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nyheder2019april11

Ability to lift weights quickly can mean a longer life

Prolong your life by increasing your muscle power. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a congress of the European Society of Cardiology.'Rising from a chair in old age and kicking a ball depend more on muscle power than muscle strength, yet most weight bearing exercise focuses on the latter,' said study author Professor Claudio Gil Araújo.

11h

People with a sense of oneness experience greater life satisfaction

People who believe in oneness — the idea that everything in the world is connected and interdependent — appear to have greater life satisfaction than those who don't, regardless of whether they belong to a religion or don't, according to new research.

17h

Giftige fluorstoffer i kosmetik overskrider kommende grænseværdi 95 gange

En rapport fra Miljøstyrelsen dokumenterer ligesom udenlandske undersøgelser, at der er stærkt sundhedsskadelige fluorstoffer i cremer og makeup. Coop, Forbrugerrådet Tænk og forskere opfordrer til forbud.

15h

Radio Atlantic: Can A Long-Shot Candidate Beat Donald Trump?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play The crowded race for the Democratic nomination includes both frontrunners and long-shots, but how do we know which is which? Some big names have trailed in fundraising and polls. And some written off early have found surprising support. For a recent Atlantic article , Isaac Dovere spoke with one candidate whose perfor

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Photos of the Week: Inflatable Astronaut, Presidential Field, Falcon Heavy

The arrest of Julian Assange in London, lioness relocation in the Gaza Strip, memorials to Nipsey Hussle in Los Angeles, a Wookiee and Dalek in Scarborough, cyclone recovery in Mozambique, record flooding in Iran, a marathon in Vienna, Thailand's water festival, overfull reservoirs in rain-soaked Lebanon and Iraq, and much more.

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The Family Weekly: Is School Desegregation in Boston Still Possible?

(Alana Semuels and her childhood friend Eddie, who met through the METCO program. Courtesy of Alana Semuels.) This Week in Family The Metropolitan Council for Educational Opportunity (METCO), the Boston area’s school-integration program, is one of the longest-running voluntary programs in U.S. history. But the housing integration that would have reinforced school integration never materialized, a

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Starvation study shows bacteria's survival skills

A larger genetic inventory may help explain how certain dangerous bacteria can persist in a hospital environment and continue to infect patients, according to a new study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers which are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach on quantum devices available today.

13min

New method inverts the self-assembly of liquid crystals

In liquid crystals, molecules automatically arrange themselves in an ordered fashion. Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have discovered a method that allows an anti-ordered state, which will enable novel material properties and potentially new technical applications, such as artificial muscles for soft robotics. They published their findings in the scientific journal Science Advances.

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This Grouchy Employee Hates Walmart’s New Floor-Scrubbing Robots

Dumb and Dangerous On Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reported that Walmart planned to add thousands more autonomous robots to its workforce. “With automation we are able to take away some of the tasks that associates don’t enjoy doing,” Mark Propes, Walmart U.S.’s senior director of central operations, told the WSJ . “At the same time we continue to open up new jobs in other things in the store

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Fuel cells strengthened by nano research

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It's a matter of honor: Why Southerners are more polite

Good hospitality and manners are well-known stereotypes of the American South. Psychologists believe that the South is so well-mannered because it has a culture of honor, where an individual's reputation is highly valuable. To test this, researchers conducted what's known as "the asshole experiment." None According to a survey by Travel + Leisure magazine, New York, Washington D.C., and Boston ar

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Scientists Invent “Sewing Machine” to Implant Brain Electrodes

Fast Delivery A group of DARPA-funded scientists associated with Elon Musk say they’ve invented a new way to “rapidly implant” brain electrodes into rats — and their “sewing machine” implantation system could facilitate the creation of a mind-reading brain-computer interface, as first reported by Bloomberg . “Although more research is needed to refine the overall interface system and better integ

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People Are Horrified When They Have to Torture a Virtual Person

Digital Shock Back in 1961, psychologist Stanley Milgram shocked the world with controversial research in which everyday people followed a scientist’s instructions to electrocute someone who they thought was giving incorrect answers on a quiz — a damning indication that many people will acquiesce to brutal directives by an authority figure. In December 2018, a team of London-based scientists repe

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Heterogeneous ice nucleation correlates with bulk-like interfacial water

Establishing a direct correlation between interfacial water and heterogeneous ice nucleation (HIN) is essential for understanding the mechanism of ice nucleation. Here, we study the HIN efficiency on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) surfaces with different densities of hydroxyl groups. We find that the HIN efficiency increases with the decreasing hydroxyl group density. By explicitly considering that inte

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Homogeneous guiding deposition of sodium through main group II metals toward dendrite-free sodium anodes

Metallic sodium is a potential anode material for rechargeable sodium-based batteries because of its high specific capacity and low cost. However, sodium commonly suffers from severe sodium dendrites and infinitely huge volume change, hampering its practical applications. Here, we demonstrate that sodium can be controllably deposited through main group II metals such as Be, Mg, and Ba since they

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Engineering phonon polaritons in van der Waals heterostructures to enhance in-plane optical anisotropy

Van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures assembled from layers of two-dimensional materials have attracted considerable interest due to their novel optical and electrical properties. Here, we report a scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy study of hexagonal boron nitride on black phosphorus (h-BN/BP) heterostructures, demonstrating the first direct observation of in-plane anisotropic

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Quantum localization bounds Trotter errors in digital quantum simulation

A fundamental challenge in digital quantum simulation (DQS) is the control of an inherent error, which appears when discretizing the time evolution of a quantum many-body system as a sequence of quantum gates, called Trotterization. Here, we show that quantum localization-by constraining the time evolution through quantum interference-strongly bounds these errors for local observables, leading to

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How heteroepitaxy occurs on strontium titanate

In traditional models of heteroepitaxy, the substrate serves mainly as a crystalline template for the thin-film lattice, dictating the initial roughness of the film and the degree of coherent strain. Here, performing in situ surface x-ray diffraction during the heteroepitaxial growth of LaTiO 3 on SrTiO 3 (001), we find that a TiO 2 adlayer composed of the R 33.7° and R 45.0° reconstructions is a

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Folding a focalized acoustical vortex on a flat holographic transducer: Miniaturized selective acoustical tweezers

Acoustical tweezers based on focalized acoustical vortices hold the promise of precise contactless manipulation of millimeter down to submicrometer particles, microorganisms, and cells with unprecedented combined selectivity and trapping force. Yet, the widespread dissemination of this technology has been hindered by severe limitations of current systems in terms of performance and/or miniaturiza

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Super-elasticity of three-dimensionally cross-linked graphene materials all the way to deep cryogenic temperatures

Until now, materials with high elasticity at deep cryogenic temperatures have not been observed. Previous reports indicated that graphene and carbon nanotube–based porous materials can exhibit reversible mechano-elastic behavior from liquid nitrogen temperature up to nearly a thousand degrees Celsius. Here, we report wide temperature–invariant large-strain super-elastic behavior in three-dimensio

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Calcium-looping reforming of methane realizes in situ CO2 utilization with improved energy efficiency

Closing the anthropogenic carbon cycle is one important strategy to combat climate change, and requires the chemistry to effectively combine CO 2 capture with its conversion. Here, we propose a novel in situ CO 2 utilization concept, calcium-looping reforming of methane, to realize the capture and conversion of CO 2 in one integrated chemical process. This process couples the calcium-looping CO 2

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Water vapor capturing using an array of traveling liquid beads for desalination and water treatment

Growing concern over the scarcity of freshwater motivates the development of compact and economic vapor capture methods for distributed thermal desalination or harvesting of water. We report a study of water vapor condensation on cold liquid beads traveling down a massive array of vertical cotton threads that act as pseudo-superhydrophilic surfaces. These liquid beads form through intrinsic flow

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Relativistic independence bounds nonlocality

If nature allowed nonlocal correlations other than those predicted by quantum mechanics, would that contradict some physical principle? Various approaches have been put forward in the past two decades in an attempt to single out quantum nonlocality. However, none of them can explain the set of quantum correlations arising in the simplest scenarios. Here, it is shown that generalized uncertainty r

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Fully soluble self-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) with an electrical conductivity greater than 1000 S cm-1

Wet-processable and highly conductive polymers are promising candidates for key materials in organic electronics. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is commercially available as a water dispersion of colloidal particles but has some technical issues with PSS. Here, we developed a novel fully soluble self-doped PEDOT (S-PEDOT) with an electrical conductivity as h

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Liquid crystal elastomer shell actuators with negative order parameter

Liquid crystals (LCs) are nonsolids with long-range orientational order, described by a scalar order parameter . Despite the vast set of existing LC materials, one-third of the order parameter value range, –1 / 2 P 2 > P 2 >

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Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can track and map active neurons as accurately as a human can, but in a fraction of the time. This new technique, based on a deep learning algorithm, addresses a critical roadblock in neuron analysis, allowing researchers to rapidly gather and process neuronal signals for real-time behavioral studies.

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A new graphene foam stays squishy at the coldest temperatures

Researchers have now made a material that is superelastic even at extremely cold temperatures, which could be helpful in space.

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New method inverts the self-assembly of liquid crystals

In liquid crystals, molecules automatically arrange themselves in an ordered fashion. Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have discovered a method that allows an anti-ordered state, which will enable novel material properties and potentially new technical applications, such as artificial muscles for soft robotics. They published their findings in the scientific journal Science Advances.

37min

Quantum simulation more stable than expected

A localization phenomenon boosts the accuracy of solving quantum many-body problems with quantum computers. These problems are otherwise challenging for conventional computers. This brings such digital quantum simulation within reach using quantum devices available today.

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Apple wants to protect you from accidental in-app subscriptions – CNET

iOS devices will reportedly now ask you to confirm your subscription.

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Diesel exhaust filtered of its tiny particles may worsen allergy-induced lung impairment

Air pollution from diesel engines may worsen allergy-induced lung impairment more when tiny particles are filtered from the exhaust than when they are not, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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The New Old Age: A New Rx for Diabetes: Lighten Up

In older patients, rigorous lowering of blood sugar may offer few benefits and pose unexpected risks.

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Tiny light-up barcodes identify molecules by their twinkling

An imaging technique developed at Duke University could make it possible to peer inside cells and watch dozens of different molecules at once — by labeling them with short strands of light-up DNA that blink on and off with their own unique rhythm. Though they're all the same color, the technique makes it possible to distinguish as many as 56 types by their twinkling, more cheaply than traditional

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We now know how insects and bacteria control ice

in a paper published today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society University of Utah professor Valeria Molinero and her colleagues show how key proteins produced in bacteria and insects can either promote or inhibit the formation of ice, based on their length and their ability to team up to form large ice-binding surfaces. The results have wide application, particularly in understanding p

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Hypernatremia and Hyponatremia: Causes and Risks of Sodium Imbalance

Why is keeping the balance of sodium in our bodies so important?

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PET Scans Reveal Elevated Tau in NFL Players' Brains

A study hints that it might be possible to diagnose chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease associated with frequent head injuries, while patients are still living.

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Learn how changes to the Clean Water Act could hurt your region before it’s too late

Environment The public comment period ends April 15. You have until April 15 to submit comments on the proposed changes, so we’ve compiled a list of threatened waterways in each region.

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‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker’: Watch the Trailer Here

The ninth installment places the mantle in Rey's hands.

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The Guardian view on the first picture of a black hole: seeing is believing | Editorial

Scientists have shown us one of the mysteries of the universe, and the extraordinary power of human cooperation “If you work on something like theoretical physics, you feel like you’re trapped inside a room, and outside people don’t know,” the physicist Carlo Rovelli said recently. While the stereotype of a space scientist is of a loner out of step with the humdrum of everyday life, Mr Rovelli is

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Genetic variant linked to cucumber fruit length

Fruit size is a major determinant of yield and market value. ASPB is pleased to announce the publication in The Plant Cell of important research describing the discovery of a key regulator of fruit length variation in cucumber.

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How not to break the bank on streaming services

With more TV streaming services than ever before, from newcomers like Disney Plus to stalwarts like Netflix, consumers may feel the ideal viewing experience is finally at hand.

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Genetic variant linked to cucumber fruit length

The cucumber is among the top five vegetable crops grown in the world. Cucumbers are most commonly eaten fresh or preserved as pickles. An important attribute of the cucumber is fruit length. Cucumbers range in size from 5 to 60 cm, depending on the cultivar.

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Ability to lift weights quickly can mean a longer life

Prolong your life by increasing your muscle power. That's the main message of a new study. 'Rising from a chair in old age and kicking a ball depend more on muscle power than muscle strength, yet most weight bearing exercise focuses on the latter,' said a study author.

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Move more to live longer

Improving fitness doesn't require doing activities you don't like. The largest study to date of cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy people found that moving more is linked to living longer, regardless of age, sex, and starting fitness level.

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Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench, Mariana Trench

Research that reveals what lies at the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean — the Mariana Trench. Until now, scientists knew more about Mars than the deepest part of the ocean. But an expedition to collect samples of the microbial population at the deepest part of the Mariana Trench (some 11,000 meters down) has revealed a new 'oil-eating' bacteria.

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New research supports volcanic origin of Kiruna-type iron ores

The origin of giant apatite-iron oxide ores of the so-called 'Kiruna-type' has been the topic of a long standing debate that has lasted for over 100 years. In a new article, scientists present new and unambiguous data in favor of a magmatic origin for these important iron ores.

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Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance

A study revealed that the bacteria present in the water overlying dozens of coral reefs changed dramatically during the night, and then returned to the same daytime community as observed the morning before. Further, as if these communities were all privy to the same schedule, these changes were synchronized across reefs separated by hundreds of miles.

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Want to quit smoking? Partner up

Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a new study. 'Quitting smoking can be a lonely endeavor,' said a study author.

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SRC-1 gene variants linked to human obesity

Researchers have discovered how the gene SRC-1 affects body weight control.

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SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios fail

A new type of pocket-sized antenna could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don't work, such as underwater, through the ground and over very long distances through air.

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Readers Respond to Caitlin Flanagan’s Argument on the College-Admissions Scandal

They Had It Coming Nearly 30 years ago, as a college counselor at a top school in Los Angeles, Caitlin Flanagan discovered that the school’s impressive matriculation list was not the simple by-product of excellent teaching, but was in fact the end result of parental campaigns. “I thought that whatever madness was whirring through the minds of the parents was a blip of group insanity that would so

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Electric vehicle adoption improves air quality and climate outlook

If you have ever wondered how much electric vehicle (EV) adoption actually matters for the environment, a new study provides evidence that making this switch would improve overall air quality and lower carbon emissions.

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Genetic variant linked to cucumber fruit length

The cucumber is among the top five vegetable crops grown in the world. Cucumbers are most commonly eaten fresh or preserved as pickles. An important attribute of the cucumber is fruit length. Cucumbers range in size from 5 to 60 cm, depending on the cultivar.

