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nyheder2019april15

Scientists print first 3D heart using patient's biological materials

In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have 'printed' the world's first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient's own cells and biological materials.

5h

Game of Thrones Recap, Season 8 Episode 1: Jon Snow Still Knows Nothing

The one-time King in the North still sees the world not as it is, but as he is.

1h

Godsoperatør: Kun ét spor i Sønderjylland vil sende flere lastbiler på vejene

DB Cargo støtter Region Syddanmarks appel om at få opgraderet de 12 km jernbane mellem Padborg og Tinglev, der er den eneste enkeltsporede flaskehals mellem Stockholm og Messina-strædet i Italien.

11h

Phys.org
Solving the mystery of fertilizer loss from Midwest cropland

Farmers can't predict their annual corn harvest with certainty, but with the help of new research from Michigan State University, they can now pinpoint specific parts of their fields that consistently produce either good or bad yields. Not only will this save them time and money; it will solve one of the most widespread environmental problems facing crop-producing regions—nitrogen loss.

2min

Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall

UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow. The first of its kind, this device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic.

2min

Scientists Found a Chunk of a Comet Inside a Meteorite

Space Turducken Scientists just found a chunk of comet hiding inside of a rocky meteorite that fell to Earth. Normally, comets burn up as they enter Earth’s atmosphere. In other words, according to Gizmodo, this cosmic calzone provided a protective shield around the comet fragments, giving scientists an valuable opportunity to study the origins of the solar system. Small Samples The meteorite in

6min

Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall

Researchers have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow, a first. The device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic.

7min

Predictability limit: Scientists find bounds of weather forecasting

In the future, weather forecasts that provide storm warnings and help us plan our daily lives could come up to five days sooner before reaching the limits of numerical weather prediction, scientists said.

7min

Low-calorie sweetener derived from lactose gets manufacturing boost from yeast

The quest to satisfy the sweet tooth without adding to the waistline has a new weapon in its arsenal: a strain of yeast that can metabolize lactose, the sugar in dairy products, into tagatose, a natural sweetener with less than half the calories of table sugar.

7min

For busy medical students, two-hour meditation study may be as beneficial as longer course

For time-crunched medical students, taking a two-hour introductory class on mindfulness may be just as beneficial for reducing stress and depression as taking an eight-week meditation course, a study finds.

7min

Procedure time proves vital in thrombectomy success

Researchers report that the current standard of care for stroke should factor in procedure time when considering surgical intervention. By studying the number of attempts and the time spent performing procedures, researchers concluded that the likelihood of completing an endovascular thrombectomy without significantly increasing the risk for the patient decreases dramatically after the first 30-60

7min

How the Kremlin Shapes the Trump-Putin Relationship

In December 2017, Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke with President Donald Trump at least twice by phone, ostensibly about economic and counterintelligence issues . Americans first learned about both calls from the Kremlin. When then–CIA Director Mike Pompeo met with Russian intelligence officials subjected to sanctions in January 2018 at Langley, Americans learned about it first from the Rus

16min

Physicists improve understanding of heat and particle flow in the edge of a fusion device

PPPL physicists have discovered valuable information about how plasma flows at the edge inside doughnut-shaped fusion devices. The findings mark an encouraging sign for the development of machines to produce fusion energy for generating electricity without creating long-term hazardous waste.

18min

Statins safe for preventing cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis patients, study suggests

Results from a large clinical trial indicate that patients with rheumatoid arthritis are likely to experience the same level of cardiovascular benefits from statins as other individuals, without additional risks.

21min

Phenols in purple corn fight diabetes, obesity, inflammation in mouse cells

Scientists have developed new purple corn hybrids with differing combinations of phenols in the pericarp that fight obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance, a new study in mice suggests. The pericarp also provides the food industry with a new source of colorants and farmers with a new value added product for their crops.

21min

Genetic analysis has potential to transform diagnosis and treatment of adults with liver disease of unknown cause

Adults suffering from liver disease of unknown cause represent an understudied and underserved patient population. A new study supports the incorporation of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in the diagnosis and management of adults suffering from unexplained liver disease and underscores its value in developing an understanding of which liver phenotypes of unknown cause in adults are genetic.

21min

Physicists Think You Could Be Rescued from a Black Hole — But Don't Risk It

Researchers have developed a new, unspeakably dangerous, and incredibly slow method of crossing the universe. It involves wormholes linking special black holes that probably don't exist.

26min

After Failed Moon Landing, Israel Vows to Try Again

Moving Forward Beresheet may have crashed while attempting to touch down on the Moon on Thursday, but the company behind the failed Moon landing isn’t discouraged . “We’re going to build a new spacecraft, we’re going to put it on the Moon, and we’re going to complete the mission,” SpaceIL founder Morris Kahn said in a video released just two days after the failed landing attempt. Small Club It’s

27min

New compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light

Scientists have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing — a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control different cellular processes. With the molecule described, it is possible to either inhibit or stimulate communication, making it a useful tool for research into bacterial communication and its influence on diff

29min

Engineering 'hairpins' increases CRISPR accuracy

Biomedical engineers have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold. The approach adds a short tail to the guide RNA that folds back and binds onto itself, creating a 'lock' that can only be undone by the targeted DNA sequence.

29min

Notre Dame Cathedral Fire: What we know so far – CNET

Almost 1000 years of French history is burning.

32min

Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall

UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow, a first. The device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic.

32min

The 140-Year-Old Dream of ‘Government Without Taxation’

The U.S. tax code is infamously complicated; in 2014, its various statutes and exemptions took roughly 2,600 pages to enumerate. Americans pay income taxes, payroll taxes, sales taxes, excise taxes, property taxes, real-estate taxes, estate taxes, gift taxes, capital-gains taxes, hotel taxes, sin taxes, luxury taxes, and more. But most have never paid a pure land-value tax—the type that followers

35min

Chinese Scientists Aim to Generate Fusion Power by 2040

Smashing Isotopes It’s the ultimate energy goal: generating power from smashing together particles at extremely high pressure and temperatures — but without the threat of nuclear catastrophe. There’s one big catch, though. Fusion energy has yet to achieve the milestone of actually generating more energy than is required to get the process going. But now, according to Reuters , are hoping to achie

41min

New compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light

Scientists have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing — a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control different cellular processes. With the molecule described, it is possible to either inhibit or stimulate communication, making it a useful tool for research into bacterial communication and its influence on diff

50min

Asteroids help scientists measure distant stars

We gaze up at them, we wish upon them, we even sing about swinging on them. But the one thing we haven't been able to do with a star is figure out how big it is…until now.

50min

Low-intensity ultrasound can change decision-making process in the brain

Imagine working in your office while the sun is shining outside. Thinking about what you could be doing instead of working is an example of "counterfactual thinking."

50min

High-speed 'electron camera' films molecular movie in HD

With an extremely fast 'electron camera,' researchers have made the first high-definition 'movie' of ring-shaped molecules breaking open in response to light. The results could further our understanding of similar reactions with vital roles in chemistry, such as the production of vitamin D in our bodies.

50min

Kratom is all the rage, but this natural supplement can be dangerous

Health Here's everything you need to know. The drug and supplement world is always turning over new leaves, and the latest ones happen to be from a tropical evergreen tree.

50min

Short tail on RNA makes CRISPR 50X more accurate

Researchers have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold. The researchers believe their method can easily translate to any of the editing technology’s continually expanding formats. The approach adds a short tail to the guide RNA that scientists used to identify a sequence of DNA for editing. This added tail folds back and bin

51min

S hallow lakes on a moon of Saturn mysteriously vanish from view

S hallow lakes on a moon of Saturn mysteriously vanish from view S hallow lakes on a moon of Saturn mysteriously vanish from view, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01221-7 Titan’s land of lakes includes bodies that were seen in winter but had disappeared by the onset of spring.

52min

Predictability limit: Scientists find bounds of weather forecasting

In the future, weather forecasts that provide storm warnings and help us plan our daily lives could come up to five days sooner before reaching the limits of numerical weather prediction, scientists said.

54min

Low-calorie sweetener derived from lactose gets manufacturing boost from yeast

The quest to satisfy the sweet tooth without adding to the waistline has a new weapon in its arsenal: a strain of yeast that can metabolize lactose, the sugar in dairy products, into tagatose, a natural sweetener with less than half the calories of table sugar.

54min

1h

Were Europe’s megalithic societies patrilineal?

Controversial new DNA study suggests “yes” for some

1h

Time is money, especially when it comes to giving

Would you be more likely to donate to charity if you could report the gift sooner on your taxes? According to a new article, the answer is yes. Researchers found that changing the deadline for donations closer to tax time increased donations by nine per cent.

1h

Astronomers take first, high-resolution look at huge star-forming region of Milky Way

A team of astronomers used a newly commissioned radio telescope in South Korea to make the first high-resolution observations of the molecular clouds within a star-forming region of the Milky Way. The first good look at the galactic region indicated large molecular clouds about 180 light years across with a mass equal to about 100,000 masses of our sun.

1h

TESS finds its first Earth-sized planet

A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world. This milestone sets the path for finding smaller planets around even smaller stars, and those planets may potentially be habitable.

1h

New evidence suggests volcanoes caused biggest mass extinction ever

Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth. The extinction 252 million years ago was so dramatic and widespread that scientists call it 'the Great Dying.' The catastrophe killed off more than 95 percent of life on Earth over the course of hundreds of thousands of years.

1h

Tiny fragment of a comet found inside a meteorite

Astronomers have made a surprising discovery that gives clues to how solar system formed.

1h

Engineering 'hairpins' increases CRISPR accuracy

Biomedical engineers have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold. The approach adds a short tail to the guide RNA that folds back and binds onto itself, creating a 'lock' that can only be undone by the targeted DNA sequence.

1h

Scanning for cancer treatment

11,000 people are predicted to die from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2019. Recently, drug developers designed a new treatment to target the cancer's mutated genes. But, these drugs don't always work. Now, in a new study, researchers investigate both sides of the drug-body relationship to better understand why certain AML treatments — and other cancer treatments — may not work as expected.

1h

6 thoughtful and inspiring books for children and young readers

Allegories like Orwell's Animal Farm take complex ideas and turn them into an approachable tale. Aesop's fables ancient insight is still relevant for any human growing up today. The Little Prince teaches children to view the world through a more wondrous lens of reality. The types of books we read in our adolescence can shape us forever. They can help us understand the world in more diverse ways

1h

For busy medical students, two-hour meditation study may be as beneficial as longer course

For time-crunched medical students, taking a two-hour introductory class on mindfulness may be just as beneficial for reducing stress and depression as taking an eight-week meditation course, a Rutgers study finds.

1h

Solving the mystery of fertilizer loss from Midwest cropland

Farmers can't predict their annual corn harvest with certainty, but with the help of new research from Michigan State University, they can now pinpoint specific parts of their fields that consistently produce either good or bad yields. Not only will this save them time and money; it will solve one of the most widespread environmental problems facing crop-producing regions — nitrogen loss.

1h

Climate change could undermine children's education and development in the tropics

A new study by a University of Maryland researcher published in the April 15, 2019, issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that exposure to extreme heat and precipitation in prenatal and early childhood years in countries of the global tropics could make it harder for children to attain secondary school education, even for better-off households.

1h

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops.

1h

Rice advances the art of protein blacksmithing

Rice University biological physicists took inspiration from the mighty blacksmith to refine their computational models of how proteins fold. These models will help structural biologists who design drugs and other therapies.

1h

Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow

For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.

1h

Synthetic peptide can inhibit toxicity, aggregation of protein in Alzheimer's disease

A team led by researchers at the University of Washington has developed synthetic peptides that target and inhibit the small, toxic protein aggregates that are thought to trigger Alzheimer's disease.

1h

Some patients with imminently fatal cancer still receive treatment

Patients who died within one month of being newly diagnosed with metastatic cancer in the United States received ineffective surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and hormonal therapy.

1h

Plastic's carbon footprint

From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans. However, its effect on the air is far less obvious. Plastic production, use, and disposal all emit prodigious amounts of greenhouse gasses, but scientists haven't had a firm grasp on the scope.

1h

Leveraging scientists' perceptions for successful interactions with policy makers

Creating new policies that deal with important issues like climate change requires input from geoscientists. Policy makers, media outlets, and the general public are interested in hearing from experts, and scientists are put under increasing amounts of pressure to effectively engage in policy decisions.

1h

North Atlantic warming hole impacts jet stream

The North Atlantic warming hole (NAWH), a region of reduced warming located in the North Atlantic Ocean, significantly affects the North Atlantic jet stream in climate simulations of the future.

1h

Simple way to inoculate teens against junk food marketing

A simple and brief intervention can provide lasting protection for adolescents against the harmful effects of food marketing. Researchers find that reframing how students view food-marketing campaigns can spur adolescents, particularly boys, to make healthier daily dietary choices for an extended period of time. The method works in part by tapping into teens' natural desire to rebel against author

1h

Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia

Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well. A study in animals may set the stage for a new therapy for a subset of patients with hemophilia who now develop antibodies to the standard maintenance treatment and then require on-demand 'bypass' therapy.

1h

Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras

Scientists have developed a novel graphene-enabled photodetector that operates at room temperature, is highly sensitive, very fast, has a wide dynamic range and covers a broad range of THz frequencies.

1h

Courts would likely uphold FDA’s menthol cigarette ban

Courts will likely uphold the US Food and Drug Administration’s proposed ban on menthol combustible tobacco products, though it may be a lengthy legal process, according to a new study. The 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act provided the FDA with broad authority to regulate the manufacturing, marketing, and distribution of tobacco products, including banning flavored cigarette

1h

50 percent off a robot vacuum and other deals happening today

Gadgets A quick guide to getting the goods for cheaper. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

1h

'Body eruption': the aphids that sacrifice themselves for colony

Scientists study species that releases huge quantities of bodily fluids to plug nest holes While humans might change their locks to deal with intruders, a species of aphid opts for a communal sacrifice, releasing huge quantities of a sticky bodily fluid to plug holes in their nests. Researchers who studied the makeup of the fluid found the process for nest repair was similar to what happens when

1h

Leveraging scientists' perceptions for successful interactions with policy makers

Creating new policies that deal with important issues like climate change requires input from geoscientists. Policy makers, media outlets, and the general public are interested in hearing from experts, and scientists are put under increasing amounts of pressure to effectively engage in policy decisions.

1h

MIT prof: It's more likely we are living in a simulation than not

submitted by /u/mrsparta [link] [comments]

1h

First Big Survey of Births Finds Millions of Missing Women

A massive effort to catalog the number of male-female births shows that 23 million women were never born who should have been, according to the natural sex ratio.

1h

Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow

For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today [Monday 15 April] in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.

1h

Assessment tool of children's environments can help predict optimal development outcomes

A paper published by Darcia Narvaez and her colleagues at the Notre Dame Family Life Project in Sage Open highlights how taking a snapshot of a young child's experience over a week, as reported by a parent, is predictive of child outcomes.

1h

Historic logging site shows first human-caused bedrock erosion along an entire river

Geologic time is supposed to be slow, and the most solid object should be bedrock. But new University of Washington research upends both concepts: Effects of logging show that human activity can significantly erode bedrock, causing geology to fast forward.

1h

Same-sex marriage legalization associated with reduced anti-gay bias in the US

A new study of evolving attitudes toward gay marriage across the U.S. suggests that state legislation has had a significant impact in reducing anti-gay bias in many parts of the country.

1h

Research explores ways to bridge gaps in science communication

"Give me a break!" "Fake News!" "Blah Blah Blah…" These retorts are symptoms of a fundamental problem in science communication—new research from the Tepper School of Business shows that when we hear something that doesn't make sense to us, it's much easier to respond with derision than to work to understand what is being said. It's difficult to bridge these gaps in understanding because they are

1h

Megalith tombs were family graves in European Stone Age

In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international research team led from Uppsala University discovered kin relationships among Stone Age individuals buried in megalithic tombs in Ireland and Sweden. The kin relations can be traced for more than 10 generations and suggest that megaliths were graves for kindred groups in Stone Age northwestern Europe.

