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nyheder2019april13

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An Archaeology Meeting Finds Itself in the Middle of #MeTooSTEM

A reporter, slated to speak about sexual harassment, is banned from the Society for American Archaeology conference after he confronts an accused sexual harasser in attendance.

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Tesla Shifts Gears, Again, and Some Fans Are Losing Patience

Tesla said it would remove the $35,000 version of its Model 3 sedan from online ordering forms, weeks after a back-and-forth over closing showrooms.

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Ingeniørhuset lagt i ruiner – og genopbygget

Royal Airforces bombning af Shellhuset under Anden Verdenskrig gik også ud over Ingeniørhuset, der var nærmeste nabo, fordi tyskerne havde nedbrudt brandmuren imellem de to bygninger. Huset udbrændte sammen med det meste af foreningens arkiv.

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The 50 Most Common Jobs and their likelihood of automation

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

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12 Best Weekly Tech Deals on Beats, Razer, iPhone SE, and More

If you've been looking for a great pair of wireless headphones, now is your chance.

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Somnox Review: Snuggling With a Robot Could Help You Fall Asleep

This fuzzy robot promises to help its bedtime companions fall asleep more quickly, sleep more deeply, and wake up more refreshed—all by simply cuddling.

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Optimize Algorithms to Support Kids Online, Not Exploit Them

Young people benefit from their online interactions. Locking them out of the Internet isn’t the answer to commercial bad actors.

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In Rwanda, We Know All About Dehumanizing Language

In Rwanda, we know what can happen when political leaders and media outlets single out certain groups of people as less than human. Twenty-five years ago this month, all hell broke loose in my country, which is tucked away in the Great Lakes region of Africa. Hordes of members of the Hutu ethnic majority, armed with machetes, spears, nail-studded clubs, and other rudimentary weapons, moved house

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Ilhan Omar Falls Victim to the Outrage Exhibitionists

When the ideological left engages in what is variously denigrated as “political correctness,” virtue-signaling, performative wokeness, or “social-justice warrior” cry-bullying, many on the right find it easy to spot the flaws in those modes of discourse. But that discernment vanishes when the populist right indulges in the same vices (even as progressives become unusually attuned to their downsid

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The Authoritarian Heroes of Game of Thrones

Imagine a man, one who lives in a stretch of vaguely frightening forest somewhere up north. And imagine that he wants to be your benevolent dictator. His pitch: Remove the current leadership. Destroy a neighboring nation and kill its populace. Then, conquer most of the continent. And somewhere in there, he’d also like to restore traditional values to the country, whatever that means. And he says

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From the Archives: Robert Hayden’s Tribute to Frederick Douglass

By the time he took to the pages of The Atlantic to make the case for black suffrage in 1866, Frederick Douglass had long since established himself as one of America’s most significant writers and political advocates. He escaped a life of bondage in Maryland at the age of 20 and fled north, becoming a powerful voice in the abolitionist movement and, after the Civil War set in, a sometime adviser

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Why we prefer people just like us. And why that may be dangerous.

It's common for people to form groups of like minded individuals who also have similar abilities. Evolution confers advantages on heterogeneous groups of people and groups with diverse talent sets. Prizing individual identity ahead of group identity also helps counteract tribalistic politics. Blueprint: The Evolutionary Origins of a Good Society List Price: $30.00 New From: $16.95 in Stock Used F

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Falcon Heavy's boosters landing in Cape Canaveral

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Trilobites: You Need Vitamin D to Live. How Could This Woman Survive With None in Her Blood?

She had a series of bone fractures, but when doctors did blood tests, the supplements she took for treatment were nowhere to be found.

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Reaction Engines announces space travel breakthrough

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Horten HX-2 'flying wing' makes its global debut

submitted by /u/bebesiege [link] [comments]

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Protesters in Sudan and Algeria Have Learned From the Arab Spring

A photograph has been floating around on social media recently featuring six Arab leaders at a previous summit meeting in 2010, all with red X marks on them. The first four, from left to right, were deposed during the Arab Spring in 2011: Tunisia’s Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, Yemen’s Ali Abdullah Saleh, Libya’s Muammar Gaddafi, and Egypt’s Hosni Mubarak. The two on the far right—Algeria’s Abdelaziz

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Fingerfærdighed med romertal

Med en lille regnetavle kunne romerne hurtigt lave beregninger uden at blive forvirret af den måde, de nedskrev tallene på.

