination in Pacific walrus tissues, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42095-z Lipid normalization and stable isotope discrimination in Pacific walrus tissues

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Tropical forest conversion to rubber plantation affects soil micro- & mesofaunal community & diversity

Tropical forest conversion to rubber plantation affects soil micro- & mesofaunal community & diversity Tropical forest conversion to rubber plantation affects soil micro- & mesofaunal community & diversity, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42333-4 Tropical forest conversion to rubber plantation affects soil micro- & mesofaunal community & diversity

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How whitening strips can damage your teeth

Many people use whitening strips and other bleaching products to make their teeth whiter. However, these often contain a damaging substance.

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Big Issues: What is Water Worth?

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Ocean uproar: saving marine life from a barrage of noise

Ocean uproar: saving marine life from a barrage of noise Ocean uproar: saving marine life from a barrage of noise, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01098-6 Ship engines, underwater blasts, sonar and oil drilling are filling the seas with sound. Researchers are now trying to pin down the damage humanity’s growing acoustic footprint has on ocean life.

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Danske lithium-batterier holder Samsøs elnet grønt om natten

Det danske firma Lithium Balance står bag batteriet, der skal gøre det muligt at opsamle og lagre grøn energi i havnebyen Ballen på Samsø.

13h

Showy male primates have smaller testicles

Male primates equipped with all the bells and whistles to attract a female mate tend to have smaller gonads, according to a study by researchers at The University of Western Australia and University of Zurich.

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Showy male primates have smaller testicles

Male primates equipped with all the bells and whistles to attract a female mate tend to have smaller gonads, according to a study by researchers at The University of Western Australia and University of Zurich.

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The basic questions about universal basic income

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Will AI Save Journalism – or Kill It? – Knowledge@Wharton

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Forslag om iværksætterfond for IDA-medlemmer møder modstand

Selvstændige Ingeniørers Liste vil arbejde for, at IDA i samarbejde med eksterne partnere etablerer en iværksætterfond, men kun tre andre lister bakker op om forslaget blandt andet Pensionistlisten og Dimittendlisten. Det er der en meget logisk forklaring på, mener forslagsstilleren.

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Why we can’t get over the death of the dinosaurs

Why we can’t get over the death of the dinosaurs Why we can’t get over the death of the dinosaurs, Published online: 10 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01096-8 Reports of a new-found snapshot of extinction highlights a mystery that scientists are still working to solve.

14h

Benin eyes video gaming in play for jobs and development

West Africa lags behind the northern hemisphere when it comes to software development but moves are afoot to tap into a growing interest in the region and across the continent.

14h

PODD: Reparera hjärnan

Våra blodkroppar förnyas hela tiden och det gör också våra hudceller. Men när hjärncellerna dör, som till exempel vid Alzheimers och Parkinsons sjukdom, eller i samband med en stroke, så bildas inga nya hjärnceller. Men finns det verkligen ingen möjlighet att ersätta de förlorade hjärncellerna? Det och mycket annat kan du höra om i vår podd med Malin Parmar.

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Record Singapore bust puts scrutiny on overlooked pangolin (Update)

Singapore has seized more than 28 tons of pangolin scales belonging to around 38,000 of the endangered mammals over the past week, a global record that spurred calls for more protection for pangolins, which are used in traditional medicine.

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Scant amounts of DNA reveal conservation clues

The key to solving a mystery is finding the right clues. Wildlife detectives aiming to protect endangered species have long been hobbled by the near impossibility of collecting DNA samples from rare and elusive animals. Now, researchers at Stanford and the National Centre for Biological Sciences at India's Tata Institute of Fundamental Research have developed a method for extracting genetic clues

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Record Singapore bust puts scrutiny on overlooked pangolin (Update)

Singapore has seized more than 28 tons of pangolin scales belonging to around 38,000 of the endangered mammals over the past week, a global record that spurred calls for more protection for pangolins.

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Scant amounts of DNA reveal conservation clues

The key to solving a mystery is finding the right clues. Wildlife detectives aiming to protect endangered species have long been hobbled by the near impossibility of collecting DNA samples from rare and elusive animals. Now, researchers at Stanford and the National Centre for Biological Sciences at India's Tata Institute of Fundamental Research have developed a method for extracting genetic clues

14h

A Night at the Museum With Beer and Skulls

For two researchers at the American Museum of Natural History, closing time means the start of an anthropological happy hour that has yielded 10 books and scores of scientific articles and papers.

15h

How a Woman in Oregon Lived to 99 With Organs in All The Wrong Places

"I don't think any of us will ever forget it, honestly."

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CSI meets conservation

The challenges of collecting DNA samples directly from endangered species makes understanding and protecting them harder. A new approach promises cheap, rapid analysis of genetic clues in degraded and left-behind material, such as hair and commercial food products.

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Amazon Kindle Review (2019): A Cheaper Way to Read at Night

Amazon’s new entry-level Kindle ebook reader is just like the 2018 Kindle Paperwhite, but $40 cheaper.

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Cuba's worker bees boost thriving honey business

In the floral valleys of Cuba's Matanzas province, old fashioned farming means bees can swarm without the threat of pesticides that have decimated populations across the world.

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Cuba's worker bees boost thriving honey business

In the floral valleys of Cuba's Matanzas province, old fashioned farming means bees can swarm without the threat of pesticides that have decimated populations across the world.

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Aviation faces challenge to reduce pollution

Aviation has boomed in the past decades, with low-cost airlines helping make travel affordable to more people, but the industry faces a major challenge to play its part in cutting emissions responsible for global warming.

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'Flight shame' has Swedes rethinking air travel

Saddled with long dark winters at home, Swedes have for decades been frequent flyers seeking out sunnier climes, but a growing number are changing their ways because of air travel's impact on the climate.

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Hawaii closer to forcing Airbnb to collect taxes on rentals

Hawaii lawmakers eager to gather tax revenue from the state's flourishing, yet mostly unpermitted, vacation rental sector on Tuesday passed legislation that would require websites like Airbnb to collect and pay taxes on behalf of short-term rental hosts.

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Capitol Hill hearing on online hate sees it firsthand

A congressional hearing on online hate turned into a vivid demonstration of the problem Tuesday when a YouTube livestream of the proceedings was bombarded with racist and anti-Semitic comments from internet users.

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Scientists set to reveal first true image of black hole

The world is finally about to see a black hole—not an artist's impression or a computer-generated likeness, but the real thing.

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Boeing reports 19% drop in Q1 plane deliveries on MAX grounding

Boeing on Tuesday reported a 19 percent drop in first-quarter commercial airplane deliveries as the global grounding of its 737 MAX plane hits results.

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