1h

Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow

For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today [Monday 15 April] in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.

1h

These suicidal aphids repair their home with their own bodily fluids

Scientists discover the recipe and origins of this bug’s quick hardening goop

1h

Photos: Notre Dame Cathedral Burns in Paris

Earlier today, smoke was observed billowing from the landmark Notre Dame Cathedral, in central Paris; it was undergoing renovation work. The smoke grew and was followed by flames, which consumed the roof and caused the central spire of the cathedral to collapse. The gothic cathedral is visited by millions of tourists and locals every year. Authorities report no injuries or deaths at the moment, a

1h

UNESCO World Heritage Sites at Risk of Flooding Due to Climate Change

Sea-level rise predictions and flooding statistics show which UNESCO sites might be submerged by 2100.

1h

How Much Fat Can You Lose?

The faster you are losing weight, the less fat you're likely to be losing — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

5G Collars Let Cows Choose When They Want to Be Milked

Moo Juice While humans wait for the age of 5G to take shape, the next generation of wireless connectivity is already changing the lives of 50 British cows. A dairy farm at the government-funded Agricultural Engineering Precision Innovation Centre in Shepton Mallet, England, has fitted about a third of its cows with 5G-connected smart collars as part of a test for Cisco Systems — and the impact of

1h

Dragonglass is real, even if white walkers (hopefully) aren’t

Environment Megapixels: 'Game of Thrones' turns a naturally-occurring glass into a fantastical weapon. Obsidian forms as lava, spewed from a volcano, quickly cools at surface temperatures. It’s found all over the planet, including in the fantastical series Game of Thrones, …

1h

PSU researchers develop blockchain protocol to prevent counterfeit pharmaceutical sales

Portland State University researcher Nirupama Bulusu wants to prevent counterfeit pharmaceuticals from flooding the market. Bulusu recently published a blockchain protocol that could do just that.

1h

Fentanyl deaths up 122 percent in West Virginia, say WVU researchers

An interdisciplinary research team — involving the WVU School of Pharmacy, the WVU School of Public Health and the West Virginia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner — analyzed data and found that fentanyl deaths are up 122 percent in the state.

1h

Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia

Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well. A study in animals may set the stage for a new therapy for a subset of patients with hemophilia who now develop antibodies to the standard maintenance treatment and then require on-demand 'bypass' therapy.

1h

2h

Microsoft Surface Buds Rumored To Sound Off Against Apple AirPods And Galaxy Buds

When it comes to wireless earbuds on the market today, there are a number of options to choose from, with the most popular being the Apple AirPods (which were just recently refreshed) and the Samsung …

2h

Study: Aegean farmers replaced hunters of ancient Britain

A wave of migrants from what is now Greece and Turkey arrived in Britain some 6,000 years ago and virtually replaced the existing hunter-gatherer population, according to a study published Monday …

2h

Meteoroid Strikes Smash Water out of the Moon’s Surface

Lunar Water Cycle The Moon is losing its water. Beneath its dusty surface, our moon has a thin, lightly-hydrated layer. But new NASA research , published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience , shows that it’s being gradually sucked dry by meteoroid impacts. Vapor Waves After a meteoroid smashes the water out to the Moon’s surface, the force of the impact coupled with the absence of an atmosphe

2h

Behind Every Robot Is a Human

Hundreds of human reviewers across the globe, from Romania to Venezuela, listen to audio clips recorded from Amazon Echo speakers, usually without owners’ knowledge, Bloomberg reported last week. We knew Alexa was listening; now we know someone else is, too. This global review team fine-tunes the Amazon Echo’s software by listening to clips of users asking Alexa questions or issuing commands, and

2h

One of Earth’s biggest insects was hiding in plain sight

One of Earth’s biggest insects was hiding in plain sight One of Earth’s biggest insects was hiding in plain sight, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01215-5 DNA analysis helps to resolve two cases of mistaken identity among Madagascan stick insects.

2h

New study finds simple way to inoculate teens against junk food marketing

A simple and brief intervention can provide lasting protection for adolescents against the harmful effects of food marketing. Researchers find that reframing how students view food-marketing campaigns can spur adolescents, particularly boys, to make healthier daily dietary choices for an extended period of time. The method works in part by tapping into teens' natural desire to rebel against author

2h

North Atlantic warming hole impacts jet stream

The North Atlantic warming hole (NAWH), a region of reduced warming located in the North Atlantic Ocean, significantly affects the North Atlantic jet stream in climate simulations of the future, according to a team of researchers.

2h

Leveraging scientists' perceptions for successful interactions with policy makers

Creating new policies that deal with important issues like climate change requires input from geoscientists. Policy makers, media outlets, and the general public are interested in hearing from experts, and scientists are put under increasing amounts of pressure to effectively engage in policy decisions.

2h

Plastic's carbon footprint

From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans. However, its effect on the air is far less obvious. Plastic production, use, and disposal all emit prodigious amounts of greenhouse gasses, but scientists haven't had a firm grasp on the scope.

2h

Time is money, especially when it comes to giving

Would you be more likely to donate to charity if you could report the gift sooner on your taxes? According to a new article published in the National Tax Journal, the answer is yes.Researchers from UBC Okanagan, University of Melbourne and the University of Guelph found that changing the deadline for donations closer to tax time increased donations by nine per cent.

2h

Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras

In a recent study, we have developed a novel graphene-enabled photodetector that operates at room temperature, is highly sensitive, very fast, has a wide dynamic range and covers a broad range of THz frequencies. Importantly, on the basis of the agreement we obtained between experiment, analytical model, and numerical simulations, we have reached a solid understanding of how the PTE effect gives r

2h

Many heart attack patients may be needlessly treated in ICU, study suggests

Many patients who suffer a type of heart attack known as an ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are treated in the intensive care unit (ICU), despite a relatively low risk of developing a complication requiring ICU care, according to a new study published in JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions.

2h

Meteor Showers Hitting the Moon Reveal Underground Water

When NASA astronauts first landed on the moon in 1969, they saw a desiccated world, bone-dry and devoid of any life-giving water. The Apollo astronauts, planning to stay only a few days, had brought plenty of water for their own needs. So this finding was disappointing for the hazy plans of future lunar outposts, but not immediately concerning. Decades later, humans have learned that the only econ

2h

Ebola Outbreak Not a Global Health Emergency, Declares WHO

The agency also shares preliminary results of an Ebola vaccine trial showing that is is 97.5 percent effective at protecting from infection.

2h

The Historic Notre Dame Cathedral Is on Fire

Photos and videos circulating around Twitter show the horrid scene

2h

2h

TED 2019: I Promise Not to Roll My Eyes at Your TED Talk

When cynicism and ironic detachment are the dominant modes of social discourse, it can feel frankly transgressive to earnestly celebrate passionate people who are trying to change the world.

2h

90 New Cases of Measles Reported as Outbreak Continues at Record Pace

This year’s outbreak is on course to be the worst since measles was eliminated as an endemic disease in 2000.

2h

George Church Wants to Make Genetic Matchmaking a Reality

Once enough humans have their genomes sequenced, we can end inherited disease — if we all play along.

2h

Human Gene Editing is Controversial. Shoukhrat Mitalipov Isn't Deterred

A research team in Oregon wants to use CRISPR to end inherited disease — even as fears mount over designer babies.

2h

Astronomers Spy Lunar Water Droplets Scattered by Meteoroid Impacts

Astronomers Spy Lunar Water Droplets Scattered by Meteoroid Impacts Their observations confirm water lurks in the moon's subsoil, not just at the poles. LADEE_topNteaser.jpg An artist's depiction of NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) observatory as it approaches lunar orbit. Image credits: NASA/Ames Space Monday, April 15, 2019 – 14:00 Ramin Skibba, Contributor (Inside

2h

Drug reduces risk of kidney failure in people with diabetes, study finds

A new landmark clinical trial shows that a drug lowers the risk of kidney failure by a third in people with Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease.

2h

What the Obsolete Art of Mapping the Skies on Glass Plates Can Still Teach Us

The first pictures of the sky were taken on glass photographic plates, and these treasured artifacts can still help scientists make discoveries today

2h

African research projects are failing because funding agencies can’t match donor money

“Counterfunding,” desired by donor countries, can be 50% of a project’s cost

2h

The Online Speech Wars

In theory, individuals should have the same rights online as they do in the physical world. But in practice, this is uncharted legal territory. Perhaps the most contentious area is free-speech law. “Your First Amendment rights exist in a digital space, just as much as they exist in the real world,” says Lata Nott, the executive director of the First Amendment Center of the Freedom Forum Institute

2h

Could 'mirror neurons' explain brain mechanisms of empathy?

When rats see other rats in pain, their brains activate the same group of nerve cells that become active when they themselves are in pain, research shows.

2h

Causes of cancer may leave 'fingerprints' in DNA, scientists say

Research raises hope that triggers of individual tumours could be pinpointed From smoking to alcohol, air pollution to sunlight, a host of factors in our environment can cause cancer. Now scientists say they might be able to pinpoint the culprits for individual tumours. Experts say they have managed to link particular environmental triggers with specific genetic mutations that give rise to cancer

2h

VW says China to become global software development hub to autonomous tech

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

2h

How long do neutrons live? Physicists close in on decades-old puzzle

How long do neutrons live? Physicists close in on decades-old puzzle How long do neutrons live? Physicists close in on decades-old puzzle, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01203-9 Researchers are narrowing down their measurements of how long the subatomic particle survives on its own.

2h

See the World’s Biggest Airplane Nail Its First Test Flight

Powerful Plane An airplane with a wingspan greater than the length of a football field just flew for the first time — putting us one step closer to more affordable spaceflight. The largest airplane in the world, the Stratolaunch, took off from Mojave Air and Space Port in Mojave, Calif., on Saturday for its first test flight. According to a news release , it reached a maximum speed of 304 kilomet

2h

Microplastics Are Blowing in the Wind

Atmospheric currents are transporting plastic pollution into remote, pristine areas, showing the global nature of the problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

How I led my lab from 18,900 kilometres away

How I led my lab from 18,900 kilometres away How I led my lab from 18,900 kilometres away, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01243-1 An opportunity to do a visiting fellowship in New Zealand meant Thomas Bennett had to manage his UK research group from afar — and so change his leadership approach.

3h

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Existential Risks: How the World Might End and Steps to Secure Our Future

Scientifically speaking, here’s how we might prepare for the end of the world and steps we could be taking to protect humanity. The post Existential Risks: How the World Might End and Steps to Secure Our Future appeared first on Futurism .

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Microplastics Are Blowing in the Wind

Atmospheric currents are transporting plastic pollution into remote, pristine areas, showing the global nature of the problem — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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World's Rarest Giant Turtle Loses Last Known Female, All But Guaranteeing Extinction

The world's last known female Yangtze giant softshell turtle died one day after a failed artificial insemination in China.

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New gene variant is even more resistant to hospital antiseptic

A team of investigators has discovered a new, more powerful variant on an antimicrobial resistance gene common among Staphylococcus species. The gene protects the bacteria from an antiseptic compound widely used in healthcare. The team showed that the newly discovered gene occurs in a highly virulent and multi-resistant clone of Staphylococcus epidermidis, found in healthcare settings worldwide.

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Breakthrough kidney disease treatment offers hope for hundreds of millions with diabetes worldwide

A new treatment for people with diabetes and kidney disease reduced kidney failure rates by a third, according to a landmark trial.

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Brain marker for angry dreams

Researchers have identified a pattern of brain activity that predicts anger experienced during dreaming, according to a new study of healthy adults published in JNeurosci. The research could potentially inform efforts to understand the neural basis of the emotional content of nightmares, a feature of various mental and sleep disorders.

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Resolving sex differences in psychiatric disorder risk

Male and female rats whose mother experienced a simulated viral infection during pregnancy display autism- and schizophrenia-like behaviors, according to a new follow-up study published in eNeuro. The researchers extended findings of their previous study of male animals to their female siblings.

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Dopamine regulates sex differences in worms

Dopamine is responsible for sex-specific variations in common behaviors, finds a study of worm movements published in JNeurosci. The research demonstrates how the same neurotransmitter can contribute to sex differences, a finding that could have implications for mental disorders.

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The Dark Saga of Katie Bouman

Two photos—one long anticipated, the other a surprise—became instantly famous in astronomy last week. First, there was the first-ever look at a black hole , a shadowy void encircled in a fiery ring of cosmic matter. Then, in the celebration that followed, another image emerged: a young computer scientist, hands over her mouth and eyes flashing with giddiness, as the image of the most mysterious o

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Neurobiologist Paul Greengard Dies

The Nobel laureate revolutionized our understanding of how brain cells communicate.

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Travel through wormholes is possible, but slow.

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Disney’s “Frozen” Inspired New Attempt to Find Dark Matter

Do You Wanna Build a Snowball Chamber? It’s not often that physicists take inspiration from Disney musicals when designing new experiments, but a team hell-bent on detecting dark matter says it did just that. To find dark matter — that’s the elusive, invisible stuff that makes up most of the matter in the universe — scientists have built gigantic apparatuses , probed deep underground , and tiny f

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Meteor showers dig up water on the moon

Meteorites release water from the moon’s soil, hinting that the moon has water buried all across its surface.

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Washington Aims to Decarbonize its Electricity Grid

It is the fourth state to pursue such a plan, with a couple others looking at following suit — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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What Angry Dreams Look Like in Your Brain

How were your dreams last night?

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Bacton sand martins return to cliff burrows after nets removed

The birds' nesting sites were blocked when netting was installed.

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Entomologists uncover Florida fire ant matriarchy

In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that's not always the way ant societies function.

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One side of your brain might be giving you nightmares

Study explores what controls emotions while we sleep. Nick Carne reports.

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Watch Your Wallet

S herman “O. T.” Powell , a retired pickpocket who honed his skills on the streets of New York in the 1980s, claims that at the height of his career he could clear up to $5,000 a month (about $12,000 today, adjusting for inflation). But over the years, his income began to fall. “Around 2000, people started carrying less cash, and I got out of the game,” he told me. By 2010, the New York Daily New

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How Amazon Demand Drives Autonomous Truck Tech

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Israeli nonprofit vows new moon mission after 1st crashes

The Israeli start-up behind last week's failed lunar landing has vowed to create a second mission to steer a privately funded spacecraft onto the moon.

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France sees blockchain as anti-monopoly weapon in digital world

France is pushing blockchain technology as a means of preventing finance giants enjoying a monopoly on transactions, Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Monday.

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Meteoroid strikes eject precious water from moon

Streams of meteoroids striking the Moon infuse the thin lunar atmosphere with a short-lived water vapor, according to researchers using data from NASA's LADEE spacecraft. The findings will help scientists understand the history of lunar water.

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Comet Ingredients Swallowed by an Asteroid, Found Sealed Inside a Meteorite

A bit of comet material lurks inside a meteorite found in Antarctica.

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Astronomers take first, high-resolution look at huge star-forming region of Milky Way

Astronomers from the United States and South Korea have made the first high-resolution, radio telescope observations of the molecular clouds within a massive star-forming region of the outer Milky Way.

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Successful research papers cite young references

When it comes to publishing the most impactful scientific research and identifying the best up-and-coming research paths, it takes one to know one.

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New evidence suggests volcanoes caused biggest mass extinction ever

Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth.

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Study: Phenols in purple corn fight diabetes, obesity, inflammation in mouse cells

Scientists at the University of Illinois have developed new hybrids of purple corn containing different combinations of phytochemicals that may fight obesity, inflammation and diabetes, a new study in mice indicates.