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'Bullshit og pseudovidenskab': Internetstjerner promoverer sundhedstrend med tvivlsom effekt

Ernæringsekspert kalder juicekure for 'en rigtig dårlig vej'.

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Hacker group posts hundreds of law officer records

A hacker group has posted online the personal information of hundreds of federal agents and police officers apparently stolen from websites affiliated with alumni of the FBI's National Academy.

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Kan du gøre det bedre? Hver tredje amerikaner ved meget lidt om videnskab

I en tid med 'fake news' kan det være en fordel for dig at have en basal videnskabelig forståelse, siger forskere.

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Hacker group posts hundreds of law officer records

A hacker group has posted online the personal information of hundreds of federal agents and police officers apparently stolen from websites affiliated with alumni of the FBI's National Academy.

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India's Jet extends international cancellations as airline teeters

India's Jet Airways extended a suspension of all of its international flights until Monday, the latest blow to the debt-stricken carrier battling to stay afloat.

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Netflix chief Hastings to leave Facebook board

Netflix chief Reed Hastings will depart Facebook's board of directors at the end of next month, according to a Friday filing with US regulators by the leading social network.

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Google takes on 'Africa's challenges' with first AI centre in Ghana

An artificial intelligence research laboratory opened by Google in Ghana, the first of its kind in Africa, will take on challenges across the continent, researchers say.

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What do you think the internet at it's true potential would look like

Credit to /u/Nullrasa "The internet was created, and it was good. But information became too free. Publishing corporations were no longer able to enforce revenue. People in power no longer was able to control the message. So, it started with media. The DCMA took down copywrited content, and prevented competition through false claims impossible for the average man to dispute, establishing a monopo

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Neolithic dog reveals tales behind Orkney's monuments

World’s first canine forensic reconstruction sheds light on lives of ancient communities The head of a dog that lived on Orkney 4,500 years ago has been recreated in what experts believe is the world’s first canine forensic reconstruction. The dog had been domesticated in the Neolithic era on the Scottish island archipelago, but still carried wolf-like characteristics, standing about the size of

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'Superbugs' found on many hospital patients' hands and what they touch most often

For decades, hospitals have worked to get staff to wash their hands and prevent the spread of germs. But a new study suggests they may want to expand those efforts to their patients, too. Fourteen percent of 399 hospital patients had 'superbug' antibiotic-resistant bacteria on their hands or nostrils early in their hospital stay, and nearly a third of tests for such bacteria on objects that patien

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Berlusconi Was Trump Before Trump

ROME—A press corps obsessed with a complicated judicial investigation. A millionaire television personality turned politician who casts himself as under attack by the courts. A party beholden to that leader, and a base that will stand by him—aware of his deep flaws and his penchant for stretching the truth. A political opposition so divided, it can’t easily form a coherent argument for what it st

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Characterization of 'hidden' dioxins from informal e-waste processing

The composition of mixed brominated/chlorinated dibenzofurans (PXDFs) and diphenyl ethers in soils from an e-waste site in Ghana suggests a formation of PXDFs through condensation of the flame retardant PBDEs and subsequent bromine-to-chlorine exchange. PXDFs were substantial contributors of toxic equivalents among dioxins from e-waste burning.

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Unexpected properties uncovered in recently discovered superconductor

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have found that crystals of a recently discovered superconducting material, a layered bismuth chalcogenide with a four-fold symmetric structure, shows only two-fold symmetry in its superconductivity. The origin of superconductivity in these structures is not yet well understood; this finding suggests a connection with an enigmatic class of materials k

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Ålandstorsken – ett hopp för Östersjöns torsk?

Torsken i Östersjön mår sämre än någonsin – den är liten, mager och full av mask. Men i Ålands hav har fiskare hittat torskar som växer sig stora och inte har maskar i köttet. Nu ska ett forskningsprojekt vid SLU i Öregrund utreda Ålandstorsken.

