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nyheder2019april12

:Rohingya refugees and the environment

4h

Microbes in the human body swap genes, even across tissue boundaries: study

Bacteria in the human body are sharing genes with one another at a higher rate than is typically seen in nature, and some of those genes appear to be traveling—independent of their microbial hosts—from one part of the body to another, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports.

13h

Gymnasieelev piller Den Digitale Prøvevagt fra hinanden – finder 90’er-kryptering

Undervisningsministeriet har udskudt implementeringen af Den Digitale Prøvevagt med henvisning til stabilitetsproblemer. Men det er ikke bare stabiliteten, der er problemer med.

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Israeli Robotic Moon Landing Fails In Final Descent

Israeli scientists are studying what caused an engine failure in the closing minutes of what they hoped would be a historic lunar landing. (Image credit: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Once Upon a Crime

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, April 11. ‣ A U.S. federal court unveiled an indictment charging the WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange with conspiring in 2010 with the former U.S. Army analyst Chelsea Manning to illegally obtain secret U.S. intelligence. Earlier today, British police arrested Assange in response to the United States’ extradition reque s t. ‣ Federal prosecutors charged G

18min

New research adds to work of Prandtl, father of modern aerodynamics

Researchers used both linear stability theory and direct numerical simulations to uncover, for the first time, fluid instabilities in the Prandtl model for katabatic slope flows. Not only will this discovery be important for agriculture, aviation and weather prediction, but it will also be vital for climate change research and associated sea-level rise, as accurate prediction of katabatic surface

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The return of the 'stoned ape' theory

Terence McKenna first proposed psychedelic mushrooms as the trigger for our rapid cognitive evolution. McKenna's theory was called the "Stoned Ape Hypothesis." The hypothesis is being revisited as a possible answer to a vexxing evolutionary riddle. None There seems to have been a profound difference in cognitive abilities between early Homo sapiens and our immediate predecessor, Homo erectus . Su

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The four-legged whale discovered off the coast of Peru: What was it like?

Researchers discovered a fossil of a four-legged, amphibious whale off the coast of Peru. The fossil is among the oldest of its kind at 42.6 million years old, and its skeletal structure offers insights into the transition of whales back into the ocean. One of the more exciting findings is that this species suggests that these ancient whales came to South America by swimming across the Atlantic O

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Advanced virtual technology captures how coral reefs recover after bleaching

Researchers have used new imaging software to detect dramatic recovery after a bleaching event on the reefs surrounding remote Palmyra Atoll in the tropical Pacific.

35min

In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease

Treatment with a choline kinase inhibitor prompts immune cells to clear away damaged mitochondria, thus reducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and preventing inflammation.

35min

Shoes made for rocky trails, wet beaches, and other tough terrain

Technology Choose the proper footwear for the ground under your feet. For long treks, the proper footwear will support your dogs and grip the ground to prevent sore soles, painful blisters, and mangled ankles. These four choices will carry…

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Uber reveals 91 million users but cautions on profitability in IPO filing

Uber Technologies Inc on Thursday revealed its initial public offering (IPO) filing, saying more than 90 million riders used the service worldwide while warning it may never make a profit due …

48min

NASA's landmark Twins Study reveals resilience of human body in space

Newly published research reveals some interesting, surprising and reassuring data about how one human body adapted to — and recovered from — the extreme environment of space.

56min

Israeli Spacecraft Fails to Make First Private Lunar Landing

Private organization SpaceIL’s Beresheet lander crashes down on the moon following engine and communications problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Israel’s first moon mission ends in failure

Israel’s first bid for a lunar landing has failed.

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Israel's Beresheet lunar lander has crashed on the moon

The first privately funded lunar lander, SpaceIL’s Beresheet spacecraft, suffered an engine failure and crashed as it was attempting to land on the moon

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Amazon Employees Try a New Form of Activism, as Shareholders

Amid a wave of petitions and walkouts among tech workers, Amazon employees proposed a shareholder resolution around the company's impact on climate change.

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Israeli spacecraft Beresheet crashes into Moon

Israeli spacecraft Beresheet crashes into Moon Israeli spacecraft Beresheet crashes into Moon, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01199-2 US$100-million lander had sought to become the first privately funded craft to touch down on the lunar surface.

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The truth about a true frog: Unknown Costa Rican frog hidden amongst a widespread species

Known to science since 1857, a common species of frog found from north-eastern Honduras through to central Panama, turns out to have been keeping its 'multiple identities' a secret. According to herpetologists who recently used DNA barcoding on the species, showed that what we currently call Warszewitsch's frog is indeed a group of 'cryptic' species.

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NASA: Genetic Changes Caused by Space Travel Are Temporary

Twin Study For years, NASA has been analyzing the health effects of space travel by comparing astronaut twins Mark and Scott Kelly. In 2015 into 2016, Scott spent 340 days in orbit while Mark stayed on Earth, giving scientists rare data about how leaving the planet affects the human body. The study, finally published Thursday in the journal Science, reveals that Scott experienced a number of gene

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Astronaut Study Shows Some Lasting Changes from Time in Space

Scott Kelly's physiology, gene activity, and mental performance changed after time aboard the International Space Station, but mostly returned to normal once back on Earth.

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CRISPR-Cas3 innovation holds promise for disease cures, advancing science

A Cornell researcher, who is a leader in developing a new type of gene editing CRISPR system, and colleagues have used the new method for the first time in human cells – a major advance in the field.

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Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies

A study in Cerebral Cortex provides new insight into why — and when — anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains. Most research into prenatal exposure to anesthesia has focused killing brain cells, this rat study showed how anesthesia disrupts the 'precisely choreographed' migration neurons make in utero, and how not 'arriving at their proper and predetermined' locations can have profound i

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The Case for Remotely Sited Underwater Nuclear Reactors

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Israeli Spacecraft Fails to Make First Private Lunar Landing

Private organization SpaceIL’s Beresheet lander crashes down on the moon following engine and communications problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Katie Bouman: the 29-year-old whose work led to first black hole photo

Bouman is a post-doctoral fellow at MIT whose algorithm lead to an image of a supermassive black hole This week, the world laid eyes on an image that previously it was thought was unseeable. Related: Black hole picture captured for first time in space breakthrough Continue reading…

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Universities will soon announce action against scientists who broke NIH rules, agency head says

Issue of foreign influence arises at Senate hearing on National Institutes of Health budget

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Israel's Beresheet Lander Crashes into Moon

Israel's Beresheet spacecraft, which was set to land on the moon today, suffered an engine and communications failure, causing it to instead crash into the lunar surface. Details are still emerging about what exactly went wrong. Within the last five minutes or so of the landing procedure, mission control reported temporarily losing telemetry data before regaining it again. Shortly after, the main

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How A Good Gut Bacteria Became A Vicious Pathogen

In 1984, bacteria started showing up in patients’ blood at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinic. Bacteria do not belong in the blood and such infections can quickly escalate into septic shock, a life threatening condition. Ultimately, blood samples revealed the culprit: A microbe that normally lives in the gut called Enterococcus faecalis had somehow infiltrated the patients’ bloodstrea

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‘We have not managed to land successfully’: Israel's moonshot fails

Spacecraft crashes in to lunar surface after engine and communications breakdown An Israeli spacecraft has crashed into the lunar surface, ending the first privately funded attempt to land on the moon. About the size of a washing machine, the 585kg (1,290lb) robotic lander experienced an engine and communication failure in the last seconds of touchdown. Continue reading…

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Philippine Fossils Add Surprising New Species to Human Family Tree

The second tiny ancestor found in the islands of southeast Asia, Homo luzonensis challenges prevailing views of early human dispersal and adaptability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Philippine Fossils Add Surprising New Species to Human Family Tree

The second tiny ancestor found in the islands of southeast Asia, Homo luzonensis challenges prevailing views of early human dispersal and adaptability — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Molecules that curb errant proteins of AL amyloidosis point to new type of therapy

Scientists at Scripps Research have identified a group of small molecules that prevent structural changes to proteins that are at the root of AL amyloidosis, a progressive and often fatal disease. The drug mechanism that the team identified is analogous to a different drug that also originated at Scripps Research: Tafamidis, which stabilizes the protein transthyretin to treat the most common syste

1h

Getting to the root of plant simulations

Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory developed a new algorithm to bolster what once were static models of root dynamics, providing researchers a clearer picture of what's really happening beneath the soil. The work, published in the January 28 issue of the Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, describes the dynamic root model and its use with the

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AI agent offers rationales using everyday language to explain its actions

Georgia Institute of Technology researchers, in collaboration with Cornell University and University of Kentucky, have developed an artificially intelligent (AI) agent that can automatically generate natural language explanations in real-time to convey the motivations behind its actions.

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One-third of cancer patients use complementary and alternative medicine

A stunning one-third of people with a cancer diagnosis use complementary and alternative medicines such as meditation, yoga, acupuncture, herbal medicine, and supplements.

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Scientists say world's protected areas need a re-boot

An international study published today in the journal Science argues that the current international target for the protected area estate, accepted by over 190 nations, is failing. They propose a new measurable target based on the best scientific evidence that they say will galvanize greater and more effective conservation efforts.

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Acer Outs Premium And Stylish ConceptD Laptops And Desktops For Creators

Acer has rolled out a new line of notebooks, monitors, and desktops that it is aiming at content creators called ConceptD. The entire line consists of premium, high-end devices positioned for …

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Infinite number of quantum particles gives clues to big-picture behavior at large scale

In quantum mechanics, measuring both the position and speed of a particle at the same time is not possible. To identify a particle's characteristics, physicists introduced the notion of quasi-distribution of position and momentum. In a new study scientists have reversed this approach; starting with quantum mechanical rules, they explore how to derive an infinite number of quasi-distributions, to e

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Formation of a magnetar 6.5 billion light years away

Building on recent discoveries about neutron stars, a team of astronomers has identified X-ray observations that are consistent with the merger of two neutron stars. This merger is believed to have formed a magnetar, which is a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field.

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Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family

Research scientists have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage. The family tree of sooglossid frogs dates back at least 63 million years. They are living ancestors of those frogs that survived the meteor strike on earth approximately 66 million years ago, making them a highly evolutionarily d

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3 signs that a lack of emotional agility is holding you back

We all have negative emotions now and then. Having emotional agility means overcoming them. Getting hooked on negative emotions is easy to do — and extremely counterproductive. Harvard psychologist Susan David offers warning signs and remedies to help you succeed. Get more actionable ideas like this for your personal and professional life by subscribing to Big Think Edge .

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Boeing makes 96 flights to test software on troubled Max jet

Boeing has made 96 flights to test a software update for its troubled 737 Max jet, according to the company's CEO.

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Are Humans Fit for Space? A ‘Herculean’ Twins Study Says Maybe Not

Scientists around the world compared the genomes and health changes of twin astronauts. Scott Kelly (left) flew in the International Space Station for a year while Mark Kelly stayed on Earth.

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Meet one of the first scientists to see the historic black hole image

Kazunori Akiyama was one of the first scientists to see the black hole snapshot.

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Israel's Beresheet Spacecraft Crashes Into Moon During Landing Attempt

Israel's first moon lander came up just short in its historic touchdown bid this afternoon (April 11).

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Objective reality may not exist, European researchers say

In 1961, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Eugene Wigner proposed a thought experiment by which the reality of two observers can diverge by measuring a single photon. Researchers recently tested Wigner's thought experiment and concluded that realities can be made irreconcilable. Do these results put the entire scientific method at risk? Let's not get ahead of ourselves. None Objective reality cannot

2h

Small shifts can stop climate change—if they happen in the right places

Nexus Media News "We have to act fast, and achieve the biggest possible impact with the actions we take." New research indicates that small actions could make a big dent in climate change.

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California wildfires: Seeking solutions to a wicked problem

More than 2.7 million Californians live in areas that are at very high risk for wildfires, according to our analysis of census data and state fire maps. They live in more than 1.1 million housing units, or in about one in 12 of the state's homes.

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Walmart buys ad tech startup

Walmart says it's buying San Francisco-based ad tech startup Polymorph Labs as it looks to better compete with online rival juggernaut Amazon in targeting shoppers online.

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Scientists capture a 'snapshot' of bacterial stress-response regulator's 'recycling truck'

Scientists have captured the first "snapshot" of two proteins involved in delivering a bacterial stress-response master regulator to the cell's recycling machinery.

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Israel’s Lunar Lander Just Crashed Into the Moon

Landing Attempt Beresheet, the lunar lander built by Israeli space nonprofit SpaceIL, crashed into the surface of the Moon on Thursday. It would have been the first privately-owned lander on the surface of the Moon, and would have made Israel the fourth country to reach the surface of the Moon — but the craft experienced engine failure during its final approach. “We have a failure of the spacecra

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Israeli spacecraft crashes during moon landing: mission control

Israel's attempt at a moon landing failed at the last minute Thursday when the craft suffered an engine failure as it prepared to land and apparently crashed onto the lunar surface.

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Scientists capture a 'snapshot' of bacterial stress-response regulator's 'recycling truck'

Scientists have captured the first "snapshot" of two proteins involved in delivering a bacterial stress-response master regulator to the cell's recycling machinery.

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NASA sees El Nino conditions prevail in the Central Pacific Ocean

An El Niño that began to form last fall has matured and is now fully entrenched across the Pacific Ocean. Changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) brought about by an El Niño affect the atmosphere, resulting in distinctive changes in the rainfall pattern across the Pacific Basin. These changes show up as anomalies or deviations in NASA's analysis of climatological rainfall.

2h

Advanced virtual technology captures how coral reefs recover after bleaching

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and engineers at UC San Diego have used new imaging software to detect dramatic recovery after a bleaching event on the reefs surrounding remote Palmyra Atoll in the tropical Pacific. The research was published April 5 in Coral Reefs.

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'Nanobodies' from alpacas could help bring CAR T-cell therapy to solid tumors

In 1989, two undergraduate students at the Free University of Brussels were asked to test frozen blood serum from camels, and stumbled on a previously unknown kind of antibody. It was a miniaturized version of a human antibody, made up only of two heavy protein chains, rather than two light and two heavy chains. As they eventually reported, the antibodies' presence was confirmed not only in camels

2h

In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease

Inflammation is a balanced physiological response—the body needs it to eliminate invasive organisms and foreign irritants, but excessive inflammation can harm healthy cells, contributing to aging and chronic diseases. To help keep tabs on inflammation, immune cells employ a molecular machine called the NLRP3 inflammasome. NLRP3 is inactive in a healthy cell, but is switched "on" when the cell's mi

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In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease

Inflammation is a balanced physiological response—the body needs it to eliminate invasive organisms and foreign irritants, but excessive inflammation can harm healthy cells, contributing to aging and chronic diseases. To help keep tabs on inflammation, immune cells employ a molecular machine called the NLRP3 inflammasome. NLRP3 is inactive in a healthy cell, but is switched "on" when the cell's mi

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New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death

Studying the movement of tiny cells is no small task. For chromatin, the group of DNA, RNA, and protein macromolecules packed within our genome, motion is an integral part of its active role as a regulator of how our genes get expressed or repressed.

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In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease

Treatment with a choline kinase inhibitor prompts immune cells to clear away damaged mitochondria, thus reducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and preventing inflammation.

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Scientists capture a 'snapshot' of bacterial stress-response regulator's 'recycling truck'

A Brown University-led team found that RssB — a protein that specifically recognizes a critical stress-response master regulator in bacteria and delivers it to the recycling machinery somewhat like a recycling truck — forms a compact structure with a factor that inhibits RssB activity. The inhibition factor, called IraD, is triggered by DNA damage, one of many stresses the master regulator helps

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Brat nedtur: Israelsk månelander crashede

Her til aften kl. 21.15 måtte Israel sande, at de ikke blev fjerde nation, der foretog en blød landing på Månen. Ifølge livestreamen ser det ud til, at sonden crashede.

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New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death

Studying the movement of tiny cells is no small task. For chromatin, the group of DNA, RNA, and protein macromolecules packed within our genome, motion is an integral part of its active role as a regulator of how our genes get expressed or repressed.

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We Wouldn’t Have the First Black Hole Image Without Katie Bouman

Algorithmic Assist It took a team of more than 200 scientists to create the first image of the event horizon of a black hole — and the internet is currently in love with one of them. Computer scientist Katie Bouman led the development of the algorithm that made the breathtaking black hole image possible, and soon after the Event Horizon Telescope team revealed the photo on Wednesday, another imag

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Update: Legislator asks Pentagon to restore contract for storied Jason science advisory group

Department of Defense says it will end funding by end of the month

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Take an Amusing Architectural Tour of Postapocalyptic Manhattan

“New York is under martial law, which can be dangerous for us casual urban explorers,” warns our tour guide, dressed in full combat gear. The members of his tour group, each armed with an AK-47, move awkwardly in their avatars. The guide explains how to maneuver with keyboard controls. “We're in a narrative multiplayer shooter game,” he says. “But today, we will walk through the battlefield with

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'Nanobodies' from alpacas could help bring CAR T-cell therapy to solid tumors

Most CAR T-cell therapies look for antigens specific to cancer cells. A new approach described in this week's PNAS instead targets the environment around the tumor, using unusually small antibodies made naturally by alpacas, camels and llamas. Using this approach in mouse models, investigators successfully curbed melanoma and colon cancer – solid tumors that currently can't be treated with CAR T-c

2h

Gender gap in spatial reasoning starts in elementary school, meta-analysis finds

Males gain a slight advantage in mental-rotation performance during the first years of formal schooling, and this advantage slowly grows with age, tripling in size by the end of adolescence.