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The Julian Assange I Met in 2010 Doesn't Exist Anymore

When the author interviewed the WikiLeaks cofounder in 2010, what happened online still seemed remote and relatively unthreatening. Today it’s deadly serious.

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Ny liste er IDA-valgets store vinder

Innovation, Trivsel og Moderne Ledelse brager ind i IDAs repræsentantskab med ni mandater, og bliver dermed en af de to største lister.

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Scientists must worry in public about the dangers of their creations

The US Department of Defense is ending its contract with cold war-era advisory group JASON. That’s OK – today’s scientists need to air concerns in public, says Audra J. Wolfe

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'Technical Glitch' Doomed Israeli Beresheet Lander in its Final Moments

Israel's Beresheet spacecraft, which was set to land on the moon yesterday, suffered an engine and communications failure, causing it to crash into the lunar surface. Details are still emerging about what exactly went wrong. SpaceIL and the Israeli Aerospace Agency (IAI), who built and operated Beresheet, have released a few specifics about the spacecraft's last moments. The trouble began when the

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Solution for Climate Change Could Come From A Few Targeted Actions

If you’ve been following climate news, you’ve probably heard about an approaching “tipping point” toward climate change — the point of no return after enough small changes brought us to certain disaster. But what if the opposite were just as likely? One group of researchers thinks that a few small, positive changes could “tip” us back in the right direction. They’re calling them “sensitive interve

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BU scientists find electrostimulation can improve working memory in people

In a groundbreaking study published in Nature Neuroscience, Boston University researchers demonstrate that electrostimulation can improve the working memory of people in their 70s so that their performance on memory tasks is indistinguishable from that of 20-year-olds.

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The Real Story Behind Game of Thrones’ Dragonglass

[This is a sneak preview of our June issue. Subscribe here to get access to many more great stories from Discover] Shiny and sharp, obsidian is enjoying a bit of a pop culture moment. It plays a central role in HBO’s hit fantasy series Game of Thrones, now wrapping its final season. Called dragonglass on the show, obsidian is one of only two substances that can cut down White Walkers, malevolent o

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Earliest life may have arisen in ponds, not oceans

Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new study finds. Researchers report that shallow bodies of water, on the order of 10 centimeters deep, could have held high concentrations of what many scientists believe to be a key ingredient for jump-starting life on Earth: nitrogen.

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Itchy skin affects the health and quality of life of many patients with kidney disease

New research reveals that pruritus, or itchy skin, affects a substantial percentage of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The study also indicates which patients are more likely to experience pruritus, and demonstrates that pruritus may affect quality of life and sleep.

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One-two punch helps solve greatest unmet need in cardiology

Combining a high-fat diet with a drug that raises blood pressure gave researchers a 'two-hit' model, like a one-two punch to heart failure.

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One-third of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine

A stunning one-third of people with a cancer diagnosis use complementary and alternative medicines such as meditation, yoga, acupuncture, herbal medicine, and supplements.

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Teens may be missing the nuances of consent

Teenagers have an overly simplistic understanding of consent that often ignores relevant non-verbal cues, a new study suggests. “If we’re really committed to preventing sexual violence, then we need to engage young people in the discussion of what consent means much earlier in development,” says Caroline Kuo, an associate professor (research) of behavioral and social sciences and associate dean o

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TET3 prevents terminal differentiation of adult NSCs by a non-catalytic action at Snrpn

TET3 prevents terminal differentiation of adult NSCs by a non-catalytic action at Snrpn TET3 prevents terminal differentiation of adult NSCs by a non-catalytic action at Snrpn , Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09665-1 The potential role of TET proteins in adult neurogenesis is unknown. In this study, authors show that TET3 is essentially required for the maintenance of the

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Mitochondria-specific drug release and reactive oxygen species burst induced by polyprodrug nanoreactors can enhance chemotherapy

Mitochondria-specific drug release and reactive oxygen species burst induced by polyprodrug nanoreactors can enhance chemotherapy Mitochondria-specific drug release and reactive oxygen species burst induced by polyprodrug nanoreactors can enhance chemotherapy, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09566-3 Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species, which can be exploit

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Immunoregulation of macrophages by dynamic ligand presentation via ligand–cation coordination

Immunoregulation of macrophages by dynamic ligand presentation via ligand–cation coordination Immunoregulation of macrophages by dynamic ligand presentation via ligand–cation coordination, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09733-6 Control of macrophage adhesion and phenotype is important to biomaterial applications. Here, the authors report on the use of bisphosphonate coate

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Transcriptional regulation of autophagy-lysosomal function in BRAF-driven melanoma progression and chemoresistance

Transcriptional regulation of autophagy-lysosomal function in BRAF-driven melanoma progression and chemoresistance Transcriptional regulation of autophagy-lysosomal function in BRAF-driven melanoma progression and chemoresistance, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09634-8 The relationship between autophagy and BRAF signalling is unclear. Here, the authors describe that BRAF

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Sublimation of terrestrial permafrost and the implications for ice-loss processes on Mars

Sublimation of terrestrial permafrost and the implications for ice-loss processes on Mars Sublimation of terrestrial permafrost and the implications for ice-loss processes on Mars, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09410-8 Sublimation of ice is believed to have generated a variety of landforms on Mars and other planetary bodies. Here the authors show the first long-term in s

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Human noise blindness drives suboptimal cognitive inference

Human noise blindness drives suboptimal cognitive inference Human noise blindness drives suboptimal cognitive inference, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09330-7 Santiago Herce Castañón and colleagues show that people are blind to mental errors that arise when combining multiple pieces of discordant information. This blindness helps explain why cognitive judgements often ar

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The relativistic causality versus no-signaling paradigm for multi-party correlations

The relativistic causality versus no-signaling paradigm for multi-party correlations The relativistic causality versus no-signaling paradigm for multi-party correlations, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09505-2 It is generally assumed that no-signalling constraints and relativistic causality are equivalent. Here, the authors show that, in the multipartite setting, the no-s

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Structure of the plastic-degrading Ideonella sakaiensis MHETase bound to a substrate

Structure of the plastic-degrading Ideonella sakaiensis MHETase bound to a substrate Structure of the plastic-degrading Ideonella sakaiensis MHETase bound to a substrate, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09326-3 Plastic polymer PET degrading enzymes are of great interest for achieving sustainable plastics recycling. Here, the authors present the crystal structures of the pl

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A new kind of metasurface uses the sun to clear foggy screens

Misted windshields could become a thing of the past thanks to a clever material engineered on a microscopic scale.

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Fecal Transplants Reduce Symptoms of Autism Long Term

Follow-Up New research suggests that fecal transplants can reduce the severity of conditions associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) — and that the changes last several years after the transplants. Back in 2017, Arizona State University conducted a study on children with ASD of varying severity. Now, research published Tuesday in the journal Scientific Reports shows that the reduction in A

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Why do we have eureka moments?

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An Abrupt End to a Historic Moon Mission

Updated at 1:18 p.m. ET on April 12, 2019. The malfunction happened just a few miles from the surface. The spacecraft had spent days orbiting the moon and, before that, about a month and a half traveling the 4 million miles from Earth. Back home, its creators sat tense in a control room as they waited for the spacecraft—the product of years of effort and engineering—to land on the terrain. “We’ve

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Electric vehicle adoption improves air quality and climate outlook

A Northwestern University study quantified the differences in air pollution generated from battery-powered electric vehicles versus internal combustion engines. The researchers found that even when their electricity is generated from combustion sources, electric vehicles have a net positive impact on air quality and climate change.

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Would You Give a Virtual Electric Shock to an Avatar?

In a repeat of a classic experiment, we find that people who are only unenthusiastically obeying unethical orders still experience trauma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Pope Benedict Says Blame the ’60s for Priests’ Abuse

VATICAN CITY —Popes are supposed to be infallible. They communicate through carefully worded speeches, apostolic letters, or encyclicals that are often the fruit of slow collaboration with doctrinal experts inside the Vatican. So what are we to make of the strange text that Benedict XVI, the pope emeritus, unleashed on the world this week, in which he effectively blamed the abuse crisis in the Ca

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The Small Rebellions of Sally Rooney’s Normal People

Sally Rooney’s new novel, Normal People , was recently featured in a Vanity Fair spread of “this season’s best new books and the must-have bags to stash them in.” In the picture, it leans confidingly against a Mansur Gavriel tote bag in a pleasing highlighter yellow (price: $595). The person who owns that combination of things would be rich, tasteful, and smart, the kind of person who has a well-

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Israeli team assesses what went wrong with lunar landing

The team behind the Israeli spacecraft that crashed into the moon moments before touchdown was working Friday to try and piece together what derailed the ambitious mission, which sought to make history as the first privately funded lunar landing.

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Beresheet spacecraft: 'Technical glitch' led to Moon crash

Preliminary data suggests a technical glitch caused the Beresheet spacecraft to shut down its main engine at the wrong time.

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Would You Give a Virtual Electric Shock to an Avatar?

In a repeat of a classic experiment, we find that people who are only unenthusiastically obeying unethical orders still experience trauma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The First Black Hole Photo Is Even More Amazing When You Zoom Out

Photo Friends The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) wasn’t the only powerful device with its gaze fixed upon galaxy Messier 87 (M87) in April 2017. While the EHT was focused on the event horizon of the black hole at the center of M87, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory was taking a wider view of the same target — and the image produced through those observations puts the black hole photo into stunning

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How Scientists Are Using Real-Time Data to Help Fishermen Avoid Bycatch

Using a strategy called dynamic ocean management, researchers are creating tools to forecast where fish will be—and where endangered species won't be

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Why Is This Smithsonian Paleontologist Dressed as Santa?

Cat-loving paleontologist answers your questions in the National Museum of Natural History's YouTube series, "The Doctor Is In."

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As cashless stores grow, so does the backlash

Hembert Figueroa just wanted a taco.

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Would You Give a Virtual Electric Shock to an Avatar?

In a repeat of a classic experiment, we find that people who are only unenthusiastically obeying unethical orders still experience trauma — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Coming Soon: Stealth U.S. Air Force F-35s Armed with Laser Weapons?

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Daily briefing: Going hungry affects children for their whole lives

Daily briefing: Going hungry affects children for their whole lives Daily briefing: Going hungry affects children for their whole lives, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01219-1 Food poverty among the world’s wealthiest, Israeli Moon lander crashes, a realist’s guide to quantum mechanics.

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How to Watch the Star Wars Celebration Livestream: Episode IX, The Mandalorian, and More

This year's Star Wars fan convention in Chicago is sure to be full of surprises—and a first look at *Episode IX*.

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Earliest life may have arisen in ponds, not oceans

Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds.

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FCC to hold big 5G auction, spend $20B for rural internet

The U.S. communications regulator will hold a massive auction to bolster 5G service, the next generation of mobile networks, and will spend $20 billion for rural internet.

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Illustrating the Messy Reality of Life as an Interracial Family

When the novelist Mira Jacob’s son was 6, he started asking her a lot of questions about race and identity. It started with Michael Jackson: Was he brown or black or white, and what did he like best? Then his questions took a more serious turn: Was it bad to be brown in America? Though he was only 6, Jacob’s son, who is biracial, was old enough to understand the news at the time, which was fixate

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Want to learn a new skill? Take some short breaks

In a study of healthy volunteers, National Institutes of Health researchers found that our brains may solidify the memories of new skills we just practiced a few seconds earlier by taking a short rest. The results highlight the critically important role rest may play in learning.

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"Hair Dryer" Winds Could Strain Vulnerable Antarctic Ice Shelf

Warm, dry winds can cause major melt as they sweep across the ice, even during frigid winter months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How do you name a black hole? It is actually pretty complicated

The first black hole ever directly imaged now has been nicknamed Pōwehi, but making the name official will take some time

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An Astrophysicist on What the Black-Hole Image Reveals – Facts So Romantic

The great irony of black holes is that, in all the decades that we astrophysicists have talked about them, we never had any direct observational evidence for them. When astronomers said they had “found black holes” in this or that location in a faraway location in the universe, what this really meant was a very compact object—an enormous concentration of mass, far greater than that of any convent

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Depression-Era Workers Found Strange Fossilized Beasts in 'Texas Serengeti'

About 12 million years ago, antelopes with slingshot-like horns and beasts that weren't quite elephants but that had long trunks and tusks tramped across the "Texas Serengeti" searching for food and caring for their babies.

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Hubble peers at cosmic blue bauble

Messier 3: containing an incredible half-million stars, this 8-billion-year-old cosmic bauble is one of the largest and brightest globular clusters ever discovered.

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AI agent offers rationales using everyday language to explain its actions

Researchers have developed an artificially intelligent (AI) agent that can automatically generate natural language explanations in real-time to convey the motivations behind its actions.

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Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Multiple new genes involved in hearing loss have been revealed in a large study of mouse mutants. The new genes reveal the metabolic pathways and regulatory processes involved in hearing.

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Rethinking conservation efforts for improved biodiversity

A new study looked into why the global commitment towards the expansion of protected areas has not delivered the expected conservation benefits. Researchers propose a new target and a set of indicators that can galvanize global conservation efforts and lead to positive biodiversity outcomes.

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Seven rules for nanotech innovation

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Emotional Intelligence: The Social Skills You Weren't Taught in School

You’re taught about history, science, and math when you’re growing up. Most of us, however, aren’t taught how to identify or deal with our own emotions, or the emotions of others. These skills can be valuable, but you’ll never get them in a classroom. According to Core Spirit , emotional intelligence is a shorthand that psychological researchers use to describe how well individuals can manage the

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Earliest life may have arisen in ponds, not oceans

Primitive ponds may have provided a suitable environment for brewing up Earth's first life forms, more so than oceans, a new MIT study finds. Researchers report that shallow bodies of water, on the order of 10 centimeters deep, could have held high concentrations of what many scientists believe to be a key ingredient for jump-starting life on Earth: nitrogen.

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Medicaid could save $2.6 billion within a year if just 1% of recipients quit smoking

Reducing smoking, and its associated health effects, among Medicaid recipients in each state by just 1 percent would result in $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year, according to new research by UC San Francisco.

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Population health: A rapidly evolving discipline in US academic medicine

Leaders from department-level initiatives across the US weigh in on how academic medicine is embracing population health and the opportunities med schools have to make an impact, according to a new analysis published in JAMA Network Open.

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Family Caught Selling Diseased Body Parts to Medical Centers

Side Hustle A father and son team from Michigan were just charged for illegally selling human body parts — and failing to disclose that the corpses carried infectious diseases. The duo, both named Donald Greene, sold bodies that people donated to the Biological Resource Center of Illinois for the purpose of furthering scientific research, according to CBS Chicago . No Returns The family sold body

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Rapport: Dyrere smøger er ikke nok til at holde alle unge fra rygning

Der skal en bred indsats til, hvis vi skal sikre, at under fem procent af de 25-årige ryger i 2030.