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Public invited to help name largest unnamed world in our Solar System

submitted by /u/The-Literary-Lord [link] [comments]

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HQ Trivia host Scott Rogowsky leaves for a sports show

HQ Trivia has been broadcasting its live game show to mobile devices for about a year and a half now, and usually the events were hosted by "quiz daddy" Scott Rogowsky. He …

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The staggering number of Bristol jobs that robots could be take

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Constitutive release of CPS1 in bile and its role as a protective cytokine during acute liver injury [Physiology]

Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 (CPS1) is the major mitochondrial urea cycle enzyme in hepatocytes. It is released into mouse and human blood during acute liver injury, where is has a short half-life. The function of CPS1 in blood and the reason for its short half-life in serum are unknown. We show…

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Machine learning-assisted directed protein evolution with combinatorial libraries [Applied Biological Sciences]

To reduce experimental effort associated with directed protein evolution and to explore the sequence space encoded by mutating multiple positions simultaneously, we incorporate machine learning into the directed evolution workflow. Combinatorial sequence space can be quite expensive to sample experimentally, but machine-learning models trained on tested variants provide a fast…

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Counterexamples in scale calculus [Mathematics]

We construct counterexamples to classical calculus facts such as the inverse and implicit function theorems in scale calculus—a generalization of multivariable calculus to infinite-dimensional vector spaces, in which the reparameterization maps relevant to symplectic geometry are smooth. Scale calculus is a corner stone of polyfold theory, which was introduced by…

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Reduced default mode network functional connectivity in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder [Neuroscience]

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common and disabling, but its neuropathophysiology remains unclear. Most studies of functional brain networks in MDD have had limited statistical power and data analysis approaches have varied widely. The REST-meta-MDD Project of resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) addresses these issues. Twenty-five research groups in China established the…

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Macromolecular relaxation, strain, and extensibility determine elastocapillary thinning and extensional viscosity of polymer solutions [Engineering]

Delayed capillary break-up of viscoelastic filaments presents scientific and technical challenges relevant for drop formation, dispensing, and adhesion in industrial and biological applications. The flow kinematics are primarily dictated by the viscoelastic stresses contributed by the polymers that are stretched and oriented in a strong extensional flow field resulting from…

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Scale-free resilience of real traffic jams [Applied Physical Sciences]

The concept of resilience can be realized in natural and engineering systems, representing the ability of a system to adapt and recover from various disturbances. Although resilience is a critical property needed for understanding and managing the risks and collapses of transportation systems, an accepted and useful definition of resilience…

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Time domain versus energy domain neutron scattering analysis of protein dynamics [Letters (Online Only)]

In PNAS, Kneller (1) suggests a quantum-theoretical justification of the “Frauenfelder energy landscape model” of protein dynamics applied to quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) (2, 3). The diffusion-broadened QENS spectrum, centered at ω = 0, is explained (Fig. 1 and ref. 2) by a distribution of narrow inelastic lines centered at…

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Reply to Doster: Franck-Condon and Van Hove formulation of quasielastic neutron scattering from complex systems [Letters (Online Only)]

Doster (1) criticizes a number of points in ref. 2, where a Franck–Condon-type spectroscopic formulation of incoherent neutron scattering is presented. My responses are given below. First, the Franck–Condon formulation of incoherent neutron scattering does not contradict standard scattering theory, and it is even based on it. It merely starts…

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Coherent directed movement toward food modeled in Trichoplax, a ciliated animal lacking a nervous system [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Trichoplax adhaerens is a small, ciliated marine animal that glides on surfaces grazing upon algae, which it digests externally. It has no muscles or nervous system and only six cell types, all but two of which are embedded in its epithelium. The epithelial cells are joined by apical adherens junctions;…

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Cytosolic Fe-superoxide dismutase safeguards Trypanosoma cruzi from macrophage-derived superoxide radical [Biochemistry]

Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD), contains exclusively Fe-dependent superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs). During T. cruzi invasion to macrophages, superoxide radical (O2•−) is produced at the phagosomal compartment toward the internalized parasite via NOX-2 (gp91-phox) activation. In this work, T. cruzi cytosolic Fe-SODB overexpressers (pRIBOTEX–Fe-SODB) exhibited higher re

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Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

At extreme pressures, potassium atoms can be both liquid and solid at the same time, a phase of matter known as 'chain melt.' Christopher Intagliata reports.