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Advanced virtual technology captures how coral reefs recover after bleaching

Researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and engineers at UC San Diego have used new imaging software to detect dramatic recovery after a bleaching event on the reefs surrounding remote Palmyra Atoll in the tropical Pacific. The research was published April 5 in Coral Reefs.

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NASA’s Twins Study reveals effects of space on Scott Kelly’s health

Ten research groups studying the twin astronauts found long-term spaceflight can alter a person’s physiology and gene activity.

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What law is Julian Assange accused of breaking?

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act has a long and controversial history.

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Drought is not just about water. It affects air pollution, too

Study reveals how stressed plants can complicate efforts to reduce ozone

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Why We Should All Use They/Them Pronouns

Using gendered identifiers, even if we get to choose our own, can reinforce bias and discrimination — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What a Year in Space Did to Scott Kelly

In the debate over whether human beings should set off to other worlds beyond Earth, one of the most compelling cons is this: Our bodies don’t like it. Few people know this better than Scott Kelly, the NASA astronaut who spent nearly a year on the International Space Station from 2015 to 2016. Like other astronauts, Kelly served as a test subject in the study of space travel’s effects on the huma

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Podcast Extra: The first image of a black hole

Podcast Extra: The first image of a black hole Podcast Extra: The first image of a black hole, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01200-y Benjamin Thompson talks to Davide Castelvecchi in a special edition of the News Chat

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NASA twins study finds no red flags for long-term space travel

Physiological and genetic effects of life on the ISS return to pre-flight levels soon after return to Earth. Nick Carne reports.

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One-two punch helps solve greatest unmet need in cardiology

Combining a high-fat diet with a drug that raises blood pressure gave UT Southwestern researchers a 'two-hit' model, like a one-two punch to heart failure.

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NASA sees El Niño conditions prevail in the Central Pacific Ocean

An El Niño that began to form last fall has matured and is now fully entrenched across the Pacific Ocean. Changes in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) brought about by an El Niño affect the atmosphere, resulting in distinctive changes in the rainfall pattern across the Pacific Basin. These changes show up as anomalies or deviations in NASA's analysis of climatological rainfall.

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Why We Should All Use They/Them Pronouns

Using gendered identifiers, even if we get to choose our own, can reinforce bias and discrimination — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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HBO to Premiere VICE SPECIAL REPORT: THE FUTURE OF WORK April 19

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NASA's Study of Astronaut Twins Creates a Portrait of What a Year in Space Does to the Human Body

Wide-ranging research compares astronaut Scott Kelly to his earthbound twin brother, Mark

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It Took Half a Ton of Hard Drives to Store the Black Hole Image Data

The newly released image of a black hole (below) is a watershed moment for physics, taking years of work and the collaboration of more than 200 scientists to make it happen. It also required 1,000 pounds of hard drives. The post It Took Half a Ton of Hard Drives to Store the Black Hole Image Data appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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NASA Twins Study: A year in space has little effect on gut microbiome

A year in space seems to have a small but significant, transient effect on the gut microbiome, according to a new paper on the NASA Twins Study published in the journal Science.

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New imaging technique reveals 'burst' of activity before cell death

Using a novel optical imaging technique, Northwestern University's Vadim Backman and researchers discovered connections between the macromolecular structure and dynamic movement of chromatin within eukaryotic cells.

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Megapixels: North Carolina's 'Pollenpocalypse' is nothing to sneeze at—but you will anyway

Environment There's a little too much spring in the air. Nuclear fallout? Acid rain? A tacky Instagram filter? Nope—plant sex. Lots and lots of plant sex.

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New research: Optimize open floor plans by shuffling workstations

Companies that hope to avoid long-term stagnation can jolt employees into creative thinking by forcing them to sit alongside unfamiliar coworkers in open work spaces, according to new research from the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University.

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Walmart says its new robots will make human employees happier

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What happened when one twin went to space and the other stayed home?

Astronaut twin brothers Scott and Mark Kelly took part in a unique space travel experiment and it turns out that space changes your urine but not your faeces

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A Quarter of Japanese People in Their 20s and 30s Are Virgins, Study Finds

Nearly a quarter of Japanese people under age 39 are virgins, according to a new analysis by a team of researchers at the University of Tokyo. The findings, published in BMC Public Health, show that Japanese young adults are having less sex today than their counterparts were decades ago. Both men and women are having their first sexual encounters later in life, and many are entering their 30s as v

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Falcon Heavy Launch Delayed Again. Launch Now Targeted for Thursday Evening

SpaceX's Falcon Heavy launch was delayed again yesterday, this time due to high winds. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk said back on April 5 that because this is the first launch of Falcon Heavy's Block 5, the latest and most powerful version of its boosters, they are being "extra cautious." Mission managers are now targeting this evening, again at 6:35 p.m. EDT, with an approximately two-hour launch window.

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Israeli Beresheet Mission Will Attempt to Land on the Moon Today

After a nearly seven-week adventure since its launch, the Israeli Beresheet spacecraft will attempt make history today and touch down on the surface of the moon at 10:25 p.m. Israel time (2:25 p.m. Central). It’s a monumental undertaking and if it succeeds, Beresheet and its creators will join the select ranks of those who have safely landed on the moon – thus far only the United States, China, an

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The Denisovans May Have Been More Than a Single Species

In anthropology, bones don't always tell the whole story. Ancient remains can be so rare that an entire species of hominids can be compressed into one single fragment of bone. Thousands of generations, millions of individuals, epic untold stories — and our only insight is a stray tooth, or a few curving shards of skull. That leaves us without a true view of who these people were, even when it come

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New Video Shows Mice Go Nuts In Space

Space travel, you may have heard, is hard. Hard on the brain, to design ways to slip the surly bonds of Earth in the first place, but also hard on the body, which needs to withstand conditions it was never designed for. If NASA’s serious about sending humans back to the moon and on to Mars, we’ll need to get a much better grasp on how spaceflight affects the human body. And instead of simply flyin

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Tests on Astronaut and Twin Brother Highlight Spaceflight's Human Impact

NASA Study reports physiological and behavioral results that could shape future space missions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Video: The chemistry behind different tea flavors

Did you know that many different types of tea come from the same plant?

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Astronaut twins study spots subtle genetic changes caused by space travel

Astronaut twins study spots subtle genetic changes caused by space travel Astronaut twins study spots subtle genetic changes caused by space travel, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01149-y Some initial effects of long-term spaceflight ebbed in the months after astronaut Scott Kelly returned to Earth.

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Retraction Note: KAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation couples chromatin sensing to ATM signalling

Retraction Note: KAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation couples chromatin sensing to ATM signalling Retraction Note: KAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation couples chromatin sensing to ATM signalling, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1142-2 Retraction Note: KAT5 tyrosine phosphorylation couples chromatin sensing to ATM signalling

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NASA Is Funding the Development of 18 Bizarre New Projects

Nurturing the Bizarre NASA isn’t afraid to take a chance on the weird . In fact, it has a program designed for that specific purpose, called NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) — and on Wednesday, the agency announced 18 bizarre new projects receiving funding through the program. “Our NIAC program nurtures visionary ideas that could transform future NASA missions by investing in revolutionar

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New microscopy method provides more details about nanocomposites

Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a new microscopy approach for imaging gel nanocomposites in their natural state, which will reveal more useful information about their assembly and properties.

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New research: Optimize open floor plans by shuffling workstations

New research from the Tepper School of Business suggests that changing work spaces pushes people out of their comfort zones, allowing employees to learn from each other and generate more innovative ideas.

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Medicaid reimbursement to treat cancer patients with radiation therapy varies widely

A new study finds wide state-by-state variations in Medicaid reimbursements to physicians who treat cancer patients with radiation therapies. These differences could compound existing disparities in access to health care in rural communities, which tend to have higher Medicaid coverage rates than metropolitan areas. The study is available for free access through April 24 in the International Journ

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Engineers tap DNA to create 'lifelike' machines

Tapping into the unique nature of DNA, Cornell engineers have created simple machines constructed of biomaterials with properties of living things.

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Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice

Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice. Ketamine treatment restored lost dendritic spines and rescued coordinated neural activity in the Prefrontal Cortex of the mice — findings that may help researchers develop interventions that promote lasting remission of depression in hum

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Near-atomic map of parathyroid hormone complex points toward new therapies for osteoporosis

An international team of scientists has mapped a molecular complex that could aid in the development of better medications with fewer side effects for osteoporosis and cancer. The near-atomic resolution images depict parathyroid hormone receptor-1 (PTH1R), a molecule that conveys signals to and from cells, interacting with two key messengers — a molecule that mimics parathyroid hormone, one of th

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Rethinking conservation efforts for improved biodiversity

A study published online by the journal Science, looked into why the global commitment towards the expansion of protected areas has not delivered the expected conservation benefits. The researchers propose a new target and a set of indicators that can galvanize global conservation efforts and lead to positive biodiversity outcomes.

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How plants defend themselves

Like humans and animals, plants defend themselves against pathogens with the help of their immune system. But how do they activate their cellular defenses? Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that receptors in plant cells identify bacteria through simple molecular building blocks.

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Interplay of pollinators and pests influences plant evolution

Brassica rapa plants pollinated by bumblebees evolve more attractive flowers. But this evolution is compromised if caterpillars attack the plant at the same time. With the bees pollinating them less effectively, the plants increasingly self-pollinate. In a greenhouse evolution experiment, scientists at the University of Zurich have shown just how much the effects of pollinators and pests influence

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Time for a new global protected area target

The world needs a new international protected area target based on scientific evidence, according to a team including University of Queensland scientists.UQ researcher Professor James Watson, who is also with the Wildlife Conservation Society, said protected areas were critically important for safeguarding biodiversity.

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Crucial 'electrical switch' in brain revealed in study published by Science

Scientists have revealed the structure of a critical receptor in the brain associated with learning, memory, behavior and mood. The new research, published in the journal Science, is the first to reveal the structure of AMPA receptors in their natural state. This discovery could lead to new insight about the mechanism behind a wide range of nervous system disorders and diseases.

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Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

Multiple new genes involved in hearing loss have been revealed in a large study of mouse mutants by researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, King's College London, and colleagues. The new genes reveal the metabolic pathways and regulatory processes involved in hearing. The study, published today (April 11) in PLOS Biology, helps to understand the underlying biology of deafness, and also pro

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Psychologists find smiling really can make people happier

Smiling really can make people feel happier, according to a new paper published in Psychological Bulletin.A team of psychologists combined data from 138 studies testing more than 11,000 participants and found that facial expressions have a small impact on our feelings.

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NASA twin study provides multi-omics view of human body's response to year in space

The NASA Twins Study is the most comprehensive integrated multi-omics, molecular, physiological, and behavioral analysis of how the human body responds to space flight to date. Study results were published in the April edition of Science.

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NASA Twins Study finds spaceflight affects gut bacteria

During his yearlong stay on the International Space Station (ISS), astronaut Scott Kelly experienced a shift in the ratio of two major categories of bacteria in his gut microbiome. The diversity of bacteria in his microbiome, however, did not change during spaceflight, which the Northwestern University-led research team found encouraging.

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Astronaut twins study yields new insights and portable DNA sequencing tools

Long-term spaceflight causes more changes to gene expression than shorter trips, especially to the immune system and DNA repair systems, according to research by Weill Cornell Medicine and NASA investigators as part of NASA's Twins Study, which followed the only set of identical twin astronauts for more than a year.

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Could 'sensitive' interventions be a tipping point in addressing climate change?

In a Policy Forum, Doyne Farmer and colleagues discuss how seemingly slight interventions in sensitive social and political systems can have large and far-reaching effects, possibly making averting an oncoming climate catastrophe a possibility.

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Unique look at combined influence of pollinators and herbivores reveals rapid evolution of floral traits in plants

Pollinating bumblebees and butterflies help plants grow prettier flowers, but harmful herbivores don't, a new study shows.

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Why is ketamine an antidepressant?

Delving deep inside the neural circuitry of 'depressed' mice, researchers have revealed how ketamine works in cells to achieve its fast-acting antidepressant effect.

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Human genomics and physiology in the final frontier: Results from the NASA Twins Study

The health impacts of NASA's longest-duration human spaceflight are detailed in a new study comparing astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent nearly a year in orbit, with his twin, Mark, back home on Earth.

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NASA Twins Study offers new insight on how a human's body responds to spaceflight

Colorado State University Professor Susan Bailey, who studies telomeres, or the protective 'caps' on the ends of chromosomes, found that Scott Kelly's telomeres in his white blood cells got longer while in space. Changes in telomere length could mean a person is at risk for accelerated aging or the diseases that come along with getting older.

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Astronaut has no lingering, major epigenetic differences from earthbound twin brother

In a landmark study, a group of US scientists from Johns Hopkins, Stanford University and other institutions has found no long-lasting, major differences between the epigenomes of astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent a year in space aboard the International Space Station, and his twin brother, Mark, who remained on Earth.

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NASA Twins Study includes San Antonio multiomics center

The NASA Twins Study compares the health of identical twin astronauts, one who spent a year in spaceflight while the other remained on Earth. A team led by UT Health San Antonio and the University of California, San Diego showed that a metabolite called lactate was increased in the astronaut in space and reverted to normal levels when he returned to Earth. Lactate is connected to the function of c

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Mice reveal 38 new genes involved in hearing loss

A large-scale screen of mouse mutants has revealed multiple new genes involved in hearing loss, according to a study publishing April 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Karen Steel of King's College London and the Wellcome Sanger Institute, and colleagues.

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Case of tick-borne relapsing fever in Mexico

Tick-borne relapsing fever (TBRF) is a recurring fever caused by exposure to infected Borrelia bacteria. Several cases have been reported in Mexico, but the disease gets little attention. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases describe the details of an additional case of TBRF in Sonora, Mexico in 2012.

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Longer neutrophil lifespan may contribute to HIV-associated intestinal inflammation

The increased survival of white blood cells called neutrophils is associated with alterations in the intestinal microbiome of HIV-infected individuals, according to a study published April 11 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nichole Klatt of the University of Miami, and colleagues. Moreover, the findings suggest that Lactobacillus bacteria, which are commonly in probiotics, may reduce

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The FASEB Journal: New strategy to reduce cancer drug's cardiotoxic effects

Doxorubicin (Doxo) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug for cancer, though it can have toxic effects on the heart. A recent animal study published in The FASEB Journal investigated whether the cardioregulatory protein chromogranin A (CgA) contributes to the regulation of the cardiotoxic and antitumor activities of Doxo.

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Tests on Astronaut and Twin Brother Highlight Spaceflight's Human Impact

NASA Study reports physiological and behavioral results that could shape future space missions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Tests on Astronaut and Twin Brother Highlight Spaceflight's Human Impact

NASA Study reports physiological and behavioral results that could shape future space missions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scott Kelly's Year in Space May Have Aged Him — But He's Mostly Fine

How a year in space affected Scott Kelly's health.

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Resultaterne fra rum-tvillinger er klar: Generne bliver ikke normale igen

I 2016 blev den ene af to enæggede tvillinger sendt ud i rummet i et år. Blandt andet for at se, hvilke ændringer i generne det kan medføre.