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CBD Lures Stressed-Out Parents Looking to Unwind

Caught in the churn of long days and sleepless nights, some parents have found solace in a nonintoxicating chemical derived from hemp. But is it safe?

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Getting to the root of plant simulations

Researchers have developed a new algorithm to bolster what once were static models of root dynamics, providing researchers a clearer picture of what's really happening beneath the soil. The work describes the dynamic root model and its use with the Energy Exascale Earth System Land Model (ELM).

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Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies

A study provides new insight into why — and when — anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains. Most research into prenatal exposure to anesthesia has focused killing brain cells, this rat study showed how anesthesia disrupts the 'precisely choreographed' migration neurons make in utero, and how not 'arriving at their proper and predetermined' locations can have profound impact on brain deve

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CRISPR-Cas3 innovation holds promise for disease cures, advancing science

Scientists have used a new type of gene editing CRISPR system for the first time in human cells – a major advance in the field.

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Scientists capture a 'snapshot' of bacterial stress-response regulator's 'recycling truck'

Researchers have found that RssB — a protein that specifically recognizes a critical stress-response master regulator in bacteria and delivers it to the recycling machinery somewhat like a recycling truck — forms a compact structure with a factor that inhibits RssB activity. The inhibition factor, called IraD, is triggered by DNA damage, one of many stresses the master regulator helps bacteria s

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New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death

Using a novel optical imaging technique, researchers discovered connections between the macromolecular structure and dynamic movement of chromatin within eukaryotic cells.

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Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners

When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. In a new study, scientists report that they have discovered how the cells trigger this process, which is called mitophagy. In cells with broken mitochondria, two proteins — NIPSNAP 1 and NIPSNAP 2 — accumulate on the mitochondrial surface, functioning as 'eat me' signals, recruit

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Longer neutrophil lifespan may contribute to HIV-associated intestinal inflammation

The increased survival of white blood cells called neutrophils is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiome of HIV-infected individuals, according to a new study.

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Case of tick-borne relapsing fever in Mexico

Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is a recurring fever caused by exposure to infected Borrelia bacteria. Several cases have been reported in Mexico, but the disease gets little attention. Now, researchers describe the details of an additional case of TBRF in Sonora, Mexico in 2012.

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Body mass index may play a significant role in the progression of multiple sclerosis

A new article identifies a link between high levels of blood lipids and worsening of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who are overweight or obese.

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Keeping the taste, reducing the salt

Researchers have found a way to make food taste salty but with less of the sodium chloride tied to poor health.

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Biophotonic therapy eliminates bacteria and viruses from organs before transplantation

A new method can prevent transmission of diseases to organ recipients. The number of transplants could be higher if organs could be decontaminated.

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Opioid epidemic may have cost US governments $37.8 billion in tax revenue

The opioid epidemic may have cost U.S. state and federal governments up to $37.8 billion in lost tax revenue due to opioid-related employment loss.

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New method may transport medicine better through the body

One of the major challenges in fighting inflammation is to get the medicine transported properly through the body. Now, chemists propose a new method for drug delivery.

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Inner electrons behave differently in aromatic hydrocarbons

Scientists found that four hydrocarbon molecules, known for their internal ring structure, have a lower threshold for the release of excess energy than molecules without a similar ring structure, because one of their electrons decays from a higher to a lower energy level, a phenomenon called the Auger effect.

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CRISPR-Cas3 innovation holds promise for disease cures, advancing science

Scientists have used a new type of gene editing CRISPR system for the first time in human cells – a major advance in the field.

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ExoMars Detects Almost No Methane on Mars in Surprise Result

The arrival of the ExoMars mission with its Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) instrument provided scientists with a chance to take the most accurate measurements of methane concentration yet. However, the first major data release shows almost none of the gas in Mars' atmosphere. That's an unexpected result. The post ExoMars Detects Almost No Methane on Mars in Surprise Result appeared first on ExtremeTech

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German price platform sues Google over search results

A German price-comparison platform says it has filed suit against Alphabet Inc.'s Google search business, saying that Google has abused its dominant position by favoring its own price-comparison service in search results.

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3 lessons on starting a movement from a self-defense trailblazer | Rana Abdelhamid

At 16, Rana Abdelhamid started teaching self-defense to women and girls in her neighborhood. Almost 10 years later, these community classes have grown into Malikah: a global grassroots network creating safety, power and solidarity for all women. How did she do it? Abdelhamid shares three ingredients for building a movement from the ground up.

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App predicts risk of developing hernia following abdominal surgery

A new app can predict the likelihood that a patient will develop an incisional hernia following abdominal surgery, using big data to potentially help address a problem effects one out of every eight of these surgical patients.

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Skype screen sharing coming to Android and iOS – CNET

The feature popped up in a new Microsoft Skype Insider build.

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GM to reveal next generate Corvette in July

It's enough to rev up Corvette fans—a new rendition of the classic sports car is coming.

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FCC to hold big 5G auction, spend $20B for rural internet

The U.S. communications regulator will hold a massive auction to bolster 5G service, the next generation of mobile networks, and will spend $20 billion for rural internet.

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Hubble peers at cosmic blue bauble

Globular clusters are inherently beautiful objects, but the subject of this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, Messier 3, is commonly acknowledged to be one of the most beautiful of them all.

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Why States Want Certain Americans to Work for Medicaid

The letters went out to governors on March 14, 2017. Seema Verma had recently been appointed by President Donald Trump as the administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the agency within the Department of Health and Human Services that oversees health-care programs for more than 130 million Americans . Verma and then–HHS Secretary Tom Price, also a Trump appointee, wanted to

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Here's How Disney+ Will Take Over the World

Netflix and Amazon have a lot of titles for subscribers to enjoy—Disney has a whole universe.

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Durable or recyclable? These goals tend to clash

Solar power has seen a boom, but what happens to all the panels in a few decades when they’re no longer useful? And what about electronic devices with even shorter life spans? “Fifteen to 20 years from now, a lot of panels are going to be coming off of roofs.” Those questions are at the heart of new research that looks into the impact of government policies that aim to reduce the amount of electr

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Autism rate rises 43 percent in New Jersey, study finds

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses research by Rutgers University, shows a significant increase in the percentage of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder in New Jersey. The study found the rate increased 43 percent from 2010 to 2014 in the state.

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New study advances treatment options for PTSD

New research examines the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

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Lower pension, shorter life

Income and social status have an increasing effect on life expectancy in Germany. On average, men with very low retirement pay die five years earlier than those who are much better off. Poverty shortens life.

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I feel you: Emotional mirror neurons found in the rat

Researchers have found that the rat brain activates the same cells when they observe the pain of others as when they experience pain themselves. In addition, without activity of these 'mirror neurons,' the animals no longer share the pain of others. Finding the neural basis for sharing the emotions of others is an exciting step towards understanding empathy.

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'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners

Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. Dysfunction in these 'simulation neurons' may help explain difficulties with social interactions in conditions such as autism and social anxiety.

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Discovery of 'kingpin' stem cell may help in the understanding of cancerous tumors

Bhatia's team spent more than six years delving down to the cellular level to examine what they say are previously overlooked cells that form on the edges of pluripotent stem cell colonies. Having characterized these cells, the team also observed them form at the earliest stages of pluripotent cell reprogramming from adult cells.

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Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments

Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma. The findings present an opportunity to find out if new therapeutic approaches can stop glioblastoma at its earliest stages of initial formation or recu

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How will tropical mammals react to rising temperatures?

How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but one of the first studies to compare the responses of tropical mammals to warmer habitats suggests the answer won't be as simple as 'move to a cooler place.'

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Ice Ages occur when tropical islands and continents collide

Earth's steady state is warm and balmy, but half a dozen times over the past billion years, the planet developed ice caps and glaciers. Researchers have now amassed evidence that these cold snaps occurred when tectonic activity propelled continents headlong into volcanic island arcs in the tropics, uplifting ophiolites that rapidly absorbed carbon dioxide, cooling Earth. Once collisions stopped, C

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The latest bomb cyclone swept dust from Mexico and Arizona all the way north to Minnesota

As the latest monster spring storm spun up over the U.S. Four Corners region on April 10, high winds drove huge amounts of dust all the way north to the Upper Midwest, where it fell as dirty snow. You can see the low-pressure center of the cyclone spinning counter-clockwise in the animation above of GOES-16 weather satellite images. Below it, watch for the gargantuan plumes of khaki-colored dust b

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Bigger portions lead to preschoolers eating more over time

Researchers found that when served larger portions of typical meals or snacks, preschoolers consumed more food, both by weight and calories.

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Listeners immerse themselves in audiobooks in very different ways

In the future, a new brain research method could be used to study creativity.

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SpaceX Milestone: Company Lands Three Falcon Heavy Boosters

The Falcons Have Landed The second time is apparently the charm for SpaceX. In February 2018, Elon Musk’s space company launched a Falcon Heavy rocket for the first time, but it wasn’t able to recover all three of the rocket’s boosters — rather than landing on SpaceX’s autonomous drone ship like it was supposed to, the center core splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean. Whoops. On Thursday, the comp

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The Books Briefing: An Ode to Elegies

This month, like every April since 1996, is National Poetry Month—an annual commemoration of a literary form forever entwined with the tradition of commemoration. Poetry first blossomed in an age before publications or printing or even written language, as a conduit for cultural memory, a way to pass histories and myths down through generations in song and verbal recitation. Thousands of years la

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Eggs for breakfast benefits those with diabetes

While some cereals may be the breakfast of champions, a professor suggests people with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) should be reaching for something else. New research shows that a high-fat, low-carb breakfast (LCBF) can help those with T2D control blood sugar levels throughout the day.

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Loss of a DNA repair system creates a unique vulnerability in many cancer types

Cancer cells adapt to potentially fatal mutations and other molecular malfunctions by adjusting one or more other genes' activity, in the process becoming dependent on those genes for their survival and growth. The resulting genetic dependencies may provide targets for developing new precision-guided drugs or other cancer treatment strategies. Reporting in Nature, researchers describe one such vul

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World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean hydrogen energy

Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission. Unfortunately, hydrogen gas is highly flammable when mixed with air, so very efficient and effective sensors are needed. Now, researchers present the first hydrogen sensors ever to meet the future performance targets for use in hydrogen powered vehicles.

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Remedy for painful jaw disease

Researchers report a breakthrough to prevent osteonecrosis of the jaw, a side effect suffered by some people undergoing treatment for cancer or osteoporosis.

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Hubble peers at cosmic blue bauble

Messier 3: containing an incredible half-million stars, this 8-billion-year-old cosmic bauble is one of the largest and brightest globular clusters ever discovered.

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New studies can inform programs to prevent sexual violence among teens locally, globally

A series of new studies by researchers at Brown University examines how teenagers in the United States and South Africa work through the challenges of exploring adult interactions, in the hope that the findings will inform new, targeted educational programs and interventions to prevent sexual violence among teenagers locally and globally.

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Abnormal proteins correlate with aggressive behavior in dementia

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have together with American colleagues studied deceased patients who were diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or frontotemporal dementia. They observed a correlation between certain proteins and dementia sufferers' tendency to commit criminal acts.

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LSU Health New Orleans research finds new Rx target for childhood cancer

Research led by Michael Lan, Ph.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Genetics at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, found that a compound named 5'-iodotubercidin (5'-IT) suppresses the growth of neuroblastoma cells and identified a potential new therapeutic approach for the disease.

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New meta-analysis of glyphosate-based plant protection products does not alter the assessment of the active substance

If used properly and for its intended purpose, glyphosate is not carcinogenic. This was the conclusion arrived at by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) and numerous other national and international authorities. A new meta-analysis in which already published studies are evaluated collectively does not alter the assessment of the BfR.

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The interface makes the difference

ICIQ researchers and collaborators look in detail at the interfaces in perovskite solar cells to understand the differences observed in their performance.

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Scientists develop artificial chemical receptor to assist viral transduction for T cell engineering

A research team, led by Prof. CAI Lintao at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and other collaborators developed a 'safe, efficient and universal' technique based on bioorthogonal chemistry and glycol-metabolic labeling for viral-mediated engineered T cell manufacturing.

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Making Some New Compounds, to Fit Some New Receptors

Here’s some medicinal chemistry combined with synthetic biology for you. Many people are used to thinking in terms of finding small-molecule probes for various cell targets, and those are valuable things. But what if you want to control a certain population of (for example) ion channels, but there aren’t any compounds that will do the job potently and selectively? One course of action is to find

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Losing Religion, Gaining a Friend

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who became roommates at the University of Utah, at a time when they were both questioning the Mormon faith they grew up with. After spending their young lives in tight-knit Mormon commun

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Amazon reveals what typical U.S. worker makes after its minimum-wage bump

The median pay of Amazon employees in the U.S. was just over $35,000 last year, the company disclosed for the first time in its 2019 proxy statement Thursday.

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Nearly 4,500 Amazon employees challenge company to lead on climate-change policies

In an unprecedented public push to change Amazon policies, nearly 4,500 employees have put their names to a letter asking CEO Jeff Bezos and the commerce giant's board of directors to become global leaders in fighting climate change.

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Super cheap tags can make our dumb stuff smarter

A new RFID-based technology could turn frying pans, pill bottles, yoga mats, coffee cups, and countless other nonelectronic objects into a network of Internet of Things sensors. The system, called IDAct, bridges the gap between the estimated 14.2 billion “smart” electronic devices that are currently part of the Internet of Things and the hundreds of billions of everyday nonsmart objects left out

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Space Station Mice Learned to Propel Themselves in Zero Gravity

Mouse House A first-of-its-kind study aboard the International Space Station (ISS) has yielded new insights into how humans adapt to spaceflight — and an entertaining video of mice in microgravity. In a study published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports , researchers from NASA’s Ames Research Center describe how they sent 20 mice to live in the ISS’s NASA Rodent Habitat to see how they’d

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AI and Robotics Are Transforming Disaster Relief

During the past 50 years, the frequency of recorded natural disasters has surged nearly five-fold. In this blog, I’ll be exploring how converging exponential technologies ( AI , robotics , drones , sensors, networks) are transforming the future of disaster relief—how we can prevent them in the first place and get help to victims during that first golden hour wherein immediate relief can save live

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Truck Giveaway: The Ultimate Diesel Daily Driver | Diesel Brothers

Diesel Dave and the Muscle go head to head building two ultimate Diesel Daily Drivers for their next truck giveaway. Stream Full Episodes of Diesel Brothers: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/diesel-brothers/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DieselBrothersTV https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter

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Harmful compounds might be formed when foods containing the sweetener sucralose are heated

Sucralose is a sweetener authorized in the European Union as E 955. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has assessed the current data situation on the stability of sucralose and the formation of possibly harmful chlorinated compounds at high temperatures.