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Powehi provides a lesson to us all | Letter

David JK Evans says recent scientific discoveries should prompt people to focus their creative genius and protect our planet, not destroy it I applaud your editorial celebrating the importance in our human history of the discovery of Powehi and the evidence it demonstrates of our species’ creative genius ( The first picture of a black hole is inspiring. So are the scientists who took it , 13 Apri

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FDA ban on menthol is likely to survive tobacco industry lawsuits

A proposed ban of menthol combustible tobacco products by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will likely be upheld in court, albeit a lengthy legal process, a Rutgers paper found.

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MU neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome

The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. It is of particular interest to those studying spinal cord injury because, unlike humans, the lamprey can regenerate nerve connections and recover normal mobility within about 8 weeks following an injury to its spinal cord.

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Study: Phenols in purple corn fight diabetes, obesity, inflammation in mouse cells

Scientists at the University of Illinois have developed new hybrids of purple corn containing different combinations of phytochemicals that may fight obesity, inflammation and diabetes, a new study in mice indicates.

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Neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome

The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. It is of particular interest to those studying spinal cord injury (SCI) because, unlike humans, the lamprey can regenerate nerve connections and recover normal mobility within about 8 weeks following an injury to its spinal cord. With the first reference

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Parasitic Wasps Play the Victim to Ambush Spiders

Parasitic Wasps Play the Victim to Ambush Spiders Their larvae slowly suck the arachnids' guts out after wasps infiltrate the spiders' webs. Wasp_topNteaser.jpg The parasitic wasp Zatypota maculata uses several strategies to lure spiders into playing the unwilling provider for the wasps' gut-sucking offspring. Image credits: Courtesy of Keizo Takasuka Creature Monday, April 15, 2019 – 12:15 Joshu

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Scientists lead the way to produce tools for engineering biomolecules

Scientists have discovered how to build novel synthetic biomolecule complexes that they believe are a critical step towards biotemplated advanced materials.

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Neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome

The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. It is of particular interest to those studying spinal cord injury (SCI) because, unlike humans, the lamprey can regenerate nerve connections and recover normal mobility within about 8 weeks following an injury to its spinal cord. With the first reference

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Face facts: we have evolved to communicate

Scientists suggest there’s a reason we look so different to our near relatives. Nick Carne reports.

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Newly drilled sediment cores could reveal how fast the Antarctic ice sheet will melt

First deep cores from the Amundsen Sea floor record how the West Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated millions of years ago

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TESS finds its first Earth-sized planet

A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world, according to a new paper from a team of astronomers that includes Carnegie's Johanna Teske, Paul Butler, Steve Shectman, Jeff Crane, and Sharon Wang.

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Astronomers take first, high-resolution look at huge star-forming region of Milky Way

A team of astronomers used a newly commissioned radio telescope in South Korea to make the first high-resolution observations of the molecular clouds within a star-forming region of the Milky Way. The first good look at the galactic region indicated large molecular clouds about 180 light years across with a mass equal to about 100,000 masses of our sun. A paper describing the observations has been

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Transgender youth faced with tough decision to freeze sperm or eggs

Transitioning transgender adolescents are forced to consider whether or not they pursue fertility preservation. Their decision is influenced by certain key factors, reports a new study.

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New evidence suggests volcanoes caused biggest mass extinction ever

Researchers say mercury buried in ancient rock provides the strongest evidence yet that volcanoes caused the biggest mass extinction in the history of the Earth. The extinction 252 million years ago was so dramatic and widespread that scientists call it 'the Great Dying.' The catastrophe killed off more than 95 percent of life on Earth over the course of hundreds of thousands of years.

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Study: Phenols in purple corn fight diabetes, obesity, inflammation in mouse cells

Scientists at the University of Illinois developed new purple corn hybrids with differing combinations of phenols in the pericarp that fight obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance, a new study in mice suggests. The pericarp also provides the food industry with a new source of colorants and farmers with a new value added product for their crops.

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Successful research papers cite young references

When it comes to publishing the most impactful scientific research and identifying the best up-and-coming research paths, it takes one to know one. That's what Northwestern University researchers found when they analyzed nearly 6 million citations among more than 156,000 published scientific papers.

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In lung disease, crackling and wheezing can be more than just a sign of sickness

Doctors know they're the sounds of lung problems, but it turns out they might be more than symptoms–crackling and wheezing could be the sounds of a disease progressing, a University of Michigan researcher has found.

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Meteoroid strikes eject precious water from moon

Researchers from NASA and the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, report that streams of meteoroids striking the Moon infuse the thin lunar atmosphere with a short-lived water vapor.

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'My robot companion has changed my life' – Independent.ie

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The discrete-time physics hiding inside our continuous-time world

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Europe looks to remold internet with new copyright rules

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Could climate change cause infertility?

The scientific community has long held an understanding about the effect of temperature on sperm production in mammals, but this new study sheds light on how spermatogenesis in insects is hampered at extreme temperatures.

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Entomologists uncover Florida fire ant matriarchy

In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that's not always the way ant societies function.

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Daily briefing: Ten simple rules for a happier, healthier lab

Daily briefing: Ten simple rules for a happier, healthier lab Daily briefing: Ten simple rules for a happier, healthier lab, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01242-2 How to make labs more nurturing, collaborative and people-centred, Ebola outbreak not an international emergency, death of a turtle could spell the end of a species.

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Harvard Physicist: Wormhole Travel Is Possible, but It’s Not Fast

Scenic Route The idea of wormholes — tunnel-like bridges connecting two points in space-time — has been around for decades , with many speculating that wormholes could enable interstellar or even intergalactic travel . Now, Harvard physicist Daniel Jafferis has a dose of good news and bad news for fans of the sci-fi staple: wormholes exist, but they’re unlikely to serve as galactic shortcuts. “It

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The history of humanity in your face

The face you see in the mirror is the result of millions of years of evolution and reflects the most distinctive features that we use to identify and recognize each other, molded by our need to eat, breath, see, and communicate.

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Precise decoding of breast cancer cells creates new option for treatment

Researchers have investigated the varying composition of cancer and immune cells in over one hundred breast tumors. They've found that aggressive tumors are often dominated by a single type of tumor cell. If certain immune cells are present as well, an immune therapy could be successful for a specific group of breast cancer patients.

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Scientists lead the way to produce tools for engineering biomolecules

Scientists have discovered how to build novel synthetic biomolecule complexes that they believe are a critical step towards biotemplated advanced materials.

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Could climate change cause infertility?

The scientific community has long held an understanding about the effect of temperature on sperm production in mammals, but this new study sheds light on how spermatogenesis in insects is hampered at extreme temperatures.

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Entomologists uncover Florida fire ant matriarchy

In most colonies, ants work in service of a single reproductive queen, but that's not always the way ant societies function.

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Scientists use eBird data to propose optimal bird conservation plan

A new paper published today in the journal Nature Communications shows a blueprint for conserving enough habitat to protect the populations of almost one-third of the warblers, orioles, tanagers, and other birds that migrate among the Americas throughout the year.

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Scientists use eBird data to propose optimal bird conservation plan

A new paper published today in the journal Nature Communications shows a blueprint for conserving enough habitat to protect the populations of almost one-third of the warblers, orioles, tanagers, and other birds that migrate among the Americas throughout the year.

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How does dark play impact the effectiveness of serious video games?

A new study has shown that allowing "dark play" in a serious video game intended to practice skills transferable to a real-life setting does not impact the game's effectiveness. Dark play, in which players choose inappropriate or unethical actions, is an option in nearly all video games. The study, which evaluated the ability and attitudes of medical students in caring for delirious patients, is p

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Starwatch: a chance to see an orange giant and a brilliant binary

The full moon is a starting point to locate two of the brightest stars in the sky – Arcturus in Boötes and Spica in Virgo The moon becomes full this week and on 18 April it sits squarely in the constellation Virgo, the Virgin. The chart shows its location at 2200BST that night. With the moon as a guide, two of the brightest stars can be located and compared. Higher in the sky to the east is Arctu

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No, 'Negative-Calorie' Foods Aren't a Real Thing, Study Says

The study is one of the first to scientifically test the idea of negative-calorie foods, or foods that theoretically require more calories to digest than they contain.

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Our nearest neighbour Proxima Centauri may host a second exoplanet

Proxima Centauri is the closest star to the solar system, and it may be home to a frigid planet six times the size of Earth in addition to the possibly habitable Proxima b

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Lyft pulls electric bikes off the road after brake problems

Lyft has pulled 3,000 electric bikes from the streets of New York, San Francisco and Washington, D.C., after customers complained the bikes were braking too hard.

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iOS 13 will reportedly introduce Safari and Mail upgrades, a system-wide Dark Mode and more

Sources familiar with the mobile operating system’s development tell 9to5Mac that the long-awaited Dark Mode will finally make its debut in iOS 13. Additionally, iOS 13 on the iPad will allow …

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Sizing up a starry night

We gaze up at them, we wish upon them, we even sing about swinging on them. But the one thing we haven't been able to do with a star is figure out how big it is…until now.

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Statins safe for preventing cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis patients

Results from a large clinical trial indicate that patients with rheumatoid arthritis are likely to experience the same level of cardiovascular benefits from statins as other individuals, without additional risks. The findings appear in Arthritis & Rheumatology, an official journal of the American College of Rheumatology.

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TESS finds its first Earth-sized planet

A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world. This milestone sets the path for finding smaller planets around even smaller stars, and those planets may potentially be habitable.

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Elon Musk Suggests Adding “Dragon Wings” to Starship

Dragon Wings Sometimes, it’s easy to tell if space travel visionary and meme reviewer Elon Musk is joking on Twitter. Other times, not so much. Just before the return of HBO’s mega-hit “Game of Thrones,” Musk tweeted that he was “thinking about adding giant stainless steel dragon wings to Starship” that could allow his eventually-Mars-bound spacecraft to keep cool during re-entry. “Starship will

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Scientists use eBird data to propose optimal bird conservation plan

A new article shows a blueprint for conserving enough habitat to protect the populations of almost one-third of the warblers, orioles, tanagers, and other birds that migrate among the Americas throughout the year.

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'Fingerprint database' could help scientists to identify new cancer culprits

Scientists have developed a catalogue of DNA mutation 'fingerprints' that could help doctors pinpoint the environmental culprit responsible for a patient's tumor – including showing some of the fingerprints left in lung tumors by specific chemicals found in tobacco smoke.

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Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters

It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research.

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Cell biology: The complexity of division by two

Researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division.

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Light from exotic particle states

In ultra thin materials, exotic bound states of particles can be created which are then converted into light. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have now succeeded in using this effect to create a novel kind of light-emitting diode.

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What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?

Scientists have now discovered that interactions between RNA-binding proteins are more critical to ALS pathogenesis than previously thought.

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Irregular schedules raise risk of injury for miners working long hours

Researchers examined how and why long work shifts increase the risk for injury among miners of all kinds. They found that injured miners who worked shifts longer than 9 hours tended to have irregular schedules or less than two years on the job.

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Could climate change cause infertility?

A number of plant and animal species could find it increasingly difficult to reproduce if climate change worsens and global temperatures become more extreme — a stark warning highlighted by new scientific research.

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Phoebe Waller-Bridge Is Working on the Next James Bond Movie

The voice of L3-37 is punching up the script. Also, 'Big Little Lies' has a new trailer.

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How Can We Increase Trust in Vaccines?

A look at India’s experience could provide an answer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Can We Increase Trust in Vaccines?

A look at India’s experience could provide an answer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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China’s Rolling Out Dedicated Highway Lanes for Self-Driving Cars

Keep Left In a bid to lead the race to fully-autonomous vehicles, China is building highways with dedicated lanes for self-driving cars. A new 62-mile stretch of freeway will have two lanes dedicated to autonomous vehicles (AVs), according to FutureCar . The idea is that the infrastructure investment will give AVs access to real-world traffic conditions — but also that the separate lanes will ens

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U.S. measles outbreaks show no signs of slowing down

This year’s measles cases have blown by 2018’s total, raising the specter that the disease could once more become endemic in the United States.

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Pepsi plans to project a giant ad in the night sky using cubesats

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Your next car may be Chinese and electric

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#MeToo controversy erupts at archaeology meeting

Society’s new antiharassment policy doesn’t include mechanisms for protecting survivors of past abuse if harasser attends meeting

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Flipping Through the Pages

I’m traveling today, but as I was scrolling through my RSS feeds on the plane (OK, yeah, I know, but they had free Wi-Fi and why not), I thought about how people of around my scientific generation, maybe a bit younger and certainly the older ones, often talk about how they miss flipping through the physical journals. There was the whole tactile object-in-your-hand thing, of course: I have a Kindl

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Meteoroid strikes eject precious water from moon

Streams of meteoroids striking the Moon infuse the thin lunar atmosphere with a short-lived water vapor, according to researchers using data from NASA's LADEE spacecraft. The findings will help scientists understand the history of lunar water.

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Procedure time proves vital in thrombectomy success

Researchers at MUSC report in a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology paper that the current standard of care for stroke should factor in procedure time when considering surgical intervention. By studying the number of attempts and the time spent performing procedures, researchers concluded that the likelihood of completing an endovascular thrombectomy without significantly increasi

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US and Japanese researchers identify how liver cells protect against viral attacks

Researchers in Chapel Hill, N.C., and Tokyo have discovered a mechanism by which liver cells intrinsic resistance to diverse RNA viruses is regulated. These results have implications for cellular responses to hepatitis, dengue and Zika.

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Peeling back the darkness of M87

Supercomputers at The University of Texas at Austin's Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) enabled researchers to confirm the accuracy, and interpret features of, the first-of-its-kind image of a black hole obtained by the Event Horizon Telescope. Relativistic simulations of black hole physics, along with ray tracing, helped predict how M87 would appear on Earth, and gave the Event Horizon team

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Genetic analysis has potential to transform diagnosis and treatment of adults with liver disease of unknown cause

Adults suffering from liver disease of unknown cause represent an understudied and underserved patient population. A new study reported in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier, supports the incorporation of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in the diagnosis and management of adults suffering from unexplained liver disease and underscores its value in developing an understanding of which liv

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Game of Thrones: Jon Snow Finally Learns the Truth

This story contains spoilers through Season 8, Episode 1 of Game of Thrones . It was Sam who shared the news. Reeling from the discovery that Daenerys had summarily executed his father and brother after they had refused to pledge their loyalty to her, Game of Thrones ’ resident intellectual finds Jon in the crypt of Winterfell, where the bodies are buried and the myths of the dead live on. Sam, h

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New clues to abnormal brain signals in movement disorders

New research on neural signals could help lead to additional treatments for movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Huntington’s disease or psychiatric conditions like obsessive compulsive disorder. Sensory signals in the brain’s cerebral cortex have a different pattern of connections between nerve cells and different effects on behavior than motor signals do, the researchers report. L

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Scientists print first 3D heart using patient's biological materials

In a major medical breakthrough, researchers have 'printed' the world's first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient's own cells and biological materials.

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Stem cells call the shots

That’s why flowering plants have genetic backup plans to protect them

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The Latest Facebook News Feed Rumor Is So Dumb I Pray It's True

Compared to other apps, Facebook can seem downright antiquated. One blogger described it recently as “a dopey website that sucks to use and look at.” Facebook seems to be aware of this problem, …

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Saturn’s moon Titan has an alien lake district that looks like Earth

NASA's Cassini spacecraft used radar data to scan the surface of Saturn's moon Titan, helping us learn about its lakes of methane

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There is water just under the surface of the moon that we could use

When there’s a meteor shower on the moon, the impacts cause puffs of water, which means that it’ll be simple for us to get that water to use for exploration

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Pristine mountains are being littered with microplastics from the air

Tiny particles of plastic are being blown on the wind, ending up in remote areas over a hundred kilometres away from cities

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Viruses Have a Secret, Altruistic Social Life

Social organisms come in all shapes and sizes, from the obviously gregarious ones like mammals and birds down to the more cryptic socializers like bacteria. Evolutionary biologists often puzzle over altruistic behaviors among them, because self-sacrificing individuals would at first seem to be at a severe disadvantage under natural selection. William D. Hamilton, one of the 20th century’s most pr

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Entomologists uncover Florida fire ant matriarchy

Researchers have found colonies of tropical fire ants, native to Florida and coastal Georgia, that thrive with multiple queens and in close proximity to single-queen colonies of the same species.