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You Don’t Have to Like Julian Assange to Defend Him

LONDON—You do not have to spend a long time in a room with Julian Assange to realize that he will be difficult. It takes a little longer, though, to realize just how difficult dealing with him can be. This was the lesson I learned in 2010, working first with Assange, and then for him at WikiLeaks, as we published tranche after tranche of bombshell material, leaked by Chelsea Manning. That was the

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Controlling cooling

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Friend turned foe

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STIMulating basophils

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Helping Einstein

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Controlling cooling

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Friend turned foe

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STIMulating basophils

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Remyelinating axons

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Research on wildlife

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Structure and dynamics of the active human parathyroid hormone receptor-1

The parathyroid hormone receptor-1 (PTH1R) is a class B G protein–coupled receptor central to calcium homeostasis and a therapeutic target for osteoporosis and hypoparathyroidism. Here we report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of human PTH1R bound to a long-acting PTH analog and the stimulatory G protein. The bound peptide adopts an extended helix with its amino terminus inserted deeply in

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Electron-phonon instability in graphene revealed by global and local noise probes

Understanding and controlling nonequilibrium electronic phenomena is an outstanding challenge in science and engineering. By electrically driving ultraclean graphene devices out of equilibrium, we observe an instability that is manifested as substantially enhanced current fluctuations and suppressed conductivity at microwave frequencies. Spatial mapping of the nonequilibrium current fluctuations

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Quantum-critical conductivity of the Dirac fluid in graphene

Graphene near charge neutrality is expected to behave like a quantum-critical, relativistic plasma—the "Dirac fluid"—in which massless electrons and holes collide at a rapid rate. We used on-chip terahertz spectroscopy to measure the frequency-dependent optical conductivity of clean, micrometer-scale graphene at electron temperatures between 77 and 300 kelvin. At charge neutrality, we observed th

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Measuring Hall viscosity of graphenes electron fluid

An electrical conductor subjected to a magnetic field exhibits the Hall effect in the presence of current flow. Here, we report a qualitative deviation from the standard behavior in electron systems with high viscosity. We found that the viscous electron fluid in graphene responds to nonquantizing magnetic fields by producing an electric field opposite to that generated by the ordinary Hall effec

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Spin coating epitaxial films

Spin-coated films, such as photoresists for lithography or perovskite films for solar cells, are either amorphous or polycrystalline. We show that epitaxial films of inorganic materials such as cesium lead bromide (CsPbBr 3 ), lead(II) iodide (PbI 2 ), zinc oxide (ZnO), and sodium chloride (NaCl) can be deposited onto a variety of single-crystal and single-crystal–like substrates by simply spin c

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Anti-parity-time symmetry in diffusive systems

Various concepts related to parity-time symmetry, including anti–parity-time symmetry, have found broad applications in wave physics. Wave systems are fundamentally described by Hermitian operators, whereas their unusual properties are introduced by incorporation of gain and loss. We propose that the related physics need not be restricted to wave dynamics, and we consider systems described by dif

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Cascading impacts of large-carnivore extirpation in an African ecosystem

Populations of the world’s largest carnivores are declining and now occupy mere fractions of their historical ranges. Theory predicts that when apex predators disappear, large herbivores become less fearful, occupy new habitats, and modify those habitats by eating new food plants. Yet experimental support for this prediction has been difficult to obtain in large-mammal systems. After the extirpat

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Bacterial medium-chain 3-hydroxy fatty acid metabolites trigger immunity in Arabidopsis plants

In plants, cell-surface immune receptors sense molecular non–self-signatures. Lipid A of Gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharide is considered such a non–self-signature. The receptor kinase LIPOOLIGOSACCHARIDE-SPECIFIC REDUCED ELICITATION (LORE) mediates plant immune responses to Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas but not enterobacterial lipid A or lipopolysaccharide preparations. Here, we demonstrat

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Arc-continent collisions in the tropics set Earths climate state

On multimillion-year time scales, Earth has experienced warm ice-free and cold glacial climates, but it is unknown whether transitions between these background climate states were the result of changes in carbon dioxide sources or sinks. Low-latitude arc-continent collisions are hypothesized to drive cooling by exhuming and eroding mafic and ultramafic rocks in the warm, wet tropics, thereby incr

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Evidence for hormonal control of heart regenerative capacity during endothermy acquisition

Tissue regenerative potential displays striking divergence across phylogeny and ontogeny, but the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. Loss of mammalian cardiac regenerative potential correlates with cardiomyocyte cell-cycle arrest and polyploidization as well as the development of postnatal endothermy. We reveal that diploid cardiomyocyte abundance across 41 species conforms to Kleiber’s law—

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Deubiquitinase USP10 regulates Notch signaling in the endothelium

Notch signaling is a core patterning module for vascular morphogenesis that codetermines the sprouting behavior of endothelial cells (ECs). Tight quantitative and temporal control of Notch activity is essential for vascular development, yet the details of Notch regulation in ECs are incompletely understood. We found that ubiquitin-specific peptidase 10 (USP10) interacted with the NOTCH1 intracell

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Rapid plant evolution driven by the interaction of pollination and herbivory

Pollination and herbivory are both key drivers of plant diversity but are traditionally studied in isolation from each other. We investigated real-time evolutionary changes in plant traits over six generations by using fast-cycling Brassica rapa plants and manipulating the presence and absence of bumble bee pollinators and leaf herbivores. We found that plants under selection by bee pollinators e

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New Products

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The way I am

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Glycosidase and glycan polymorphism control hydrolytic release of immunogenic flagellin peptides

Plants and animals recognize conserved flagellin fragments as a signature of bacterial invasion. These immunogenic elicitor peptides are embedded in the flagellin polymer and require hydrolytic release before they can activate cell surface receptors. Although much of flagellin signaling is understood, little is known about the release of immunogenic fragments. We discovered that plant-secreted β-

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Ultrapotent chemogenetics for research and potential clinical applications

Chemogenetics enables noninvasive chemical control over cell populations in behaving animals. However, existing small-molecule agonists show insufficient potency or selectivity. There is also a need for chemogenetic systems compatible with both research and human therapeutic applications. We developed a new ion channel–based platform for cell activation and silencing that is controlled by low dos

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Sustained rescue of prefrontal circuit dysfunction by antidepressant-induced spine formation

The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the induction and remission of depressive episodes over time are not well understood. Through repeated longitudinal imaging of medial prefrontal microcircuits in the living brain, we found that prefrontal spinogenesis plays a critical role in sustaining specific antidepressant behavioral effects and maintaining long-term behavioral remission. Depression-r

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The NASA Twins Study: A multidimensional analysis of a year-long human spaceflight

To understand the health impact of long-duration spaceflight, one identical twin astronaut was monitored before, during, and after a 1-year mission onboard the International Space Station; his twin served as a genetically matched ground control. Longitudinal assessments identified spaceflight-specific changes, including decreased body mass, telomere elongation, genome instability, carotid artery

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News at a glance

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The trespasser

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Lost in the fire

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Matter: Scott Kelly Spent a Year in Orbit. His Body Is Not Quite the Same.

NASA scientists compared the astronaut to his earthbound twin, Mark. The results hint at what humans will have to endure on long journeys through space.

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4 Takeaways From That Huge Study of Scott Kelly

Scott Kelly spent 340 days aboard the International Space Station for a unique study of the biological effects of space travel.

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Ralph Solecki, Who Found Humanity in Neanderthals, Dies at 101

Dr. Solecki’s archaeological research at Shanidar Cave in Iraq found that Neanderthals cared for the ailing and buried their dead with flowers.

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Senate Confirms Bernhardt as Interior Secretary Amid Calls for Investigations Into His Conduct

The former oil lobbyist has already played a central role in designing many of President Trump’s policies for expanding drilling and mining.

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Report: Tesla Doc Is Playing Down Injuries to Block Workers’ Comp

Here’s A Band-Aid Tesla’s on-site clinic, Access Omnicare, has allegedly been downplaying workers’ injuries to keep the electric automaker off the hook for workers’ compensation. Several former Tesla employees, all of whom got hurt on the job, and former employees of Access Omnicare, told Reveal News that the clinic was minimizing worker injuries so that the automaker wouldn’t have to pay workers

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Ketamine cultivates new nerve cell connections in mice

In mice, ketamine prods nerve cells to connect, which may explain the hallucinogenic drug’s ability to ease depression.

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Time for a new global protected area target

The world needs a new international protected area target based on scientific evidence, according to a team including University of Queensland scientists.

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The first study of a twin in space looks like good news for a trip to Mars

Thanks to twin astronauts, we now have our first solid evidence of how the human body responds to long-term spaceflight—and it’s thrown up some mysteries.

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Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

Scientists are learning how the party drug ketamine relieves depression so quickly — and why its effects fade over time. (Image credit: Kevin Link/Science Source )

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How the Brain Changes on Ketamine: A Live Animal Study

The drug promotes and sustains brain cell connectivity in mice, reversing the effects of chronic stress.

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New way of crafting crystals could speed up flexible electronics

Cheap “supersaturating” method makes unbroken crystalline films

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Space flight causes multiple changes in human biology

Nasa study of astronaut and twin brother shows health hazards of year in orbit

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Time for a new global protected area target

The world needs a new international protected area target based on scientific evidence, according to a team including University of Queensland scientists.

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Astronaut has no lingering, major epigenetic differences from earthbound twin brother

In a landmark study, a group of U.S. scientists from Johns Hopkins, Stanford University and other institutions has found no long-lasting, major differences between the epigenomes of astronaut Scott Kelly, who spent a year in space aboard the International Space Station, and his twin brother, Mark, who remained on Earth.

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Spending time in space causes subtle physiological changes, Nasa twins study finds

Investigation on impact of life in space on human body could inform potential missions to Mars When Nasa set out to study identical twin astronauts – one orbiting in space for nearly a year, the other left behind on Earth – the outcome was uncertain. Would Scott Kelly return to Earth younger than his brother, Mark, as depicted in the film Interstellar? The answer, outlined in the most comprehensi

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Lasers Highlight Ketamine's Depression-Fighting Secrets

Researchers implanted prisms in mouse brains to watch how ketamine affects neurons. The findings could lead to more effective antidepressant treatments.

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Kroppen förändras på flera sätt i rymden – astronaut blev ”yngre”

Det planeras för långa rymdfärder till månen och Mars i framtiden. Ändå vet vi väldigt lite om hur kroppen påverkas. Nu kommer resultaten efter Nasas uppmärksammade tvillingstudie.

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IDT lowers genomic barriers with powerful rhAmpSeq™ targeted sequencing system

Increasing accuracy and reducing cost barriers, IDT’s innovative system delivers simple and cost-effective amplicon sequencing

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The 10 Jobs Disappearing the Fastest (Thanks, Automation)

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Acer unveils the Predator Helios 700, a high-end gaming notebook with a slide-out keyboard

Acer's Global Press Conference took place today, and the company unveiled a host of new products for productivity, gaming, and content creation. Today, we'll be focusing on one of the most interesting …

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Fall Into the Google Doodle of a Black Hole

You can't resist the attraction of Google Doodle's black hole animation.

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Photos: Sudan Protests Lead to the Removal of President Omar al-Bashir

Anti-government protests in Sudan have built since the end of last year, with furious demonstrators calling for President Omar al-Bashir to step down. Sharply rising food prices and economic mismanagement have driven the recent uprisings against al-Bashir, who has been in power since 1989. Last weekend, a sit-in protest was organized in the capital city of Khartoum. It was met by attacks from som

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Scientist superstar Katie Bouman designed algorithm for black hole image

Anonymous to the public just days ago, a US computer scientist named Katie Bouman has become an overnight sensation due to her role in developing a computer algorithm that allowed researchers to take the world's first image of a black hole.

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A brief history of barbed wire

Technology Looking back on the invention's complicated past. The “wild West” was quickly tamed. In its stead, settlers left a patchwork of privately-owned lands, each wrapped in a barbed wire bow.

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Kan dyreforsøg erstattes af møntkast?

PLUS. Hvis man gentager et eksperiment med forsøgsdyr, får man i visse tilfælde ikke mere viden end ved at slå plat eller krone.

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Is It Solid? Or Is It Liquid? New Kind of Matter Is Both.

Solid and liquid intertwine at the atomic level.

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Tesla shares fall on report plant expansion has been iced

Shares of Tesla fell Thursday following a report the electric car company and Panasonic are suspending plans to expand a battery plant due to weak demand for the vehicles.

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Israel set to land spacecraft on the moon in first

Israel's first spacecraft to the moon was expected to make its historic landing there Thursday, making the Jewish state the fourth and smallest country to complete the trip.

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To get to the Moon in 2024, the rocket is just NASA's first headache

In the shadow of the Rocky Mountains, Alan Campbell, a project manager for space systems at the famed Draper Laboratory that built the computer which took astronauts to the Moon 50 years ago, is waiting for news from NASA.

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Do not waste nature's 'capital': David Attenborough

Overconsumption of the world's natural resources is unsustainably cutting into its ecological "capital," revered British naturalist David Attenborough warned Thursday.

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Clearing forests: No simple solution to California wildfires

With nearly 40 million people living in California and development spreading into once-wild regions, some of the state's best tools toward preventing wildfires can't be widely used.

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Biophotonic therapy eliminates bacteria and viruses from organs before transplantation

Method developed by scientists in Brazil and Canada can prevent transmission of diseases to organ recipients. The number of transplants could be higher if organs could be decontaminated.

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Keeping the taste, reducing the salt

Washington State University researchers have found a way to make food taste salty but with less of the sodium chloride tied to poor health.

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Autism rate rises 43 percent in New Jersey, Rutgers study finds

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses research by Rutgers University, shows a significant increase in the percentage of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder in New Jersey.The study found the rate increased 43 percent from 2010 to 2014 in the state.

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Tesla shares fall on report plant expansion has been iced

Shares of Tesla fell Thursday following a report the electric car company and Panasonic are suspending plans to expand a battery plant due to weak demand for the vehicles.

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Infertile Couple Gives Birth to “Three-Parent Baby”

Happy Birthday On Tuesday, a couple gave birth to what researchers are calling a “three-parent baby” — giving new hope to infertile couples across the globe. After four cycles of in vitro fertilization failed to result in a pregnancy, the Greek couple enrolled in a clinical trial for mitochondrial replacement therapy (MRT) — meaning doctors placed the nucleus from the mother’s egg into a donor eg

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Keeping the taste, reducing the salt

Washington State University researchers have found a way to make food taste salty but with less of the sodium chloride tied to poor health.

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New research adds to work of Prandtl, father of modern aerodynamics

In 1942, Ludwig Prandtl—considered the father of modern aerodynamics—published "Führer durch die Strömungslehre," the first book of its time on fluid mechanics and translated to English from the German language in 1952 as "Essentials of Fluid Mechanics." The book was uniquely successful such that Prandtl's students continued to maintain and develop the book with new findings after his death. Today

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Researchers find new ways to image, characterize unique material

Graphene can come from graphite. But borophene? There's no such thing as borite.

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More Michigan students taking, passing advanced math

Michigan high school students are going above and beyond the required math curriculum, likely an effect of the state's graduation requirements, finds new research from Michigan State University.

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When it comes to deductions, holding the SALT leaves a bitter taste in N.J., researcher finds

Every renter has tried to do the math to figure out if it makes more sense to buy a home, rather than continue to lease.

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People turn to consumerism to confront problems, grief and feelings

People are increasingly turning to commercial settings as outlets for their emotions, confronting problems, grief and feelings.

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The truth about a true frog: Unknown Costa Rican frog hidden amongst a widespread species

Known to science since 1857, a common species of true frog (a "true frog" is one assigned to the family Ranidae), found from north-eastern Honduras, through Nicaragua and Costa Rica to central Panama, turns out to have been keeping its "multiple identities" a secret all along.

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The truth about a true frog: Unknown Costa Rican frog hidden amongst a widespread species

Known to science since 1857, a common species of true frog (a "true frog" is one assigned to the family Ranidae), found from north-eastern Honduras, through Nicaragua and Costa Rica to central Panama, turns out to have been keeping its "multiple identities" a secret all along.

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Multi-region sequencing unveils novel actionable targets and spatial heterogeneity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

Multi-region sequencing unveils novel actionable targets and spatial heterogeneity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma Multi-region sequencing unveils novel actionable targets and spatial heterogeneity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09255-1 Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is highly prevalent in China. Here, the authors ca

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Formation of colloidal alloy semiconductor CdTeSe magic-size clusters at room temperature

Formation of colloidal alloy semiconductor CdTeSe magic-size clusters at room temperature Formation of colloidal alloy semiconductor CdTeSe magic-size clusters at room temperature, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09705-w Alloy magic-size clusters (MSCs) are difficult to synthesize, in part because so little is known about how they form. Here, the authors produce single-ens

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Dynamic anticipation by Cdk2/Cyclin A-bound p27 mediates signal integration in cell cycle regulation

Dynamic anticipation by Cdk2/Cyclin A-bound p27 mediates signal integration in cell cycle regulation Dynamic anticipation by Cdk2/Cyclin A-bound p27 mediates signal integration in cell cycle regulation, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09446-w The cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27Kip1 (p27) folds upon binding to Cdk/cyclin complexes and during cell cycle progressi

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Early warning signals of recovery in complex systems

Early warning signals of recovery in complex systems Early warning signals of recovery in complex systems, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09684-y While several studies have documented early warning signals of population collapse, the use of such signals as indicators of population recovery has not been investigated. Here the authors use models and empirical fisheries data

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Impaired cellular energy metabolism in cord blood macrophages contributes to abortive response toward inflammatory threats

Impaired cellular energy metabolism in cord blood macrophages contributes to abortive response toward inflammatory threats Impaired cellular energy metabolism in cord blood macrophages contributes to abortive response toward inflammatory threats, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09359-8 Neonatal immune responses are known to differ to those of an adult immune response. Here

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Defining the genetic and evolutionary architecture of alternative splicing in response to infection

Defining the genetic and evolutionary architecture of alternative splicing in response to infection Defining the genetic and evolutionary architecture of alternative splicing in response to infection, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09689-7 Genetic ancestry might influence immunological response to infection at different regulatory levels. Here, the authors use RNA-Seq to

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Gasdermin pores permeabilize mitochondria to augment caspase-3 activation during apoptosis and inflammasome activation

Gasdermin pores permeabilize mitochondria to augment caspase-3 activation during apoptosis and inflammasome activation Gasdermin pores permeabilize mitochondria to augment caspase-3 activation during apoptosis and inflammasome activation, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09397-2 Gasdermins mediate lytic cell death by forming pores in the plasma membrane. Here the authors sh

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Quantifying economic resilience from input–output susceptibility to improve predictions of economic growth and recovery

Quantifying economic resilience from input–output susceptibility to improve predictions of economic growth and recovery Quantifying economic resilience from input–output susceptibility to improve predictions of economic growth and recovery, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09357-w Supply demand equilibria in modern macroeconomic theories do not hold during recessionary shoc

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Rice, Northwestern find new ways to image, characterize unique material

Researchers at Rice and Northwestern have imaged and modeled the unique geometry of 2D borophene, a material that could surpass the promises of graphene for electronic, thermal, optical and other applications.