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Running Made Us Human: How We Evolved to Run Marathons

This Monday the 123rd annual Boston Marathon will take place, with an expected 30,000 participants and a half million spectators. The top finishers should complete the grueling 26.2-mile course in just over 2 hours by clocking a pace of under five minutes per mile. I know. It’s painful to imagine. Most of us couldn't maintain that speed for one mile — forget 26 of them. But take heart, recreationa

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The Atlantic Daily: A Night at the Museum

What We’re Following The American Museum of Natural History is coming under fire for hosting Jair Bolsonaro. Since coming into office in October, Bolsonaro—the newly elected, ultranationalist president of Brazil—has repeatedly prioritized business interests over environmental concerns, opening up the Amazon rainforest for agriculture and mining while wresting land away from indigenous communities

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Walmart: Robot Janitors, Scanner, Vacuums Threaten Workers

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BBC climate doc adviser: Earth is sending us really powerful messages

Chris Rapley, scientific advisor on the BBC's new climate change documentary, talks rising temperatures, hammering home the message, and David Attenborough

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David Attenborough finally talks climate change in prime time BBC slot

The BBC is finally putting global warming in TV’s spotlight in an hour-long film, but is it too little, too late from the corporation?

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World Health Organization decides against declaring Ebola emergency as outbreak worsens

World Health Organization decides against declaring Ebola emergency as outbreak worsens World Health Organization decides against declaring Ebola emergency as outbreak worsens, Published online: 12 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01201-x Officials say inadequate funding and mistrust are hampering efforts to combat the outbreak.

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Trump’s Unpardonable Challenge to the Constitution

Updated at 7:35 p.m. ET on April 12, 2019. Speaking at a U.S. Border Patrol station in Calexico on April 5, President Trump announced his ideal immigration policy : “Our country is full,” he said. “Our area is full. The sector is full. Can’t take you anymore, I’m sorry. Can’t happen. So turn around. That’s the way it is.” His comments were widely denounced the time, evoking skepticism along with

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Squeezed Potassium Atoms Straddle Liquid and Solid

At extreme pressures, potassium atoms can be both liquid and solid at the same time, a phase of matter known as 'chain melt.' Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A New 'Star Wars' Trailer,'Game of Thrones' Returns, and More

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Surprise: The $35,000 Tesla Model 3 That’s Finally Shipping? Not Any More

Plan to jump through hoops if you want to get the Model 3 Standard Range. You may wind up with a Standard Plus, with software lockouts on a bigger battery, the nav system, and even the heated seats. The post Surprise: The $35,000 Tesla Model 3 That’s Finally Shipping? Not Any More appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Ebola outbreak in Congo still not an international crisis, WHO decides

Cases top 1000 amid funding woes, but virus has yet to jump borders

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Watch 'giant pill bugs' burrow inside this alligator carcass for legitimate scientific reasons

Animals The first recorded "reptile fall" is a real feast. This week, for the first time ever, the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) did the same for an alligator—the resulting video footage is wild.

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Zinc oxide reduces body odor caused by bacteria and aids wound healing

New research presented at this week's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that a formulation containing zinc oxide is effective at reducing armpit odour through killing the responsible bacteria, and assists in wound healing.

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Study underlines large variation in patient mortality associated with different bloodstream infections

New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows the danger posed by bloodstream infections (BSIs), and the large variation in mortality rates associated with different infectious microorganisms. The study is by Liya Lomsadze and colleagues from Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y., United St

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High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities

The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year — with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day.

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Microbiome of baby's first stool is associated with overweight at age 3 years

New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the early microbiome (population of gut bacteria) in newborn babies is able to predict the risk of the child subsequently becoming overweight. These gut bacteria can also be affected by maternal antibiotic use during pregnancy.

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Mode of delivery alters infants' gut microbiota and this may impact respiratory health in first year of life

New research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (April 13-16), suggests that mode of delivery influences the development of the microbial composition of the gut (i.e. the gut microbiota) in infants, independently of a mother's use of antibiotics. This, in turn, may affect infants' respiratory health

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Caesarean babies have lower level of 'good' gut bacteria, study shows

Research suggests surgical delivery may make babies more prone to respiratory infections Babies delivered by caesarean section are slower to acquire certain types of “good bacteria” in their gut and have higher levels of potentially problematic bacteria than those born vaginally, researchers say. A study of more than 100 babies showed that those born vaginally had a very different make-up of thei

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Facebook spends $22.6 million to keep Mark Zuckerberg safe

Facebook Inc more than doubled the money it spent on Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg's security in 2018 to $22.6 million, a regulatory filing showed on Friday.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: First Daughter

What We’re Following Today It’s Friday, April 12. ‣ On Tuesday, Attorney General William Barr told a House committee that he’d release the full Mueller report—with redactions—to the public “within a week.” That means as soon as this weekend, just as members of Congress head back home to their districts for two weeks of recess. Here’s what else we’re watching: Trump’s Plan: White House officials p

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Rite Aid to Stop Selling E-Cigarettes, Citing Surge in Young Users

The chain said it would remove the products from its more than 2,400 locations over the next 90 days. It will continue to sell regular tobacco products.