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Study questions the sustainability of plant ingredients as fishmeal substitutes

Substituting fishmeal in aquaculture feeds with plant ingredients may not be as beneficial for the environment as many predict, according to new research from an international team of experts.

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Experts provide new guidelines to athletes on protein intake

A review led by a sports scientist at the University of Stirling has set out new international guidelines for protein intake in track and field athletes.

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Digital parent training for child's disruptive behavior successful in primary health care

A program developed for the early detection of children's disruptive behavior and low-threshold digital parent training intervention was successfully transferred to child health clinics in primary health care, shows a new Finnish study. In addition, the program's low discontinuation rate implies that parents experienced digitally implemented intervention as both user-friendly and easily accessible

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CD30: From witness to culprit

Cells of certain blood cancers such as Hodgkin's lymphoma carry the protein CD30 on their surface. The molecule is not only an indicator of a few cancers of the immune system but also increases the risk of their occurrence, according to a report in the journal Blood by researchers of the Helmholtz Zentrum München. A greatly increased number of CD30-bearing cells are produced after certain viral in

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Men sometimes act less interested in sex — in order to get it

In a new study, women said they acted a little more interested in sex than they really were. Men are the ones who apparently play cool most often.

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Knowing how cells grow and divide can lead to more robust and productive plants

In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a plant's life. Scientists from the VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology, together with researchers from UK, Germany and Denmark identified a novel component that controls the development of root branches supporting plants.

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Indian IT giants Infosys, TCS see profits soar

India's biggest software exporters reported a surge in net profits on Friday thanks to strong revenue growth and a slew of big new deals.

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Researchers use Game of Thrones to shed light on facial recognition

The popular series and its fans demonstrate the difficulties of remembering and identifying faces. Gina Grimshaw and Christel Devue from the Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand explain.

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How chemical exposure early in life is ‘like a ticking time bomb’

Some early life experiences can affect health, but only if unmasked by events in adulthood.

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How to ensure a quantum key arrives on time

How to ensure a quantum key arrives on time How to ensure a quantum key arrives on time, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01148-z Adjustment to photons’ wavelengths could make their transmission through conventional fibre-optic cables more reliable.

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Who manages the reactor on Nuclear Submarines? Who will manage the reactors on spaceships?

Who manages the reactor on a nuclear submarine? Is it a division of the Navy that's been trained in how to control a compact fission reactor? I'm guessing the Army and later Navy and Airforce have always had engineering experts to fix steam engines and later trucks, tanks, battleships, helicopters etc. But a nuclear reactor is a step up in complexity and it got me thinking, do they have dedicated

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What it's really like working as a safety driver in a self-driving car

Cars Riding in cars with computers. Joe VanOflen is the operations lead at drive.ai, a company running autonomous shuttles in Texas.

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Why the Great Plains has such epic weather

From 78 degrees on Tuesday to snow on Wednesday? Swings like this aren't unusual in the central United States, where weather can quickly shift from one extreme to another. That's especially true in the springtime, when conditions turn into a roller coaster, with balmy spring days followed by abrupt returns to winter.

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Researchers of the University of Malaga relate DNA methylation levels to obesity

A multidisciplinary study performed at the University of Malaga (UMA) has related DNA methylation levels to the development of the metabolic disease associated with obesity. A multidisciplinary work that has been carried out by biologists, surgeons and endocrinologists and conducted in patients with metabolic risk factors such as high levels of glucose (hyperglycemia), triglycerides (hypertriglyce

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Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA*. They create data-driven, easily interpretable maps that reveal cellular processes and fates in complex contexts. Their paper has been published in Genome Biology.

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Neutral Zinc-air battery with cathode NiCo/C-N shows outstanding performance

In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, a team of researchers from the School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at Hunan University of Science and Technology have proposed a novel strategy for the synthesis of non-precious metal catalysts in zinc-air batteries that do not compromise its electroactivity, affordability and stability.

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Harnessing microorganisms for smart microsystems

A research team at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a method to construct a biohybrid system that incorporates Vorticella microorganisms. The method allows movable structures to be formed in a microchannel and harnessed to Vorticella. The biohybrid system demonstrates the conversion of motion from linear motion to rotation. These fundamen

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F-16 skød sig selv under øvelse

En hollandsk F-16 pilot måtte nødlande, efter maskingeværkugler affyret af piloten selv ramte flyet flere steder under en øvelse.

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HPV rates are increasing among women under 40

Human papillomavirus infection rates are increasing in women born after 1980 who did not receive the HPV vaccine, research finds. And this puts them at higher risk for HPV-related cancers, according to the new study. While more than 90 percent of HPV-related cancers are preventable, HPV causes more than 40,000 cases of cancer in the United States each year, including cervical, oropharyngeal, anal

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Dell adds to market share in weakening global PC market

As worldwide PC shipments decline, the top three vendors—Lenovo, HP Inc. and Dell Technologies—boosted their share of the global PC market in the first quarter of 2019, according to new industry data.

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Turtle-friendly plastic? A crafty solution to pollution, poaching and poverty

Every year thousands of turtles come ashore along the beaches of the south Pacific coast of Nicaragua to lay their eggs. The female turtles return to the beaches on which they were born to lay an average of 100 ping-pong ball shaped eggs into nest holes dug out of the sand. The beaches in this region are of global importance for nesting turtles, including endangered olive ridley turtles, and criti

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Turtle-friendly plastic? A crafty solution to pollution, poaching and poverty

Every year thousands of turtles come ashore along the beaches of the south Pacific coast of Nicaragua to lay their eggs. The female turtles return to the beaches on which they were born to lay an average of 100 ping-pong ball shaped eggs into nest holes dug out of the sand. The beaches in this region are of global importance for nesting turtles, including endangered olive ridley turtles, and criti

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Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers faster and more efficiently than ever. This optical "traffic cop" could one day revolutionize how information travels through data centers and high-performance supercomputers that are used for artificial intelligence and other data-intensive ap

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Researchers find a way to synthesize small cyclodextrins

A team of researchers at Kwansei Gakuin University in Japan has found a way to synthesize small cyclodextrins (types of cyclic oligosaccharides) for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines their strategy and describe how well it worked.

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Rocket break-up provides rare chance to test debris formation

The discarded 'upper stage' from a rocket launched almost ten years ago has recently crumbled to pieces.

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Tests for the InSight 'Mole'

A blue box, a cubic metre of Mars-like sand, a rock, a fully-functional model of the Mars 'Mole' and a seismometer – these are the main components with which the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is simulating the current situation on Mars. After its first hammering operation on 28 February 2019, the DLR Heat and Physical Properties Package (HP³), the Mars Mo

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Despite recent spate of knife crime, UK sees decline in serious violence

Despite the recent spate of knife violence and homicide in some UK cities, the number of people injured in serious violence in England and Wales dropped by 1.7 percent between 2017 and 2018, according to a report published by Cardiff University.

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Linguists found the weirdest languages – and English is one of them

Is English "weird"? Many of us might feel this is true when we're trying to explain the complex spelling rules of the language, or the meanings of idioms such as "it's raining cats and dogs" to someone who is learning English. Teaching or learning any language is, however, never an easy task.

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Can you spot ocean plastic from space?

Scientists work on the challenging task of tracking pollution from orbit with encouraging results.

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Singapore and Australian scientists build a machine to see all possible futures

A team of researchers from Singapore and Australia have implemented a prototype quantum device that can generate and analyze a quantum superposition of possible futures. Using a novel quantum algorithm, the possible outcomes of a decision process are encoded as a superposition of different photon locations. Using interferometry, the team show that it is possible to conduct a search through the set

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Heads in the cloud: Scientists predict internet of thoughts 'within decades'

An international collaboration led by researchers at UC Berkeley and the US Institute for Molecular Manufacturing predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, AI, and computation will lead this century to the development of a "Human Brain/Cloud Interface" (B/CI), that connects neurons and synapses in the brain to vast cloud-computing networks in real time.

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Improved procedure for cancer-related erectile dysfunction

Melbourne surgeons have modified a minimally invasive technique to help men regain erectile function lost after prostate cancer surgery. The surgery had a 71 per cent success rate with two participants achieving their first erection in 12 years.

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Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers faster and more efficiently than ever. This optical 'traffic cop' could one day revolutionize how information travels through data centers and high-performance supercomputers that are used for artificial intelligence and other data-intensive ap

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Researchers find a way to synthesize small cyclodextrins

A team of researchers at Kwansei Gakuin University in Japan has found a way to synthesize small cyclodextrins (types of cyclic oligosaccharides) for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group outlines their strategy and describe how well it worked.

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How to talk about climate change

The United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released a report last fall warning of a catastrophic effect on the world's people, environment and economy if temperatures rise by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius, which could happen as soon as 2040. But meaningful action to stop climate change is not possible without political will, and despite overwhelming scientific evidence of global

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Living with natural disasters – how to change Indonesia's culture of passive resignation

Situated in the "Ring of Fire", one of the most geologically active regions in the world, Indonesia is prone to natural disasters, as the past year has grimly confirmed.

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Shimadzu's New Nexera UHPLC Series with AI and IoT Enhancements Sets Industry Standard for Intelligence, Efficiency and Design

Shimadzu Corporation announces the release of the Nexera Ultra High-Performance Liquid Chromatograph series, incorporating artificial intelligence as Analytical Intelligence, allowing systems to detect and resolve issues automatically. The Nexera series makes lab management simple by integrating IoT and device networking, enabling users to easily review instrument status, optimize resource allocat

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New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

In order to understand the brain, scientists must be able to see the brain—cell by cell, and moment by moment. However, because brains comprise billions of microscopic moving parts, faithfully recording their activity comes with many challenges. In dense mammalian brains, for example, it is difficult to track rapid cellular changes across multiple brain structures—particularly when those structure

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Study questions the sustainability of plant ingredients as fishmeal substitutes

Substituting fishmeal in aquaculture feeds with plant ingredients may not be as beneficial for the environment as many predict, according to new research from an international team of experts.

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New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

In order to understand the brain, scientists must be able to see the brain—cell by cell, and moment by moment. However, because brains comprise billions of microscopic moving parts, faithfully recording their activity comes with many challenges. In dense mammalian brains, for example, it is difficult to track rapid cellular changes across multiple brain structures—particularly when those structure

5h

NRL researcher ventures to the Arctic in search of cosmic dust

After arriving at McMurdo Station on the unforgiving continent of Antarctica, it still took Dr. Rhonda Stroud two days of safety training and a four-hour flight before she was finally where she needed to be: the bottom of the world.

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Texts as networks: How many words are sufficient to identify an author?

People are more original than they think—this is suggested by a literary text analysis method of stylometry proposed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences. The author's individuality can be seen in the connections between no more than a dozen words in an English text. It turns out that in Slavic languages, authorship identification requires even fewer words

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S vil beholde ventetidsgarantierne

Ventetidsgarantierne virker, som de skal og skal derfor ikke ændres. Det siger Socialdemokratiets sundhedsordfører trods kritik fra flere ledende overlæger.

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Behind the Buzz: How Ketamine Changes the Depressed Patient's Brain

The anesthetic-cum-party drug restores the ability to make connections among brain cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Fishy diagnostics for food allergy testing

James Cook University scientists in Australia have found material commonly used for fish allergy testing is unreliable — potentially putting lives at risk.

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'Fortnite' Now Has Reboot Vans to Respawn Your Dead Teammates

Also, you can finally change your PlayStation ID—but you may not want to.

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Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science

Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean.

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The First Group of Female Cosmonauts Were Trained to Conquer the Final Frontier

Two decades before the first American woman flew to space, a group of female cosmonauts trained in Star City of the Soviet Union

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‘Service with a smile’ makes people booze after work

Employees who force themselves to smile and be happy in front of customers—or who try to hide annoyance—may be at risk for heavier drinking after work. Researchers studied the drinking habits of people who routinely work with the public, such as people in food service who work with customers, nurses who work with patients, or teachers who work with students. They found a link between those who re

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Behind the Buzz: How Ketamine Changes the Depressed Patient's Brain

The anesthetic-cum-party drug restores the ability to make connections among brain cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Behind the Buzz: How Ketamine Changes the Depressed Patient's Brain

The anesthetic-cum-party drug restores the ability to make connections among brain cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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New study of Avebury monument suggests it started out as a single-family home

A trio of researchers from the University of Leicester and the University of Southampton has found evidence that suggests the Avebury monument might have started out as a single-dwelling home. In their paper published in Cambridge University's journal, Antiquity, Mark Gillings, Joshua Pollard and Kristian Strutt discuss their study of the Neolithic monument and what they found.

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Researchers discover an economical way to produce high-performance thin films for electronics

Researchers at Missouri S&T have found an unprecedented, economical method for creating high-performance inorganic thin films, or "epitaxial" films, used in the manufacture of semiconductors for flexible electronics, LEDs and solar cells.

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Tesla Makes Vaporware $35K Model 3 Special Order Only, Raises Prices With Standard Autopilot

Tesla’s wild few months of price changes, new trim introductions/deletions, and a new Model Y crossover is coming to a head this week with another round of changes. In a blog post that went …

5h

Stor del av svensk järnmalm bildades i vulkaniska processer

Trots en ökande efterfrågan på sällsynta metaller är järn fortfarande den sammantaget viktigaste metallen för modern industri. Järnmalmer av så kallad kirunatyp, uppkallade efter gruvan i norra Sverige, representerar idag över 90 procent av Europas totala järnmalmsproduktion och utgör också en mycket viktig malmtyp i andra länder världen över. Ursprunget och bildningssättet för järnmalm av kiruna

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$1,000 for a smartphone? How about $100?

The Samsung Galaxy J phone won't win any critics awards.

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American parents (still) prefer boys—and it's hurting their daughters' test scores

The math gender gap may be narrowing, thanks to STEM programs, advocacy and an overdue backlash against inequality. But there's still a lot we don't know about why girls historically haven't achieved better. Norms around women's rights and roles in society play a part, but when girls are devalued, precisely how does that create gender differences in math performance?

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Experts find the origins of Europe's climate hidden in shrimp shells

An international team of geographers has found indications that the climate we have in Europe today began 5000 years ago, hidden in the shells of mussel shrimps.

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Knowing how cells grow and divide can lead to more robust and productive plants

A large portion of a plant is hidden below the ground. This buried root system is essential for the plant: it provides stability, water, and food. In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a plant's life. The labs of Prof. Ive De Smet and Prof. Tom Beeckman (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Syst

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A Google brain program is learning how to program

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Knowing how cells grow and divide can lead to more robust and productive plants

A large portion of a plant is hidden below the ground. This buried root system is essential for the plant: it provides stability, water, and food. In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a plant's life. The labs of Prof. Ive De Smet and Prof. Tom Beeckman (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Syst

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A faster method for multiplying very big numbers

The multiplication of integers is a problem that has kept mathematicians busy since Antiquity. The "Babylonian" method we learn at school requires us to multiply each digit of the first number by each digit of the second one. But when both numbers have a billion digits each, that means a billion times a billion or 1018 operations.