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Study: How will tropical mammals react to rising temperatures?

How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but one of the first studies to compare the responses of tropical mammals to warmer habitats suggests the answer won't be as simple as "move to a cooler place."

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Researchers observe formation of a magnetar 6.5 billion light years away

A University of Arkansas researcher is part of a team of astronomers who have identified an outburst of X-ray emission from a galaxy approximately 6.5 billion light years away, which is consistent with the merger of two neutron stars to form a magnetar—a large neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field. Based on this observation, the researchers were able to calculate that mergers like

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Infinite number of quantum particles gives clues to big-picture behavior at large scale

In quantum mechanics, the Heisenberg uncertainty principle prevents an external observer from measuring both the position and speed (referred to as momentum) of a particle at the same time. They can only know with a high degree of certainty either one or the other—unlike what happens at large scales where both are known. To identify a given particle's characteristics, physicists introduced the not

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The golden path towards new two-dimensional semiconductors

Two-dimensional (2-D) semiconductors are promising for quantum computing and future electronics. Now, researchers can convert metallic gold into semiconductor and customize the material atom-by-atom on boron nitride nanotubes.

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Breathe the Pain Away: Mindfulness and Chronic Pain

Focus on your breath. Notice the sensation of air flowing in at the tip of your nose, of your chest expanding, and your shoulders rising.

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Reproduction: How male flies enforce their interests

During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests. Researchers have now found out: male flies manipulate their partners primarily in order to increase their own chances in reproductive competition.

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Sexual behavior may influence gut microbiome

A person's sexual behavior could affect their microbiome and immune system, potentially elevating their risk of HIV infection, according to a new study.

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More than a strip of paint needed to keep cyclists safe

On-road marked bicycle lanes are not the optimal solution to keeping cyclists safe, new research has found.

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Study: How will tropical mammals react to rising temperatures?

How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but one of the first studies to compare the responses of tropical mammals to warmer habitats suggests the answer won't be as simple as "move to a cooler place."

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Meet the scientist painter who turns deadly viruses into beautiful works of art

David Goodsell’s scientifically precise watercolor paintings of the cells and microbes he studies grace journal covers and impress colleagues

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Inner electrons behave differently in aromatic hydrocarbons

In an international research collaboration between Tsinghua University in Beijing and Sorbonne University in Paris, scientists found that four hydrocarbon molecules, known for their internal ring structure, have a lower threshold for the release of excess energy than molecules without a similar ring structure, because one of their electrons decays from a higher to a lower energy level, a phenomeno

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Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family

Research scientists led by the University of Kent have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage.

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Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family

Research scientists led by the University of Kent have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage.

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Student Builds A Robotic Hand He Can Control with his Mind

submitted by /u/codemaker1 [link] [comments]

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Millennials are being left out of the world's middle class, research says

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Why Walmart is adding thousands of robots to U.S. stores

Walmart plans to soon add more than 3,900 robots to stores across the U.S. The robots will perform tasks such as scanning products, sorting shipments, cleaning floors, and readying online purchases for pickup. Walmart says the robots will free up time for employees to help customers, while critics say its a long-term move toward replacing human workers. None Walmart is adding thousands of new rob

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MIT Prof: If We Live in a Simulation, Are We Players or NPCs?

Simulation Hypothesis Futurism readers may recognize Rizwan Virk as the MIT researcher touting a new book arguing that we’re likely living in a game-like computer simulation. Now, in new interview with Vox , Virk goes even further — by probing whether we’re protagonists in the simulation or so-called “non-player characters” who are presumably included to round out a player character’s experience.

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New research adds to work of Prandtl, father of modern aerodynamics

Not only will this discovery be important for agriculture, aviation and weather prediction, but it will also be vital for climate change research and associated sea-level rise, as accurate prediction of katabatic surface wind profiles over large ice sheets and glaciers is critical in energy balance of melting ice.

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Here’s How Big the M87 Black Hole Is Compared to the Earth

Pale Black Dot On Wednesday, a team of scientists from around the world released the first ever directly-observed image of the event horizon of a black hole . The black hole, M87*, is found within the constellation Virgo — and as the webcomic XKCD illustrated, it’s as big as our entire solar system. Stellar Giant The gigantic black hole, not counting the giant rings of trapped light orbiting it,

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Can atmospheric chemists rescue the stalled quest for a human pheromone?

Measuring volatile compounds in real time offers new hope for a field in crisis

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Confused about climate change? Talk to our chat bot

BBC News launches a chat bot to help users learn about climate change in weekly conversations.

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New algorithm optimizes quantum computing problem-solving

Researchers have developed an algorithm that enhances the ability of a quantum computer to more efficiently find the best solution for complicated problems.

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Sharp unveils radical concept phone that folds vertically like a Game Boy

Sharp unveiled a new concept phone that folds vertically, transforming its 6.18-inch display into one that's small enough to fit in your pocket and looks similar to the Game Boy Advance SP.

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The Denisovans May Have Been More Than a Single Species

In anthropology, bones don't always tell the whole story. Ancient remains can be so rare that an entire species of hominids can be compressed into one single fragment of bone. Thousands of generations, …

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Body mass index may play a significant role in the progression of multiple sclerosis

A newly published paper in the Lancet journal EBioMedicine identifies a link between high levels of blood lipids and worsening of disease in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients who are overweight or obese.

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Oregon scientists drill into white graphene to create artificial atoms

By drilling holes into a thin two-dimensional sheet of hexagonal boron nitride with a gallium-focused ion beam, University of Oregon scientists have created artificial atoms that generate single photons, which work in air and room temperature.

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2D gold quantum dots are atomically tunable with nanotubes

Gold atoms ski along boron nitride nanotubes and stabilize in metallic monolayers. The resulting gold quantum dots could be a promising material for future electronics and quantum computing.

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The right polymers for the job

One of the most promising clean energy technologies just got even better. Researchers from the University of Delaware have developed the most powerful, durable hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell components on record.

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More Michigan students taking, passing advanced math

Michigan high school students are going above and beyond the required math curriculum, likely an effect of the state's graduation requirements, finds new research from Michigan State University.

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Getting closer: Finding out why the immune system attacks itself

University of Houston biomolecular engineer Navin Varadarajan thinks B cells gone bad could be the culprit in Rheumatoid Arthritis and he is the first to publish a comprehensive profile of the cells, moving closer to finding out why the immune system attacks itself in patients with RA.

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Kidney Health Atlas reveals global burden of disease and inequities in access

A global study of the burden of kidney disease will be released at the World Congress of Nephrology in Melbourne, Australia. It reveals that by 2030 14.5 million people will have end-stage kidney disease (ESKD); yet, only 5.4 million will receive treatment due to economic, social, and political factors. More than 2 million people die every year worldwide because of little or no access to dialysis

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Breaking Down the Julian Assange Hacking Case

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been arrested, and now faces extradition to the United States. But not for leaking classified information.

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Daily briefing: Saving marine life from a barrage of noise

Daily briefing: Saving marine life from a barrage of noise Daily briefing: Saving marine life from a barrage of noise, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01197-4 The unquiet seas, a new hominin species, and the US cuts ties with JASON.

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A President Falsely Charging ‘Treason’ Is What the Founders Feared

Donald Trump swore to protect and defend the U.S. Constitution. The Constitution declares, “Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying war against them, or in adhering to their enemies, giving them aid and comfort.” On Wednesday, President Trump wrote , “I think what the Democrats are doing with the Border is TREASONOUS. Their Open Border mindset is putting our Country at ri

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A Movie That Radically Rewrites the Myths of A Star Is Born

This post contains major spoilers for Her Smell . The prophecy is old: The rocker must die. At least the staggering-about, sensorially scrambled, substance-soaked rocker that fame so often visits must die—or so pop culture seems to want to believe. On some level, A Star Is Born must have been remade so many times because it confirms this. For years of Amy Winehouse’s career, people placed bets on

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Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more

During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. The workers retrieved tens of thousands of specimens that have been studied in small bits and pieces while stored in the state collections of The University of Texas at Austin for the past 80 years. Now, decades after they were first collected, a researcher has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from dig

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'Hellboy' Could Get 'Shazam!'-ed at the Box Office

Also, Hawkeye might be getting his own Disney+ show. Catch up on your pop culture news here.

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Metro-entreprenør missede deadline: Nu står ny linje til 25 mia. kr. til forsinkelse

Det er ikke lykkedes den italienske entreprenør at blive færdig med installationsarbejdet i Cityringens tunneler. Metroselskabets direktør håber at kunne holde en evt. forsinkelse nede på få måneder.

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This Newfound Extinct Human Lineage Also Mated with Modern Humans

An entirely new lineage of the mysterious human relatives called Denisovans has been discovered.

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Black hole image vindicates farsighted scientists

The visual proof of ‘dark stars’ would delight those who first posited their existence

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How Work-Family Justice Can Bring Balance to Scientist Moms

It’s time to change cultural views and expectations around science and motherhood — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dorothy Rowe obituary

Psychologist who believed in listening to patients, and could express complex ideas with brilliant simplicity Dorothy Rowe, who has died aged 88, was one of the earliest figures in psychology to build a bridge between the sometimes arcane world of clinical practice and the general public. Coming to prominence in the 1980s, particularly with her book Depression: The Way Out of Your Prison, she made

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New study advances treatment options for PTSD

Dr. Stephen Maren, University Distinguished Professor in the Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, recently published significant research on the psychological and neural basis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

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Astronomers successfully obtain first ever image of a black hole

The very first image of a black hole has been obtained by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), a network of eight radio telescopes on four different continents designed for this purpose.

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How Work-Family Justice Can Bring Balance to Scientist Moms

It’s time to change cultural views and expectations around science and motherhood — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A 102-year-old bacterial culture reveals a microbe’s foul methods

A 102-year-old bacterial culture reveals a microbe’s foul methods A 102-year-old bacterial culture reveals a microbe’s foul methods, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01136-3 A strain of cholera bacterium collected during the First World War is sequenced after decades in storage.

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Amazon Workers Listen to Your Alexa Conversations, Then Mock Them

I Hear You Amazon pays thousands of workers across the globe to review audio picked up by its Echo speakers — and their behavior raises serious concerns about both privacy and safety. Bloomberg recently spoke with seven people who participated in Amazon’s audio review process. Each worker was tasked with listening to, transcribing, and annotating voice recordings with the goal of improving the ab

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Researchers observe formation of a magnetar 6.5 billion light years away

Building on recent discoveries about neutron stars, a team of astronomers has identified X-ray observations that are consistent with the merger of two neutron stars. This merger is believed to have formed a magnetar, which is a neutron star with an extremely powerful magnetic field.

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'A monopoly on information': Russia closes grip on internet

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Dragons: A Brief History of the Mythical, Fire-Breathing Beasts

We've known for a very long time that dragons aren't real, but we're still enamored by them.

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First Black-Hole Image: It’s Not Looks That Count – Facts So Romantic

FIRST LOOK: The Event Horizon Telescope measures wavelength in the millimeter regime, too long to be seen by eye, but ideally suited to the task of imaging a black hole: The gas surrounding the black hole is almost transparent at this wavelength and the light travels to Earth almost undisturbed. Since we cannot see light of such wavelength by eye, the released telescope image shows the observed s

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The Beckoning of the Ice Worlds – Issue 71: Flow

I have seen the future of space exploration, and it looks like a cue ball covered with brown scribbles. I am talking about Europa, the 1,940-mile-wide, nearly white, and exceedingly smooth satellite of Jupiter. It is an enigmatic world that is, in many ways, almost a perfect inversion of Earth. It is also one of the most plausible places to look for alien life. If it strikes you that those two st

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How Does Turbulence Get Started? – Issue 71: Flow

The water is always running in Björn Hof’s laboratory. Like a Zen water fountain, it gently flows over the top of a reservoir into a tube, and from there into a glass pipe 15 meters long, but thinner than a glass thermometer. To keep the flow as smooth and serene as possible, Hof, of the Institute of Science and Technology Austria in Klosterneuberg, controls conditions such as temperature and ste

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The Strangeness of Black Holes – Issue 71: Flow

This essay is one of the five winners in the 2019 writing competition held by the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University. “The Black Hole Initiative offers a unique environment for thinking about the topic of black holes more creatively and comprehensively,” says BHI director, Avi Loeb. To add context to the exciting April 10 announcement that astronomers have observed a black hole for the f

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How Black Holes Nearly Ruined Time – Issue 71: Flow

This essay is one of the five winners in the 2019 writing competition held by the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University. “The Black Hole Initiative offers a unique environment for thinking about the topic of black holes more creatively and comprehensively,” says BHI director, Avi Loeb. To add context to the exciting April 10 announcement that astronomers have observed a black hole for the f

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Paradox Is Illuminating the Black Hole – Issue 71: Flow

This essay is one of the five winners in the 2019 writing competition held by the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University. “The Black Hole Initiative offers a unique environment for thinking about the topic of black holes more creatively and comprehensively,” says BHI director, Avi Loeb. To add context to the exciting April 10 announcement that astronomers have observed a black hole for the f

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How Supermassive Black Holes Were Discovered – Issue 71: Flow

This essay is one of the five winners in the 2019 writing competition held by the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University. “The Black Hole Initiative offers a unique environment for thinking about the topic of black holes more creatively and comprehensively,” says BHI director, Avi Loeb. To add context to the exciting April 10 announcement that astronomers have observed a black hole for the f

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How to Get Close to a Black Hole – Issue 50: Emergence

This essay is one of the five winners in the 2019 writing competition held by the Black Hole Initiative at Harvard University. “The Black Hole Initiative offers a unique environment for thinking about the topic of black holes more creatively and comprehensively,” says BHI director, Avi Loeb. To add context to the exciting April 10 announcement that astronomers have observed a black hole for the f

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The Day Feynman Worked Out Black-Hole Radiation on My Blackboard – Facts So Romantic

After a few minutes, Richard Feynman had worked out the process of spontaneous emission, which is what Stephen Hawking became famous for a year later. Wikicommons T he amazing image of a black hole unveiled Wednesday, along with data from the Event Horizon Telescope, may not substantiate Stephen Hawking’s famous theory that radiation, an example of spontaneous emission at the quantum level, is em

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Pollinators may have evolved 40 million years before flowers existed

A fossil of a Jurassic fly suggests that pollinating insects may have been flying around on Earth long before the first flowers had begun to bloom

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Moon Landing by Israel’s Beresheet Spacecraft Appears to End in Crash

The spacecraft’s orbit of the moon was a first for a private effort, but the landing failure highlighted the risks of fast and cheap approaches to space exploration.

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Scientists Say New Quantum Material Could “‘Download’ Your Brain”

Computer Brain Scientists say they’ve developed a new “quantum material” that could one day transfer information directly from human brains to a computer. The research is in early stages, but it invokes ideas like uploading brains to the cloud or hooking people up to a computer to track deep health metrics — concepts that until now existed solely in science fiction. Quantum Interface The new quan

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As Rome digs its first new metro route in decades, an archaeologist safeguards the city's buried treasures

Science How to build a subway in the Eternal City. Archaeologist Rosella Rea bridges the divide between modernity and history as she helps Rome's Metro expand safetly for the first time in decades.

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Ice Ages occur when tropical islands and continents collide

Earth's steady state is warm and balmy, but half a dozen times over the past billion years, the planet developed ice caps and glaciers. Researchers have now amassed evidence that these cold snaps occurred when tectonic activity propelled continents headlong into volcanic island arcs in the tropics, uplifting ophiolites that rapidly absorbed carbon dioxide, cooling Earth. Once collisions stopped, C

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Study: How will tropical mammals react to rising temperatures?

How wildlife will react to climate change is an open question, but one of the first studies to compare the responses of tropical mammals to warmer habitats suggests the answer won't be as simple as 'move to a cooler place.'

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Infinite number of quantum particles gives clues to big-picture behavior at large scale

In quantum mechanics, measuring both the position and speed of a particle at the same time is not possible. To identify a particle's characteristics, physicists introduced the notion of quasi-distribution of position and momentum. In a new study published in EPJ ST, Dr J.S. Ben-Benjamin and colleagues from Texas A&M University, USA, reverse this approach; starting with quantum mechanical rules, th

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Multiple Denisovan-related ancestries in Papuans

Researchers examined DNA fragments passed down from Neanderthals and Denisovans to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea and found: the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, which had been separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years. One of those Denisovan lineages is so different from the other that they might even b

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Rutgers scientists discover new role for sensory signals in the brain

Learning how to tie a shoe or shoot a basketball isn't easy, but the brain somehow integrates sensory signals that are critical to coordinating movements so you can get it right. Now, Rutgers scientists have discovered that sensory signals in the brain's cerebral cortex, which plays a key role in controlling movement and other functions, have a different pattern of connections between nerve cells

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Lots of patients with cancer, cancer survivors use but don't report complementary/alternative medicine therapies

This study used data from a nationwide survey to estimate how many patients with cancer and cancer survivors use complementary and alternative medicines (CAMS) in addition to or instead of conventional therapies, and how many don't disclose that to their physicians.