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New theory derived from classical physics predicts how economies respond to major disturbances

Understanding economies in times of crises? Modern macroeconomics failed so far. Researchers are now proposing a novel method that makes the effects of shocks on out-of-equilibrium economies computable for the first time.

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Power to the people: How everyday acts of defiance can shape and change markets

Subtle, hidden and everyday acts of resistance and defiance by people with limited resources could have an impact on markets in societies where state and religion is all-powerful. These are the key findings of a new study which shows consumers and individuals can help markets to evolve in societies where they cannot freely and openly participate in them.

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Necrophagy: A means of survival in the Dead Sea

Researchers have examined the sediments in the Dead Sea. The geologists drilled a 400-meter hole before analyzing each layer of sediment and the traces of a strategy that enables bacteria to survive by feeding on the remains of other organisms. This discovery will further our understanding of how life can develop even in the most severe conditions. It also provides vital research leads for detecti

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Sharks more vulnerable than originally thought

A new study reveals in excess of 2.5 million sharks are caught annually in the South West Indian Ocean – 73% more than officially reported. Experts say that similar underreporting is happening in small scale fisheries globally.

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Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories

Scientists have revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. Their research sheds light on how drug addiction develops and reveals pathways that can be exploited for the development of strategies to treat cocaine addiction.

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Diet during development affects mating habits, insect study shows

An animal's choice of mating partner can be influenced by what it eats during its sexual development, a study of insects has shown.

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Laser processing method to increase efficiency of optoelectronic devices

Researchers discover new method to passivate defects in next generation optical materials.

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Scanning for cancer treatment

11,000 people are predicted to die from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2019. Recently, drug developers designed a new treatment to target the cancer's mutated genes. But, these drugs don't always work. Now, in a new study, researchers investigate both sides of the drug-body relationship to better understand why certain AML treatments–and other cancer treatments–may not work as expected.

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Russian scientists alter 3D genome using 'small molecules'

Researchers have discovered that the spatial organization of the genome can be altered using small molecule compounds which are considered as promising anti-cancer drugs. This work opens up the prospect of developing a new class of anticancer epigenetic drugs that alter the 3D genome. The results were published in Nature Communications.

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Precise decoding of breast cancer cells creates new option for treatment

Researchers at the University of Zurich and from IBM Research have investigated the vary-ing composition of cancer and immune cells in over one hundred breast tumors. They've found that aggressive tumors are often dominated by a single type of tumor cell. If certain immune cells are present as well, an immune therapy could be successful for a specific group of breast cancer patients.

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Low-intensity ultrasound can change decision-making process in the brain, research shows

This is a peer-reviewed empirical study conducted in animals (macaque monkeys)The study shows how low-intensity ultrasonic waves can be used to generate or suppress electrical signals in the brain, modulating normal brain function. The process is reversible. This study applies to counterfactual thinking, and does not suggest you can directly change someone's personality

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Comet fragment discovered inside meteorite gives clues to the origin of the solar system

An international team including researchers from the Institute of Space Studies of Catalonia at the Institute of Space Sciences (Spanish National Research Council-CSIC) has discovered a pristine comet fragment inside a meteorite. This finding demonstrates that the class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites contains clues to the composition of more fragile objects that formed in regions d

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China, India economic development key to achieving MDG for safe drinking water

Research led by The University of Tokyo examined why the United Nations Millennium Development Goal for access to safe drinking water was achieved when all previous attempts had failed. They looked at previous targets, definitions of water safety, and relations with population movement and socioeconomic change. They found keys to success were the relatively easier and somewhat ambiguous targets, h

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CRISPRed wheat helps farmers control weeds

Recently, a research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGDB, CAS), together with Associate Prof. JIANG Linjian at China Agricultural University (CAU), generated several herbicide-tolerant wheat germplasms using base editing to facilitate weed control in wheat fields.

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The history of humanity in your face

The skull and teeth provide a rich library of changes that we can track over time, describing the history of evolution of our species. Prime factors in the changing structure of the face include a growing brain and adaptations to respiratory and energy demands, but most importantly, changes in the jaw, teeth and face responded to shifts in diet and feeding behavior.

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Safety-net hospitals fare better under new Medicare reimbursement rules

New Medicare reimbursement rules provide some relief to safety-net hospitals, shifting the burden of financial penalties toward hospitals serving wealthier patient populations, according to a new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The new rules also reduce the burden of such penalties on hospitals in states that have more generous Medicaid programs.

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Tiny fragment of a comet found inside a meteorite

ASU researcher helps team make surprising discovery that gives clues to how solar system formed

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A simple nudge leads low-income immigrants to apply for citizenship

Through a randomized field experiment, researchers at Stanford's Immigration Policy Lab demonstrate that a low-cost nudge informing immigrants about their eligibility for a federal fee waiver increased rates of citizenship applications.

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A new bacteria-killing weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance

In a bid to boost the arsenal available against antibiotic resistance, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, the CNRS and the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid successfully programmed a bacterial genetic structure to make it capable of specifically killing multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria without also destroying bacteria that are beneficial to the body. Unlike other approaches under developm

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New compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light

Scientists from the University of Groningen have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing — a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control different cellular processes. With the molecule described, it is possible to either inhibit or stimulate communication, making it a useful tool for research into bacterial commun

5h

Need for social skills helped shape modern human face

As large-brained, short-faced hominins, our faces are different from other, now extinct hominins (such as the Neanderthals) and our closest living relatives (bonobos and chimpanzees), but how and why did the modern human face evolve this way?

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Princeton scientists discover an interaction that helps cancers spread to bone

A Princeton-led team of researchers have discovered a factor that promotes the spread of cancers to bone, opening the way toward treatments that could mitigate cancer's ability to colonize bone. The study by Mark Esposito, Yibin Kang and colleagues appears in the April 15 issue of Nature Cell Biology.

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SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera' films molecular movie in HD

With an extremely fast 'electron camera' at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have made the first high-definition 'movie' of ring-shaped molecules breaking open in response to light. The results could further our understanding of similar reactions with vital roles in chemistry, such as the production of vitamin D in our bodies.

5h

Examination of adolescent homicides committed by intimate partners

This study used data from a large national surveillance system from 2003 to 2016 to report on adolescent homicides committed by an intimate partner (current or former girlfriend or boyfriend or spouse) and to describe characteristics of the victims, perpetrators and incidents.

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To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans

When it comes to stem cell management, all flowering plants work to maintain the same status quo. Researchers have now identified the various strategies plants use to preserve a single, essential genetic circuit.

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Asteroids help scientists to measure the diameters of faraway stars

Using the unique capabilities of telescopes specialized on cosmic gamma rays, scientists have measured the smallest apparent size of a star on the night sky to date. The measurements reveal the diameters of a giant star 2,674 light-years away and of a sun-like star at a distance of 700 light-years. The study establishes a new method for astronomers to determine the size of stars, as the internatio

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Decoding cancer's molecular signature

New algorithm successfully identifies patients with a tumor-fueling DNA repair defect found in multiple cancers and treatable with a common cancer drug. Most genetic tests currently used in clinic do not reliably capture the cancer-causing defect, missing many patients who could benefit from treatment.

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First-year doctors spend almost 90% of their time away from patients

Largest study to date uncovers the reality of young doctors' lives in the hospital.

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Cometary surprise found inside meteorite

An ancient sliver of the building blocks from which comets formed was discovered by a Carnegie-led research team encased inside a meteorite like an insect in amber. The finding, published by Nature Astronomy, could offer clues to the formation and evolution of our solar system.

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Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds

Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs. A new study finds that care provided by primary care practitioners accounts for only a small fraction of total spending among Medicare beneficiaries.

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Stimulating the epileptic brain breaks up neural networks to prevent seizures

Reactive neurostimulation reduces seizure frequency by remodeling the brain, and early electrical signatures of this process could be used to accelerate and personalize treatment.

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Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins

A novel strategy capable of extracting and driving hard-to-reach proteins into water solution where they can be effectively studied using mass spectrometry, a powerful analytical technique, promises a trove of biological insights and, importantly, may help identify therapeutically relevant proteins and provide new disease diagnostic techniques.

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What makes a jellyfish?

Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones.

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Engineering 'hairpins' increases CRISPR accuracy

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold. The approach adds a short tail to the guide RNA that folds back and binds onto itself, creating a 'lock' that can only be undone by the targeted DNA sequence.

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The moon is losing 200 tons of water a year to meteorite strikes

Impacts shake loose ancient water in lunar soil

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Baby tyrannosaur’s eBay auction sparks outrage

Paleontologists decry sale, scientific display of commercially owned specimen

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Your brain your thoughts and how it works

submitted by /u/eljoseph7860 [link] [comments]

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Empower a girl, transform a community | Kakenya Ntaiya

Kakenya Ntaiya turned her dream of getting an education into a movement to empower vulnerable girls and bring an end to harmful traditional practices in Kenya. Meet two students at the Kakenya Center for Excellence, a school where girls can live and study safely — and uplift their community along the way. "When you empower a girl, you transform a community," Ntaiya says.

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Scientific American Launches New Paywall

Readers will receive three articles for free before being asked to subscribe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Snailfish from the Mariana Trench reveal clues about living life under pressure

Snailfish from the Mariana Trench reveal clues about living life under pressure Snailfish from the Mariana Trench reveal clues about living life under pressure, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01158-x Scientists produce the first gene sequence from an animal living in the deepest stretches of the ocean.

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Compartmentalized gut lymph node drainage dictates adaptive immune responses

Compartmentalized gut lymph node drainage dictates adaptive immune responses Compartmentalized gut lymph node drainage dictates adaptive immune responses, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1125-3 Immune responses in the gut and associated draining lymph nodes differ between tolerogenic and inflammatory depending on their anatomical location.

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The M87 Black Hole Now Has an Epic Name

Pōwehi We can now call the black hole at the center of the M87 galaxy something far cooler than “the black hole at the center of the M87 galaxy.” On April 10, the team behind the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) released the first image of a black hole’s event horizon . But before making the discovery public, they tasked Larry Kimura, a Hawaiian language professor at the University of Hawaii at Hilo

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Study: Aegean farmers replaced hunters of ancient Britain

A wave of migrants from what is now Greece and Turkey arrived in Britain some 6,000 years ago and virtually replaced the existing hunter-gatherer population, according to a study published Monday in the journal Nature.

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RNA transport in neurons: Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner

A team of scientists has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought. RNA is transported within highly complex protein-RNA particles whose structure and specificity are still poorly understood. The team's findings opens up new approaches to improve our understanding of the process.

5h

What makes a jellyfish?

Translucent jellyfish, colorful corals and waving sea anemones have very different bodies but all fall on the same big branch in the animal family tree. Jellyfish actually start out anchored to the sea floor, just like corals and anemones. Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) recently uncovered which genes allow jellyfish to graduate from this s

5h

SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera' films molecular movie in HD

With an extremely fast "electron camera" at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have made the first high-definition "movie" of ring-shaped molecules breaking open in response to light. The results could further our understanding of similar reactions with vital roles in chemistry, such as the production of vitamin D in our bodies.

5h

Engineering 'hairpins' increases CRISPR accuracy

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold. They believe it can be easily translated to any of the editing technology's continually expanding formats.

5h

Tiny fragment of a comet found inside a meteorite

A tiny piece of the building blocks from which comets formed has been discovered inside a primitive meteorite. The discovery by a Carnegie Institution of Science-led team, including a researcher now at Arizona State University, was published April 15 in Nature Astronomy.

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To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans

Despite evolution driving a wide variety of differences, many plants function the same way. Now a new study has revealed the different genetic strategies various flowering plant species use to achieve the same status quo.

5h

A simple nudge leads low-income immigrants to apply for citizenship

When the "nudge" first appeared on the policymaking scene, it struck many as an ideal tool. Unlike traditional interventions aiming to improve people's behavior, a nudge is low-cost, non-coercive, and less likely to have unintended consequences. More than a decade later, though, nudge enthusiasts readily admit that designing an effective nudge isn't easy.

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Need for social skills helped shape modern human face

The modern human face is distinctively different to that of our near relatives and now researchers believe its evolution may have been partly driven by our need for good social skills.

5h

Compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light

Scientists from the University of Groningen have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing—a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control cellular processes. With the molecule described, it is possible to either inhibit or stimulate communication. This makes it a very useful tool for further research into bacterial co

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Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins

DNA and the genome, we know, provide the blueprint for life. But it is the proteins made according to the genome's instructions that are the nuts and bolts of living organisms, providing the molecular building blocks for all cells and that are critical targets for therapy.

5h

CRISPRed wheat helps farmers control weeds

Chinese farmers are facing worsening problems with the weed jointed goatgrass (Aegilops tauschii), a close relative of wheat.

5h

A new bacteria-killing weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance

When the first antibiotics were discovered in the early 20th century, the rate of death from infectious diseases fell dramatically. But the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria as a result of antibiotic misuse is raising fears that by 2050, these same diseases will once again become the leading cause of death worldwide. In a bid to boost the arsenal available to tackle this threat, scientists

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Asteroids help scientists measure distant stars

Look up at the sky on a clear night, and you'll see lots of stars. Sometimes they seem almost within reach or at least a short rocket ride. But the closest star to Earth—not counting our sun—is more than four light years away, at a distance of 25 trillion miles.

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Winds May Be Blowing Microplastics Around the World

In the remote French Pyrenees, scientists are finding tiny bits of plastic—likely blown from big cities like Barcelona, 100 miles to the south.

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How does dark play impact the effectiveness of serious video games?

A new study has shown that allowing "dark play" in a serious video game intended to practice skills transferable to a real-life setting does not impact the game's effectiveness.

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Army scientists lead the way to produce tools for engineering biomolecules

Army scientists have discovered how to build novel synthetic biomolecule complexes that they believe are a critical step towards biotemplated advanced materials. Their work was recently featured in Nature Chemistry.

5h

Scientists use eBird data to propose optimal bird conservation plan

A new paper published today in the journal Nature Communications shows a blueprint for conserving enough habitat to protect the populations of almost one-third of the warblers, orioles, tanagers, and other birds that migrate among the Americas throughout the year.

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Moffitt researchers identify mechanism of resistance to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma

Melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of skin cancer, but recent advances in targeted therapies have improved the prognosis for many patients. Unfortunately, for some patients these positive outcomes are not long lasting, due to the development of drug resistance and tumor recurrence. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers have discovered a mechanism by which melanoma cells become resistant to t

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Face facts: we have evolved to communicate

Scientists suggest there’s a reason we look so different to our near relatives. Nick Carne reports.

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Airborne microplastics found atop France’s remote Pyrenees mountains

The microplastics soared at least 100 kilometers from their source

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Som vinden blæser: Mikroplast rejser gennem luften til øde bjergeområder

Mikroplast i de franske bjerge er blæst mere end 100 kilometer med vinden.

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What makes a jellyfish?

Translucent jellyfish, colorful corals and waving sea anemones have very different bodies but all fall on the same big branch in the animal family tree. Jellyfish actually start out anchored to the sea floor, just like corals and anemones. Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) recently uncovered which genes allow jellyfish to graduate from this s

5h

Engineering 'hairpins' increases CRISPR accuracy

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a method for improving the accuracy of the CRISPR genome editing technology by an average of 50-fold. They believe it can be easily translated to any of the editing technology's continually expanding formats.

