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8h

Notre-Dame var 3D-scannet ned til mindste detalje

Forskere har kortlagt Notre-Dame med milimeter-præcision, og de data kan blive vigtige under genopbygningen.

7h

Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water

Researchers at the University of Maryland's A. James Clark School of Engineering have demonstrated a successful prototype of one critical component for affordable small-scale desalination: an inexpensive solar evaporator, made of wood.

6h

6min

Climate change to blame for Hurricane Maria's extreme rainfall

Hurricane Maria dropped more rain on Puerto Rico than any storm to hit the island since 1956, a feat due mostly to the effects of human-caused climate warming, new research finds.

7min

New arsenic-based broad-spectrum antibiotic

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. There is a pressing need for new and novel antibiotics to combat the rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers have now discovered a new broad-spectrum antibiotic that contains arsenic. Arsinothricin is a natural product made by soil bacteria.

7min

Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives

Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that. Researchers have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in patients.

7min

Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment

Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. It is also a leading cause of cancer-related death in children and young adults. Scientists have 'reverse engineered' brain cancer stem cells gene by gene, uncovering multiple potential targets for this hard-to-treat cancer.

7min

In mice, feeding time influences the liver's biological clock

The timing of food intake is a major factor driving the rhythmic expression of most genes in the mouse liver, researchers report. The findings demonstrate that body-wide signals driven by rhythmic food intake significantly contribute to driving rhythms in liver metabolic functions and gene expression independently of the liver and clock.

7min

Corals in the Red Sea offer long-term view of the south Asian summer monsoon

When it comes to understanding future climate, the south Asian summer monsoon offers a paradox. Most climate models predict that as human-caused global warming increases, monsoon rain and wind will become more intense — but weather data collected in the region shows that rainfall has actually declined over the past 50 years.

7min

Alzheimer's: Synthetic protein blocks toxic beta-amyloid

Scientists have designed a protein that folds into alpha sheets that can block toxic beta-amyloid in brain cells before it forms into large clumps.

7min

Climate Change Is 'Greatest Challenge Humans Have Ever Faced,' Author Says

Bill McKibben, who first warned of climate change 30 years ago, says its effects are now upon us: "The idea that anybody's going to be immune from this anywhere is untrue." His new book is Falter .

7min

After the Fire: Photos From Inside Notre-Dame Cathedral

A day after the devastating blaze that destroyed the roof and spire of the Notre-Dame cathedral, investigators and photographers were able to get a first look at the damage inside, showing the preservation of a number of valuable artifacts and features among piles of debris and a heavily damaged roof. Private citizens and companies in France have stepped forward, pledging hundreds of millions of

10min

The Last Constraint on Trump

Donald Trump has cut through old norms like a combine through wheat at harvest. Courts have sometimes restrained him, though they’ve more often just slowed him down. Congress, now under Democratic management, has begun to bark but hasn’t shown any bite yet. But the president’s frustrations on recent border stories show that the law remains the one persistent barrier to the president’s ability to

10min

‘Added sugar’ food labels may prevent heart disease and diabetes

Nutrition labeling changes that highlight sugar added to food or drink may have large benefits for public health, researchers say.

11min

What Earth's gravity reveals about climate change

On March 17, 2002, the satellite duo GRACE was launched to map the Earth's gravity field more precisely than ever before. The measurements make it possible to monitor the terrestrial water cycle, the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers or changes in sea levels. This helps to better understand important trends in the global climate system.

21min

Bacteria harness viruses to distinguish friend from foe

Bacterial cells that normally colonize our guts can distinguish themselves from other bacterial species using what's traditionally considered their enemy — a virus. Researchers report that some bacteria use viruses that have infected them (i.e., phages) for self-recognition and thereby show greater fitness, repelling competitors that lack this adaptation.

21min

When it comes to learning, what's better: The carrot or the stick?

Does the potential to win or lose money influence the confidence one has in one's own decisions? Researchers investigated confidence bias in a learning context through a system of monetary punishment and reward. They demonstrated that we become more confident in our choices when learning to seek rewards. However, this confidence evolves into over-confidence. Moreover, the monetary gains makes us l

21min

Scientists crack the code to regenerate plant tissues

A group of scientists have discovered a new way to regenerate flowering plant tissues, opening possibilities of mitigating global food shortage problem.

21min

Astronomers discover third planet in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system

Astronomers have discovered a third planet in the Kepler-47 system, securing the system's title as the most interesting of the binary-star worlds. Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, a team of researchers detected the new Neptune-to-Saturn-size planet orbiting between two previously known planets.