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Discovery of 'kingpin' stem cell may help in the understanding of cancerous tumors

Bhatia's team spent more than six years delving down to the cellular level to examine what they say are previously overlooked cells that form on the edges of pluripotent stem cell colonies. Having characterized these cells, the team also observed them form at the earliest stages of pluripotent cell reprogramming from adult cells.

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Protein complex may help prevent neurodegenerative diseases

The protein complex NAC in the cell helps to prevent the aggregration of proteins associated with several neurodegenerative diseases.

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Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments

Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma. Published in Cell Stem Cell, the findings present an opportunity to find out if new therapeutic approaches can stop glioblastoma at its earliest stages

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'Mindreading' neurons simulate decisions of social partners

Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. Dysfunction in these 'simulation neurons' may help explain difficulties with social interactions in conditions such as autism and social anxiety.

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Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners

When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. In a paper publishing April 11, in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists in Norway report that they have discovered how the cells trigger this process, which is called mitophagy. In cells with broken mitochondria, two proteins — NIPSNAP 1 and NIPSNAP 2 — accumulate on the mi

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Ancient DNA reveals new branches of the Denisovan family tree

A study examining DNA fragments passed down from these ancient hominins to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea now suggests that the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, separated from each other for hundreds of thousands of years. The findings, based on a new collection of genome data from the Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biolo

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Biologists uncover new rules for cellular decision-making in genetics

A team of biologists has uncovered new rules that cells use in making decisions about which genes they activate and under what conditions, findings that add to our understanding of how gene variants affect human traits.

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I feel you: Emotional mirror neurons found in the rat

Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience have found that the rat brain activates the same cells when they observe the pain of others as when they experience pain themselves. In addition, without activity of these 'mirror neurons,' the animals no longer share the pain of others. Finding the neural basis for sharing the emotions of others is an exciting step towards understanding

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Mathematicians Discover the Perfect Way to Multiply

Four thousand years ago, the Babylonians invented multiplication. Last month, mathematicians perfected it. On March 18, two researchers described the fastest method ever discovered for multiplying two very large numbers . The paper marks the culmination of a long-running search to find the most efficient procedure for performing one of the most basic operations in math. “Everybody thinks basicall

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Folk gillar obligatorisk vaccination

I dag erbjuds alla barn i Sverige vaccin mot nio sjukdomar samt HPV-vaccin för flickor som skyddar mot ett virus som kan orsaka cancer främst i livmoderhalsen. Men det är tillåtet att avstå. Nu har den årliga SOM-undersökningen från Göteborgs universitet för första gången frågat folk om de tycker att vaccinationsprogrammet borde vara obligatoriskt för alla barn. Hela 74 procent ansåg att det är et

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Trump’s Immigration Policies Unify White Republicans

Donald Trump’s ongoing purge of the Department of Homeland Security marks another milestone in his transformation of the GOP into an exclusionary party defined by its hostility to immigration in particular and demographic change in general. Trump’s move to install more hard-liners at DHS—headlined by his dismissal of Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen and the withdrawal of his nominee to head Immigration

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The Boy Missing an Entire Type of Brain Cell

Even before he was born, it was clear that the boy’s brain was unusual—so much so that his expecting parents flew from rural Alaska to Seattle, where specialists could attend to their son from birth. That is how James Bennett first met the boy, then a days-old infant struggling to breathe. The baby’s head was too big. The structures in his brain looked wrong. Bennett, a pediatric geneticist at Se

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Ancient DNA reveals new branches of the Denisovan family tree

It's widely accepted that anatomically modern humans interbred with their close relatives, the Neanderthals and Denisovans, as they dispersed out of Africa. But a study examining DNA fragments passed down from these ancient hominins to modern people living in Island Southeast Asia and New Guinea now suggests that the ancestry of Papuans includes not just one but two distinct Denisovan lineages, wh

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Protein complex may help prevent neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers from the Universities of Konstanz (Germany), Leeds (U.K.) and Stanford (U.S.) have discovered that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) prevents the aggregation of proteins associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. The study, "Dual role of ribosome-binding domain of NAC as a potent suppressor of protein aggregation and aging-related proteinopathies," is published

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Team uncovers new rules for cellular decision-making in genetics

A team of biologists has uncovered new rules that cells use in making decisions about which genes they activate and under what conditions, findings that add to our understanding of how gene variants affect human traits.

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Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners

When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. In a paper publishing April 11, 2019, in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists in Norway report that they have discovered how the cells trigger this process, which is called mitophagy. In cells with broken mitochondria, two proteins—NIPSNAP 1 and NIPSNAP 2—accumulate on the mi

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Universal standards of care to Ebola virus disease

Medical researchers are calling for universal standards of care to be applied in relation to Ebola virus disease.

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Millions of children worldwide develop asthma annually due to traffic-related pollution

About 4 million children worldwide develop asthma each year because of inhaling nitrogen dioxide air pollution, according to a new study. The study, based on data from 2010 to 2015, estimates that 64 percent of these new cases of asthma occur in urban areas.

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Opinion: Transparency Is Critical to Defend Animal Research

Research organizations should start sharing with the public information, stories, photos, and videos on how animals are cared for and used in science.

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Protein complex may help prevent neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers from the Universities of Konstanz (Germany), Leeds (U.K.) and Stanford (U.S.) have discovered that the nascent polypeptide-associated complex (NAC) prevents the aggregation of proteins associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. The study, "Dual role of ribosome-binding domain of NAC as a potent suppressor of protein aggregation and aging-related proteinopathies," is published

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Team uncovers new rules for cellular decision-making in genetics

A team of biologists has uncovered new rules that cells use in making decisions about which genes they activate and under what conditions, findings that add to our understanding of how gene variants affect human traits.

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Broken mitochondria use 'eat me' proteins to summon their executioners

When mitochondria become damaged, they avoid causing further problems by signaling cellular proteins to degrade them. In a paper publishing April 11, 2019, in the journal Developmental Cell, scientists in Norway report that they have discovered how the cells trigger this process, which is called mitophagy. In cells with broken mitochondria, two proteins—NIPSNAP 1 and NIPSNAP 2—accumulate on the mi

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DNA remnants of three separate Denisovan populations found in human genomes

The archaic hominins weren’t homogenous, and archaic humans weren’t shy, research suggests. Dyani Lewis reports.

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How risk-taking changes a teenager's brain | Kashfia Rahman

Why do teenagers sometimes make outrageous, risky choices? Do they suddenly become reckless, or are they just going through a natural phase? To find out, Kashfia Rahman — winner of the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (and a Harvard freshman) — designed and conducted an experiment to test how high school students respond to and get used to risk, and how it changes their still-dev

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Rare gut condition a model for study of genetic diseases

A study published online in the April 11, 2019 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine found that Hirschsprung disease is more predictable from an individual's genetic makeup than previously thought.

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Inner electrons behave differently in aromatic hydrocarbons

In an international research collaboration between Tsinghua University in Beijing and Sorbonne University in Paris, scientists found that four hydrocarbon molecules, known for their internal ring structure, have a lower threshold for the release of excess energy than molecules without a similar ring structure, because one of their electrons decays from a higher to a lower energy level, a phenomeno

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The truth about a true frog: Unknown Costa Rican frog hidden amongst a widespread species

Known to science since 1857, a common species of frog found from north-eastern Honduras through to central Panama, turns out to have been keeping its 'multiple identities' a secret. According to herpetologists from the University of Plymouth and UCL, who recently used DNA barcoding on the species, showed that what we currently call Warszewitsch's frog is indeed a group of "cryptic" species. Their

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Lower pension, shorter life

Income and social status have an increasing effect on life expectancy in Germany. On average, men with very low retirement pay die five years earlier than those who are much better off. Poverty shortens life.

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Tax deductions: Holding the SALT leaves a bitter taste for homebuyers

Ghoddusi develops a model to explore the effectiveness of a mortgage as a tax shield amid uncertainty.

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Police stops actually increase teen criminal behavior

Black and Latino teen boys stopped by the police report more frequent engagement in delinquent behavior from that point on, according to a new study. The research also demonstrates that police stops have a negative impact on these adolescents’ psychological well-being. “Our findings indicate that the single most common proactive policing strategy—directing officers to make contact with individual

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Biosynthesis of widespread pigments from bacteria revealed

Bacteria can protect themselves from the attack of free radicals using specific natural products in their membranes. The biosynthesis of one of the most common protective pigments that could also be of interest for the medical and cosmetic industries has now been uncovered.

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Chronic diseases restrict the mobility of older people — often unconsciously

Chronic diseases are a key factor limiting the mobility of older people. Usually individuals are conscious of their condition in the case of an acute musculoskeletal disorder that causes pain or functional limitations. However, if the condition has progressed slowly, the gradual restriction of mobility often goes unnoticed.

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Child vaccination levels falling short in large parts of Africa

A study shows that several low- and middle-income countries, especially in Africa, need more effective child vaccination strategies to eliminate the threat from vaccine-preventable diseases.

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Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science

Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean.

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Rapid urbanization increasing pressure on rural water supplies globally

An international team of researchers has carried out the first systematic global review of water reallocation from rural to urban regions — the practice of transferring water from rural areas to cities to meet demand from growing urban populations. They found that 69 cities with a population of 383 million people receive approximately 16 billion cubic meters of reallocated water per year — almos

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Microbes in the human body swap genes, even across tissue boundaries, study indicates

Bacteria in the human body are sharing genes with one another at a higher rate than is typically seen in nature, and some of those genes appear to be traveling — independent of their microbial hosts — from one part of the body to another, researchers report.

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Getting back to work after a heart attack

Heart attack patients with the desire to return to work can do it. That's the main message of a paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Patients who believe they can still do their job and want to go back will make a success of it,' said lead author Dr. Rona Reibis, of the University of Potsdam, Germany.

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Scientists Release First Photo of a Black Hole

Space We have now seen what we thought was unseeable, team says. 04/10/2019 Catherine Meyers, Editor To read more…

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Impact factors are still widely used in academic evaluations

Impact factors are still widely used in academic evaluations Impact factors are still widely used in academic evaluations, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01151-4 Survey finds that 40% of research-intensive universities mention the controversial metric in review documents — despite efforts to dampen its influence.

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From fantastical ferns to icicle towers, glass artworks take over Kew Gardens

Dale Chihuly shipped in 32 installations which go on display across London site There are wildly coloured, alien-looking spheres in the brushed gravel of Kew’s Japanese garden while in the Victorian temperate house a 10-metre abstract glass sculpture hangs from the ceiling. Elsewhere, yellow glass spikes poke upwards among the brunfelsia australis , (yesterday, today and tomorrow trees), while re

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Nepal to send team to clean Mount Everest

Nepal will send a dedicated team to Mount Everest this climbing season to collect garbage and retrieve bodies littering the world's highest peak, officials said Thursday.

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How some birds are responding to climate change

By laying a second clutch of eggs

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Astronomers take the first picture of a black hole

Using a string of radio telescopes around Earth

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More new human species are discovered

South-East Asia reveals details of ancient relatives

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All Your Questions About the New Black Hole Image Answered

Yesterday, Earthlings first laid eyes on an actual image of a black hole — turning what lived only in our collective imaginations into concrete reality.

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New method may transport medicine better through the body

One of the major challenges in fighting inflammation is to get the medicine transported properly through the body. Now, chemists propose a new method for drug delivery.

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Opioid epidemic may have cost US governments $37.8 billion in tax revenue

The opioid epidemic may have cost U.S. state and federal governments up to $37.8 billion in lost tax revenue due to opioid-related employment loss, according to Penn State researchers.

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CNIO researchers succeed at removing some types of pancreatic cancer in animal models

Until now, no full regression had been observed in advanced pancreatic cancer in experimental models.

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People turn to consumerism to confront problems, grief and feelings

People are increasingly turning to commercial settings as outlets for their emotions, confronting problems, grief and feelings.

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The iteration generation: a new age of design | The Engineer

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Ships slide in an air envelope

Friction, corrosion, and biofilms are three major problems in shipping. The research project "Air-retaining Surfaces" (ARES) – a collaboration project of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the universities of Bonn and Rostock – studies new types of ship coatings that permanently retain an air layer under water and, thus, help considerably reduce the three problems. ARES has now been grant

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The Mind-Boggling Art-House Film That Broke China’s Box Office

There are plenty of ways in which Bi Gan’s new film, Long Day’s Journey Into Night , resembles a superhero blockbuster. It’s epically long—two hours and 20 minutes, just a little shorter than the last Avengers movie. It requires 3-D glasses, though only for a specific section of the film. And upon its release in China in 2018, it broke box-office records , earning more money in pre-sales than any

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Kids get antibiotics more often via telemedicine

Children receive antibiotic prescriptions more often during telemedicine visits than during in-person primary care or urgent care visits, according to a new study. “In recent years, the use of telemedicine for acute, primary care concerns has increased among children,” says lead author Kristin Ray, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. “We know very

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Sydney Brenner (1927-2019)

Sydney Brenner (1927-2019) Sydney Brenner (1927-2019), Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01192-9 Mischievous steward of molecular biology’s golden age.

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Mexican ecologists push to transform prison island into nature reserve

Mexican ecologists push to transform prison island into nature reserve Mexican ecologists push to transform prison island into nature reserve, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01030-y Waters surrounding Isla María Madre host vibrant coral reefs that have stayed relatively untouched for over 100 years.

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Conservationists discover hidden diversity in ancient frog family

Research scientists led by the University of Kent have uncovered hidden diversity within a type of frog found only in the Seychelles, showing that those on each island have their own distinct lineage.The family tree of sooglossid frogs dates back at least 63 million years. They are living ancestors of those frogs that survived the meteor strike on earth approximately 66 million years ago, making t

7h

Measuring iceberg production with earthquakes

An international team led by French researchers from the CNRS and Paris Diderot University came up with the idea of using earthquakes generated when icebergs break away — felt hundreds of kilometres off — to measure this ice loss. This breakthrough in environmental seismology has made it possible to quantify Greenland glacial shrinkage through calving between 1993 and 2013.

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Driving a wedge into historic gaps of climate science

Evidence of historic marine life present in Alaskan permafrost is helping scientists reconstruct ancient changes in the ice cover over the Arctic Ocean.

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Child vaccination levels falling short in large parts of Africa

A study by the University of Southampton shows that several low- and middle-income countries, especially in Africa, need more effective child vaccination strategies to eliminate the threat from vaccine-preventable diseases.

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Chronic diseases restrict the mobility of older people — often unconsciously

Chronic diseases are a key factor limiting the mobility of older people. Usually individuals are conscious of their condition in the case of an acute musculoskeletal disorder that causes pain or functional limitations. However, if the condition has progressed slowly, the gradual restriction of mobility often goes unnoticed.

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Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 predicts advanced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

AKR1B10 is a useful serum biomarker for advanced liver fibrosis in Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and, combined with serum WFA(+)-M2BP, it can predict hepatocellular carcinoma development, gastroesophageal varix formation, and poor prognosis.

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Bright spot analysis for photodynamic diagnosis of brain tumors using confocal microscopy

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University have found that bright spot areas have generally lower fluorescence in brain tumors than in normal tissues in images captured by irradiation with a 405 nm wavelength laser and 544.5-619.5 nm band-pass filter. This may facilitate discrimination of glioblastoma with or without 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and could be applicable to other t

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Prostate medicines linked to type 2 diabetes risk, study suggests

Men taking medicines to reduce the symptoms of prostate disease may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, a study led by the University of Edinburgh and UCL suggests. Researchers say patients should continue to take the drugs, which are commonly prescribed to older men, but warn they may need additional health checks.

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Biosynthesis of widespread pigments from bacteria revealed

Bacteria can protect themselves from the attack of free radicals using specific natural products in their membranes. The biosynthesis of one of the most common protective pigments that could also be of interest for the medical and cosmetic industries has now been uncovered by researchers from Goethe University and TU Munich.

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CNIO researchers assess melanoma progression with a new liquid biopsy technique

Analysis of extracellular vesicles and circulating DNA from fluid obtained from the drainage implanted after surgery, normally disposed of as medical waste, detects melanoma patients with risk of recurrence and may help doctors decide who should undergo adjuvant therapyThe new technique might change the way melanoma patients are followed up.The upcoming goals are to verify whether liquid biopsy ca

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New super-accurate optical atomic clocks pass critical test

Researchers have measured an optical clock's ticking with record-breaking accuracy while also showing the clock can be operated with unprecedented consistency. These achievements represent a significant step toward demonstrating that the new generation of optical atomic clocks are accurate and robust enough to be used to redefine the official length of a second, which is currently based on microwa

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Warm winds in autumn could strain Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf

New research shows that the Larsen C ice shelf — the fourth largest ice shelf in Antarctica — experienced an unusual spike in late summer and early autumn surface melting in the years 2015 to 2017. The study, spanning 35 years from 1982 to 2017, quantifies how much of this additional melting is due to warm, dry air currents called foehn winds that originate high in the peninsula's central mounta

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Bezos upbeat on Amazon Go physical stores

Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos said Thursday he sees a bright future in the company's cashierless retail stores and that many consumers see the experience as "magical."