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Forskare: Hjärnvågor skvallrar om arga drömmar

När en människa känner ilska i sömnen uppstår ett särskilt mönster i hjärnan. Det rapporterar forskare vid Högskolan i Skövde

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Why Tiger Woods’s Masters Win Was Different This Time

To watch the Masters Tournament, held every spring at Augusta National Golf Club in Georgia, is to be caught between times. On the one hand, there is the usual 21st-century sports futurism, as in every golf tournament. Players are forever driving the ball farther with more refined equipment, the cameras that capture them do so in higher and higher definition, and tracing lines appear on-screen to

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Stem cells call the shots

That’s why flowering plants have genetic backup plans to protect them

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Saturn’s moon Titan sports phantom hydrocarbon lakes

Three lakes on Saturn’s moon Titan have pulled a vanishing act, a study finds.

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Tiny microplastics travel far on the wind

Airborne bits of plastic that originated in cities ended up in pristine mountains at least 95 kilometers away, a study finds.

5h

Scientific American Launches New Paywall

Readers will receive three articles for free before being asked to subscribe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans

Despite evolution driving a wide variety of differences, many plants function the same way. Now a new study has revealed the different genetic strategies various flowering plant species use to achieve the same status quo.

5h

Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins

DNA and the genome, we know, provide the blueprint for life. But it is the proteins made according to the genome's instructions that are the nuts and bolts of living organisms, providing the molecular building blocks for all cells and that are critical targets for therapy.

5h

CRISPRed wheat helps farmers control weeds

Chinese farmers are facing worsening problems with the weed jointed goatgrass (Aegilops tauschii), a close relative of wheat.

5h

A new bacteria-killing weapon in the fight against antibiotic resistance

When the first antibiotics were discovered in the early 20th century, the rate of death from infectious diseases fell dramatically. But the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria as a result of antibiotic misuse is raising fears that by 2050, these same diseases will once again become the leading cause of death worldwide. In a bid to boost the arsenal available to tackle this threat, scientists

5h

Researchers Create First Ever 3D-Printed Heart Using Human Tissue

Small Heart In what the Israeli media is calling a “world’s first,” scientists at Tel Aviv University have 3D printed a small heart using human tissue that includes vessels, collagen, and biological molecules — a breakthrough, according to Haaretz , that they hope could one day render organ donation obsolete. Rodent Model The technology is still many years out from human transplants, though — the

5h

Raising Boys With a Broader Definition of Masculinity

In recent years, some of society’s gender norms have begun to stretch and soften, while others cling fast. For many young boys, there continues to be a very small space that they can occupy to be considered traditionally “masculine,” and that small space can be restricting, forcing boys to lose what doesn’t fit inside it. In his new book, How to Raise a Boy , Michael Reichert calls that space the

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Entomologists uncover Florida fire ant matriarchy

Researchers at the University of Georgia have found colonies of tropical fire ants, native to Florida and coastal Georgia, that thrive with multiple queens and in close proximity to single-queen colonies of the same species.

5h

Could climate change cause infertility?

A number of plant and animal species could find it increasingly difficult to reproduce if climate change worsens and global temperatures become more extreme — a stark warning highlighted by new scientific research.

5h

APOE gene has a gender-based effect on sleep behaviour of Alzheimer's disease patients

The Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele is a well-known risk factor for Alzheimer's Disease (AD), and sleep disturbances are commonly associated with AD. However, few studies have investigated the relationship between APOE ε4 and abnormal sleep patterns (N+) in AD.

5h

Scientists get sly, use deception to fight cancer

In recent years, it's become clear that RNA-binding proteins play a major role in cancer growth. These proteins, active in all cells but especially so in cancer cells, bind to RNA molecules and accelerate cancer cell growth. Unfortunately, no cancer treatment has targeted these proteins. Until now.

5h

Top journals retract DNA-repair studies after misconduct probe

Top journals retract DNA-repair studies after misconduct probe Top journals retract DNA-repair studies after misconduct probe, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-00406-4 Investigation found that Science and Nature papers contained data falsified by one author.

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The 2018 heatwave may not have been possible without climate change

We already knew that climate change made the 2018 heatwave more likely, but now some researchers have said it wouldn't have been possible without it

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Top EPA advisers challenge long-standing air pollution science, threatening Americans' health

Americans rely on the Environmental Protection Agency to set pollution control standards that protect their health. But on April 11, an important scientific advisory group submitted recommendations to EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler that propose new and dangerous ways of interpreting findings on the health effects of air pollution.

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Turning silenced cancer genes back into fighters

Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the function of hundreds of cancer-fighting genes that became "misregulated" by the disease.

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Staying in a hotel during travel to tropical regions is associated with contracting drug-resistant bacteria

Staying in a hotel or private accommodation is associated with contracting and carrying home drug-resistant bacteria in travelers to low and/or middle-income countries (LMICs), according to new research.

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National handwashing campaign reduces incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Australia's hospitals

Since its implementation in 2009, the National Australian Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI) has seen significant, sustained improvements in hand hygiene compliance among Australian healthcare workers, and reduced risks of potentially fatal healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to new research.

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Low hand hygiene compliance in ICUs

Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research.

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Applying hand rub with three steps for 15 seconds as effective at reducing bacteria as WHO-recommended 6 steps for 30 seconds

A shortened 15-second application time and a simpler three-step technique for use of alcohol-based hand rub is as effective in reducing bacteria as the 30-second application and six-step technique recommended by WHO, and could improve hand hygiene compliance.

6h

Cancers 'change spots' to avoid immunotherapy

Cancers can make themselves harder for new immunotherapies to see by 'changing their spots' — and switching off a key molecule on the surface of cells that is otherwise recognised by treatment.

6h

Auction bids decline with intensity of competition

People bid less in auctions that have more bidders, new research suggests.

6h

Cognitive functioning does not predict weight-loss outcome for adolescents

Young people with cognitive impairments and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, have similar weight-loss trajectories to those with typical cognitive function after bariatric surgery, according to a new study.

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A specific gene could play a major role in reducing brain swelling after stroke

Inflammation gone awry in the brain due to stroke, head injury or infection causes damage; in a lab model of stroke, a particular gene tamped down swelling.

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Tel Aviv University scientists print first 3D heart using patient's biological materials

In a major medical breakthrough, Tel Aviv University researchers have 'printed' the world's first 3D vascularised engineered heart using a patient's own cells and biological materials.

6h

Irregular schedules raise risk of injury for miners working long hours

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago examined how and why long work shifts increase the risk for injury among miners of all kinds. They found that injured miners who worked shifts longer than 9 hours tended to have irregular schedules or less than two years on the job.

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'Fingerprint database' could help scientists to identify new cancer culprits

Scientists in Cambridge and London have developed a catalogue of DNA mutation 'fingerprints' that could help doctors pinpoint the environmental culprit responsible for a patient's tumour – including showing some of the fingerprints left in lung tumours by specific chemicals found in tobacco smoke.

6h

Light from exotic particle states

In ultra thin materials, exotic bound states of particles can be created which are then converted into light. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) have now succeeded in using this effect to create a novel kind of light-emitting diode.

6h

RNA transport in neurons — Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner

A team of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Ulm has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought. RNA is transported within highly complex protein-RNA particles whose structure and specificity are still poorly understood. The team's findings, recently published in

6h

Rare but important gene target found in many tumor types, suggesting new therapy possible

A consortium of researchers led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center investigators have completed the largest analysis of a new gene fusion they believe is responsible for development of a wide spectrum of cancer types.

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Regular cannabis users require up to 220% higher dosage for sedation in medical procedures

Researchers in Colorado examined medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalized recreational cannabis. They found patients who smoked or ingested cannabis on a daily or weekly basis required 14% more fentanyl, 20% more midazolam, and 220% more propofol to achieve optimum sedation for routine procedures, including colonoscopy.

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Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters

It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. "Jake" Saunders.

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Senolytics Show Promise Against Alzheimer’s in Mice

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

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Power to the people: How everyday acts of defiance can shape and change markets

Subtle, hidden and everyday acts of resistance and defiance by people with limited resources could have an impact on markets in societies where state and religion is all-powerful.

6h

Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters

It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. "Jake" Saunders.

6h

Team develops laser processing method to increase efficiency of optoelectronic devices

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) discovered a new method to passivate defects in next generation optical materials to improve optical quality and enable the miniaturization of light emitting diodes and other optical elements.

6h

'Snowball chamber' helps researchers use supercooled water to search for dark matter

After watching YouTube videos of people supercooling water in a bottle and then triggering it to freeze by banging it, something about this concept solidified for a researcher, especially when he saw it again during the Disney movie 'Frozen.' He has now described how this inspired him to explore whether a subatomic particle like dark matter can trigger the freezing of supercooled water.

6h

The discrete-time physics hiding inside our continuous-time world

Physicists have shown that Markov processes, widely used to model complex systems, must unfold over a larger space than previously assumed.

6h

Celebrity fat shaming has ripple effects on women's implicit anti-fat attitudes

Comparing 20 instances of celebrity fat-shaming with women's implicit attitudes about weight before and after the event, psychologists found that instances of celebrity fat-shaming were associated with an increase in women's implicit negative weight-related attitudes. They also found that from 2004-2015, implicit weight bias was on the rise more generally.

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Abundance of information narrows our collective attention span

A new study finds increasingly narrow peaks of collective attention over time, supporting a 'social acceleration' occurring across different domains.

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1 protein sounds the alarm when the liver is in trouble

A protein involved in one of the liver’s most basic functions also sounds the alarm when liver cells get hurt, according to new research with mice. The findings point to a potential way to better monitor the health of patients who have suffered the damage, treat the damage, and even prevent the damage from happening. On a normal day, the cells of a human liver do what they do best—make key blood

6h

Extinction Rebellion: Climate protesters block roads

Extinction Rebellion targets central London in a global day of action against climate change.

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Why the world is due a revolution in economics education

Economic thinking governs much of our world. But the discipline's teaching is stuck in the past. Centred around antiquated 19th-century models built on Newtonian physics, economics treats humans as atomic particles, rather than as social beings.

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Too much information? Sure looks like it

Research reveals 'social acceleration' occurring across different domains. Samantha Page reports.

6h

The discrete-time physics hiding inside our continuous-time world

Physicists have shown that Markov processes, widely used to model complex systems, must unfold over a larger space than previously assumed.

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Bridging the gap between radar meteorology/hydrology/engineering and weather prediction

Accurate weather prediction depends on a fundamental understanding of storm dynamics and cloud microphysics and their representation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, as well the optimal use of high-resolution multi-parameter measurements, according to Professor Guifu Zhang at the School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma, and one of the authors of a recently published review paper

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Parental influence on educational attainment much greater than previously thought, new research finds

Governments keen to raise levels of educational attainment need to look at the cultures and attitudes of parents in high-achieving countries, not just national education systems – according to new findings from researchers at the University of Warwick and the Bank of Italy.

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Racism is still a huge problem in UK's workplaces, finds report

A shocking report has found that the majority of ethnic minority workers have experienced racial harassment at work in the last five years, and have been subjected to unfair treatment by their employer because of their race.

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Image: the Egg Nebula

The Egg Nebula is a preplanetary nebula, created by a dying star in the process of becoming a planetary nebula. Planetary nebulas have nothing to do with planets – the name arose when 18th century astronomers spotted them in their telescopes and thought they looked like planets. Instead, they are the remnants of material expelled by Sun-like stars in the later stages of their lives.

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A novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division.

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RNA transport in neurons—Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner

A team of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Ulm has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought. RNA is transported within highly complex protein-RNA particles whose structure and specificity are still poorly understood. The team's findings, recently published in

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Efter sag om ulovlig behandling af personoplysninger: Erhvervsstyrelsen er i tvivl om lovgivningen

Justitsministeriet bliver nu inddraget i en sag, hvor Erhvervstyrelsen har fået »alvorlig kritik« for at behandle personoplysninger i strid med databeskyttelsesforordningen

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Senolytics Show Promise Against Alzheimer’s in Mice

For the past quarter century, scientists battled Alzheimer’s disease under a single guiding principle : that protein clumps—beta-amyloid—deposited outside sensitive brain cells gradually damage neuronal functions and trigger memory loss. The solution seems simple: remove junk amyloid, protect the brain. They could be completely wrong. Last month, Alzheimer’s disease defeated another promising nea

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A novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division.

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RNA transport in neurons—Staufen2 detects its target transcripts in a complex manner

A team of scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the University of Ulm has discovered that the neuronal transport factor Staufen2 scans and binds to its target transcripts in a much more complex manner than previously thought. RNA is transported within highly complex protein-RNA particles whose structure and specificity are still poorly understood. The team's findings, recently published in

6h

How birders helped pinpoint hotspots for migratory bird conservation

Many bird populations are crashing, largely because they migrate such long distances and are at risk from human influence at every link in their migratory chain.

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Diet in development affects insect mating habits

The study in beetles is the first to link an animal's nutritional intake during sexual development with its adult breeding habits.

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What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?

Lara Marrone and Jared Sterneckert from the Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at Technische Universität Dresden (TUD), together with collaborating scientists from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the USA, have now discovered that interactions between RNA-binding proteins are more critical to ALS pathogenesis than previously thought.

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Sharks more vulnerable than originally thought, new research shows

New study reveals in excess of 2.5 million sharks are caught annually in the South West Indian Ocean – 73% more than officially reported. Experts say that similar underreporting is happening in small scale fisheries globally.

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NRL develops laser processing method to increase efficiency of optoelectronic devices

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) discovers new method to passivate defects in next generation optical materials.

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Power to the people: How everyday acts of defiance can shape and change markets

Subtle, hidden and everyday acts of resistance and defiance by people with limited resources could have an impact on markets in societies where state and religion is all-powerful.These are the key findings of a new study, led by the University of Portsmouth, which shows consumers and individuals can help markets to evolve in societies where they cannot freely and openly participate in them.

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Diet during development affects mating habits, insect study shows

An animal's choice of mating partner can be influenced by what it eats during its sexual development, a study of insects has shown.

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A breakthrough in acidic water electrolysis via ruthenium-based catalysts

A recent study from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) makes hydrogen production through water electrolysis easier and more efficient, and allows people to see the great potential of hydrogen as an alternative new energy in the future.

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Cannabis users need more sedatives before routine medical procedures

US study finds regular users have poor responses to standard doses. Nick Carne reports.

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How birders helped pinpoint hotspots for migratory bird conservation

Many bird populations are crashing, largely because they migrate such long distances and are at risk from human influence at every link in their migratory chain.

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Diet in development affects insect mating habits

The study in beetles is the first to link an animal's nutritional intake during sexual development with its adult breeding habits.

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Developing a vaccine against Nipah virus

Researchers developed a novel recombinant vaccine called NIPRAB that shows robust immunization against Nipah virus in animal models and may be effective against other viruses in the same family.

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Do songbirds pay a price for winter wandering?

During harsh winters, birds that eat conifer seeds sometimes leave their homes in northern forests and wander far from their normal ranges in search of food. A new study uses citizen science data to show for the first time that these winter movements lead to a decline in birds' population density in their breeding range the following summer, suggesting that irrupting birds succumb to the difficult

6h

‘Extra’ enzymes boost E. coli resistance at low pH

Many so-called redundant enzymes in E. coli are actually specialists that ensure maximal growth across different environments, research finds. In addition, the findings indicate these enzymes increase E. coli’s resistance to antibiotics in low pH conditions, such as those in the GI or urinary tracts. This raises concerns that current antibiotic susceptibility tests are inadequate. “Some enzymes t

6h

Rankings: Most effective members of the 115th Congress

A new study identifies the most effective lawmakers in the 115th Congress (2017-18). Senators Chuck Grassley of Iowa (R) and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota (D) along with Representative Don Young (R) and Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton (D) of the District of Columbia take that top billing, according to new research conducted by political scientist Alan Wiseman of Vanderbilt University. Effectiveness s

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Israeli Researchers Print 3D Heart Using Patient's Own Cells

submitted by /u/PilotPig [link] [comments]

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German prosecutors charge ex-VW boss with fraud

Former Volkswagen chief Martin Winterkorn on Monday became the target of German charges over the group's "dieselgate" emissions cheating scandal, bringing the affair back into headlines as VW battles to turn eyes to its future.