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Agrochemists find proof of the ferrous wheel hypothesis

A team of agrochemists from Russia, Germany, and Chile confirmed the so-called ferrous wheel hypothesis—the turnover of iron in the soil that enriches it with organic nitrogen. The results of the study were published in the Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta journal.

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Chemists develop eco-friendly nanocomposites from fruit and berry peel

A RUDN chemist synthesized nanomaterials for water purification, catalysis of organic reactions and sensors. The substances were developed on the basis of porous carbon with iron oxide and nitrogen particles. The article was published in Applied Surface Science.

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6. juni-protestbevægelse er uden klar plan

Protestbevægelsen, der opfordrer landets læger til at protestere over egne vilkår, har ikke gjort sig de store planer omkring mødets indhold. Men en ting er sikkert, de håber politikerne vågner op.

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Camera traps capture mammals reacting to climate

How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but a new study suggests the answer won’t be as simple as “move to a cooler place.” Ecologists examined how 36 tropical mammal species on three continents reacted to changing temperatures at specific places in their local habitats between 2007-15. The scientists used more than 400,000 camera-trap photos and observations, including tem

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White House eyes nuclear weapons expert to lead challenge to climate science

Physicist Paul Robinson once led Sandia National Laboratory

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SpaceX Successfully Launches Falcon Heavy, Lands All Three Boosters

This was SpaceX's first commercial Falcon Heavy launch, and all three of the Falcon Heavy boosters returned safely to Earth. In 2018, the center stage crashed into the ocean. The post SpaceX Successfully Launches Falcon Heavy, Lands All Three Boosters appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Food waste costs not appetizing to many

Wasting food has become a way of life for many Londoners who, according to one Western-led study, are tossing an average of $600 into the trash every year.

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Predicting heat waves? Look half a world away

When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100°F in four to 16 days.

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Thunderstorms half a world away significantly contribute to heat waves in central California

Scientists reveal links between unusually strong tropical convection and extreme California heat waves.

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Paddor på landet drabbas oftare av parasitsvamp

Det visar en ny studie som forskare vid Uppsala universitet och SLU publicerat i den vetenskapliga tidskriften Diseases of Aquatic Organisms. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) är en vattenlevande parasitsvamp som orsakar sjukdomen chytridiomykos hos groddjur. Denna sjukdom har under de senaste decennierna utrotat 90 grodarter och anses vara ett globalt hot mot groddjur. Under de senare åren har

6h

Hey Siri! Why are food retailers so slow to embrace technology?

Your own voice will likely become the most significant focus for food retailers and restaurants over the next little while. Voice searches are increasingly becoming the norm. A recent study suggests that more than 50 per cent of all online searches will be voice-activated by 2020.

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This ancient sea creature had 45 tubular tentacles and will haunt your dreams

Animals The Paleozoic-era fossil gives off a certain Cthulhu vibe. The new species of echinoderm––the taxa which includes sea urchins, sea cucumbers, and sea stars––reveals clues about how the modern day sea cucumber evolved.

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The big question – what if automation kills more jobs than it creates?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Fluorstoffer – De giftige guldæg

PLUS. Hemmeligholdte undersøgelser, megaudslip og en voksende liste over sundhedsmæssige og økonomiske konsekvenser rejser ifølge eksperter spørgsmålet: Hvorfor er unedbrydelige fluorstoffer stadig tilladt?

6h

We May See Flying Cars Yet.

Over the years I have waxed and waned in terms of my optimism that one day flying cars will be a reality – and not just prototypes, but in general use for transportation. I was at an ebb in my enthusiasm, but a recent article has nudged me toward more optimism. By “flying car” I mean a vehicle used for personal transportation that can fly but also be driven by someone with about the level of trai

6h

Economic butterfly wings can create a climate action tornado

The answer to the climate crisis could be seizing social and political tipping points where a modest intervention can lead to massive change, suggest leading University of Oxford economists.

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What is explicit instruction and how does it help children learn?

Explicit instruction is a term that summarises a type of teaching in which lessons are designed and delivered to novices to help them develop readily available background knowledge on a particular topic.

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Climate change will redistribute tuna

The increase in skipjack and yellowfin tuna in the tropical area, and the movement of the rest of the species (albacore, Atlantic bluefin tuna, bigeye tuna and southern bluefin tuna) towards colder waters are the main conclusions of the research led by AZTI, which has analysed the impact of climate change on the most important tuna species.

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Human Drugs Are Polluting the Water—And Animals Are Swimming in It

W hat impels small salmon , called smolts, out of their nursery brooks to the ocean? Across thousands of miles, the fish transmogrify from fingerlings into trollish adults—hook-jawed, toothy, and, in the case of many males, humpbacked. Though reversing the journey does not rescind their metamorphosis, the big fish famously return, waggling against currents, vaulting over dams, and pushing togethe

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Climate change will redistribute tuna

The increase in skipjack and yellowfin tuna in the tropical area, and the movement of the rest of the species (albacore, Atlantic bluefin tuna, bigeye tuna and southern bluefin tuna) towards colder waters are the main conclusions of the research led by AZTI, which has analysed the impact of climate change on the most important tuna species.

6h

Plant immune system detects bacteria through small fatty acid molecules

Like humans and animals, plants defend themselves against pathogens with the help of their immune system. But how do they activate their cellular defenses? Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that receptors in plant cells identify bacteria through simple molecular building blocks.

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Plant immune system detects bacteria through small fatty acid molecules

Like humans and animals, plants defend themselves against pathogens with the help of their immune system. But how do they activate their cellular defenses? Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that receptors in plant cells identify bacteria through simple molecular building blocks.

6h

A user's guide to self-driving cars

You may remember the cute Google self-driving car. In 2014, the tech giant announced their brand-new prototype of what the future of transportation might one day look like. If you wish you could drive one today, you are out of luck. The design was unfortunately scrapped in 2017. But don't worry, what happened didn't make a dent in the plan of introducing the world to self-driving cars, I mean auto

6h

Why some low-income neighborhoods are better than others

Levels of violence, incarceration and lead exposure in a neighborhood can predict a low-income child’s future earnings and outcome, a study suggests.

6h

Sony Xperia 10, Xperia 10 Plus Review: Cheap and Cinema-Wide

Sony's newest affordable phones may not be ready for wide release.

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Ancient lakes: Eyes into the past, and the future

Baikal, Biwa and Bosuntwi. Maracaibo, Malawi and Matano. Tule, Tahoe and Titicaca.

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Predicting heat waves? Look half a world away

When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100°F in four to 16 days, according to a collaborative research team from the University of California, Davis, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Climate Center in Busan, South Korea.

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Image of the Day: New Growth

Injection of a hydrogel that mechanically resembles a blood clot promotes the growth of new blood vessels in mice.

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Facebook might reintegrate Messenger back into its main app – CNET

Researcher Jane Wong discovered tests showing minimal chat features could be reintroduced.

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Flying cars could cut emissions, replace planes, and free up roads – but not soon enough

When Chitty Chitty Bang Bang was released 50 years ago, flying cars were a flight of fancy. Now, these futuristic vehicles are entering the outer fringes of reality. According to a new study published in Nature, for some journeys flying cars could eventually be greener than even electric road cars, cutting emissions while also reducing traffic on increasingly busy roads.

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Better city bike maps are made by volunteers

Not all bike routes are equal. Some places that are marked as bike routes on a map feel precarious when traversed on two wheels, including shoulders covered in debris and places where you can feel the wind from speeding cars.

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Genome research platform expands use of lab technique to visualise DNA in cells

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet present a publicly available resource that can accelerate the use of so-called FISH techniques for studying how the genome is spatially organised in the cell nucleus. The new platform, which enables more cost-effective analyses for both research and diagnostic labs, is described in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

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Genome research platform expands use of lab technique to visualise DNA in cells

Researchers at Karolinska Institutet present a publicly available resource that can accelerate the use of so-called FISH techniques for studying how the genome is spatially organised in the cell nucleus. The new platform, which enables more cost-effective analyses for both research and diagnostic labs, is described in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

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Curiosity tastes first sample in 'clay-bearing unit'

Scientists working with NASA's Curiosity Mars rover have been excited to explore a region called "the clay-bearing unit" since before the spacecraft launched. Now, the rover has finally tasted its first sample from this part of Mount Sharp. Curiosity drilled a piece of bedrock nicknamed "Aberlady" on Saturday, April 6 (the 2,370th Martian day, or sol, of the mission), and delivered the sample to i

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After-school programs improve academic outcomes, study finds

A study of after-school programs in Connecticut led by UConn researchers suggests that students who participate for several years in programs sponsored by 21st Century Community Learning Centers have higher attendance in school and higher academic performance.

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A study on zebrafish reveals how sexual rivalry can affect sperm function and quality

The presence of a rival male affects sperm quality, according to a research study led by the University of Alicante and the University of Upsala (Sweden). The work was carried out with adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and reveals that male spermatozoa exposed to high competition (two males and a single female) present dramatic changes in phenotype resulting in faster and more competitive spermatozoa.

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Study shows many senior managers distrust big data

A new Massey University study shows many top executives are failing to capitalise on the benefits of big data, preferring to rely on their own intuition.

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A study on zebrafish reveals how sexual rivalry can affect sperm function and quality

The presence of a rival male affects sperm quality, according to a research study led by the University of Alicante and the University of Upsala (Sweden). The work was carried out with adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) and reveals that male spermatozoa exposed to high competition (two males and a single female) present dramatic changes in phenotype resulting in faster and more competitive spermatozoa.

7h

Characterization of 'hidden' dioxins from informal e-waste processing

A research team in Ehime University characterized the complex composition of chlorinated, brominated and mixed halogenated dioxins as well as their major precursors in soils from e-waste burning and dismantling areas in Agbogbloshie (Accra, Ghana), a major hub of informal e-waste processing in Africa. The findings were published on February 22, 2019 in Environmental Science & Technology.

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Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA. They create data-driven, easily interpretable maps that reveal cellular processes and fates in complex contexts. Their paper has been published in Genome Biology.

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Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA. They create data-driven, easily interpretable maps that reveal cellular processes and fates in complex contexts. Their paper has been published in Genome Biology.

7h

How hackers use tricks to make money from your clicks

Online clicks are worth big money. Now hackers are using a cunning set of click-tricks to make money from people visiting websites without them realising

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Arbejdstilsynet dumper 30 steder med rulletrapper – ud af 41

Det var de færreste rulletrapper, der slap helskindet igennem Arbejdstilsynets kontrol. Nu vil Arbejdstilsynet mødes med de virksomheder, der har ansvaret for at føre tilsyn med rulletrapperne.

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Genredigerede hamsterceller producerer proteiner til syge

DTU-forskere har fundet en metode til at producere et vigtigt blodprotein til patienter ved brug af genredigerede hamsterceller.

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Want to Be a Better Scientist? Take an Improv Class

Active listening and a sense of humor offer benefits for both communication and research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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NASA's 'Twins Study,' landmark research for an eventual Mars mission

A NASA study of a US astronaut who spent a year in space while his twin brother remained on Earth is providing valuable insights into the effects of extended spaceflight on the human body, a key to planning a future manned mission to Mars, researchers said Thursday.

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The Mathematics of (Hacking) Passwords

The science and art of password setting and cracking continues to evolve, as does the war between password users and abusers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Want to Be a Better Scientist? Take an Improv Class

Active listening and a sense of humor offer benefits for both communication and research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Don't trust the environmental hype about electric vehicles? The economic benefits might convince you

With electric cars back in the headlines, it's time to remember why we should bother making the transition away from oil.

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Doing up the deep dish

ESA's 35-metre radio antenna in Malargüe, Argentina, has had a major refurbishment. Extenstive modifications made will now allow the ESTRACK network to support future missions like Euclid, launching in 2022, and to transfer data at much higher rates.

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Researchers characterize molecular scissors for plastic waste

A research team from the University of Greifswald and Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin (HZB) has solved the molecular structure of the enzyme MHETase at BESSY II. MHETase was discovered in bacteria, and together with a second enzyme, PETase, is able to break down the widely used plastic PET into its basic building blocks. This 3D structure already allowed the researchers to produce a MHETase variant with

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New research supports volcanic origin of Kiruna-type iron ores

The origin of so-called Kiruna-type apatite-iron oxide ores has been the topic of a longstanding debate for over 100 years. In a new article published in Nature Communications, a team of scientists presents new and unambiguous data in favour of a magmatic origin for these important iron ores. The study was led by researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden.

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Study confirms the precise nature of fractional crystallization in hard sphere mixtures

Although several past studies have investigated the formation of crystals from identical particles, the conditions under which non-uniform particles crystallize and the crystals resulting from this process are still poorly understood. In a recent study published in Physical Review Letters (PRL), researchers at Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg have gathered interesting findings abou

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Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution

Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. But this evolution is compromised if caterpillars attack the plant at the same time. As bees pollinate them less effectively, the plants increasingly self-pollinate. In a greenhouse evolution experiment, scientists at the University of Zurich have shown just how much the effects of pollinators and pests influence each ot

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New method may lead to better in vivo drug delivery

At some point, every person is likely to experience an inflammatory condition. There are many causes of inflammation, and just as many treatments. Some types of inflammation disappear by themselves, while others require medical treatment.

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Researchers Want to Link Your Genes and Income—Should They?

A push to calculate a 'genetic income score' using giant DNA databases raises a raft of ethical questions.

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When Black Horror Consumes Us

It's not just Jordan Peele. Everything from Atlanta to The Last Black Man in San Francisco draws on a central question: How do we find a way to survive?

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'Game of Thrones': What We Want—and Need—from Season 8

Here are all of our predictions for who will live, who will die, and who should take the Iron Throne.

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Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution

Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. But this evolution is compromised if caterpillars attack the plant at the same time. As bees pollinate them less effectively, the plants increasingly self-pollinate. In a greenhouse evolution experiment, scientists at the University of Zurich have shown just how much the effects of pollinators and pests influence each ot

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Evolutionary biologists demonstrate that male fruit flies manipulate their female partners

During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests. Researchers from Münster (Germany) and Lausanne (Switzerland) now report that male flies manipulate their partners primarily in order to increase their own chances in reproductive competition. The study was published in the journal PNAS.

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In a New York Measles Hotspot, Mandatory Vaccination Comes to Town

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio declared a public health emergency on Tuesday, ordering mandatory measles vaccinations in Brooklyn’s Williamsburg neighborhood. The area, home to a large ultra-Orthodox Jewish community, has seen more than 250 cases of the illness since an outbreak began last fall.