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California races to predict which town could be next to burn

Impoverished towns in the shadow of Mount Shasta. Rustic Gold Rush cities in the Sierra Nevada foothills. High-dollar resort communities on the shores of Lake Tahoe. Ritzy Los Angeles County suburbs.

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It is all in the genes: Decoding the effects of multiple stressors

As the number of new chemicals used in industry, food and consumer products is constantly increasing, so is the chemical release to the environment, and the need to understand the adverse effects of chemical mixtures becomes increasingly urgent. In addition, chemicals may act in combination with non-chemical stressors (e.g., radiation, temperature, pH etc.) to produce unexpected multiple stressor

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Fountains of Plasma Rain Might Explain One of the Biggest Mysteries of the Sun

This strange structure could explain what happens during solar rain.

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Stress-related disorders linked to heightened risk of cardiovascular disease

Stress-related disorders — conditions triggered by a significant life event or trauma — may be linked to a heightened risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), finds a large study.

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Genome analysis shows the combined effect of many genes on cognitive traits

Individual differences in cognitive abilities in children and adolescents are partly reflected in variations in their DNA sequence, according to a new study.

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Mozilla Releases Native ARM64 Firefox Browser For Snapdragon Windows 10 PCs, Get It Here

Microsoft and Qualcomm are really pushing to get customers interested in ARM-powered Windows 10 machines. There’s no question that the Windows 10 scene is currently dominated by x86-64 processors …

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Bezos upbeat on Amazon Go physical stores

Amazon chief executive Jeff Bezos said Thursday he sees a bright future in the company's cashierless retail stores and that many consumers see the experience as "magical."

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Warm winds in autumn could strain Antarctica's Larsen C ice shelf

The Antarctic Peninsula is the northernmost part of Earth's coldest continent, making it particularly vulnerable to a changing global climate. Surface melting of snow and ice initiated the breakup of the peninsula's northernmost Larsen A ice shelf in 1995, followed in 2002 by the Larsen B ice shelf to the south, which lost a section roughly the size of Rhode Island.

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Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more

During the Great Depression, some unemployed Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. The workers retrieved tens of thousands of specimens that have been studied in small bits and pieces while stored in the state collections of The University of Texas at Austin for the past 80 years.

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New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented

Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors.

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Triboluminescence

I was interested to see this paper , which goes into detail on a chemical phenomenon that many have seen but no one understands very well: triboluminescence . That word meets with a blank stare or instant recognition; there’s not much in between. It means “emission of light when a material is physically broken”, and that encompasses fracturing, scratching, rubbing, and so on. Many people have not

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Elever från grundskola och gymnasium strejkar för klimatet

Med skolstrejk utanför riksdagen initierade svenska Greta Thunberg vad som kommit att bli en global klimatkampanj bland skolungdomar. Vilka är det som strejkar? Det har forskare i tio europeiska länder undersökt och resultaten presenteras nu i en ny rapport. För att undersöka vilka som deltar i dessa protester och vad de anser i klimatfrågan genomförde forskare i tio europeiska länder en samordna

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Killer tadpoles threaten Andaman archipelago's native frog species

The Indian bullfrog, which is native to the Indian sub-continent, has recently invaded the Andaman archipelago. This group of islands lies about 1200 km east of the Indian mainland. The bullfrog was probably introduced to the archipelago in the early 2000s – either as adults released for human consumption, as tadpoles that contaminated aqua-cultural stocks, or both.

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George Monbiot Q + A – How rejuvenating nature could help fight climate change

Natural climate solutions let nature do the hard work in the fight against climate change by restoring habitats such as forests and wetlands. This could absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and help biodiversity thrive. Stephen Woroniecki – a Ph.D. Researcher in Climate Change Adaptation from Lund University in Sweden – discusses how this approach could address the ecological crisis with Guar

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Killer tadpoles threaten Andaman archipelago's native frog species

The Indian bullfrog, which is native to the Indian sub-continent, has recently invaded the Andaman archipelago. This group of islands lies about 1200 km east of the Indian mainland. The bullfrog was probably introduced to the archipelago in the early 2000s – either as adults released for human consumption, as tadpoles that contaminated aqua-cultural stocks, or both.

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Reptile expert sizes up the ‘Game of Thrones’ dragons

As Game of Thrones returns for its final season, herpetologist Rachel Keeffe has answers to your pressing dragon-related questions. If Daenerys’ dragons are as big as 747s, could they actually get off the ground? If dragons are cold-blooded, could they really go north of the wall? Could a herpetologist address highly fictional dragon scenarios using real science? Keeffe studies reptiles and amphi

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Mass extinction recovery governed by “morphospace”

Slow return to diversity is due tensions between ecology and possibility. Stephen Flieschfresser reports.

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Meet the cookie micro-monster

New wasp species named after snack, because why not?

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Camera traps are revealing the secret lives of Britain’s mammals

With a growing human population, it’s more important than ever that scientists and the public work together to monitor mammals effectively, writes Sian Green from the UK's Durham University.

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Scientists warn on Antarctic ice shelf vulnerability

Larsen C could be set to follow Larsen A and B and split apart. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Beth Lilja stopper som vicedirektør

Til juli går Beth Lilja på pension og stopper derfor som vicedirektør på Sjællands Universitetshospital.

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Nu bliver seksårsfristen afskaffet

Læger kan nu se frem til ikke at skulle være færdig med deres hoveduddannelse inden for en bestemt tidsgrænse. Seksårsfristen bliver nemlig nu endelig smidt i skraldespanden.

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Regeringen på besøg: Den besværlige onkel, man bliver nødt til at invitere

Stemningen blev noget anstrengt, da økonomi- og indenrigsministeren leverede regeringens hilsen på Danske Regioners generalforsamling. Men han prøvede at løsne op med morskab.

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The Tangled Web of Turning Spider Silk Into a Super Material

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Is anyone listening to you on Alexa

submitted by /u/fossil112 [link] [comments]

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NEJM applying universal standards of care to Ebola virus disease

LSTM's Senior Clinical Lecturer, Dr. Shevin Jacob, is corresponding author on a perspective piece published in the New England Journal of Medicine calling for universal standards of care to be applied in relation to ebola virus disease.

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Can a computer write a script? Machine learning goes Hollywood

submitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]

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In Search of Hitler's Gold | Expedition Unknown

Josh Gates is in deep woods of the Bavarian Alps with treasure hunters who are hot on the trail for Nazi gold. Stream Full Episodes of Expedition Unknown: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/expedition-unknown/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram! http

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The Impressionistic Tracings of Airplane Lights at Night

Pete Mauney stiches hundreds of photographs together to create these poetic, nocturnal renderings.

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New super-accurate optical atomic clocks pass critical test

Researchers have measured an optical clock's ticking with record-breaking accuracy while also showing the clock can be operated with unprecedented consistency. These achievements represent a significant step toward demonstrating that the new generation of optical atomic clocks are accurate and robust enough to be used to redefine the official length of a second, which is currently based on microwa

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Amazon Go stores to accept cash under growing pressure to serve low-income shoppers

Amazon Go, the app-enabled stores that enable customers to simply walk out with their purchases—no checkout clerk needed—plans to begin accepting cash amid growing criticism that the process discriminates against low-income shoppers.

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Lack of awareness of inequality means we penalise those who have least

People can automatically assume that someone who gives less money to charity is less generous, according to new research. The assumption was made in the study when people had no knowledge of how much someone had donated as a percentage of their overall income.

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Public invited to help name the largest unnamed world in the solar system

More than 10 years since its discovery, (225088) 2007 OR10 is the largest minor planet in our solar system without a name, and the 3 astronomers who discovered it want the public's help to change that. In an article published by The Planetary Society today, Meg Schwamb, Mike Brown, and David Rabinowitz, the astronomers who helped discover 2007 OR10, announced a campaign inviting the public to pick

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Cold plasma can kill viruses in the air

Energetic, charged fragments of air molecules can render dangerous airborne viruses harmless, research shows. Researchers hope to one day harness this capability to replace a century-old device: the surgical mask. The engineers have measured the virus-killing speed and effectiveness of nonthermal plasmas—the ionized, or charged, particles that form around electrical discharges such as sparks. A n

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The Tangled Web of Turning Spider Silk Into a Super Material

Spider-Man is one of the most popular superheroes of all time. It’s a bit surprising given that one of the more common phobias is arachnophobia—a debilitating fear of spiders . Perhaps more fantastical is that young Peter Parker, a brainy high school science nerd, seemingly developed overnight the famous web-shooters and the synthetic spider silk that he uses to swing across the cityscape like Ta

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Researchers induce limb movement in paralysed mice

Activating an axon-regenerating pathway pays dividends. Biplab Das reports.

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Historic water levels at Iraq reservoirs and dams: Officials

Water levels in Iraq's reservoirs and dams have reached historic heights, officials have told AFP, with thousands of families facing possible displacement by more flooding.

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How flying cars could help in the fight against climate change

Have you ever been stuck in traffic and wished you could zoom above the gridlock in a flying car? A new study predicts these futuristic vehicles could be good for your commute and good for the environment—as long as they're used on long-distance trips with several carpool buddies.

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A 3-year-old disabled his family's iPad for 25 million minutes. His dad went to Twitter for help

A 3-year-old boy tried to unlock his family's iPad this weekend. He ended up disabling it for nearly 50 years.

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The Utter Inadequacy of America’s Efforts to Desegregate Schools

My best friend in kindergarten, Eddie Linton, did not live in one of the spacious houses on the hill in the Boston suburb where I grew up in the 1980s and 1990s, Belmont, which is best known for its stellar schools and abundance of Harvard professors. Eddie, who is black, lived instead in a brownstone in the South End of Boston, alongside his two American-born sisters, plus grandparents and aunts

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Reproduction: How male flies enforce their interests

During mating, both males and females sometimes evolve creative strategies to pursue their interests. Researchers from Münster (Germany) and Lausanne (Switzerland) have now found out: male flies manipulate their partners primarily in order to increase their own chances in reproductive competition. The study was published in the journal PNAS.

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Ancient 'Texas Serengeti' had elephant-like animals, rhinos, alligators and more

During the Great Depression, Texans were put to work as fossil hunters. The workers retrieved tens of thousands of specimens that have been studied in small bits and pieces while stored in the state collections of The University of Texas at Austin for the past 80 years.Now, decades after they were first collected, a UT researcher has studied and identified an extensive collection of fossils from d

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Texts like networks: How many words are sufficient to recognize the author?

We are more original than we think — this is what is being suggested by literary text analysis carried out by a new method of stylometry proposed by scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences. The author's individuality can already be seen in connections between no more than a dozen of words in English text. It turns out that in Slavic languages authorship identif

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New tunable nanomaterials possible due to flexible process invented by Bath physicists

Physicists at the University of Bath have developed a flexible process allowing the synthesis in a single flow of a wide range of novel nanomaterials with various morphologies, with potential applications in areas including optics and sensors.

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Lack of access to antibiotics is a major global health challenge

In a new report, researchers at the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy (CDDEP) conducted stakeholder interviews and literature reviews in Uganda, India, and Germany to identify key, global access barriers to antibiotics.

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USC research shows remedy for painful jaw disease

USC researchers and collaborators report a breakthrough to prevent osteonecrosis of the jaw, a side effect suffered by some people undergoing treatment for cancer or osteoporosis.

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UBC researchers say eggs for breakfast benefits those with diabetes

While some cereals may be the breakfast of champions, a UBC professor suggests people with Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) should be reaching for something else.Associate Professor Jonathan Little, who teaches in UBC Okanagan's School of Health and Exercise Sciences, published a study this week demonstrating that a high-fat, low-carb breakfast (LCBF) can help those with T2D control blood sugar levels throug

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Exoplanet detectors

The first batch of charge-coupled devices, or CCDs, to be flown on ESA's PLATO space observatory was accepted by ESA last month. This is an important milestone on the road to creating a groundbreaking spacecraft that will detect Earth-sized exoplanets in orbit around nearby stars.

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Therapeutics-on-a-chip (TOC): Manufacturing synthetic proteins for point-of-care therapeutics

Therapeutic proteins are protein-based drug candidates bioengineered in the lab for pharmaceutical and clinical applications. Based on their pharmacokinetics, the candidates can be divided into groups that (1) replace a defective or abnormal protein, (2) augment an existing path in vivo, (3) provide a new function or activity in vivo, (4) interfere with activities of a molecule or organism and (5)

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MOFs can sense and sort troublesome gases

From astronauts and submariners to miners and rescue workers, people who operate in small, enclosed spaces need good air quality to work safely and effectively. Electronic sensors now developed by a KAUST team can simultaneously detect at least three critical parameters that are important to monitor to ensure human comfort and safety.

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Which houses survived wildfire? Often, those built to code

The sky was turning orange and the embers were flying from the Camp Fire when Oney and Donna Carrell and Donna's father sped away from their Paradise home.

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First black hole picture: The big mysteries we still need to solve

We finally have the first real image of a black hole, so researchers can begin studying these cosmic mysteries in detail. Here is what they are hoping to learn

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Portugal has potential to lead Industry 4.0: PM – Xinhua

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The best Android shortcuts that aren't built-in

DIY Four apps that'll make your tapping and swiping more efficient. The beauty of Android lies in its customizability. Apps can hook into the operating system and add shortcuts that weren’t built-in, allowing you to streamline your…

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Surviving climate change means transforming both economics and design

What could be more important than sustaining habitable living conditions on Earth? Climate change, biodiversity loss and other environmental problems demand changes on an order of magnitude well beyond the trajectory of business-as-usual. And yet, despite accumulative social and technological innovation, environmental problems are accelerating far more quickly than sustainable solutions.

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Monsanto loses appeal in French farmer's poisoning case

A French appeals court on Thursday said US chemicals giant Monsanto was guilty of poisoning a farmer who said he suffered neurological damage after accidently inhaling fumes from a weedkiller made by the company.

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Biosynthesis of widespread pigments from bacteria revealed

Bacteria can protect themselves from the attack of free radicals using specific natural products in their membranes. The biosynthesis of one of the most common protective pigments that could also be of interest for the medical and cosmetic industries has now been uncovered by researchers from Goethe University and TU Munich.

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First black hole photo confirms Einstein's theory of relativity

Black holes are long-time superstars of science fiction. But their Hollywood fame is a little strange given that no-one has ever actually seen one – at least, until now. If you needed to see to believe, then thank the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), which has just produced the first ever direct image of a black hole. This amazing feat required global collaboration to turn the Earth into one giant t

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Lose vægter regeringens overlevelse højere end regionernes

Både regeringen og regionerne kæmper for overlevelsen, og det sætter en helt central person i lidt af et dilemma.

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Biosynthesis of widespread pigments from bacteria revealed

Bacteria can protect themselves from the attack of free radicals using specific natural products in their membranes. The biosynthesis of one of the most common protective pigments that could also be of interest for the medical and cosmetic industries has now been uncovered by researchers from Goethe University and TU Munich.

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This physicist is trying to make sense of the brain’s tangled networks

Brought up to think she couldn’t go to college, Danielle Bassett now believes she can capture the brain’s dynamics in a set of equations to optimize learning or treat diseases

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Scientists Find a New Way to Kickstart Stable Fusion Reactions

Warm Fusion Scientists from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory say that they’ve found a new way to start up nuclear fusion reactions . The new technique, described in research published last month in the journal Physics of Plasmas , provides an alternate means for reactors to convert gas into the superhot plasma that gets fusion reactions going with less equipment taking up valuable lab spac

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What Spy-Satellite Companies Can Teach NASA About Climate Change

SAN FRANCISCO —The sky has filled with eyes, and NASA is starting to notice. Over the past several years, venture-funded start-ups have hurled hundreds of inexpensive satellites into orbit. For-profit companies have used smartphone technology to make compact satellites that look down at Earth and monitor its every oceanic gurgle, erupting volcano, or forest conflagration. Hundreds of these satell

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Team makes artificial atoms that work at room temp

Ultra-secure online communications, completely indecipherable if intercepted, is one step closer with the help of a recently published discovery by University of Oregon physicist Ben Alemán.

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New species of deep-sea corals discovered in Atlantic marine monument

DNA analysis recently confirmed that Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists and their collaborators at OceanX, the University of Connecticut (UConn), and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) discovered two new species of deep-sea corals during a September 2018 expedition in the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Monument, located about 100 miles from the Northeast U.S. coas

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New species of deep-sea corals discovered in Atlantic marine monument

DNA analysis recently confirmed that Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) scientists and their collaborators at OceanX, the University of Connecticut (UConn), and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) discovered two new species of deep-sea corals during a September 2018 expedition in the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Monument, located about 100 miles from the Northeast U.S. coas

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Johns Hopkins researchers create novel cell model of aging-related colon cancer risk

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say a new study of clusters of mouse cells known as "organoids" has significantly strengthened evidence that epigenetic changes, common to aging, play a essential role in colon cancer initiation. The findings show that epigenetic changes are the spark that pushes colon-cancer driving gene mutations into action, the researchers say.

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People with a sense of oneness experience greater life satisfaction

People who believe in oneness — the idea that everything in the world is connected and interdependent — appear to have greater life satisfaction than those who don't, regardless of whether they belong to a religion or don't, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Singapore airport nature dome unveiled in fight for flights

A 40-metre indoor waterfall cascading through a steel and glass dome is at the heart of a vast complex in Singapore's main airport unveiled Thursday, part of the city-state's fight for global flights.