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Trilobites: It’s Warm and Stealthy, and It Killed Yellowstone Trees and Turned Soil Pale

A growing warm spot in a remote section of the national park was not unexpected, but it sneaked up on the park’s volcanologists.

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Trump Vows Speedy Path to 5G, but Offers Few New Ideas

President Trump says the US "must win" the race to 5G. But a plan outlined by FCC Chair Ajit Pai is a modest expansion of existing programs.

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Last week in tech: Disney's streaming service, a new Kindle, and Ikea's loudest lamp

Technology Plus: The latest episode of the Techathlon podcast. Catch up on the week's tech news to run out the work week.

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A Second Planet May Orbit Earth's Nearest Neighboring Star

Informally called “Proxima c,” the candidate world appears to be six times the mass of Earth, and orbits in the frigid outskirts of the Proxima Centauri system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Second Planet May Orbit Earth's Nearest Neighboring Star

Informally called “Proxima c,” the candidate world appears to be six times the mass of Earth, and orbits in the frigid outskirts of the Proxima Centauri system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Elon Musk: Tesla Autopilot | Artificial Intelligence (AI) Podcast

submitted by /u/New_Hush [link] [comments]

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Boston University fires geologist found to have harassed women in Antarctica

David Marchant, terminated despite faculty recommendation of leniency, vows to sue

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Gadget Lab Podcast: What Happens to Uber After Its IPO?

WIRED Transportation reporter Aarian Marshall joins the Gadget Lab podcast to talk about what Uber’s IPO means for the future of ride-sharing … and everything else Uber does.

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Performance of perovskite solar cells: The interface makes the difference

Researchers look in detail at the interfaces in perovskite solar cells to understand the differences observed in their performance.

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Largest, fastest array of microscopic 'traffic cops' for optical communications

Engineers have built a new photonic switch that can control the direction of light passing through optical fibers faster and more efficiently than ever. This optical 'traffic cop' could one day revolutionize how information travels through data centers and high-performance supercomputers that are used for artificial intelligence and other data-intensive applications.

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The Source of That Mysterious E. Coli Outbreak Has Likely Been Found

The mystery behind what's causing the E. coli outbreak that's sickened more than 100 Americans in the past month may finally be solved.

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The Israeli moon crash reminds us that lunar landings are a pain in the butt

Space The robot's failed mission shouldn't come as a shock. An Israeli lander crashed en route to the moon on Thursday, but this isn't exactly a shocking failure.

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Growth hormone acts to prevent weight loss

A Brazilian study shows that, like leptin, growth hormone contributes directly to energy conservation when the body loses weight.

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ICU patients with non-brain-related injuries may suffer undetected cognitive dysfunction

Researchers assessed 20 patients as they left the ICU and every single patient had detectable cognitive deficits in two or more cognitive areas of investigation, including memory, attention, decision-making and reasoning.

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Facebook ships Oculus Touch controllers with labels like 'Big Brother is Watching'

Facebook shipped tens of thousands of controllers for its new Oculus headsets with 'inappropriate easter eggs' making light of the company's privacy disasters.

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'Molecular scissors' for plastic waste

A research team has solved the molecular structure of the enzyme MHETase at BESSY II. MHETase was discovered in bacteria and together with a second enzyme — PETase — is able to break down the widely used plastic PET into its basic building blocks. This 3D structure already allowed the researchers to produce a MHETase variant with optimized activity in order to use it, together with PETase, for a

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Scott Kelly Spent a Year Taking Photos in Space. They’re Beautiful.

In orbit aboard the International Space Station, the astronaut wasn’t just gathering data for NASA’s Twins Study. He also produced some, well, stellar images.

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Children Are Swallowing Foreign Objects More Frequently, Study Finds

According to a new study in the journal Pediatrics, the rate of foreign-body ingestions among children under age 6 nearly doubled in the two decades after 1995.

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When a Black Hole Finally Reveals Itself, It Helps to Have Our Very Own Cosmic Reporter

Astronomers announced Wednesday that they had captured the first image of a black hole. The Times’s Dennis Overbye answers readers’ questions.