21min

A California City Just Launched a Basic Income Trial

New Pilot Stockton, California, recently started an experimental basic income program . The concept is simple: 130 residents will receive monthly payments, no strings attached, over the course of 18 months. The first payment was delivered in February. When the experiment is complete, according to The Los Angeles Times , city authorities will pore over how people spent the money and how it changed

24min

College Students Hatch Nuclear-Powered Magnetic Plan to Protect Marsonauts from Cosmic Rays

A team of undergraduate students at Drake University in Iowa is developing a magnetic shield to defend interplanetary astronauts from the intense cosmic radiation between Earth and Mars.

26min

The cosmic drama that helped to build the Milky Way

The cosmic drama that helped to build the Milky Way The cosmic drama that helped to build the Milky Way, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01226-2 Stellar baby boom added a slew of stars to the Galaxy’s disk.

28min

Capcom Home Arcade Is A Different Kind of Retro Console

As we all prepare for true next-generation consoles like the PlayStation 5 and whatever this more powerful Nintendo Switch will be, the console war between little plug-and-play retro consoles …

31min

Waymo’s app is now in the Google Play Store — but don’t expect to hail a driverless car right away

Waymo’s ride-hail app is now available in the Google Play Store for Android users, but don’t download it expecting to summon a self-driving car right away. Waymo, the self-driving …

31min

Notre Dame’s stonework isn’t flammable but may be structurally damaged

The stone vault in the roof of Notre Dame means it was more resilient to fire than many other cathedrals but heat may still have warped the building’s stonework

31min

Nobelist Says System of Science Offers Life Lessons

At an event honoring Nobel and Kavli Prize winners, economist Paul Romer talked about how the social system of science offers hope for humanity and for how we can live with each other. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

34min

The industries that millennials really aren't killing

submitted by /u/pmp301 [link] [comments]

38min

Scientists Discover Genes Causing Age-Related Hearing Loss

Even though our ears get bigger as we age, our hearing tends to fade. This ironic problem is common and gets progressively worse the older we get. An estimated 25 percent of Americans between the ages of 65 and 74 have disabling hearing loss. And losing hearing can mean having a hard time understanding what people are saying, which can lead to social isolation and depression. Although the tendency

40min

Workplace Wellness Programs Change Some Behaviors But Not Outcomes

Turns out workplace wellness programs don't work so well. According to a large-scale study over 18 months — the first of its kind to study the issue — initiatives intended to help employees get healthier and more productive, and cost the boss less money, have decidedly lackluster results. Some employees did adopt better behaviors — or at least said they did. However, health outcomes and productivi

40min

After Backlash, Pepsi Says It Never Planned a Space Billboard

Fizzing-Out Recall the Pepsi slogan of yore: “ Refresh Everything .” Apparently, that also includes the truth! On Saturday, Futurism broke a story about Pepsi’s plans to use a space billboard sponsored by one of its energy drinks to protest against what it claimed were stereotypes unfair to gamers. But by Monday, after an outpouring of anger about the project on social media, PepsiCo — which owns

45min

The Big Charm of Marsai Martin’s Little

In the 1988 Tom Hanks film Big , a 12-year-old boy named Josh Baskin (David Moscow) changes his life forever to impress an older girl. After being told he’s too short for a carnival ride, he enters a strange arcade machine and earnestly wishes to be “big.” The following day, Josh wakes up as a 30-year-old man (played by Hanks), whose initial confusion about the corporeal switch later gives way to

50min

Can PET scans spot CTE in the living?

Experimental PET scans on living people can detect abnormal brain tissue—called tau protein—in patterns similar to those in the brains of deceased people diagnosed with CTE after death, report researchers. For the time being, the only way for scientists to detect whether a person has CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is to examine their brain tissue after death. But to get any closer to b

53min

Cheap, portable scanners could transform brain imaging. But how will scientists deliver the data?

Q&A with neuroethicist Francis Shen and MRI developer Michael Garwood

1h

Wikipedias grundlægger: Det frie internet er under angreb

Wikipedia er verdens 5. største hjemmeside, men hvordan begyndte det hele? Og hvad har de af udfordringer i dag?

1h

Google Fiber to pay Louisville nearly $4 million as it pulls out of city – CNET

The money will go toward roads and other public rights-of-way affected by its departure.

1h

Heat-Loving Microbes, Once Dormant, Thrive Over Decades-Old Fire

Just past the intersection of Centre and Locust in Centralia, Pennsylvania, the microbiologist Tammy Tobin turned the wheel of her aging Prius sharply to the right. As the windshield wipers whipped furiously back and forth to fend off the driving sleet — a reminder that winter had yet to bid farewell — Tobin announced, “We’re here.” We were at the base of a grassy slope nestled behind the SS. Pet

1h

The Dreams You Can’t Remember Might Never Have Occurred

Where do our minds go at night? For more than a century, discussions of dreams have tended to revolve around the interpretation of our dreams’ contents. Do they reflect our unconscious anxieties? Are they an attempt to simulate threats , training us to cope with future challenges? Or are they simply the result of our mental housekeeping, as the sleeping brain reactivates our memories and processe