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Bezos: Amazon will take risks, learn from failures

Amazon challenged its retail rivals to raise their wages and improve benefits, saying the competition will help everyone.

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Is Hemp the key to a sustainable future?

Hemp is one of the most versatile and sustainable plants on the planet—and with Mirreco's new harvesting machine, its many uses could go mainstream.

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Scientists find self-healing catalyst for potential large-scale use in hydrogen production

Researchers working within NCCR MARVEL have discovered a self-healing catalyst that can be used to release hydrogen through the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. The catalyst, SION-X, is based on the abundant mineral Jacquesdietrichite, is sustainable, air stable and can be easily regenerated, stored and handled. These characteristics mean that it may offer significant advantages over

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New microscopy method provides more details about nanocomposites

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have developed a new microscopy approach for imaging gel nanocomposites in their natural state, which will reveal more useful information about their assembly and properties.

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Quantum dots are just as awesome as we’d hoped

A new measurement technique may finally dissolve doubts about the quality of quantum dots. Quantum dots—tiny, easy-to-produce particles—may soon take the place of more expensive single crystal semiconductors in advanced electronics found in solar panels, camera sensors, and medical imaging tools. Although quantum dots have begun to break into the consumer market—in the form of quantum dot TVs—lon

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Scant amounts of DNA reveal conservation clues

The challenges of collecting DNA samples directly from endangered species makes understanding and protecting them harder. A new approach promises cheap, rapid analysis of genetic clues in degraded and left-behind material, such as hair and commercial food products.

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Beating Weeds With High Power Zaps – No Chemicals Required

submitted by /u/Tristan_R [link] [comments]

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3-D-printed propeller blade opens the way to eco-friendly shipping

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How to knit a sports car with carbon fibre

Replacing steel and aluminium in the factory

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The Struggle of 'The Twilight Zone' in the Age of Streaming Services

Is Jordan Peele’s latest project buzz-y enough to be a “system-seller” for CBS All Access?

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NordicTrack Commercial S22i iFit Studio Cycle Review

Hate going to studio fitness classes? Head to Norway on NordicTrack's Peloton-style bike instead.

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When science is put in the service of evil

The Holocaust is one of the worst collective crimes in the history of humanity – and medical science was complicit in the horrors.

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MAXI J1957+032 contains a neutron star, Swift observations suggest

Observations conducted with NASA's Swift space telescope have provided more insights about the nature of a compact component of the transient low-mass X-ray binary named MAXI J1957+032. Results of these observations, available in a paper published April 1 on arXiv.org, suggest that the system hosts a neutron star.

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Machine learning algorithm predicts who will be left standing in 'Game of Thrones'

Shortly before the curtain drops on the hit HBO show Game of Thrones (GoT), students attending a computer science seminar at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) embarked on an unusual scientific mission: predicting which character has the best chance to sit the coveted Iron Throne.

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Maintenance immunotherapy fails to improve survival in extensive small cell lung cancer

Maintenance immunotherapy fails to improve survival in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), according to late-breaking results from the CheckMate 451 study to be presented today at the European Lung Cancer Congress (ELCC) 2019.

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Philadelphia hospitals responded to equivalent of 54 mass shooting-type events in 11 years

A research team led by Temple's Dr. Jessica H. Beard, set out to calculate the number and analyze trends in the rates of firearm-injured patients (FIP) transported at clustered time intervals to Philadelphia-area hospitals over an 11-year period. They also examined FIP demographics and mortality, time of day of FIP transport and level of treating trauma center over the same study period, comparing

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Loss of a DNA repair system creates a unique vulnerability in many cancer types

Cancer cells adapt to potentially fatal mutations and other molecular malfunctions by adjusting one or more other genes' activity, in the process becoming dependent on those genes for their survival and growth. The resulting genetic dependencies may provide targets for developing new precision-guided drugs or other cancer treatment strategies.Reporting in Nature, researchers describe one such vuln

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Disney Plus: 7 questions we want answered at today's unveiling – CNET

Disney is rounding up investors, reporters and analysts for a first look into its much-anticipated Netflix rival, Disney Plus. Here's what we want to know.

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World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean hydrogen energy

Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission. Unfortunately, hydrogen gas is highly flammable when mixed with air, so very efficient and effective sensors are needed. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, present the first hydrogen sensors ever to meet the future performance targets for use in hydrogen powered

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Kennedy Krieger research scientist explores Leonardo da Vinci's knowledge of the brain

Jonathan Pevsner, PhD, professor and research scientist at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, wrote an article featured in the April edition of The Lancet titled, 'Leonardo da Vinci's studies of the brain.' In the piece, Pevsner highlights the exquisite drawings and curiosity, dedication and scientific rigor that led Leonardo to make penetrating insights into how the brain functions.

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Archaeology is unravelling new stories about Indigenous seagoing trade on Australia's doorstep

It has long been assumed that Indigenous Australia was isolated until Europeans arrived in 1788, except for trade with parts of present day Indonesia beginning at least 300 years ago. But our recent archaeological research hints of at least an extra 2,100 years of connections across the Coral Sea with Papua New Guinea.

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Israel's Beresheet spacecraft crashes on Moon

Israel's Beresheet spacecraft is believed to have smashed into the lunar surface after engine failure.

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Look out for I, Robot: 8 jobs soon to be lost to automation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Jura kan spænde ben for løbehjulsløsning i Aarhus

Efter det i januar blev lovligt at køre på de elektroniske løbehjul, har Aarhus Kommune forhandlet med operatøren Voi, så deleløbehjulsordningen kunne komme til byen. Men nu hvor samarbejdsaftalen er i hus, ser det ud til, at kommunen bliver nødt til at gøre plads til flere potentielle samarbejds…

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Astronomerne er blevet klogere på sorte huller, men de vil vide mere

PLUS. Nye observationer i 2020 og årene efter skal give os skarpere billeder og mere viden om de sorte huller i galaksernes midte.

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Scientists create a super-fast robot microscope to search for dark matter

Researchers from the National University of science and technology MISIS (NUST MISIS, Moscow, Russia) and the National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN, Naples, Italy) have developed a simple and cost-effective technology that allows increasing the speed of automated microscopes (AM) by 10 to 100 times. The microscopes' speed increase will help scientists in many fields: medicine, nuclear physi

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Scientists improve cycling performance of Al-based batteries with high areal density cathode

Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are the dominant power source for portable electronics and electric vehicles. However, the relatively low theoretical capacity of the graphite anode (372 mAh g-1) hinders the enhancement of the energy density of LIBs. Therefore, exploiting anode materials with high capacity is drawing increasing attention.

9h

Heightened Awareness for Parkinson’s Disease

Today is World Parkinson’s Day, which was established 22 years ago on April 11, 1997 as a joint initiative between the European Parkinson’s Disease Association (EDPA) and the World Health Organization. The observance fittingly takes place on the birthday of social reformer and political activist James Parkinson (b. April 11, 1755), who first recognized Parkinson’s (then “Shaking Palsy”) as a medi

9h

How much nature is lost due to higher yields?

The exploitation of farmland is being intensified with a focus on raising yields. The degree to which yields actually increase as a result, and the extent of the simultaneous loss of biological diversity have to date been under-researched factors. An international team of scientists led by the UFZ has now evaluated data from worldwide research in which both yield and biodiversity were examined bef

9h

Deep learning tests billions of graphene combos in 2 days

Researchers are applying one of the first uses of deep learning to the field of materials science. Deep learning refers to the technology computers use to intelligently perform tasks such as recognizing language and driving autonomous vehicles. Discovering how atoms—such as a single layer of carbon atoms found in graphene, one of the world’s strongest materials—work to create a solid material is

9h

How much nature is lost due to higher yields?

The exploitation of farmland is being intensified with a focus on raising yields. The degree to which yields actually increase as a result, and the extent of the simultaneous loss of biological diversity have to date been under-researched factors. An international team of scientists led by the UFZ has now evaluated data from worldwide research in which both yield and biodiversity were examined bef

9h

Pre-crop values from satellite images to support diversification of agriculture

Pre-crop values for a high number of previous and following crop combinations originating from farmers' fields are, for the first time, available to support diversification of currently monotonous crop sequencing patterns in agriculture. The groundbreaking method utilizing satellite images was developed by Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) in collaboration with Finnish Geospatial Research

9h

Observing the invisible: The long journey to the first image of a black hole

The first picture of a supermassive black hole at the centre of a galaxy shows how we have, in a sense, observed the invisible.

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Pre-crop values from satellite images to support diversification of agriculture

Pre-crop values for a high number of previous and following crop combinations originating from farmers' fields are, for the first time, available to support diversification of currently monotonous crop sequencing patterns in agriculture. The groundbreaking method utilizing satellite images was developed by Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) in collaboration with Finnish Geospatial Research

9h

Första bilden av ett svart hål

Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) länkar samman teleskop runt hela jorden för att skapa ett virtuellt teleskop lika stort som planeten. Med nätverket av teleskop har forskarna fått ett nytt sätt att studera de extrema objekt i universum som Einsteins allmänna relativitetsteori kunde förutspå, hundra år efter experimentet som först bekräftade teorin. Svarta hål är extrema astronomiska objekt med enorm

9h

World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean hydrogen energy

Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission. Unfortunately, hydrogen gas is highly flammable when mixed with air, so very efficient and effective sensors are needed. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, present the first hydrogen sensors ever to meet the future performance targets for use in hydrogen powered

9h

Greenland Telescope to image black holes by moving onto the Greenland ice sheet

Scientists from the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, will soon be able to participate in the "Event Horizon Telescope" (EHT) with the Greenland Telescope (GLT). The GLT will become part of a global network of radio telescopes designed to get the first images of black holes.

9h

Researchers charge ahead on battery storage

QUT researchers will lead key research projects in expanding Australia's battery industry from mining to manufacturing, with the announcement of the Future Battery Industries Cooperative Research Centre.

9h

It doesn't pay to play angry when negotiating: study

Anger, the faux, feigned kind, has been a tool in negotiations for generations. The idea that pretending to be angry can coerce the counterpart into conceding to your terms. Those thinking about using such a tool, though, need to realize the real costs and risks involved.

9h

There’s a new fungal superbug, and it’s probably humanity’s fault

Health Don't panic—but do pay attention. Candida auris undeniably has public health officials on edge, but its story also contains some important lessons for the public. Here’s what you need to know.

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How to feed 530 million Europeans with sustainable food by 2050

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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A sex-determining gene might help guarantee better papaya production

A gene that dictates which of three sexes a papaya tree will become, before seed germination, could spur a leap in the ultra-nutritious crop's production.

10h

Why Europeans Don’t Get Huge Medical Bills

Should America just get rid of health insurers? Americans don’t seem to like insurance companies much, even if they’re happy with their health coverage itself. Several Democratic health-care proposals would end private health insurance entirely, an idea that some Americans seem to applaud, until you tell th em that it would entail higher taxes and a government-run system. And then they sometimes

10h

What Is the Greatest Act of Courage?

Roger Moorhouse, author, The Devils’ Alliance: Hitler’s Pact With Stalin, 1939–1941 It is hard to top the incredible bravery of Witold Pilecki, a Polish soldier who in 1940 volunteered to join a German roundup so that he could report on what was going on inside a newly established concentration camp. That camp was Auschwitz. Heath Hardage Lee, author, The League of Wives On May 2, 1966, the Ameri

10h

A sex-determining gene might help guarantee better papaya production

A gene that dictates which of three sexes a papaya tree will become, before seed germination, could spur a leap in the ultra-nutritious crop's production.

10h

Fluc­tu­a­tions in the void

In quantum physics, a vacuum is not empty, but rather steeped in tiny fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Until recently it was impossible to study those vacuum fluctuations directly. Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a method that allows them to characterize the fluctuations in detail.

10h

Measuring iceberg production with earthquakes

Global warming is significantly reducing the volume of ice sheets—like the one covering Greenland—through melting or by shearing away blocks of ice that tumble into the ocean and become icebergs, a process known as calving.

10h

Study outlines how social media can play successful role in protest in authoritarian countries

Social media played a central role in the Arab Spring, when citizens demonstrated against and ousted oppressive government regimes. A new study from the University of Kansas analyzes how social media can also help citizens in authoritarian countries oppose state actions without invoking retribution from the government, all by strategically framing their message and sharing information. One such mo

10h

Image of the Day: Eroded Coral

Coral reefs near Maui, Hawaii, show signs of erosion due to excess nutrients from wastewater.

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Why Mirror Symmetry Is Like Fancy Ramen

Ursula Whitcher tells us why she loves this physics-inspired branch of mathematics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nye anbefalinger: Læger skal overveje akupunktur mod hovedpine

Sundhedsstyrelsens nye anbefalinger om hovedpine skal sikre ensartet visitation og mere behandling gennem almen praksis. Og så skal lægerne overveje alternativ behandling.

10h

First 3-parent baby born in clinical trial to treat infertility

A Greek woman has given birth to a boy using a controversial technique that combines DNA from three people

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New device in Z machine measures power for nuclear fusion

If you're chasing the elusive goal of nuclear fusion and think you need a bigger reactor to do the job, you first might want to know precisely how much input energy emerging from the wall plug is making it to the heart of your machine.

10h

How designing an AV safety model enabled better safety solutions for human drivers

When Mobileye set out to design a safety concept for autonomous vehicles (AVs), we first had to examine the concepts and mechanisms that humans use to maintain road safety. We needed a framework fully compliant with the human road safety system so that AVs could share the same roads. We also needed something demonstrably safer, by design, for society to accept them on the roads.

10h

U.S. forests changes are double-edged sword for environment

Climate change, nitrogen deposition and fire suppression are leading to shifts in the types of trees that dominate American forests. These changes will have environmental consequences, potentially positive and negative, according to a Purdue University study.

10h

'Game of Thrones' Marketing Is Spreading Like Greyscale

Winter is coming for marketing teams working with the show—and they know it.

10h

Mars Methane Hunt Comes up Empty, Flummoxing Scientists

Trace Gas Orbiter spacecraft did not find the gas in red planet’s atmosphere during its first months of operation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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U.S. forests changes are double-edged sword for environment

Climate change, nitrogen deposition and fire suppression are leading to shifts in the types of trees that dominate American forests. These changes will have environmental consequences, potentially positive and negative, according to a Purdue University study.

10h

Water never freezes in these lipid ‘traps’

Scientists have discovered a way to prevent water from freezing by confining in nanometer-scale lipid channels. Even at extreme sub-zero temperatures the water retains the amorphous characteristics of a liquid. Making ice cubes is a simple process: you take a plastic ice-cube tray, fill it with water, and put it in the freezer. Before long, the water crystallizes and turns to ice. If you were to

10h

Life May Be Evolving on the Closest Alien Planet to Earth

Researchers from Cornell University are taking a closer look at Proxima-b to determine if it might harbor life. They believe that it very well may, and the proof they cite is Earth. The post Life May Be Evolving on the Closest Alien Planet to Earth appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Herbals Potentially Unsafe in Pregnancy

I know this blog is a metaphorical finger in the dike of a massive corporate advertising and misinformation campaign, but I need to say it as often as possible that herbal products are drugs. They are consumed or applied for the pharmacological effects of the chemicals they contain. But they are advertised as “natural” which is somehow magically supposed to alter that reality. Many people, I supp

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LIVE: Se den israelske månelanding

NB: Opdateret tid: I aften lander det israelske rumfartøj Beresheet på Månen. Det er første privatudviklede fartøj, udviklet som led i Google Lunar X-Prize-konkurrencen. Følg med her på kanalen fra ca. kl. 20.45. Landingen er sat til at starte ca. kl. 21.10 dansk tid.

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Why the black hole is a ray of light in these dark times | Ellie Mae O’Hagan

This stunning scientific feat shows what humanity can achieve when we’re co-operating not attacking each other “The gates of hell, the end of space and time.” That was how black holes were described at the press conference in Brussels where the first ever photograph of one was revealed to an excited audience. And this black hole, a super-massive object at the centre of the galaxy Messier 87 (M87),

10h

Utmaning att hantera våld i skolan

Våld i skolan leder gärna till upprörda känslor och högljudda meningsutbyten om ”skolans kris”. – Det går att urskilja ett perspektivskifte i debatten kring hur elevers oönskade handlingar ska bemötas. Anmälningsskyldigheten i socialtjänstlagen bygger på rätten till stöd, då en elev riskerar att utvecklas ogynnsamt på grund av sin livssituation. En polisanmälan handlar däremot om att det är eleve

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A gene linked to alcohol habits may influence who you choose to marry

People in a relationship tend to drink a similar amount, but it’s not clear why. Now it seems that a gene linked to alcohol use may shape our choice of partners

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Snowline helps set melting speed of Greenland ice sheet

Meltwater from Greenland’s ice sheet contributes to global sea level rise. An under-appreciated factor—the snowline’s position on the ice sheet—plays a key role in the melting’s pace, a new study shows. Researchers used satellite imagery to track the movement of the ice sheet’s snowline—the elevation above where the surface is snow-covered—and below where bare ice is exposed. The findings show th

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New York City gentrification creating urban 'islands of exclusion,' study finds

The New York metropolitan area has seen tremendous economic growth, but many residents in rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods are struggling to afford living in the 31-county, tri-state region, University of California, Berkeley, researchers have found.