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Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Might Spark an Old Fight

Luke Skywalker is dead. Rey’s parents are “nobody.” Yet Star Wars: Episode IX will be subtitled The Rise of Skywalker . What Skywalker is rising? From where to where? The name is a provocation—one very much in line with the director J. J. Abrams’s love of teasing audiences like a magician. He promises huge, reality-shifting twists. Behind the curtain often lies something familiar. The teaser that

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NASA Asks SpaceX to Help It Save Earth From Incoming Asteroids

Space Besties NASA has a plan to defend Earth from an incoming asteroid — and it’s now tapped SpaceX to help carry it out. On Friday, NASA announced that it had selected Elon Musk’s SpaceX to provide launch services for its $69 million Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) mission — adding to the ever-growing list of collaborations between the two entities. Collision Course NASA’s DART mission

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Knowing how cells grow and divide can lead to more robust and productive plants

In contrast to mammals, where the body plan is final at birth, the formation of new root branches ensures that the root system keeps growing throughout a plant's life. Scientists identified a novel component that controls the development of root branches supporting plants.

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Harnessing microorganisms for smart microsystems

A research team has developed a method to construct a biohybrid system that incorporates Vorticella microorganisms. The method allows movable structures to be formed in a microchannel and harnessed to Vorticella. The biohybrid system demonstrates the conversion of motion from linear motion to rotation. These fundamental technologies help researchers to create wearable smart microsystems by using a

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Psychologists find smiling really can make people happier

Smiling really can make people feel happier, according to a new article. A team of psychologists combined data from 138 studies testing more than 11,000 participants and found that facial expressions have a small impact on our feelings.

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Southwest doesn't plan to use Boeing Max jets until August

Southwest Airlines customers relaxing on Thursday evening got an email that may mean their summer vacation could be more stressful and expensive than they planned.

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Stem Cell trial for osteoarthritis patients reduces pain, improves quality of life

In the first North American stem cell clinical trial for osteoarthritis of the knee patients, 12 patients were given injections of their own stem cells and followed for 12 months. The results show a significant improvement in pain levels and quality of life.

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A Guy Got a QR Code Tattoo and Then Someone Broke the Link

Semi-Permanent Tattoos provide unusual snapshots, frozen in time, of a person’s life. Children, immortalized on a bicep tattoo, grow up. Quotations once considered profound may lose meaning after years resting on someone’s ribcage. And QR codes linking to YouTube footage of a favorite sports team kicking ass may suddenly stop working after several hours. At least, that’s what happened to one fan

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Tesla to stop selling $35,000 Model 3 online

Tesla has pulled the plug on Internet sales of its cheapest Model 3 sedan in the latest shift to the company's retail strategy.

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Foxconn buys building across street from Wisconsin Capitol

Foxconn Technology Group announced Friday it was buying a six-story office building across the street from Wisconsin's state Capitol to house an off-campus research center it will run as part of a partnership with the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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NOAA: Bryde's whales in Gulf of Mexico are endangered

Federal scientists say a tiny group of Bryde's whales in the Gulf of Mexico is endangered, facing threats including oil and gas exploration and development.

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We now know how insects and bacteria control ice

Contrary to what you may have been taught, water doesn't always freeze to ice at 32 degrees F (zero degrees C). Knowing, or controlling, at what temperature water will freeze (starting with a process called nucleation) is critically important to answering questions such as whether or not there will be enough snow on the ski slopes or whether or not it will rain tomorrow.

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Social Anxiety Disorder: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Social anxiety disorder isn't just being shy.

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NOAA: Bryde's whales in Gulf of Mexico are endangered

Federal scientists say a tiny group of Bryde's whales in the Gulf of Mexico is endangered, facing threats including oil and gas exploration and development.

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A Natural History Museum Is Under Fire for Hosting Brazil's New President

Updated at 5:06 p.m . Natural-history museums are research centers, public attractions, and stores of natural treasures. But many of them are also event spaces that command a hefty price for weddings, award ceremonies, gala dinners, and conferences. These two roles can seem like Janus’s faces: inseparable, but looking away from each other. Often, that’s not a problem. Sometimes, it very much is.

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Tiny light-up barcodes identify molecules by their twinkling

An imaging technique developed at Duke University could make it possible to peer inside cells and watch dozens of different molecules in action at once—by labeling them with short strands of light-up DNA that blink on and off with their own unique rhythm.

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Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA

Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA. They create data-driven, easily interpretable maps that reveal cellular processes and fates in complex contexts.