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Dansk F-16 pilot: Defekt ammunition kan være årsag til fly skød sig selv

Da en hollandsk F-16 pilot måtte nødlande, efter at have skudt sig selv, var det sandsynligvis på grund af projektilerne var blevet fragmenteret. Det fortæller dansk F-16 pilot, der også har set den type ulykker i Danmark.

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Sharks more vulnerable than originally thought

A study of small-scale fisheries operating from Kenya, Zanzibar and Madagascar, has revealed the massive underreporting of sharks and rays caught annually in the region.

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New research uncovers the key to promoting safer workplaces

Motivated employees who take initiative at work could hold the key to making Australian workplaces safer, new research involving Curtin University researchers has found.

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Light from exotic particle states

A new type of light-emitting diode has been developed at TU Wien. Light is produced from the radiative decay of exciton complexes in layers of just a few atoms thickness.

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Questions over coverage plague rural broadband expansion

There is a way around the notoriously sluggish internet in West Virginia. You just need a car and some time.

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I’m a scientist studying laughter – and it’s funnier than you might think | Sophie Scott

Parrots do it, rats do it, and we do it partly for social reasons. But to learn more, I need the help of comedy fans The American writer EB White famously said, “Analysing humour is like dissecting a frog. Few people are interested and the frog dies of it.” But is the same true of analysing laughter? I am a brain scientist who studies laughter, and I find it quite interesting, not least because sc

6h

Necrophagy: A means of survival in the Dead Sea

Researchers from UNIGE and Lyon have examined the sediments in the Dead Sea. The geologists drilled a 400-metre hole before analysing each layer of sediment and the traces of a strategy that enables bacteria to survive by feeding on the remains of other organisms. This discovery will further our understanding of how life can develop even in the most severe conditions. It also provides vital resear

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Shocking economics

Understanding economies in times of crises? Modern macroeconomics failed so far. Researchers from the Complexity Science Hub Vienna are now proposing a novel method that makes the effects of shocks on out-of-equilibrium economies computable for the first time.

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New study reveals 'silence' around suicide in young people

Mental health professionals treating children and young people with suicidal feelings should refer to 'suicide' explicitly to ensure they feel listened to, according to new research.

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Cell biology: The complexity of division by two

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have identified a novel protein that plays a crucial role in the formation of the mitotic spindle, which is essential for correct segregation of a full set of chromosomes to each daughter cell during cell division.

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Hold the mustard: What makes spiders fussy eaters

It might be one of nature's most agile and calculating hunters, but the wolf spider won't harm an insect that literally leaves a bad taste in its mouth, according to new research by a team of Wake Forest University sensory neuroscientists, including C.J. Saunders.

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How to Belong in America

The Other Americans begins with blood. In the first pages of the Pulitzer finalist Laila Lalami’s new novel, a Moroccan immigrant named Driss Guerraoui is struck by a vehicle one evening while leaving the diner he owns, near California’s Mojave Desert. The car speeds off, its driver either unconcerned—or, worse yet, satisfied. Through the perspectives of nine alternating narrators, including Dris

6h

Sharks more vulnerable than originally thought

A study of small-scale fisheries operating from Kenya, Zanzibar and Madagascar, has revealed the massive underreporting of sharks and rays caught annually in the region.

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Why so many racing machines rely on this 'trouble metal'

Technology Magnesium's light weight and ease of casting and machining make it attractive for a variety of applications. Magnesium is a lightweight, useful metal used on high-performance motorcycles to good effect.

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How to link your motorcycle to your smartphone

Technology Rever introduces the RLink device to sync with its app. Smartphones abound, and now we have devices to make our motorcycles smarter with theft detection and diagnostic devices via cellular and GPS.

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Techathlon Podcast: Social media’s rules, expensive digital hats, and the week’s biggest tech news

Technology Play along and learn with our technology podcast! Learn about this week's big tech stories and have some fun along the way.

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Just 15 days left for deal to save ailing Alitalia airline

Concern was mounting in Italy on Monday over the fate of the troubled national airline Alitalia, with just 15 days until the deadline for the state railway company to submit a concrete takeover offer.

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Europe looks to remold internet with new copyright rules

The European Union has approved a copyright overhaul that aims to give more protection to artists and news organizations but which critics say will stifle freedom of speech and online creativity and punish smaller web companies.

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UK proposes banning social media 'likes' for children

Britain's privacy regulator wants to stop kids from being able to "like" posts on Facebook and other social media sites as part of tough new rules it's proposing to protect children's online privacy.

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Turning silenced cancer genes back into fighters

Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the function of hundreds of cancer-fighting genes that became "misregulated" by the disease.

7h

Scientists invent handheld device for quick monitoring of drinking water quality

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a portable device, inspired by the ability of the human body, to detect trace levels of heavy metals …

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Scientists develop artificial chemical receptor to assist viral transduction for T cell engineering

Engineered T cell immunotherapy, such as chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) and T cell receptor T cell (TCR-T) therapy, has emerged as a potent therapeutic strategy for treating tumors.

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Can we cure cancer by finding out how two proteins interact?

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Dr. Özdemir has studied two protein families named Rho GTPases and IQGAPs, which are known to play an important role in cancer metastasis. These two "suspicious" protein families have been studied by many researchers over the years, but the interaction between them had not previously been fully understood.

7h

Turning silenced cancer genes back into fighters

Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the function of hundreds of cancer-fighting genes that became "misregulated" by the disease.

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The warming Arctic permafrost may be releasing more nitrous oxide than previously thought

About one fourth of the Northern Hemisphere is covered in permafrost. Now, these permanently frozen beds of soil, rock, and sediment are actually not so permanent: They're thawing at an increasing rate.

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A next-generation triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) to realize constant current from electrostatic breakdown

Scientists have dedicated intense work in recent years to convert environmental energy into electricity to meet the ongoing demands for a cleaner and more sustainable power source. Harvesting environmental mechanical energy as an eco-friendly method is a promising solution and plays a significant role in building wearable electronics and sensor networks in the Internet of Things (IoTs). A triboele

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Seven common myths about quantum physics

I have been popularising quantum physics, my area of research, for many years now. The general public finds the topic fascinating and covers of books and magazines often draw on its mystery. A number of misconceptions have arisen in this area of physics and my purpose here is to look at the facts to debunk seven of these myths.

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Graphene-based foam stays soft and squishy even at super cold temperatures

A team of researchers with members from Nankai University in China and Rice University in the U.S. has developed a type of foam that retains its squishiness when exposed to extremely cold temperatures. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes how they made their foam, how it performed under different temperature conditions and possible uses for it.

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SpaceX Wins Contract to Launch NASA’s DART Asteroid Impactor

The Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) has been in development for several years, and now it's got a real launch date with the awarding of a contract to SpaceX. The post SpaceX Wins Contract to Launch NASA’s DART Asteroid Impactor appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Travel through wormholes is possible, but slow

A physicist has shown that wormholes can exist: tunnels in curved space-time, connecting two distant places, through which travel is possible. But don't pack your bags for a trip to other side of the galaxy yet; although it's theoretically possible, it's not useful for humans to travel through, said the author of the study.

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Sniffing pleasant odors may decrease cigarette craving

Smokers who are trying to quit may not always have to reach for a piece of nicotine gum to stave off a craving. Deliberately inhaling a pleasant aroma may be enough to reduce the urge to light up, at least temporarily, and could be used as part of an effective smoking cessation strategy.

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Warming Arctic permafrost releasing large amounts of potent greenhouse gas

A recent study shows that nitrous oxide emissions from thawing Alaskan permafrost are about twelve times higher than previously assumed. About one fourth of the Northern Hemisphere is covered in permafrost, which is thawing at an increasing rate. As temperatures increase, the peat releases more and more greenhouse gases. And, even though researchers are monitoring carbon dioxide and methane, no on

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FDA added sugar label could be a cost-effective way to improve health, generate savings

The FDA's mandatory added sugar labeling policy for packaged foods and beverages could generate important health gains and cost-savings for the healthcare system and society, according to a new modeling study.

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Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children

Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research.

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Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories

A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. Their research sheds light on how drug addiction develops and reveals pathways that can be exploited for the development of strategies to treat cocaine addiction.

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Sniffing pleasant odors may decrease cigarette craving

Smokers who are trying to quit may not always have to reach for a piece of nicotine gum to stave off a craving. Deliberately inhaling a pleasant aroma may be enough to reduce the urge to light up, at least temporarily, and could be used as part of an effective smoking cessation strategy, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Travel through wormholes is possible, but slow

A Harvard physicist has shown that wormholes can exist: tunnels in curved space-time, connecting two distant places, through which travel is possible. But don't pack your bags for a trip to other side of the galaxy yet; although it's theoretically possible, it's not useful for humans to travel through, said the author of the study, Daniel Jafferis, from Harvard University, written in collaboration

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The trouble with thaw

A recent study shows that nitrous oxide emissions from thawing Alaskan permafrost are about twelve times higher than previously assumed. About one fourth of the Northern Hemisphere is covered in permafrost, which is thawing at an increasing rate. As temperatures increase, the peat releases more and more greenhouse gases. And, even though researchers are monitoring carbon dioxide and methane, no on

7h

Scientists develop artificial chemical receptor to assist viral transduction for T cell engineering

Engineered T cell immunotherapy, such as chimeric antigen receptor T cell (CAR-T) and T cell receptor T cell (TCR-T) therapy, has emerged as a potent therapeutic strategy for treating tumors.

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Researchers look in detail at the interfaces in perovskite solar cells

A collaboration led by ICIQ's Palomares group deepens the understanding of the impact that changing the materials in a perovskite solar cell has on its performance. The results, published in the peer-reviewed journal Energy & Environmental Science will inform the design of the components of solar cells, thus increasing their commercial appeal.

7h

Can we cure cancer by finding out how two proteins interact?

In a paper published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Dr. Özdemir has studied two protein families named Rho GTPases and IQGAPs, which are known to play an important role in cancer metastasis. These two "suspicious" protein families have been studied by many researchers over the years, but the interaction between them had not previously been fully understood.

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Star Wars News: Is the Franchise Going on Hiatus? Only Kinda

Also, a bunch of trailers dropped during Star Wars Celebration. Watch them here.

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Travel through wormholes is possible, but slow

A Harvard physicist has shown that wormholes can exist: tunnels in curved space-time, connecting two distant places, through which travel is possible.

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Study of Perry Mason is bid to combat 'innocence fatigue'

A University of Manchester historian is to study the influence of Erle Stanley Gardner, creator of renowned TV attorney Perry Mason, in a bid to reveal the roots of the fascination with stories about wrongful criminal conviction.

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Of bunyips and other beasts: Living memories of long-extinct creatures in art and stories

On many continents during the last ice age, typically from about 50,000 to 12,000 years ago, species of megafauna that had lived there for hundreds of thousands of years became extinct. Comparatively abruptly, it appears, in most instances.

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Of bunyips and other beasts: Living memories of long-extinct creatures in art and stories

On many continents during the last ice age, typically from about 50,000 to 12,000 years ago, species of megafauna that had lived there for hundreds of thousands of years became extinct. Comparatively abruptly, it appears, in most instances.

7h

Men sometimes act less interested in sex—in order to get it

When heterosexuals have casual sex, previous research indicates it is typically the woman who sets the boundaries. If she's not interested, usually nothing will happen.

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Trænger du til nyt knæ? Ultralyd dirigerer printede stamceller på plads

Amerikanske forskere har fundet ud af at bruge ultralyd som fårehyrde til at holde sammen på bioprintede stamceller.

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Men sometimes act less interested in sex—in order to get it

When heterosexuals have casual sex, previous research indicates it is typically the woman who sets the boundaries. If she's not interested, usually nothing will happen.

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Gravitational echo phenomenon will become a key to the new physics, physicist says

Gravitational echoes may be caused by the collision of two black holes, and may indicate that these objects have completely new physical properties. This conclusion was made by RUDN physicists after a series of mathematical calculations. The scientists state that if the existence of the echo phenomenon is confirmed, astrophysicists would have to reconsider their view of compact space objects. The

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Beresheet: First privately-funded mission crashes on moon, but its significance is huge

It came so close. It even took a selfie. But with only a few kilometres left to descend, something went wrong and the spacecraft Beresheet veered out of control, taking one final photograph just before it hit the surface. It is thought that there was a fault, possibly in the inertial system, possibly an engine failure, that led to the crash.

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En sond till stjärnorna

Forskare planerar att skicka iväg en rymdsond som ska färdas längre ut i rymden än någon annan. Stas Barabash, som är föreståndare för Institutet för rymfysik, vill ha svenska instrument med ombord. Sonden ska ta sig utanför det område som domineras av solen – heliosfären – som sträcker sig ungefär tre gånger så långt bort som Plutos bana. Utanför denna gräns skulle sonden kunna studera de partikl

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Twitter Doesn't Want You Sharing This Link About TV Piracy

Twitter is home to some of the vilest neo-Nazis, racists, and homophobes on the planet. But don’t even think about discussing the one topic that’s apparently taboo on the platform: Piracy of …

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Bridging the gap between radar meteorology/hydrology/engineering and weather prediction

Accurate weather prediction depends on a fundamental understanding of storm dynamics and cloud microphysics and their representation in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, as well the optimal use of high-resolution multi-parameter measurements.

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Weight bias spikes after celebrity fat-shaming

New research links celebrity fat-shaming—critiques of their appearance—with increased implicit negative weight-related attitudes among women. “These cultural messages appeared to augment women’s gut-level feeling that ‘thin’ is good and ‘fat’ is bad,” says study coauthor Jennifer Bartz, of the psychology department at McGill University. “These media messages can leave a private trace in peoples’

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Samsung Galaxy Fold First Look: Hands On With the Folding Phone

The long-awaited folding smartphone goes on sale April 26. We got to spend some time with it first.

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Scientists invent handheld device for quick monitoring of drinking water quality

Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a portable device, inspired by the ability of the human body, to detect trace levels of heavy metals in drinking water in just five minutes.

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Tip the planet: Tackling climate change with small, sensitive interventions

Search online for "climate change" and "tipping points" and you'll find some scary results. Melting ice sheets, the collapse of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation , the permafrost methane "time bomb" and the die-back of the Amazon rainforest threaten to exacerbate the climate crisis and send global warming spiralling out of control.

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Faster, more accurate diagnoses: Healthcare applications of AI research

When Google DeepMind's AlphaGo shockingly defeated legendary Go player Lee Sedol in 2016, the terms artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and deep learning were propelled into the technological mainstream.

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Astronomers investigate jet kinematics of the blazar 4C+21.35

Using very-long-baseline-interferometry (VLBI), an international team of astronomers has conducted a kinematic study of a jet of the blazar 4C+21.35. The research, presented in a paper published April 5 on the arXiv pre-print repository, sheds more light on the nature of this quasar and its jet.

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The sorrows of psychiatry

The sorrows of psychiatry The sorrows of psychiatry, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01170-1 Alison Abbott probes a history on the fraught nexus of mental illness and biology.