10h

The Fundamental Legitimacy of Donald Trump

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s inquiry into links between Russia and the president’s campaign could have turned out so much worse for Donald Trump. It almost seemed certain that it would. But it didn’t. The end of the Mueller investigation has now made hollow the maximalist charges of collusion against Trump and his team. The collusion claim was an indirect—or direct—way of saying that Donald T

10h

The emergence of male and female traits in the development of beetle horns

The male Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus, which lives on Japan's main island, has big horns that are used as weapons to fight other males for females. Scientists have sought the developmental mechanism that creates these horns, and to this end, a research team at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan has identified sex-determining genes for the rhinoceros beetle, and

10h

Martian methane mystery: First results from the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter

New evidence of the impact of the recent planet-encompassing dust storm on water in the atmosphere, and a surprising lack of methane, are among the scientific highlights of the ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter's first year in orbit.

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The emergence of male and female traits in the development of beetle horns

The male Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus, which lives on Japan's main island, has big horns that are used as weapons to fight other males for females. Scientists have sought the developmental mechanism that creates these horns, and to this end, a research team at the National Institute for Basic Biology in Japan has identified sex-determining genes for the rhinoceros beetle, and

10h

Attention skills in a nonhuman cooperative breeding species

Cooperative breeding may facilitate the development of sophisticated communicative abilities such as intentionality and joint attention skills. Two new studies of researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrück provide the first evidence that a cooperatively breeding bird species

10h

How much evidence is enough to declare a new species of human?

The announcement of a new species of ancient human (more correctly hominin) from the Philippines, reported today in Nature, will cause a lot of head-shaking among anthropologists and archaeologists.

10h

Attention skills in a nonhuman cooperative breeding species

Cooperative breeding may facilitate the development of sophisticated communicative abilities such as intentionality and joint attention skills. Two new studies of researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrück provide the first evidence that a cooperatively breeding bird species

10h

Lower pension, shorter life

Income and social status have an increasing effect on life expectancy in Germany. On average, men with very low retirement pay die five years earlier than those who are much better off. Poverty shortens life. According to a study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, this correlation is also very clear for Germany. Their analysis shows that the gap between rich and p

10h

Working together as a 'virtual telescope,' observatories around the world produce first direct images of a black hole

An international team of over 200 astronomers, including scientists from MIT's Haystack Observatory, has captured the first direct images of a black hole. They accomplished this remarkable feat by coordinating the power of eight major radio observatories on four continents, to work together as a virtual, Earth-sized telescope.

10h

Greenland Telescope flytter ind på indlandsisen for at hjælpe med at tage billeder af sorte huller

Forskere fra DARK ved Niels Bohr Institutet får snart mulighed for at deltage i det verdensomspændende…

10h

Baby with DNA from three people born in Greece

Experimental IVF, which involves extra egg from female donor, criticised by UK experts A baby with DNA from three people has been born in Greece following a controversial fertility treatment. The baby boy, weighing 2.9kg (6lb), was born on Tuesday and both he and his mother, who is 32, are said to be in good health. Continue reading…

10h

Nuclear fusion breakthrough breathes life into the overlooked Z-pinch approach

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

11h

What Will 'Game of Thrones' Mean When It's All Over?

No matter who wins the game, their victory will signify something.

11h

Pete Buttigieg Revived South Bend With Tech. Up Next: America

As the mayor of a small Indiana city, Buttigieg applied his low-key technocratic style to economic and social dysfunction. Now he wants a chance to fix the country.

11h

How the Boston Marathon Messes With Runners to Slow Them Down

The course is mostly downhill and has few dramatic turns, yet it ranks among the slowest marathons in the world. Here's why.

11h

In an Ex-Googler's Novel, Silicon Valley Runs on Male Ego

The book by former Google communications head Jessica Powell is fiction, but many of its tropes are drawn from real life.

11h

The Event Horizon Telescope, the Hawking Effect and the Foundations of Physics

A theoretical physicist offers his take on the implications of the first-ever image of a black hole — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The Tragedy of "The Tragedy of the Commons"

The man who wrote one of environmentalism’s most-cited essays was a racist, eugenicist, nativist and Islamaphobe—plus his argument was wrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Datacentre i Danmark kan koste borgerne 400 millioner kroner årligt fra 2030

Datacentre til Google, Apple og Facebook risikerer at øge Danmarks samlede elforbrug med 17 pct. inden 2030, hvilket kan koste staten dyrt.

11h

Climate change made the Arctic greener. Now parts of it are turning brown.

Arctic browning could have far-reaching consequences for people and wildlife, affecting habitat and atmospheric carbon uptake as well as increasing wildfire risk.

11h

The Event Horizon Telescope, the Hawking Effect and the Foundations of Physics

A theoretical physicist offers his take on the implications of the first-ever image of a black hole — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Tragedy of "The Tragedy of the Commons"

The man who wrote one of environmentalism’s most-cited essays was a racist, eugenicist, nativist and Islamaphobe—plus his argument was wrong — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

Is Dark Matter Fuzzy?

These particles would be much tinier than electrons.

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Historic First Images of a Black Hole Show Einstein Was Right (Again)

Albert Einstein's towering genius is on display yet again.

11h

10 Interesting Places in the Solar System We'd Like to Visit

Counting down the weirdest spots in our cosmic backyard.

11h

Glaciers in European Alps Could Disappear by 2100

Even if humans manage to prevent further global warming, the glaciers will still lose half their volume by 2050.

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In Photos: The Vanishing Glaciers of Europe's Alps

Half of the ice stored in the Alps will be gone by 2050. Here's a look at what's vanishing.

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Environment Watchdogs Harness AI to Track Overflowing Factory-Farm Waste

Floods dump tons of pathogen-laden manure into U.S. waterways, often from hard-to-identify farms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Environment Watchdogs Harness AI to Track Overflowing Factory-Farm Waste

Floods dump tons of pathogen-laden manure into U.S. waterways, often from hard-to-identify farms — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11h

The First Cave Art from the Balkans May Date Back 30,000 Years

In a first, archaeologists have discovered Upper Paleolithic cave paintings in the Balkans.

11h

Udskifter alle bybusser: Nu bliver Roskilde Danmarks første elbus-by

Søndag bliver Roskilde den første danske by, hvor alle bybusser kører på el, når 20 kinesiske Yutong-busser sættes i drift.

11h

12 timer tilbage: Se, hvem du er mest enig med til IDA-valget

Valget til IDAs repræsentantskab lukker til midnat. Har du glemt at stemme, eller er du stadig i tvivl om, hvor du skal sætte dit kryds, så læs med her.

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Buy SMA Solar Inverters Online in Middle East, South and Southeast Asian Region

Get solar powered products of SMA here at Power n Sun. These are perfect power backup solutions, which could cater to both industrial and domestic markets. Power n Sun is a supplier of SMA small PV inverters, Commercial and Industrial PV inverters , and Battery inverters for On and Off grid Applications in UAE, Saud, and South Asian Countries. We have very attractive rates for Distributors/Dealer

11h

Online dating sites give us an intriguing look at how we meet people now

More than 300 million people use online dating sites. We’re now beginning to get a look at how these complex networks work.

11h

Why can’t I sleep? My mission to understand insomnia – video

Millions of people in the UK have trouble sleeping, and Guardian reporter Leah Green is one of them. Like many insomniacs, she has tried all the home remedies, sleep hygiene techniques and gadgets designed to cure her sleep problems. She finds out why it is so difficult to conquer insomnia, and why good treatment is so hard to come by For more information about treating insomnia: NHS advice Digit

11h

‘I Don’t Want to Stay Here’: Half a Million Live in Flood Zones, and the Government Is Paying

About 450,000 government-subsidized households are in flood plains, a risk that is growing more urgent in the era of climate change.

12h

The Plan to Resurrect the North Korea Nuclear Talks

SEOUL, South Korea—Once Air Force One was wheels-up from Hanoi, Vietnam, last February, the American president phoned his South Korean counterpart and asked for help. Donald Trump had just walked out on nuclear negotiations with North Korea’s leader, but he hadn’t given up on diplomacy just yet. Trump told Moon Jae In that “you need to talk to Kim Jong Un,” recalled a senior South Korean official

12h

Pete Buttigieg Isn’t Just Winning Over People on the Internet

CONCORD, N.H.—Getting nonstop press is different from getting actual votes, but for now, Pete Buttigieg is everywhere. The Wall Street Journal has attacked him as a Trojan horse for “packaging progressive policies and methods in a smooth, moderate persona.” The prime minister of Ireland tweeted at him about Ulysses and invited him to Dublin. And he really does answer questions in Norwegian and It

12h

Retraction Watch readers, we need your help to be able to continue our work

Dear Retraction Watch readers: Maybe you’re a researcher who likes keeping up with developments in scientific integrity. Maybe you’re a reporter who has found a story idea on the blog. Maybe you’re an ethics instructor who uses the site to find case studies. Or a publisher who uses our blog to screen authors who submit … Continue reading Retraction Watch readers, we need your help to be able to co

12h

How best to live with grit and grace

Former NASA astronaut Leland Melvin is the only person to catch a pass in the NFL and in space. Here, he shares his thoughts on living in a state of grace and advocating for justice. Humanity's future is among the stars and to get there, we'll need everyone's diverse talents. Chasing Space: An Astronaut's Story of Grit, Grace, and Second Chances List Price: $25.99 New From: $11.97 in Stock Used F

12h

Ikke kun AI: Amazons medarbejdere lytter med til Alexas samtaler

Ansatte hos Amazon skal analysere og give feedback på kundernes samtaler med deres Alexa-enheder i et forsøg på at forbedre tjenesten.

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How scientists reacted to the first-ever image of a black hole

How scientists reacted to the first-ever image of a black hole How scientists reacted to the first-ever image of a black hole, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01191-w W e asked researchers what the breakthrough means for them and for science.

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This robot can sort recycling by giving it a squeeze

The robot, called RoCycle, uses pincers to pick through garbage and identify what materials each bit contains. It could help reduce how much waste gets sent to landfill.

12h

Would Columbus discover America Using Google Maps?

submitted by /u/mlorenzana12 [link] [comments]

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Why Journalists Are Wrong to Say Trump Is at War With Science

There's no question that the Trump administration often ignores or downplays science when making policy decisions. But that is very different from waging a war against science. When we science journalists get dragged into political fights, we only make it harder to reach those who we most need to reach.

12h

Mediatory roles of leukotriene B4 receptors in LPS-induced endotoxic shock

Mediatory roles of leukotriene B 4 receptors in LPS-induced endotoxic shock Mediatory roles of leukotriene B 4 receptors in LPS-induced endotoxic shock, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42410-8 Mediatory roles of leukotriene B 4 receptors in LPS-induced endotoxic shock

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Determination of oligomerization state of Drp1 protein in living cells at nanomolar concentrations

Determination of oligomerization state of Drp1 protein in living cells at nanomolar concentrations Determination of oligomerization state of Drp1 protein in living cells at nanomolar concentrations, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42418-0 Determination of oligomerization state of Drp1 protein in living cells at nanomolar concentrations

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Fabrication of Stacked MoS2 Bilayer with Weak Interlayer Coupling by Reduced Graphene Oxide Spacer

Fabrication of Stacked MoS 2 Bilayer with Weak Interlayer Coupling by Reduced Graphene Oxide Spacer Fabrication of Stacked MoS 2 Bilayer with Weak Interlayer Coupling by Reduced Graphene Oxide Spacer, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42446-w Fabrication of Stacked MoS 2 Bilayer with Weak Interlayer Coupling by Reduced Graphene Oxide Spacer

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A bioinformatics investigation into the pharmacological mechanisms of the effect of Fufang Danshen on pain based on methodologies of network pharmacology

A bioinformatics investigation into the pharmacological mechanisms of the effect of Fufang Danshen on pain based on methodologies of network pharmacology A bioinformatics investigation into the pharmacological mechanisms of the effect of Fufang Danshen on pain based on methodologies of network pharmacology, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40694-4 A bioinformatics investiga

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Enhancing cancer cell adhesion with clay nanoparticles for countering metastasis

Enhancing cancer cell adhesion with clay nanoparticles for countering metastasis Enhancing cancer cell adhesion with clay nanoparticles for countering metastasis, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42498-y Enhancing cancer cell adhesion with clay nanoparticles for countering metastasis

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Clinicopathological features and prognosis of young gastric cancer patients following radical gastrectomy: a propensity score matching analysis

Clinicopathological features and prognosis of young gastric cancer patients following radical gastrectomy: a propensity score matching analysis Clinicopathological features and prognosis of young gastric cancer patients following radical gastrectomy: a propensity score matching analysis, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42406-4 Clinicopathological features and prognosis of

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Horizontal gene transfer in human-associated microorganisms inferred by phylogenetic reconstruction and reconciliation

Horizontal gene transfer in human-associated microorganisms inferred by phylogenetic reconstruction and reconciliation Horizontal gene transfer in human-associated microorganisms inferred by phylogenetic reconstruction and reconciliation, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42227-5 Horizontal gene transfer in human-associated microorganisms inferred by phylogenetic reconstruct

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Phase-Encoded Hyperpolarized Nanodiamond for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Phase-Encoded Hyperpolarized Nanodiamond for Magnetic Resonance Imaging Phase-Encoded Hyperpolarized Nanodiamond for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Published online: 11 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42373-w Phase-Encoded Hyperpolarized Nanodiamond for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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Københavns Kommune beholder omstridte grønne poser

Miljø- og teknikudvalget i Københavns Kommune har valgt at beholde den bionedbrydelige pose til bioaffald, da man vurderer, at bioposerne er dyrere, men bedre end fossile plasticposer.

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Microbes in the human body swap genes, even across tissue boundaries, study indicates

Bacteria in the human body are sharing genes with one another at a higher rate than is typically seen in nature, and some of those genes appear to be traveling — independent of their microbial hosts — from one part of the body to another, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports.

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AI identifies risk of cholesterol-raising genetic disease, Stanford-led study finds

A new algorithm can determine whether a patient is likely to have a cholesterol-raising genetic disease that can cause early, and sometimes fatal, heart problems, reports a new study conducted by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.

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As Weeds Outsmart The Latest Weedkillers, Farmers Are Running Out Of Easy Options

In the long-running war between farmers and weeds, it's advantage, weeds. Scientists in Kansas have found examples of the dreaded pigweed that are immune to the newest weed-killing technologies. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)

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Plast gör världens snabbaste vätgassensor möjlig

Det forskarna arbetat fram är en optisk nanosensor som är inkapslad i ett plastmaterial. Sensorn bygger på ett optiskt fenomen – plasmoner – som uppstår när nanopartiklar av metall blir belysta och fångar upp ljus av en viss våglängd. Sensorn ändrar helt enkelt färg när mängden vätgas i omgivningen förändras. Plasten runt den lilla sensorn är inte bara ett skydd, utan en nyckelkomponent. Den ökar

12h

Filipinos plan more diggings where new human species found

Archaeologists who discovered fossil bones and teeth of a previously unknown human species that thrived more than 50,000 years ago in the northern Philippines say they plan more diggings and better protection of the popular limestone cave complex where the remains were unearthed.

13h

Microbes in the human body swap genes, even across tissue boundaries: study

Bacteria in the human body are sharing genes with one another at a higher rate than is typically seen in nature, and some of those genes appear to be traveling—independent of their microbial hosts—from one part of the body to another, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports.

13h

Bets on things VR/AR/MR that will change, for better and for worse

submitted by /u/hamishtodd1 [link] [comments]

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Designing Responsible AI

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Første gang nogensinde: I aften lander et privat rumfartøj på Månen

Så er det i aften, vi kan smække benene op med computeren i skødet og se verdens første private månelandingsfartøj dale ned på Månen i en forhåbentlig succesrig landing. Følg med her på siden, hvor vi streamer live.

13h

Solar Power is Engine of Spain's Economic Growth

submitted by /u/CaptainTomato21 [link] [comments]

13h

Battle for space more stealth than Star Wars

submitted by /u/MrSerious1 [link] [comments]

13h

Millennials hurt most by middle class squeeze: OECD

The middle class is getting squeezed and it is the millennial generation above all that is bearing the brunt, the OECD said, urging action to help households struggling with the rising cost of education and housing as incomes stagnate.

13h

Rapid urbanization increasing pressure on rural water supplies globally

An international team of researchers has carried out the first systematic global review of water reallocation from rural to urban regions—the practice of transferring water from rural areas to cities to meet demand from growing urban populations. They found that 69 cities with a population of 383 million people receive approximately 16 billion cubic meters of reallocated water per year—almost the

13h

Plastic toys: Is it time we cut back?

Plastic toys are convenient and cheap but they can be bad for the environment.

13h

Rapid urbanization increasing pressure on rural water supplies globally

An international team of researchers has carried out the first systematic global review of water reallocation from rural to urban regions — the practice of transferring water from rural areas to cities to meet demand from growing urban populations. They found that 69 cities with a population of 383 million people receive approximately 16 billion cubic meters of reallocated water per year — almos

13h