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Evolutionary biologists demonstrate that male fruit flies manipulate their female partners

During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests. Researchers from Münster (Germany) and Lausanne (Switzerland) now report that male flies manipulate their partners primarily in order to increase their own chances in reproductive competition. The study was published in the journal PNAS.

7h

The Mathematics of (Hacking) Passwords

The science and art of password setting and cracking continues to evolve, as does the war between password users and abusers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Here's What Happens When You Put Giant Sea Spiders into Boot Camp

The realization that giant sea spiders have Swiss cheese-like holes in their exoskeletons has shed light on a decades-old mystery about how underwater creatures living in the polar oceans and deep abysses got so spookily huge.

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Football-Size 'Bugs' Feast on an Alligator in This Creepy Deep-Sea Video

In the food deserts of the deep ocean, it doesn't take long for scavengers to find a bonanza when it lands.

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NASA traced a meteorite back to its original home in deep space

An impact in the inner asteroid belt 22 million years ago was responsible for a meteorite shower over Turkey in 2015

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Datatilsynet forbyder TDC at optage samtaler

TDC forbydes at optage telefonsamtaler, indtil de har en løsning, der kan leve op til databeskyttelsesforordningen, lyder det fra Datatilsynet.

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Ny rapport: Forsvarsministeriet tog fuldstændig fejl af flystøjen i Skrydstrup

Langt flere af de boliger i nærheden af kampflyenes base i Sydjylland end hidtil antaget lider under støj over grænseværdierne. Helt galt går det, når de larmende F-35 ankommer.

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Nepali scientists record country’s first tornado

Nepali scientists record country’s first tornado Nepali scientists record country’s first tornado, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01159-w The team confirmed the rare event using satellite images, social-media posts and a visit to the affected area.

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Move more to live longer

Improving fitness doesn't require doing activities you don't like. That's the main message of research presented today at EuroPrevent 2019. The largest study to date of cardiorespiratory fitness in healthy people found that moving more is linked to living longer, regardless of age, sex, and starting fitness level.'People think they have to start going to the gym and exercising hard to get fitter,'

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Taking a Scientific Approach to Worrying

Bees, public restrooms, and the Ebola virus are all things we might potentially worry about — but how much attention should we give them? In the new book "Worried?" a biomedical engineer and a neuroscientist take an analytical approach and help make sense of some of our most common fears.

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Prognosen holdt: IDA-valgets stemmeprocent oppe på 20

Optur: Hvert femte IDA-medlem deltog i IDAs repræsentantskabsvalg, hvor stemmeprocenten steg med 85 procent i forhold til valget i 2016. Dermed holdt Ingeniørens prognose stik.

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This newsletter was not written by a robot*

Bots are becoming an inevitable part of newsgathering. Two women are determined to prevent them becoming an inevitable part of warfare *although it’s a bit stilted in places In a week in which robot journalists won new customers and admirers in Britain , you’ll be reassured to note that the Guardian is still relying on human beings, for the Upside series at least. And very busy they were, investi

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Julian Assange Got What He Deserved

In the end, the man who reportedly smeared feces on the walls of his lodgings, mistreated his kitten, and variously blamed the ills of the world on feminists and bespectacled Jewish writers was pulled from the Ecuadorian embassy looking every inch like a powdered-sugar Saddam plucked straight from his spider hole. The only camera crew to record this pivotal event belonged to Ruptly, a Berlin-base

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The Implosion of Jeremy Corbyn

It may have been at the Sternberg Center, where a large overflow marquee housed my London congregation on the High Holidays. There was an abandoned trailer in the woods behind it, and we kids would sneak out to play in it. I don’t even remember specifically when it happened. But I remember the sound of the word the first time I heard it spoken, its icy vituperation, the way the speaker’s jaw move

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Huge in France Delivers an Unconvincing Dissection of Fame

There are moments during Huge in France when you can perceive what the show might have been—a semi-satirical, semi-screwball comedy about the acute insanity of modern-day fame. The new eight-part Netflix series exists in a meta universe similar to HBO’s Entourage , in that it’s loosely based on the real experiences of an actor and comedian, Gad Elmaleh. The plight of the show’s Gad (he refers to

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Missing Link Is a Sweet-Hearted, Stop-Motion Spectacle

Sir Lionel Frost, the ostensible hero of Missing Link , is a perfect match for the medium of stop-motion filmmaking. He’s an explorer who travels to eye-popping locations around the world, makes a habit of finding the strangest-looking creatures possible, and does it all with a clipped sort of fastidiousness straight out of his Victorian era. The opening scene of the film sees Frost (voiced by Hu

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Climate denial isn’t stopping climate action. Here’s what is.

Climate change denial draws headlines. But is it actually an obstacle to climate action? A great majority of Americans say they're concerned about climate change. The real roadblock is our unwillingness to pay money to help stop climate change. The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming List Price: $27.00 New From: $16.12 in Stock Used From: $13.50 in Stock

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Off the Seychelles, a dive into a never-seen landscape

The submersible dropped from the ocean's surface faster than I had expected. With a loud "psssssss" the air escaped from the ballast tanks and the small craft suddenly tilted forward.

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Black hole image validates imagining the unimaginable

Human creativity conjured up the most extreme of astronomical phenomena long before they could be seen.

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Is it correct to say that a person's social media newsfeed reflects his/her personality?

We all know that social media companies have been collecting data about us from everything. They also personalize our news feed too. This really strikes me when I realize that the major news for everyone around in their news feed are different from each other. This makes me think whether our social media news feed will become the new metric to measure our personality. submitted by /u/talos1279 [l

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SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket has flown its first commercial flight

The Falcon Heavy rocket’s maiden flight was last February, but now it has launched a satellite for a paying customer for the first time, which is a big step for SpaceX

9h

Even remote mountain glaciers are contaminated with microplastics

Plastics are leaving no corner of the planet untouched. Tiny pieces, called microplastics, have now been found in a mountain glacier for the first time

9h

9h

Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance

A study published in Nature Communications revealed that the bacteria present in the water overlying dozens of coral reefs changed dramatically during the night, and then returned to the same daytime community as observed the morning before. Further, as if these communities were all privy to the same schedule, these changes were synchronized across reefs separated by hundreds of miles.

9h

New research supports volcanic origin of Kiruna-type iron ores

The origin of giant apatite-iron oxide ores of the so-called 'Kiruna-type' has been the topic of a long standing debate that has lasted for over 100 years. In a new article, published in Nature Communications, a team of scientists presents new and unambiguous data in favour of a magmatic origin for these important iron ores. The study was led by researchers from Uppsala University in Sweden.

9h

SRC-1 gene variants linked to human obesity

Researchers have discovered how the gene SRC-1 affects body weight control.

9h

'Molecular scissors' for plastic waste

A research team from the University of Greifswald and Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin (HZB) has solved the molecular structure of the enzyme MHETase at BESSY II. MHETase was discovered in bacteria and together with a second enzyme — PETase — is able to break down the widely used plastic PET into its basic building blocks. This 3D structure already allowed the researchers to produce a MHETase variant wi

9h

SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios fail

A new type of pocket-sized antenna, developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don't work, such as under water, through the ground and over very long distances through air.

9h

Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Cytotoxin A Causes Anorexia and Anxiety via Hypothalamic Urocortin 1 in Mice

Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Cytotoxin A Causes Anorexia and Anxiety via Hypothalamic Urocortin 1 in Mice Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Cytotoxin A Causes Anorexia and Anxiety via Hypothalamic Urocortin 1 in Mice, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42163-4 Helicobacter pylori Vacuolating Cytotoxin A Causes Anorexia and Anxiety via Hypothalamic Urocortin 1 in Mice

9h

Activation of immune responses against the basement membrane component collagen type IV does not affect the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice

Activation of immune responses against the basement membrane component collagen type IV does not affect the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice Activation of immune responses against the basement membrane component collagen type IV does not affect the development of atherosclerosis in ApoE-deficient mice, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42375-8 Activation

9h

Increased Plasma Levels of the TH2 chemokine CCL18 associated with low CD4+ T cell counts in HIV-1-infected Patients with a Suppressed Viral Load

Increased Plasma Levels of the TH2 chemokine CCL18 associated with low CD4+ T cell counts in HIV-1-infected Patients with a Suppressed Viral Load Increased Plasma Levels of the TH2 chemokine CCL18 associated with low CD4+ T cell counts in HIV-1-infected Patients with a Suppressed Viral Load, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41588-1 Increased Plasma Levels of the TH2 chemoki

9h

Facile synthesis of ternary graphene nanocomposites with doped metal oxide and conductive polymers as electrode materials for high performance supercapacitors

Facile synthesis of ternary graphene nanocomposites with doped metal oxide and conductive polymers as electrode materials for high performance supercapacitors Facile synthesis of ternary graphene nanocomposites with doped metal oxide and conductive polymers as electrode materials for high performance supercapacitors, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41939-y Facile synthesis

9h

Prognostic models based on imaging findings in glioblastoma: Human versus Machine

Prognostic models based on imaging findings in glioblastoma: Human versus Machine Prognostic models based on imaging findings in glioblastoma: Human versus Machine, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42326-3 Prognostic models based on imaging findings in glioblastoma: Human versus Machine

9h

Assembly of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cortical Spheroids and Vascular Spheroids to Model 3-D Brain-like Tissues

Assembly of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cortical Spheroids and Vascular Spheroids to Model 3-D Brain-like Tissues Assembly of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cortical Spheroids and Vascular Spheroids to Model 3-D Brain-like Tissues, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42439-9 Assembly of Human Stem Cell-Derived Cortical Spheroids and Vascular Spheroids to Model 3-D Brain-like Tissues

9h

Intergeneric hybrids inform reproductive isolating barriers in the Antarctic icefish radiation

Intergeneric hybrids inform reproductive isolating barriers in the Antarctic icefish radiation Intergeneric hybrids inform reproductive isolating barriers in the Antarctic icefish radiation, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42354-z Intergeneric hybrids inform reproductive isolating barriers in the Antarctic icefish radiation

9h

Sundhedsskadelige fluorstoffer i din kosmetik

Fluorstoffer er igen blevet dokumenteret sundhedsskadelig, men alligevel findes de helt lovligt i blandt andet kosmetikprodukter.

9h

Should That Minor Planet Be Named Gonggong? Astronomers Want the Public’s Help

Astronomers discovered the minor planet 2007 OR10 more than a decade ago. Now they’re asking the public to vote on what to submit as its official name.

9h

Inside Ivanka’s Dreamworld

Y ou could tell by his eyes, the way they popped and gleamed and fixed on someone behind me. Only one person gets that kind of look from Donald Trump. “Oh!” the president said. “Ivanka!” Ivanka Trump lifted her hands, astonished. “I forgot you guys were meeting—I was just coming by!” she said. “Uh-oh!” The first daughter (though not the only daughter), wearing a fitted black mockneck and black pa

9h

9h

Multidisciplinær ­rehabilitering øger sklerosepatienters ­livskvalitet

Hidtil største randomiserede studie af effekterne af multidisciplinær rehabilitering til MS-patienter under indlæggelse peger på god effekt på patienternes livskvalitet

9h

Tiden sårer alle læger, men læger den også alle sår?

Så længe dommer og anklager er samme enhed, og der ingen ankemuligheder findes, kan tilliden ikke genoprettes.

9h

Bedre ­billeder af hjernen skal opklare MS-mysterier

Danske forskere på Hvidovre Hospital kan med den kraftfulde 7 tesla MR-scanner se de skader i hjernens grå substans, som er usynlige på almindelige scannere. Som de første i verden er forskerne ved at kortlægge den præcise sammenhæng mellem specifikke læsioner i den grå substans og konkrete symptomer hos sklerosepatienter. Målet er at forbedre både forståelsen og behandlingen af den komplekse syg

9h

What is fair when it comes to AI bias?

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

9h

I was misdiagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease

Tackling the similar but treatable ‘normal pressure hydrocephalus’ would advance public health

9h

SLAC develops novel compact antenna for communicating where radios fail

A new type of pocket-sized antenna, developed at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, could enable mobile communication in situations where conventional radios don't work, such as under water, through the ground and over very long distances through air.

9h

WikiLeaks set 21st century model for cyber-leak journalism

Using cryptography and virtual drop boxes, Julian Assange's WikiLeaks created a revolutionary new model for media to lure massive digitized leaks from whistleblowers, exposing everything from US military secrets to wealthy tax-dodgers' illicit offshore accounts.

9h

Bacteria surrounding coral reefs change in synchrony, even across great distance

In coral reef ecosystems, amid stony corals, fronds of algae and schools of fish, microorganisms are essential for recycling nutrients—transforming bits of organic matter into forms of nitrogen and phosphorus, for example, that are useful to photosynthetic organisms.

9h

Microsoft's work with Chinese military university raises eyebrows

Microsoft has been collaborating with researchers linked to a Chinese military-backed university on artificial intelligence, elevating concerns that US firms are contributing to China's high-tech surveillance and censorship apparatus.

9h

Løsningen er ikke at forlænge KBU

Det er positivt, at regionerne vil løse nogle af psykiatriens problemer, men vi må afvise at forlænge den kliniske basisuddannelse.

9h

Forskere sammenligner partipolitik med klimamodel: »Forkert« og »provokerende«, mener politikere

PLUS. Flere energipolitikere var utilfredse med DTU-klimamodellens sammenligning af partiernes energi-politik, fremgik det af Christiansborg-konference onsdag. »Ment som en provokation«, sagde DTU-forsker bag programmet.

10h

10h

Want to quit smoking? Partner up

Kicking the habit works best in pairs. That's the main message of a study presented today at EuroPrevent 2019, a scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).'Quitting smoking can be a lonely endeavor,' said study author Magda Lampridou, of Imperial College London, UK.

10h

Sundhedsminister ved ikke, hvad central patientrettighed koster

Ventetidsgarantierne er en hjørnesten i regeringens sundhedspolitik. Men sundhedsministeren kan ikke oplyse om, hvad det politiske værdibevis koster. Det bekymrer lægeformand.

10h

11h

Major geological survey hopes to make Indonesia more resistant to deadly tsunamis

A major new survey of Indonesia's eastern seafloor has been approved by the Royal Society in a move that it's hoped will boost the country's resilience to deadly tsunamis.

11h

New smart material works better under pressure

Advanced robotics sensitive touch or next-generation wearable devices with sophisticated sensing capabilities could soon be possible following the development of a rubber that combines flexibility with high electrical conductivity.