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Printing 3 D heart

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Hellre miljöskatt mot industrin än privatkonsumtionen

År 2015 enades världens länder om det så kallade Parisavtalet. Avtalet innebär att länderna ska ta gemensamt ansvar för att minska sina utsläpp av växthusgaser, och samtidigt göra det möjligt för fattiga länder att bekämpa fattigdom och ställa om till ett fossilfritt samhälle. Hur framgångsrika länderna varit med att implementera olika klimatpolitiska åtgärder beror till viss del på hur stort stö

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Sida med ett quiz

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Europe looks to remold internet with new copyright rules

The European Union has approved a copyright rule that aims to give more protection to artists and news organizations but which critics say will stifle freedom of speech and online creativity …

8h

Harnessing microorganisms for smart microsystems

A research team at the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a method to construct a biohybrid system that incorporates Vorticella microorganisms. The method allows movable structures to be formed in a microchannel and combined with Vorticella. In addition, the biohybrid system demonstrates the conversion of motion from linear motion to rotation.

8h

Abundance of information narrows our collective attention span

The negative effects of social media and a hectic news cycle on our attention span has been an ongoing discussion in recent years—but there's been a lack of empirical data supporting claims of a 'social acceleration.' A new study in Nature Communications finds that our collective attention span is indeed narrowing, and that this effect occurs not only on social media, but also across diverse domai

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Turning silenced cancer genes back into fighters

Working with human colon cancer cells and mice, researchers led by experts at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center say they have successfully blocked the activity of portions of a protein known as UHRF1 and restored the function of hundreds of cancer-fighting genes that became "misregulated" by the disease.

8h

90% of teens killed by an intimate partner are girls

Intimate partner homicide among teens does occur and 90% of the victims are girls, according to a new study in JAMA Pediatrics.

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The dissolution of Masculinity and Femininity

Some far reaching parts of society are already beginning to wake up to the fact that, as it stands today, we humans have been and still are needlessly cut into two parts, two types of beings, men and women. This was something that was always accepted as normal, but more and more people begin to wake up to the intuition that this dual birth cut is unnecessary and the root of many of our social ten

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No more Hoover dams: Hydropowered countries suffer higher levels of poverty, corruption and debt

Countries relying on the world's biggest and most established source of renewable electricity have seen their poverty, corruption and debt levels rise and their economy slow at significantly greater rates than nations which use other energy resources over the last three decades, a major new study has found.

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Democracy in the matrix

A new online platform enables users to get information about the democratic quality of a specific country with just a few clicks. The new tool has been designed by political scientists from the University of Würzburg.

8h

Why the Parker Solar Probe is NASA's most exciting mission

The Parker Solar Probe is set to uncover a mystery about the sun: Why is it's corona hotter than its surface? NASA's ability to fly a probe so close to the sun is a marvel of engineering. Michelle Thaller, an astronomer at NASA, explains why the Parker Solar Probe is so hot right now.

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What NASA’s twin study actually taught us about living in space

Space Results show the human body changes, but not dramatically. Twin studies are the closest scientists can get to putting a person in two places at once. But they are also hard to come by.

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Why a (Very Bad and Unsafe!) Playground Stunt Sends Folks Flying

If common sense hasn't convinced you that using a moped to spin a merry-go-round is a bad idea, perhaps the physics of circular motion will.

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Svenske socialdemokrater mister kontrol over Twitter-konto

De svenske socialdemokrater mistede i nat kontrol med deres egen Twitter-konto. Kontoen har udsendt en række tweets med fokus på indvandring og forsvar.

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Algorithms to enhance forest inventories

An EPFL doctoral student has come up with methods to map out forests more effectively using aerial remote sensing, in support of on-the-ground forest inventories.

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Image of the Day: Space Mice

See what the rodents do aboard the International Space Station.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor skal jeg trykke på en knap for at få grønt lys?

En læser er irriteret over sit lokale lyskryds, hvor man skal trykke på en knap for at få grønt, og så kan man ellers vente en hel runde. ITS-projektleder svarer på, hvorfor han skal det.

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DISCUSSION: The dissolution of Masculinity and Femininity

Society is beginning to wake up to the fact that, as it stands today, we humans have been and still are needlessly cut into two parts, two types of beings, men and women. This was something that was always accepted as normal, but more and more people begin to wake up to the intuition that this dual birth cut is unnecessary and the root of many of our social tensions and problems. The dual nature

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How does 5G work and when will you be able to use it?

submitted by /u/iamparameswaran [link] [comments]

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Breezing through the space environment of Barnard's Star b

The closest exoplanet to us, if we include only single stars like the Sun, is the planet around Barnard's Star, Barnard's Star-b ("BSb"). (The planet Promixa Centauri-b is closer, but Proxima Cen is part of a triple-star system with Alpha and Beta Centauri, and understanding the evolutionary development of the planet is more complicated.) BSb orbits at a distance similar to that of Mercury around

8h

Furthering the Flying Car Thought Experiment

I love the conversation stemming from my last post on flying cars , and also our discussion on the SGU . Some great points were raised, and I want to further the conversation by addressing them. I will begin by more explicitly laying out the various ways to frame the question of what impact flying cars may have. Whenever we ask a question about how something will affect a complex system, the answ

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Study highlights concerning financial situation for retirees who don't own a home

University of Otago research investigating the impact housing plays on the financial situation of New Zealand retirees shows that non-homeowners are in a worse position financially, and action is recommended before the problem grows.

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Unexpected properties uncovered in recently discovered superconductor

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have found that crystals of a recently discovered superconducting material, a layered bismuth chalcogenide with a four-fold symmetric structure, shows only two-fold symmetry in its superconductivity. The origin of superconductivity in these structures is not yet well understood; this finding suggests a connection with an enigmatic class of materials k

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Video: The making of the largest 3-D map of the universe

DESI, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, will mobilize 5,000 swiveling robots – each one pointing a thin strand of fiber-optic cable – to gather the light from about 35 million galaxies.

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Lead ammunition polluting Argentina

Pollution from lead ammunition causes environmental health problems in Argentina, and progress is underway to find viable replacements for lead shot, according to an overview of lead pollution from hunting in the country. Argentina's pioneering awareness and attention to this problem may help others address this global health issue that threatens humans, animals and landscapes.

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How bugs overcome host defenses

Bacterial pathogens must acquire nutrient metals from the host to survive and cause disease. To counter infection, hosts attempt to starve bacteria by hiding metals away in a process called "nutritional immunity." Bacteria are wily foes though, and they change in order to survive metal starvation.

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Lead ammunition polluting Argentina

Pollution from lead ammunition causes environmental health problems in Argentina, and progress is underway to find viable replacements for lead shot, according to an overview of lead pollution from hunting in the country. Argentina's pioneering awareness and attention to this problem may help others address this global health issue that threatens humans, animals and landscapes.

8h

How bugs overcome host defenses

Bacterial pathogens must acquire nutrient metals from the host to survive and cause disease. To counter infection, hosts attempt to starve bacteria by hiding metals away in a process called "nutritional immunity." Bacteria are wily foes though, and they change in order to survive metal starvation.

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The arrestin-GPCR connection

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the "inbox" of environmental messages in mammalian cells. Because of their central role in signaling pathways, mutations resulting in abnormal GPCR functions cause a wide variety of diseases. Therefore, GPCRs are the most intensively studied drug targets.

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The arrestin-GPCR connection

G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the "inbox" of environmental messages in mammalian cells. Because of their central role in signaling pathways, mutations resulting in abnormal GPCR functions cause a wide variety of diseases. Therefore, GPCRs are the most intensively studied drug targets.

9h

A Battle Over California’s Public Records Law

Though a recent bill could offer relief to academics who feel harassed by mounting requests, it also has major implications for would-be requesters — an unlikely combination of journalists, policy advocates, and industry representatives — who stand to lose access to a significant body of public records.

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Automation helping to cut costs, stirring debate over effect on jobs

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Israeli scientists 3D print human heart.

submitted by /u/Thegsgs [link] [comments]

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Encounters with the Keeling Curve

A geologist recounts his first experiences with the celebrated graph that proved CO2 levels are rising — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A touch-feely part of the brain helps you enjoy a gentle caress

A part of the brain involved with self-awareness, called the insular cortex, appears to be linked to why a tender stroke on the skin can feel nice

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Prescriptions for UTIs may be making antibiotic resistance even worse

New evidence shows two thirds of urinary tract infections are treated wrongly. To fight back we must develop fast, accurate diagnostics, says Colin Garner

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The Evolution of Stereotypical Color-Coded Childhoods

South Korea-based photographer JeongMee Yoon explores targeted advertisements to children through their inventories of pink and blue things.

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Safeguards for human studies can’t cope with big data

Safeguards for human studies can’t cope with big data Safeguards for human studies can’t cope with big data, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01164-z Forty years on from a foundational report on how to protect people participating in research, cracks are showing, warns Nathaniel Raymond.

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Maersk-selskab vandt geotermi-licens – men konkurrent kan stadig løbe med aftalen

Energiministeriet har tildelt A.P. Møller Holding Invest IV licens til at etablere geotermiske anlæg i Aarhus og Aalborg. Aalborg Forsyning kan dog stadigvæk skrive kontrakt med andre selskaber.

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Encounters with the Keeling Curve

A geologist recounts his first experiences with the celebrated graph that proved CO2 levels are rising — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Environmental Thinker Bill McKibben Sounds Warning on Technology

Known for climate change work, the pioneer says global warming, AI and genetic engineering are self-inflicted threats to humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Orange Lush: California's 'Superbloom' Wows from the Air

A NASA photographer captured a lush aerial shot of an ephemeral wildflower bloom in the desert.

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Environmental Thinker Bill McKibben Sounds Warning on Technology

Known for climate change work, the pioneer says global warming, AI and genetic engineering are self-inflicted threats to humanity — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The World’s Most Complicated Single-Day Election Is a Feat of Democracy

The shabby headquarters of Indonesia’s general-election commission in central Jakarta is an unlikely bastion of democracy. But it is from here that the KPU, as it is known, will soon execute the world’s most complicated single-day election. The logistical challenges are breathtaking. Six million election workers have been recruited and trained to oversee more than 810,000 polling stations spread

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Leonardo Da Vinci Was Ambidextrous, Handwriting Analysis Shows

The famously left-handed artist was all right as a righty.

10h

The World's Glaciers Are Sponging Up Loads of Nuclear Fallout, But You Shouldn't Worry — Yet

There's more nuclear fallout trapped in the world's glaciers than anywhere besides disaster sites like Chernobyl, new research finds.

10h

Ilhan Omar’s Deeply American Message

I watched Ilhan Omar’s recent address to the Council of American Islamic Relations for the same reason most people did: to see whether she had—as Donald Trump claimed —minimized the 9/11 terrorist attacks. What I found was unexpected. In offering a vision for how to live as an American Muslim, her speech to CAIR beautifully evoked what I treasure about being an American Jew. Omar’s core argument

10h

Basing Laws on Nothing Is Easier Than Using Evidence

For many economists, nothing is more exasperating than watching well-intentioned policies fall short because they were based on ideology, gut judgment, or something else besides sound evidence. In the now-infamous Kansas tax experiment , lawmakers made huge tax cuts in hopes of spurring economic growth—but ended up starving the state’s schools and infrastructure. In the short run, rent control in

10h

Discrimination’s Digital Frontier

Data and technology are the new frontier in the struggle for civil rights, and out on the frontier, a lot can go wrong. Millions of people find their homes or learn about jobs through ads, but what once took place in the pages of newspapers now happens on digital platforms. Laws such as the Fair Housing Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 have long helped hold newspapers and their a

10h

The Brief Life of Jackson Lake

This tiny, short-lived lake is a perfect example of a volcano's power to create and a river's power to destroy — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Congress wants to protect you from biased algorithms, deepfakes, and other bad AI

Only a few legislators really know what they’re talking about, but it’s a start.

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Facebook and Instagram may have to remove like buttons for UK children

The like function on Facebook and Instagram could be removed and privacy settings set to max for UK children under new proposed social media guidelines

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Indonesian mega-science agency in the balance as election begins

Indonesian mega-science agency in the balance as election begins Indonesian mega-science agency in the balance as election begins, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01160-3 President Joko Widodo wants to create a single agency to control most research and its funding.

10h

Caught stealing a manuscript, author blames a dead colleague

As William Faulkner wrote in Requiem for a Nun, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” Farzad Kiani learned that lesson the hard way. Kiani, of Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim University, was the “author” of a 2018 review article in Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing titled “A survey on management frameworks and open challenges … Continue reading Caught stealing a manuscript, author blam

10h

UK proposes banning social media 'likes' for children

Britain's privacy regulator wants to stop kids from being able to "like" posts on Facebook and other social media sites as part of tough new rules it's proposing to protect children's online …

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Some people may have genes that hamper a drug’s HIV protection

Newly discovered genetic variants could explain why an anti-HIV medication doesn’t protect everyone.

10h

Finsk kæmpereaktor står snart klar: »Et wakeup-call for industrien«

PLUS. 20 år efter at det finske parlament godkendte planerne, er reaktoren Olkiluoto 3 ved at være en realitet, 10 år forsinket og milliarder af kroner over budget.

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11h

Want to Escape Global Warming? These Cities Promise Cool Relief

While climate change affects everywhere, some areas in America will be less affected than others. And some of those fortunate places, it happens, might be looking for people.

11h

Psykologer i psykiatrien

Det lader til, at Rasmus Handest ikke er klar over, at psykologer ligesom læger specialiserer sig efter deres kandidatuddannelse.

11h

Developing a vaccine against Nipah virus

Researchers developed a novel recombinant vaccine called NIPRAB that shows robust immunization against Nipah virus in animal models and may be effective against other viruses in the same family.

11h

Abundance of information narrows our collective attention span

New study in Nature Communications finds increasingly narrow peaks of collective attention over time, supporting a 'social acceleration' occurring across different domains.

11h

The discrete-time physics hiding inside our continuous-time world

Physicists at the Santa Fe Institute and MIT have shown that Markov processes, widely used to model complex systems, must unfold over a larger space than previously assumed.

11h

FDA added sugar label could be a cost-effective way to improve health, generate savings

The FDA's mandatory added sugar labeling policy for packaged foods and beverages could generate important health gains and cost-savings for the healthcare system and society, according to a new modeling study led by researchers from Tufts University and the University of Liverpool.

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Labeling added sugars content on packaged foods and beverages could lower heart disease/diabetes risk and cut healthcare costs

Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs.If food makers reformulate their products with less sugar as a result of the added sugars label, the potential health gains and cost savings could be twice as large

11h

The Next George Bush Bet Everything on Trump

John Cuneo George Prescott Bush wants you to know that he is not low-energy. At least, that’s the distinct impression I got when I encountered Bush, the elder son of Jeb and leading repository for the hopes of an endangered political dynasty, one January morning at a CrossFit gym in Austin, Texas. The day before, Bush had switched up our meeting place from a barbecue joint, where we were supposed

11h

Einstein, Eddington and the 1919 eclipse

Einstein, Eddington and the 1919 eclipse Einstein, Eddington and the 1919 eclipse, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01172-z Peter Coles weighs up three books on the momentous expedition that proved the general theory of relativity.