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Increase in foreign body ingestions among young children

A new study analyzed data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) for children younger than six years who were treated in a US emergency department due to concern of a foreign body ingestion from 1995 through 2015.

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'Molecular scissors' for plastic waste

A research team has solved the molecular structure of the enzyme MHETase at BESSY II. MHETase was discovered in bacteria and together with a second enzyme — PETase — is able to break down the widely used plastic PET into its basic building blocks. This 3D structure already allowed the researchers to produce a MHETase variant with optimized activity in order to use it, together with PETase, for a

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Predicting heat waves? Look half a world away

When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100°F in four to 16 days.

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For Some Ungodly Reason, Hellboy Is Back

A common refrain in film criticism these days is that there are too many superhero franchises. Studios’ nonstop efforts to launch new cinematic comic-book brands have choked theaters to the point where you can barely enter a multiplex without knocking over a cardboard standee of a caped crusader or two. Now the glut has reached the level of more specific complaints: There aren’t just too many sup

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Electric vehicle adoption improves air quality and climate outlook

A new study quantified the differences in air pollution generated from battery-powered electric vehicles versus internal combustion engines. The researchers found that even when their electricity is generated from combustion sources, electric vehicles have a net positive impact on air quality and climate change.

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Can you spare one hour tomorrow to help accelerate a year of Alzheimer's research?

Tomorrow is Citizen Science Day (#CitSciDay2019) and there are many ways to celebrate. Add or find an event near you or access lots of free resources, including downloadable bookmarks, posters and more, on the Citizen Science Day page. The signature project this year is the Stall Catchers Megathon, an online game you can play from anywhere (with internet access) to help Cornell scientists better u

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Watching Falcon Heavy Land is a Glimpse at the Future of Spaceflight

After a successful launch that delivered the Arabsat-6A satellite into its planned orbit, SpaceX also succeeded in landing all three of the boosters for their Falcon Heavy rocket — a first for the private space company. On a previous test flight, SpaceX landed and recovered only the side boosters. The launch was also Falcon Heavy's first commercial endeavor.

https://twitter.com/SpaceX/statu

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Chinese Scientist Defends Splicing Human Brain Gene Into Monkeys

Human-Monkey Hybrid In March, a team of Chinese scientists published a study detailing how they made monkeys smarter by splicing a human gene into their DNA. The news was met by a wave of backlash . But now, one of the scientists behind the study is defending the team’s work — and pledging to push forward on the controversial research. Above Board Chinese Academy of Sciences professor Su Bing tol

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Nature and Science Retractions Connected to Research Misconduct

The University of Cambridge and the University of Bristol conducted investigations of the research.

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Want to learn a new skill? Take some short breaks

In a study of healthy volunteers, researchers found that our brains may solidify the memories of new skills we just practiced a few seconds earlier by taking a short rest. The results highlight the critically important role rest may play in learning.

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How Close Are We to a Self-Driving World?

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

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If Progressives don’t get optimistic about automation, they’ll lose 2020

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Black Holes Are Awesome. Why Are Their Names Usually So Boring?

Black holes aren't usually named like planets, asteroids or comets are.

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A Self-Driving Car’s Human Operator Says He Takes Over When Passengers Get Impatient

Out Run Right now, almost all self-driving cars are supervised by a human safety driver sitting behind the wheel. Futurism previously reported that drivers working for Waymo One, the autonomous ride-hailing service, are told to stay quiet. But now, Joe VanOflen, the operations lead at self-driving car startup Drive.ai, told Popular Science how he approaches working as a safety driver, sharing a r

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Pesticide Marketed as Safe for Bees Harms Them in Study

Flupyradifurone, sold as Sivanto, is reported to have greater lethal and sublethal effects on honey bees when combined with a common fungicide.

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How Google is building the fastest internet cable to cross the Atlantic

Technology It involves armadillos. Here's how the highest-capacity cable to cross the Atlantic will work.

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As Ebola Cases Rise in Congo, the W.H.O. Declines to Issue Emergency Declaration

The epidemic shows no signs of abating. In the eight-month-old outbreak, the highest number of cases recorded in a single day occurred this week.

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NASA’s Twin Study Reveals the Effects of a Year in Space

Scientists have been studying the effects of long-term space habitation for decades, but astronaut Scott Kelly's one-year stint aboard the International Space Station (ISS) afforded them a unique opportunity to run a controlled experiment. The post NASA’s Twin Study Reveals the Effects of a Year in Space appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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