11h

”Därför är arbete så viktigt för unga med psykisk ohälsa”

Avbruten skolgång, hemmasittande och isolering. Så ser vardagen ofta ut för den ökande gruppen unga vuxna med psykisk ohälsa. Nu undersöker forskare vid Lunds universitet hur man bättre kan hjälpa de som drabbas att bli aktiva igen, fortsätta sina studier, komma in i arbetslivet och få ett hållbart mående. Ulrika Liljeholm, doktorand vid Lunds universitet, skriver här om sin egen forskning inom äm

11h

Amazon Adventure review – a microscope in the rainforest

Following the true story of scientist Henry Bates in the 1840s, this satisfying film uses Imax tech to provide astonishing wildlife detail In places, this satisfying Imax edutainment brings forth happy memories of James Gray’s excellent The Lost City of Z . It’s a tribute to another overshadowed historical figure, that of Henry Walter Bates , the Leicester-born amateur scientist – and Alfred Wall

11h

11h

Research provides speed boost to quantum computers

A new finding by researchers at the University of Chicago promises to improve the speed and reliability of current and next generation quantum computers by as much as ten times. By combining principles from physics and computer science, the researchers developed a new scalable compiler that makes software aware of the underlying quantum hardware, offering significant performance benefits as scient

11h

Peak break: China to add 'eco' toilet on Mount Everest

Climbers with pressing needs on Mount Everest will soon find an "eco-friendly" toilet at a Chinese campsite 7,028 metres (23,058 feet) above sea level in an ongoing campaign to deal with the peak's waste problem.

11h

Humanity now has its first Xenobiologists!

submitted by /u/bescritt [link] [comments]

11h

11h

Boeing to meet with US airlines over 737 MAX

The US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announced Thursday it would meet with American commercial airlines that use the Boeing 737 MAX, which has been grounded worldwide since mid-March following two accidents that killed 346 people.

11h

Trump's Space Force collides with skeptical Congress

The Space Force that President Donald Trump wants to launch ran headlong on Thursday into skeptical lawmakers who questioned the need for a stand-alone military wing.

11h

Amazon, Walmart trade barbs on taxes, wages

The Amazon-Walmart battle for retail supremacy veered into a trash-talk phase on Thursday over worker pay and alleged tax shirking.

11h

Uber sets IPO in motion, seeks to 'ignite opportunity'

Uber filed documents Thursday for its much-anticipated public share offering expected to be the largest in the tech sector in years, and a bellwether for other venture-backed startups eyeing Wall Street listing.

11h

Israeli spacecraft crashes in attempt to land on moon

An Israeli spacecraft crashed into the moon just moments before touchdown, failing in an ambitious attempt to make history Thursday as the first privately funded lunar landing.

11h

Disney+ streaming service sets November launch

Disney announced Thursday that its video streaming service would launch in the US in November, spotlighting its blockbuster-making studios as it takes on powerhouse Netflix.

11h

Journalism or not? WikiLeaks' status in media world complex

After the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in London, his lawyer was quick to characterize it as an assault against the rights of journalists all over the world who seek to uncover secrets.

11h

SpaceX launches mega rocket, lands all three boosters

SpaceX launched its second supersized rocket and for the first time landed all three boosters Thursday, a year after sending up a sports car on the initial test flight.

11h

11h

Skibslæge i et realityshow

Søren Schmidt Morgen er i programmet ‘Over Atlanten’ på Kanal 5 med om bord som skibslæge. Her behandler han alt fra alvorlig søsyge til brækkede fingre hos seks kendisser, som ikke har erfaring som sejlere. Turen stillede store krav til den lægefaglige mavefornemmelse og gav ham en oplevelse, han sent glemmer.

11h

11h

12h

A robot has figured out how to use tools

In a startling demonstration, the machine drew on experimentation, data, and observation of humans to learn how simple implements could help it achieve a task.

12h

Lægerne giver grønt lys: Mennesket er robust nok til en rejse til Mars

Nasas tvillingestudie af Mark og Scott Kelly bekræfter i vid udstrækning, at mennesket ikke ser ud til at tage voldsomt skade af et år eller mere i rummet. Men der er alligevel et par overraskelser og bekymringer.

12h

New dynamic model better portrays how plant roots forage and adapt to resource fluctuation

If you've ever tended a garden or potted a plant, you know a few simple truths about green things—they require water and nutrients to survive and their roots are good indicators of their overall health. So we water on a regular schedule, provide for root growth and add nutrient-rich soils to ensure a balanced diet.

12h

12h

Molecules that curb errant proteins of AL amyloidosis point to new type of therapy

Scientists at Scripps Research have identified a group of small molecules that prevent structural changes to proteins that are at the root of AL amyloidosis, a progressive and often fatal disease.

12h

New dynamic model better portrays how plant roots forage and adapt to resource fluctuation

If you've ever tended a garden or potted a plant, you know a few simple truths about green things—they require water and nutrients to survive and their roots are good indicators of their overall health. So we water on a regular schedule, provide for root growth and add nutrient-rich soils to ensure a balanced diet.

12h

12h

This new invention can generate power from the softest breeze

A patent was issued to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on Tuesday for a novel generator that buzzes in a light breeze.

12h

Lab develops quantum dot polymer for next-gen screens

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory scientists have developed and patented the fabrication of transparent, luminescent material they say could give smartphone and television screens flexible, stretchable, and shatterproof properties.

12h

Molecules that curb errant proteins of AL amyloidosis point to new type of therapy

Scientists at Scripps Research have identified a group of small molecules that prevent structural changes to proteins that are at the root of AL amyloidosis, a progressive and often fatal disease.

12h

New research, April 1-7, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change impacts Mankind Potential impacts of climate change on dengue fever distribution using RCP scenarios in China (open access) Effects of Increasing Aridity on Ambient Dust and Public Health in th

12h

Experts warn of fatty liver disease 'epidemic' in young people

Study finds substantial numbers of young people at risk of liver cancer, diabetes and heart attacks Experts are warning that high levels of fatty liver disease among young people, caused by being overweight, could signal a potential public health crisis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is fairly common among older adults, detectable in about a quarter of the population. But a study has found th

13h

Modern Love: I Had to Do It Without Telling My Beloved

Feeling grateful and able, I donated a kidney to a stranger. The only problem: I made the decision on my own.

13h

Police: DNA first leads to arrest in Yuba City cold case

submitted by /u/SFinTX [link] [comments]

13h

Why fast fashion should slow down – Science Weekly podcast

Science Weekly teams up with the Chips with Everything podcast to examine the environmental price tag of our throwaway culture and explore how technology could help the clothing industry follow a more sustainable model. Graihagh Jackson and Jordan Erica Webber present As the days get lighter, Britons are likely to discard about 680m dresses, trousers, T-shirts and the like during the annual sprin

13h

Why fast fashion should slow down – Science Weekly podcast

Science Weekly teams up with the Chips with Everything podcast to examine the environmental price tag of our throwaway culture and explore how technology could help the clothing industry follow a more sustainable model. Graihagh Jackson and Jordan Erica Webber present. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

13h

13h

13h

Så flyt dig dog: Bilister opfatter ikke cyklister som mennesker

Når vi ikke ser andre trafikanter som mennesker, er det nemmere at retfærdiggøre aggression.

13h

SpaceX nails triple booster landing after satellite delivery

Elon Musk's Falcon Heavy launched a satellite into orbit for a Saudi Arabian company.

13h

Powehi: black hole gets a name meaning 'the adorned fathomless dark creation'

Language professor in Hawaii comes up with name welcomed by scientists who captured first image of galactic phenomenon The black hole that was depicted for the first time this week in in an image produced in a landmark experiment has been named by a language professor in Hawaii. University of Hawaii-Hilo Hawaiian professor Larry Kimura named the cosmic object Powehi, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser

13h

Norway aviation firm orders 60 all-electric airplanes

submitted by /u/hotmial [link] [comments]

14h

14h

Lack of awareness of inequality means we penalize those who have least money

People can automatically assume that someone who gives less money to charity is less generous, according to new research. The assumption was made in the study when people had no knowledge of how much someone had donated as a percentage of their overall income.

14h

Colombia experience could help reduce UK knife crime and street violence

A leading public health expert says the UK should learn lessons from systematic violence reduction work in Cali, Colombia, to tackle rising rates of knife crime on British streets. The work in Colombia resulted in significant reductions in homicides between 1995 and 2018.

14h

Diesel exhaust filtered of its tiny particles may worsen allergy-induced lung impairment

Air pollution from diesel engines may worsen allergy-induced lung impairment more when tiny particles are filtered from the exhaust than when they are not, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

14h

Increase in foreign body ingestions among young children

A new study from researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for children younger than six years who were treated in a US emergency department due to concern of a foreign body ingestion from 1995 through 2015.

14h

Er det blevet sværere at være myndighed?

KRONIK. Mit bedste bud på at etablere autoritet er noget så gammeldags som ordentlig sagsbehandling, ordentlig metode og ordentlige principper. Man skal dele sin viden og erfaring, blotte sit levede liv, vise sine styrker og tvivl, hvis man skal legitimere sin autoritet. Personligt gør jeg meget for, at man kan mærke, hvem jeg er, og hvad jeg har med i bagagen af både godt og skidt.

14h

Læger: Ventetidsgarantier er forkert prioritering

Ventetidsgarantierne begrænser den lægefaglige prioritering på hospitalerne, viser en ny rundspørge. Sundhedsministeren er uenig.

14h

Ortopædkirurg: Vi prioriterer de forkerte patienter

Politikernes ønske om at sikre, at patienter maksimalt skal vente 30 dage på udredning og behandling, gør, at de forkerte patienter bliver prioriteret, mener ledende overlæge.

14h

Urologen: Ventetidsgarantierne er som at pisse i bukserne for at få varmen

På urinvejskirurgisk afdeling i Holstebro kæmper de en umulig kamp for at nedbringe ventetiderne. Det forklarer ledende overlæge på afdelingen, der peger på, at en differentieret løsning i stedet er vejen frem.

14h

Øjenlægen: Ventetidsgarantier ­forblænder patienterne

Politikere forfører patienter med ventetidsgarantierne, men glemmer, at det er på bekostning af andre patienter. Det mener ledende overlæge på afdelingen for øjensygdomme på Sygehus Sønderjylland i Aabenraa.

14h

Kirurgen: Garantier strider mod lægeløftet og besværliggør lægegerningen

Ventetidsgarantierne er politisk styring, der strider mod lægeløftet. Det mener ledende overlæge på kirurgisk afdeling i Køge, der peger på, at lægernes arbejde er blevet mere besværligt med garantierne.

14h

14h

Opgørelse: Netbankindbrud sker via gammeldags tyveri af ID og fup-opkald

Svindlere forsøge at komme i folks netbanker ved at ringe til deres ofre, oplyser Finans Danmark.

15h

New Human species find in Philippine

submitted by /u/hloreddit [link] [comments]

15h

The right polymers for the job

One of the most promising clean energy technologies just got even better. Researchers have developed the most powerful, durable hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell components on record.

15h

15h

Gender gap in spatial reasoning starts in elementary school, meta-analysis finds

Males gain a slight advantage in mental-rotation performance during the first years of formal schooling, and this advantage slowly grows with age, tripling in size by the end of adolescence.

16h

Prostate medicines linked to type 2 diabetes risk, study suggests

Men taking medicines to reduce the symptoms of prostate disease may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, a study suggests. Researchers say patients should continue to take the drugs, which are commonly prescribed to older men, but warn they may need additional health checks.

16h

16h

Scientists drill into white graphene to create artificial atoms

By drilling holes into a thin two-dimensional sheet of hexagonal boron nitride with a gallium-focused ion beam, scientists have created artificial atoms that generate single photons, which work in air and room temperature.

16h

Getting closer: Finding out why the immune system attacks itself

New research suggests that B cells gone bad could be the culprit in rheumatoid arthritis. A comprehensive profile of the cells has just been published, moving us closer to finding out why the immune system attacks itself in patients with RA.

16h

The right polymers for the job

One of the most promising clean energy technologies just got even better. Researchers have developed the most powerful, durable hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell components on record.

16h

16h

16h

Disney+ streaming service sets November launch

Disney announced Thursday that its video streaming service would launch in the US in November, spotlighting its blockbuster-making studios as it takes on powerhouse Netflix.

16h

New genetic factors linked to kidney stones

Researchers have discovered new genetic factors that likely contribute to the development of kidney stones. The findings may be useful for predicting individuals' risk of developing kidney stones and for identifying new targets for prevention and treatment.

16h

Biologists uncover new rules for cellular decision-making in genetics

A team of biologists has uncovered new rules that cells use in making decisions about which genes they activate and under what conditions, findings that add to our understanding of how gene variants affect human traits.

16h

New ways to image, characterize unique material

Researchers have imaged and modeled the unique geometry of 2D borophene, a material that could surpass the promises of graphene for electronic, thermal, optical and other applications.

16h

New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented by physicists

Physicists have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors.

16h

AI identifies risk of cholesterol-raising genetic disease

A new algorithm can determine whether a patient is likely to have a cholesterol-raising genetic disease that can cause early, and sometimes fatal, heart problems, reports a new study.

16h

Warm winds in autumn could strain Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf

New research shows that the Larsen C ice shelf — the fourth largest ice shelf in Antarctica — experienced an unusual spike in late summer and early autumn surface melting in the years 2015 to 2017. The study, spanning 35 years from 1982 to 2017, quantifies how much of this additional melting is due to warm, dry air currents called foehn winds that originate high in the peninsula's central mounta

17h

New super-accurate optical atomic clocks pass critical test

Researchers have measured an optical clock's ticking with record-breaking accuracy while also showing the clock can be operated with unprecedented consistency. These achievements represent a significant step toward demonstrating that the new generation of optical atomic clocks are accurate and robust enough to be used to redefine the official length of a second, which is currently based on microwa

17h

Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

Coyotes become fearless around people in just a few generations—which isn’t good for their longterm co-existence with humans in cities. Jason G. Goldman reports.

17h

Israeli Lander Failure Marks 1st Moon Crash in 48 Years

Beresheet's moon crash was the first in nearly half a century. But back in the day, moon crashes happened all the time.

17h

Despite years of progress, many african countries have wide variation in vaccine coverage

Many African nations have made substantial progress in vaccinating children against life-threatening diseases, however, within countries wide discrepancies remain, according to a new scientific study.