11h

Scalable dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization with rapid transfer of a polarized solid

Scalable dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization with rapid transfer of a polarized solid Scalable dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization with rapid transfer of a polarized solid, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09726-5 Dissolution-dynamic nuclear polarization is able to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance signals, but requires complex procedures to generate hyperpolariz

11h

Effect of molecular architecture on ring polymer dynamics in semidilute linear polymer solutions

Effect of molecular architecture on ring polymer dynamics in semidilute linear polymer solutions Effect of molecular architecture on ring polymer dynamics in semidilute linear polymer solutions, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09627-7 Understanding the dynamics of ring polymers is challenging are despite recent progress, understanding of the nonequilibrium behavior of ring

11h

A space–time tradeoff for implementing a function with master equation dynamics

A space–time tradeoff for implementing a function with master equation dynamics A space–time tradeoff for implementing a function with master equation dynamics, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09542-x Deterministic maps from initial to final states can always be modelled using the master equation formalism, provided additional “hidden” states are available. Here, the autho

11h

Partially methylated domains are hypervariable in breast cancer and fuel widespread CpG island hypermethylation

Partially methylated domains are hypervariable in breast cancer and fuel widespread CpG island hypermethylation Partially methylated domains are hypervariable in breast cancer and fuel widespread CpG island hypermethylation, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09828-0 In cancer, global DNA methylation loss and CpG island hypermethylation are commonly observed. Here, in breast

11h

Towards reliable extreme weather and climate event attribution

Towards reliable extreme weather and climate event attribution Towards reliable extreme weather and climate event attribution, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09729-2 Understanding how climate change has shaped past high impact events requires reliable probabilities of extreme event occurrences. This study demonstrates how often overlooked techniques from weather forecasti

11h

Non-stationary coherent quantum many-body dynamics through dissipation

Non-stationary coherent quantum many-body dynamics through dissipation Non-stationary coherent quantum many-body dynamics through dissipation, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09757-y Typically, a quantum system that dissipates into the environment relaxes to a stationary state. Here the authors identify conditions under which dissipation prevents quantum many-body systems

11h

Centromere mechanical maturation during mammalian cell mitosis

Centromere mechanical maturation during mammalian cell mitosis Centromere mechanical maturation during mammalian cell mitosis, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09578-z During mitosis, tension at the centromere occurs from the spindle but the role of centromere mechanics in controlling metaphase tension is poorly understood. Here, the authors report that mechanical stiffnnes

11h

Supersonic plasma turbulence in the laboratory

Supersonic plasma turbulence in the laboratory Supersonic plasma turbulence in the laboratory, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09498-y Supersonic turbulence is relevant to astrophysical plasmas with their study mostly limited to numerical simulations. Here the authors demonstrate supersonic turbulence in collisional high Mach number plasma jets generated in laboratory by u

11h

A mission to Alpha Centauri affirms humanity's faith in the future

Designing and building spacecraft that can traverse 4.3 light years in just two decades is an unprecedented challenge, but one well worth undertaking

11h

Author Correction: Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer

Author Correction: Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer Author Correction: Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41385-w Author Correction: Prostate-specific extracellular vesicles as a novel biomarker in human prostate cancer

11h

Heritability and genome-wide association study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the eMERGE network

Heritability and genome-wide association study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the eMERGE network Heritability and genome-wide association study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the eMERGE network, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42427-z Heritability and genome-wide association study of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in the eMERGE network

11h

Functional Evaluation of Two Corneal Endothelial Cell-Based Therapies: Tissue-Engineered Construct and Cell Injection

Functional Evaluation of Two Corneal Endothelial Cell-Based Therapies: Tissue-Engineered Construct and Cell Injection Functional Evaluation of Two Corneal Endothelial Cell-Based Therapies: Tissue-Engineered Construct and Cell Injection, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42493-3 Functional Evaluation of Two Corneal Endothelial Cell-Based Therapies: Tissue-Engineered Construct

11h

Release of eDNA by different life history stages and during spawning activities of laboratory-reared Japanese eels for interpretation of oceanic survey data

Release of eDNA by different life history stages and during spawning activities of laboratory-reared Japanese eels for interpretation of oceanic survey data Release of eDNA by different life history stages and during spawning activities of laboratory-reared Japanese eels for interpretation of oceanic survey data, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42641-9 Release of eDNA by d

11h

Single cell RNA-sequencing identified Dec2 as a suppressive factor for spermatogonial differentiation by inhibiting Sohlh1 expression

Single cell RNA-sequencing identified Dec2 as a suppressive factor for spermatogonial differentiation by inhibiting Sohlh1 expression Single cell RNA-sequencing identified Dec2 as a suppressive factor for spermatogonial differentiation by inhibiting Sohlh1 expression, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42578-z Single cell RNA-sequencing identified Dec2 as a suppressive factor

11h

Oscillatory shear potentiates latent TGF-β1 activation more than steady shear as demonstrated by a novel force generator

Oscillatory shear potentiates latent TGF-β1 activation more than steady shear as demonstrated by a novel force generator Oscillatory shear potentiates latent TGF-β1 activation more than steady shear as demonstrated by a novel force generator, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42302-x Oscillatory shear potentiates latent TGF-β1 activation more than steady shear as demonstrate

11h

Shape Dynamics of Bouncing Droplets

Shape Dynamics of Bouncing Droplets Shape Dynamics of Bouncing Droplets, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42580-5 Shape Dynamics of Bouncing Droplets

11h

Controlling frequency dispersion in electromagnetic invisibility cloaks

Controlling frequency dispersion in electromagnetic invisibility cloaks Controlling frequency dispersion in electromagnetic invisibility cloaks, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42481-7 Controlling frequency dispersion in electromagnetic invisibility cloaks

11h

Forskarkollo för nyfikna barn

Tid: 17–19 juni 2019 Plats: Vår bas är Nobel Prize Museum i Stockholm. Här samlas vi varje morgon, återsamlas varje eftermiddag och gör vissa av experimenten. Däremellan gör vi expeditioner till andra platser i Stockholmsområdet. Preliminärt schema: Dag 1 – Presentation och experiment på museet. Dag 2 – Egna experiment och utflykt till laboratorium. Dag 3 – Raketprovning, fysikexperiment på Gröna

11h

The discrete-time physics hiding inside our continuous-time world

Scientists believe that time is continuous, not discrete—roughly speaking, they believe that it does not progress in "chunks," but rather "flows," smoothly and continuously. So they often model the dynamics of physical systems as continuous-time "Markov processes," named after mathematician Andrey Markov. Indeed, scientists have used these processes to investigate a range of real-world processes f

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How anchoring a ship to an ice floe will help fight climate change

Mosaic, a year-long Arctic mission aims to answer fundamental questions about global warming In September, the giant German polar research vessel Polarstern will set off from Tromsø in Norway on a remarkable voyage. It will sail across the Arctic Ocean and after a few weeks reach a point off the Siberian coast, around 85 deg N 120 deg E, where it will attach itself to the biggest, strongest-looki

12h

Transparency from charities about how funds are used builds trust and increases giving

Charitable and humanitarian organizations are increasingly tapping into a $30 billion crowdfunding market, not only to raise funds but to build donors' trust by being more transparent, according …

12h

Do songbirds pay a price for winter wandering?

In years when winter conditions are especially harsh, birds that depend on conifer seeds for food are sometimes forced to leave their homes in northern forests and wander far from their normal …

12h

Death of rare turtle leaves 3 remaining in the world

The only known female member of one of the world's rarest turtle species has died at a zoo in southern China, officials said Sunday.

12h

Ny icke-antibiotisk strategi för behandling av bakteriell hjärnhinneinflammation

I en tid då hotet från antibiotikaresistens blir allt större ökar behovet av nya behandlingsstrategier mot bakterier. Nu publiceras intressanta resultat som kan ge hopp om en sådan alternativ behandlingsstrategi vid bakteriell hjärnhinneinflammation, en allvarlig infektion som kan leda till sepsis.

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Volkswagen unveils fully-electric SUV for China market

Volkswagen is planning to release a fully-electric SUV in China which could compete with Tesla's Model X.

12h

Academy warned against excluding Netflix from Oscars

It may already have Oscars under its belt, but Netflix's acceptance by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hangs in the balance.

12h

Death of rare turtle leaves 3 remaining in the world

The only known female member of one of the world's rarest turtle species has died at a zoo in southern China, officials said Sunday.

12h

Academics concerned about Singapore's 'fake news' law

Nearly 100 academics worldwide have expressed concern over Singapore's proposed law against "fake news", warning it could threaten academic freedom and hurt the city-state's ambition to become a global education hub.

12h

Barn født med tre forældre som led i fertilitetsbehandling

Barn med tre biologiske forældre født, denne gang som forsøg i avanceret fertilitetsbehandling.

12h

Death of rare turtle leaves 3 remaining in the world

The only known female member of one of the world's rarest turtle species has died at a zoo in southern China, officials said Sunday.

12h

Knife crime: Assault data can help forecast fatal stabbings in London, study suggests

Knife crime data from a 12-month period could be used to help forecast the London neighbourhoods most likely to suffer a fatal stabbing the following year, according to latest research.

12h

Auction bids decline with intensity of competition: new research

Economists from the University of Sydney and the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have co-authored a new study that challenges conventional thinking about auctions and is applicable to real-life bidding situations including property auctions.

12h

Shark bite research reveals politicians' fishy behaviour

More than a decade's worth of research has revealed how politicians manipulate highly emotional incidents like shark bites to influence public sentiment and protect their own interests.

12h

Do songbirds pay a price for winter wandering?

In years when winter conditions are especially harsh, birds that depend on conifer seeds for food are sometimes forced to leave their homes in northern forests and wander far from their normal ranges to find enough to eat. A new study published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances uses citizen science data to show for the first time that these winter movements—called "irruptions"—lead to a decline

12h

Shark bite research reveals politicians' fishy behaviour

More than a decade's worth of research has revealed how politicians manipulate highly emotional incidents like shark bites to influence public sentiment and protect their own interests.

12h

Do songbirds pay a price for winter wandering?

In years when winter conditions are especially harsh, birds that depend on conifer seeds for food are sometimes forced to leave their homes in northern forests and wander far from their normal ranges to find enough to eat. A new study published in The Auk: Ornithological Advances uses citizen science data to show for the first time that these winter movements—called "irruptions"—lead to a decline

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'Snowball chamber' helps researchers use supercooled water to search for dark matter

After watching YouTube videos of people supercooling water in a bottle and then triggering it to freeze by banging it, something about this concept solidified for Matthew M. Szydagis, an assistant professor of physics at the University at Albany, State University at New York, especially when he saw it again during the Disney movie "Frozen."

13h

Apple Rumored To Invest Over $500M Into Apple Arcade Game Subscription Service

Apple announced in March plans to launch Apple Arcade, a game subscription service that will feature over 100 new and exclusive games, including original releases from renowned creators such …

13h

Transparency from charities about how funds are used builds trust and increases giving

Charitable and humanitarian organizations are increasingly tapping into a $30 billion crowdfunding market, not only to raise funds but to build donors' trust by being more transparent, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

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Measles outbreaks and the antivaccine movement

Dr. Gorski returns from medical leave and finds that a lot has been going on with respect to vaccines, antivaxers, and measles outbreaks. Measles outbreaks are changing the narrative, emboldening legislators to tighten vaccine mandates, and also making antivaxers more radical. However, the narrative is, as is usually the case, more complex than what we usually hear.

13h

American Airlines to cancel 115 flights daily over 737 MAX

American Airlines announced Sunday it would scrap some 115 flights per day in the coming months because its fleet of Boeing 737 MAX planes is being grounded until August 19.

13h

Nuclear fuel removed from crippled Japan plant

The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima power plant on Monday began removing atomic fuel from inside a building housing one of the reactors that melted down in 2011.

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13h

The Redemption of Arturo Casadevall

Arturo Casadevall is probably the most recognized expert for research integrity, author of many peer reviewed papers on that topic. But now his own publications on microbiology and immunity are under scrutiny.

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Removing Fuel Rods, Japan Hits Milestone in Fukushima Nuclear Cleanup

After a yearslong delay, the nuclear plant’s operator began removing radioactive fuel rods at one of three reactors that melted down after an earthquake and a tsunami in 2011.

15h

National poll: Most parents concerned about safety of teens using ride-sharing services

As teens prepare to leave home for college or live on their own in a new city, many may also be using ride-sharing services for the first time — and that raises safety concerns for many parents — a new national poll suggests.

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Only rebellion will prevent an ecological apocalypse | George Monbiot

No one is coming to save us. Mass civil disobedience is essential to force a political response Had we put as much effort into preventing environmental catastrophe as we’ve spent on making excuses for inaction, we would have solved it by now. Everywhere I look, I see people engaged in furious attempts to fend off the moral challenge it presents. The commonest current excuse is this: “I bet those p

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Startup Nikola Bets Hydrogen Will Finally Break Through With Big Rigs

submitted by /u/bluefirecorp [link] [comments]

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Game of Thrones Makes Time for Love Before War

Every week for the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers will be discussing new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we’ll be posting our thoughts in installments. Spencer Kornhaber: Game of Thrones ’s ending apparently has put David Benioff and D.B. Weiss in the wistful mindset of a high-school yearboo

15h

This gene could play a major role in reducing brain swelling after stroke

Inflammation gone awry in the brain due to stroke, head injury or infection causes damage; in a lab model of stroke, a particular gene tamped down swelling.

16h

Auction bids decline with intensity of competition: new research

People bid less in auctions that have more bidders, new research suggests.

16h

Transparency from charities about how funds are used builds trust and increases giving

Charitable and humanitarian organizations are increasingly tapping into a $30 billion crowdfunding market, not only to raise funds but to build donors' trust by being more transparent, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

16h

Cognitive functioning does not predict weight-loss outcome for adolescents

Young people with cognitive impairments and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, have similar weight-loss trajectories to those with typical cognitive function after bariatric surgery, according to a new study in Pediatrics authored by psychologists at Children's National Health System.

16h

Celebrity fat shaming has ripple effects on women's implicit anti-fat attitudes

Comparing 20 instances of celebrity fat-shaming with women's implicit attitudes about weight before and after the event, psychologists from McGill University found that instances of celebrity fat-shaming were associated with an increase in women's implicit negative weight-related attitudes. They also found that from 2004-2015, implicit weight bias was on the rise more generally.

16h

Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children

Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

16h

Do songbirds pay a price for winter wandering?

During harsh winters, birds that eat conifer seeds sometimes leave their homes in northern forests and wander far from their normal ranges in search of food. A new study uses citizen science data to show for the first time that these winter movements lead to a decline in birds' population density in their breeding range the following summer, suggesting that irrupting birds succumb to the difficult

16h

Have you seen this type of image?

submitted by /u/pjbddd0316 [link] [comments]

16h

App-udvikler: Nogen har gang i noget skummelt og ønsker adgang til vores Apple-certifikat

Nogen vil have adgang til dansk udviklers enterprise-certifikat, som gør det muligt at installere apps på iOS uden om App Store.

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Næste år åbner første nye a-kraftværk i EU i 14 år

Elproduktionen fra atomkraftværker i EU er faldet med 17 pct. siden 2004.

17h

Earth-bound tips for leaders who shoot for the moon

The space race provided a framework for modern management that is still relevant

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OpenAI Five defeats professional Dota 2 team, twice

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Cow-milking robots the new face of dairy farming

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Saving the future of our planet – By David Attenborough

submitted by /u/epSos-DE [link] [comments]

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Florida Man Killed by His Cassowary, Huge Species Known as 'World's Most Dangerous Bird'

In the wild, they're reclusive giant birds that eat fruit deep in the jungle.

20h

Fake anger won’t help you win in negotiations

Using fake anger as a tactic in negotiations generally leaves parties of both parts feeling guilty, distrusted, and needing to make amends afterward, according to a new study. Anger, the faux, feigned kind, has been a tool in negotiations for generations. The idea is that pretending to be angry can coerce the counterpart into conceding to your terms. Those thinking about using such a tool, though

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Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research

Researchers are currently looking for candidates who will stay in bed 24 hours a day, seven days a week for 60 straight days for a study on how the body adapts to weightlessness. (Image credit: Patrick Semansky/AP)

20h

Boys aren’t born with better spatial reasoning

Men aren’t born with better spatial reasoning than women are, a new meta-analysis suggests. It is well-established that, on average, men outperform women on a spatial reasoning task known as mental rotation—imagining multi-dimensional objects from different points of view. The new research, however, indicates that males gain a slight advantage in mental-rotation performance during the first years

20h

Cancers 'change spots' to avoid immunotherapy

Cancers can make themselves harder for new immunotherapies to see by 'changing their spots' — and switching off a key molecule on the surface of cells that is otherwise recognised by treatment.

20h

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