17h

Structural dynamics and transient lipid binding of synaptobrevin-2 tune SNARE assembly and membrane fusion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and their conformational transitions play an important role in neurotransmitter release at the neuronal synapse. Here, the SNARE proteins are essential by forming the SNARE complex that drives vesicular membrane fusion. While it is widely accepted that the SNARE proteins are intrinsically disordered in their monomeric…

17h

A diecast mineralization process forms the tough mantis shrimp dactyl club [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Biomineralization, the process by which mineralized tissues grow and harden via biogenic mineral deposition, is a relatively lengthy process in many mineral-producing organisms, resulting in challenges to study the growth and biomineralization of complex hard mineralized tissues. Arthropods are ideal model organisms to study biomineralization because they regularly molt their…

17h

On the chain-melted phase of matter [Physics]

Various single elements form incommensurate crystal structures under pressure, where a zeolite-type “host” sublattice surrounds a “guest” sublattice comprising 1D chains of atoms. On “chain melting,” diffraction peaks from the guest sublattice vanish, while those from the host remain. Diffusion of the guest atoms is expected to be confined to…

17h

Distinct segregation patterns of yeast cell-peripheral proteins uncovered by a method for protein segregatome analysis [Cell Biology]

Protein segregation contributes to various cellular processes such as polarization, differentiation, and aging. However, the difficulty in global determination of protein segregation hampers our understanding of its mechanisms and physiological roles. Here, by developing a quantitative proteomics technique, we globally monitored segregation of preexisting and newly synthesized proteins during cell

17h

Intrinsically cell-penetrating multivalent and multitargeting ligands for myotonic dystrophy type 1 [Biochemistry]

Developing highly active, multivalent ligands as therapeutic agents is challenging because of delivery issues, limited cell permeability, and toxicity. Here, we report intrinsically cell-penetrating multivalent ligands that target the trinucleotide repeat DNA and RNA in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), interrupting the disease progression in two ways. The oligomeric ligands…

17h

Bootstrapping variables in algebraic circuits [Mathematics]

We show that for the blackbox polynomial identity testing (PIT) problem it suffices to study circuits that depend only on the first extremely few variables. One needs only to consider size-s degree-s circuits that depend on the first log○c⁡s variables (where c is a constant and composes a logarithm with…

17h

Giant nonvolatile resistive switching in a Mott oxide and ferroelectric hybrid [Physics]

Controlling the electronic properties of oxides that feature a metal–insulator transition (MIT) is a key requirement for developing a new class of electronics often referred to as “Mottronics.” A simple, controllable method to switch the MIT properties in real time is needed for practical applications. Here we report a giant,…

17h

Fast and robust active neuron segmentation in two-photon calcium imaging using spatiotemporal deep learning [Neuroscience]

Calcium imaging records large-scale neuronal activity with cellular resolution in vivo. Automated, fast, and reliable active neuron segmentation is a critical step in the analysis workflow of utilizing neuronal signals in real-time behavioral studies for discovery of neuronal coding properties. Here, to exploit the full spatiotemporal information in two-photon calcium…

17h

Klebsiella and Providencia emerge as lone survivors following long-term starvation of oral microbiota [Microbiology]

It is well-understood that many bacteria have evolved to survive catastrophic events using a variety of mechanisms, which include expression of stress-response genes, quiescence, necrotrophy, and metabolic advantages obtained through mutation. However, the dynamics of individuals leveraging these abilities to gain a competitive advantage in an ecologically complex setting remain…

17h

Structural insight into TRPV5 channel function and modulation [Biochemistry]

TRPV5 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5) is a unique calcium-selective TRP channel essential for calcium homeostasis. Unlike other TRPV channels, TRPV5 and its close homolog, TRPV6, do not exhibit thermosensitivity or ligand-dependent activation but are constitutively open at physiological membrane potentials and modulated by calmodulin (CaM) in a calcium-dependent manner….

17h

Environmental DNA for improved detection and environmental surveillance of schistosomiasis [Environmental Sciences]

Schistosomiasis is a water-based, infectious disease with high morbidity and significant economic burdens affecting >250 million people globally. Disease control has, with notable success, for decades focused on drug treatment of infected human populations, but a recent paradigm shift now entails moving from control to elimination. To achieve this ambitious…

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Linear magnetoresistance in the low-field limit in density-wave materials [Physics]

The magnetoresistance (MR) of a material is typically insensitive to reversing the applied field direction and varies quadratically with magnetic field in the low-field limit. Quantum effects, unusual topological band structures, and inhomogeneities that lead to wandering current paths can induce a cross-over from quadratic to linear MR with increasing…

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Mutations in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein can broadly rescue blocks at multiple steps in the virus replication cycle [Microbiology]

The p6 domain of HIV-1 Gag contains highly conserved peptide motifs that recruit host machinery to sites of virus assembly, thereby promoting particle release from the infected cell. We previously reported that mutations in the YPXnL motif of p6, which binds the host protein Alix, severely impair HIV-1 replication. Propagation…

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Inherited predisposition to malignant mesothelioma and overall survival following platinum chemotherapy [Medical Sciences]

Survival from malignant mesothelioma, particularly pleural mesothelioma, is very poor. For patients with breast, ovarian, or prostate cancers, overall survival is associated with increased sensitivity to platinum chemotherapy due to loss-of-function mutations in DNA repair genes. The goal of this project was to evaluate, in patients with malignant mesothelioma, the…

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Intrinsic planar polarity mechanisms influence the position-dependent regulation of synapse properties in inner hair cells [Neuroscience]

Encoding the wide range of audible sounds in the mammalian cochlea is collectively achieved by functionally diverse type I spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) at each tonotopic position. The firing of each SGN is thought to be driven by an individual active zone (AZ) of a given inner hair cell (IHC)….

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Structural basis for ligand modulation of the CCR2 conformational landscape [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a part of the chemokine receptor family, an important class of therapeutic targets. These class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in mammalian signaling pathways and control cell migration toward endogenous CC chemokine ligands, named for the adjacent cysteine motif on their N…

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Neoproterozoic to early Phanerozoic rise in island arc redox state due to deep ocean oxygenation and increased marine sulfate levels [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

A rise in atmospheric O2 levels between 800 and 400 Ma is thought to have oxygenated the deep oceans, ushered in modern biogeochemical cycles, and led to the diversification of animals. Over the same time interval, marine sulfate concentrations are also thought to have increased to near-modern levels. We present…

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Evolution of social norms and correlated equilibria [Evolution]

Social norms regulate and coordinate most aspects of human social life, yet they emerge and change as a result of individual behaviors, beliefs, and expectations. A satisfactory account for the evolutionary dynamics of social norms, therefore, has to link individual beliefs and expectations to population-level dynamics, where individual norms change…

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Ahead of IPO, Uber’s Losing Less—but Growing Less, Too

Uber revealed its plans to go public, just weeks after rival Lyft. The filing shows Uber dwarfs Lyft, but continues to post operating losses.

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Israelsk rumfartøj blev ødelagt, da det skulle lande på Månen

Israel håbede med landing af lille robotfartøj at blive fjerde nation i verden, der foretager månelanding.

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SpaceX Lands All 3 Boosters of Its Falcon Heavy Rocket

The first commercial flight of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy ended with two boosters touching down on land while a third alighted on its drone ship out at sea.

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Opioid Sales Reps Swarmed New York at Height of Crisis

New disclosures in the New York attorney general’s lawsuit detail the massive sales efforts of Purdue Pharma and other companies.

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Robert Reich: Everything You Need to Know About the New Economy

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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Electricity-eating microbes could make bioplastics

Scientists have figured out a way to feed electricity to microbes to grow truly green, biodegradable bioplastics, according to a new study. The research comes from the idea that engineers can use electricity harvested from the sun or wind interchangeably with power from coal or petroleum sources. Or they can turn sustainably produced electricity into something physical and useful. “As our planet

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Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench

Research that reveals what lies at the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean — the Mariana Trench.Until now, scientists knew more about Mars than the deepest part of the ocean. But an expedition to collect samples of the microbial population at the deepest part of the Mariana Trench (some 11,000 meters down) has revealed a new 'oil-eating' bacteria.

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Trump’s Homeland Security Purge Worries Cybersecurity Experts

A leadership void at DHS means the White House is calling the shots where it wants to, cybersecurity experts warn, and other agencies can muscle in where it won’t.

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Disney Plus will cost $7 a month and launch Nov. 12 – CNET

Disney Plus will cram new originals and legacy premium programming into its service, at almost half the cost of Netflix's most popular plan in the US.

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Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

Coyotes become fearless around people in just a few generations—which isn’t good for their longterm co-existence with humans in cities. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Urban Coyote Evolution Favors the Bold

Coyotes become fearless around people in just a few generations—which isn’t good for their longterm co-existence with humans in cities. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Julian Assange Arrested, *Jeopardy!* Game Theory, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Bagsiden: Elgigantpris

Vor læser i omegnen af Solrød Strand har kigget på tilbud på computerspillet ‘Apex Legends’ hos firmaet Elgiganten.

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Tænkeboks – løsning: Edderkoppen skal kravle…

Kunne du regne sidste uges tænkeboks ud? Her kommer løsningen.

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Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench

Scientists from the University of East Anglia have discovered a unique oil eating bacteria in the deepest part of the Earth's oceans—the Mariana Trench.

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The Atlantic Daily: The WikiLeaks Dilemma

What We’re Following (Henry Nicholls / Reuters) Julian Assange was arrested in London, after nearly seven years in the Ecuadorian Embassy . Assange, the founder of the radical-transparency group WikiLeaks, burst onto the scene in 2010 when his organization released a trove of files documenting abuses by American forces. More recently, in 2016, WikiLeaks published emails from the Democratic Nation

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Twin astronauts show how mitochondria handle space

Mitochondria, the body’s “cellular powerhouse” are remarkably resilient to the stress of space, according to the NASA Twins Study. From March 2014 to March 2015, astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days on the International Space Station while his identical twin, former astronaut Mark Kelly, remained on Earth as part of a NASA and Russian Federal Space Agency study on the health effects of long-term

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Teen conservationist: 'Why I adopted a cheetah'

Kenyan teenager Some, who adopted big cat Diji when she was 17, wants to be a conservationist.

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Would you sort your rubbish into seven different bags?

A city with impressive recycling credentials has a unique waste system involving seven coloured bags.

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To change how you feel, put on a smile

Smiling really can make you feel happier, report researchers. The paper looked at nearly 50 years of data testing whether posing facial expressions can lead people to feel the emotions related to those expressions. “These findings address a critical question about the links between our internal experience and our bodies—whether changing our facial expression can alter the emotions we feel and our

19h

Researchers call for rethink of external NHS inspections amid questions of effectiveness

Researchers at the University of York have shown that costly external NHS hospital inspections are not associated with improvements in quality of care.

19h

Measles Outbreak: Tensions Rise as New York City Steps Up Response

An order to require immunizations in the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community seemed to mobilize vaccine skeptics. Others worried that the effort did not address the root of the problem: misinformation.

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How Katie Bouman Accidentally Became the Face of the Black Hole Project

The project included more than 200 researchers around the world, about 40 of them women, including Dr. Bouman.

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After a $14-Billion Upgrade, New Orleans' Levees Are Sinking

Sea level rise and ground subsidence will render the flood barriers inadequate in just four years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How does grief affect your immune system?

A new review digs into existing research on the connection between grief and the immune system. Losing a loved one is one of the most stressful life experiences a person will endure, and its toll can be physical as well as emotional. Science has shown, for example, that widows and widowers have a 41 percent higher risk of early death, compared to their still-married peers. The relationship betwee

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The Uber IPO Is a Landmark

Updated on April 12 at 7:30 a.m. ET. Here’s a deeply strange thing about Uber, which publicly filed for its IPO today: The company has lost $10 billion from operations, just since 2016, and while riders have paid $79.4 billion for rides, many drivers attest that they can barely scrape together a living . So no part of the operation is a high-margin business, and yet Uber keeps growing and growing

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The Lancet: Inappropriate pain management after surgery is a major cause of the opioid crisis

Targets to eliminate pain after surgery have driven increases in the use of opioids, and are a major cause of the opioid crisis in the USA, Canada and other countries. For the first time, a new Series of three papers, published in The Lancet, brings together global evidence detailing the role of surgery in the opioids crisis.

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Falcon Heavy, SpaceX’s Giant Rocket, Launches Into Orbit, and Sticks Its Landings

It was only the second flight for what is the most powerful rocket now available on Earth, improving on its spectacular test launch in 2018.

20h

How To Make Your Amazon Echo and Google Home as Private as Possible

With news that Amazon lets human employees listen to Alexa recordings, you might want to tighten up your smart assistant ship.

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Privately Launched Israeli Spacecraft Smashes Into Moon

The Israeli mission to the Moon has ended in failure. The Beresheet lander did not land successfully. The post Privately Launched Israeli Spacecraft Smashes Into Moon appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Authors have papers in Nature and Science retracted on the same day

A University of Cambridge researcher — Steve Jackson — and a former researcher at the University of Bristol — Abderrahmane Kaidi — have accomplished a two-fer: Retracting a paper in Nature, and one in Science, on the same day. In September of last year, the BBC reported that Kaidi was resigning “after admitting that he fabricated his … Continue reading Authors have papers in Nature and Science ret

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UK study shows most patients with suspected urinary tract infection and treated with antibiotics actually lack evidence of this infection

New research presented at this week's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019) shows that only one third of patients that enter the emergency department with suspected urinary tract infection (UTI) actually have evidence of this infection, yet almost all are treated with antibiotics, unnecessarily driving the emergence

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Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance

New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals.

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Immune responses in Ebola survivors 2 years after infection provide clues for vaccine development

Scientists have discovered that 2 years after infection, West African Ebola survivors exhibit memory immune responses — including specific T cells against Ebola virus. They believe their discovery opens up the possibility of improving Ebola vaccines by boosting key immune cells needed for long-lasting protective immunity.

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Study suggests the majority of tourniquets used in medical procedures are contaminated

New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that a majority of tourniquets inspected contained microbes which could put patient safety and care quality at risk.

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Privacy curtains used in healthcare worldwide are a potential source of drug-resistant bacteria transmission to patients

New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that contamination of privacy curtains with multidrug-resistant organisms is a common problem and could be a source of disease transmission to patients.

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Glecaprevir/pibrentasvir is effective and well tolerated in individuals with hepatitis C

Two large 'real-world' studies conducted in Germany and the USA have confirmed the high rates of sustained virological response (SVR) observed in controlled clinical studies of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (G/P) involving individuals with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.

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Think you have a concussion? The FDA says there's not an app for that.

Health No one test can diagnose the brain injury. This week, the FDA warned consumers against using phone or tablet applications that claim to identify suspected concussions.

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Author Correction: Reconstruction of cysteine biosynthesis using engineered cysteine-free enzymes

Author Correction: Reconstruction of cysteine biosynthesis using engineered cysteine-free enzymes Author Correction: Reconstruction of cysteine biosynthesis using engineered cysteine-free enzymes, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42196-9 Author Correction: Reconstruction of cysteine biosynthesis using engineered cysteine-free enzymes

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Author Correction: Efficient Characterization and Classification of Contrast Sensitivity Functions in Aging

Author Correction: Efficient Characterization and Classification of Contrast Sensitivity Functions in Aging Author Correction: Efficient Characterization and Classification of Contrast Sensitivity Functions in Aging, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42527-w Author Correction: Efficient Characterization and Classification of Contrast Sensitivity Functions in Aging

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Report: Prominent neuroscientist worked for months after university found he violated sexual relationship policies

Sources tell school newspaper that Thomas Jessell kept working at his lab for 8 months

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