1h

Notre-Dame Isn’t Lost

In 1665, Christopher Wren visited Paris, studying its architecture and taking notes for his restoration of the majestic, crumbling St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. The fourth church built on that site, Old St. Paul’s had taken roughly 200 years to construct, having finally been consecrated in 1240. Its windows are referenced in The Canterbury Tales . Catherine of Aragon was married in the cathedra

1h

Radiology publishes roadmap for AI in medical imaging

In August 2018, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., to explore the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in medical imaging. The workshop was co-sponsored by NIH, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), the American College of Radiology (ACR) and The Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research (The Academy). The organizers aimed to

1h

Lower approval rates evidence of discrimination for same-sex borrowers

Mortgage lenders are less likely to approve loans for same-sex couples. Researchers in Iowa State University's Ivy College of Business analyzed national mortgage data from 1990 to 2015 and found the approval rate for same-sex couples was 3 to 8 percent lower.

1h

Heaviest U.S. Rains Will Happen More Often Even if Warming Targets Are Met

Extreme rainfall projections inform plans to increase infrastructure resilience — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

NASA is Building Inflatable Robot Astronauts

Balloon Animals NASA is investing in robots that do away with hard metal chassis and instead navigate by rapidly inflating and deflating air-filled sacs. Scientists from Brigham Young University teamed up with the startup Pneubotics to build an inflatable robot named King Louie, according to IEEE Spectrum . The robot looks sort of like a Rock ‘Em Sock ‘Em Robot crossbred with a Bobo Doll — but it

1h

Extinction Rebellion: what do they want – and is it realistic?

The UK needs to move to net zero CO2 emissions by 2025 say protestors but how hard would that be to achieve?

1h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Symbiosis and gene expression in luminescent squid Luminous symbionts (red) induce edema-associated gene expression (green) in host epithelia (nuclei, blue). Animal microbiomes can affect tissues and organs anatomically distant from those with which they directly associate. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unknown. Using the symbiosis between the Hawaiian…

1h

Plague, camels, and lice [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, the paper by Namouchi et al. (1) suggests that there were no reservoirs of plague in Europe in the Middle Ages, but rather multiple reintroductions. This study may be completed by reporting several works poorly cited in literature which add to our comprehension of plague transmission. It is…

1h

Reply to Barbieri et al.: Out of the Land of Darkness: Plague on the fur trade routes [Biological Sciences]

In their letter, Barbieri et al. (1) cite valuable works on human ectoparasite transmission well known to us. Indeed, we previously tested alternatives to the rat/rat–flea mechanism of transmission and found that a model with human ectoparasites was the most appropriate in Europe (2, 3) where there were no known…

1h

Profile of Dame Carol Robinson [Profiles]

Over a quarter century ago, chemist Carol Robinson led research that yielded the first mass spectra of molecular chaperones in complex with protein ligands. The achievement, which defied early scientific dogma concerning the theorized limits of mass spectrometry, inspired a discipline: gas-phase structural biology. Since then, the work of this…

1h

Theory and experiments join forces to characterize the electrocatalytic interface [Chemistry]

Electrocatalysis is gaining impetus as a key technology in fuel cells and for the medium-term energy storage in the context of intermittent, renewable energy sources such as wind and solar power. Furthermore, electrocatalysis promises to convert rather inert molecules such as CO2 and N2 into reduced products such as CO…

1h

Synthetic ubiquitinated proteins meet the proteasome: Distinct roles of ubiquitin in a chain [Biochemistry]

Protein homeostasis is tightly regulated, and multiple cellular mechanisms are in place to dispose of misfolded or no-longer-needed proteins. One of the key players is the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome system (UPS), in which a variety of specific ligases mark substrate proteins with a Ub “flag” to be recognized by the proteolytic…

1h

Shining light on microbial signaling to distant organs [Microbiology]

Almost all organisms, from insects to mammals, have coevolved with microorganisms, establishing symbiotic interactions. Whereas most such interactions are based on nutrition (1), there are other examples, among which one of the most well studied is symbioses involving light-emitting bacteria. The bobtailed squid, Euprymna scolopes, forms a symbiosis with the…

1h

Boron-oxygen complex yields n-type surface layer in semiconducting diamond [Applied Physical Sciences]

Diamond is a wide-bandgap semiconductor possessing exceptional physical and chemical properties with the potential to miniaturize high-power electronics. Whereas boron-doped diamond (BDD) is a well-known p-type semiconductor, fabrication of practical diamond-based electronic devices awaits development of an effective n-type dopant with satisfactory electrical properties. Here we report the synthes

1h

Unsupervised learning by competing hidden units [Computer Sciences]

It is widely believed that end-to-end training with the backpropagation algorithm is essential for learning good feature detectors in early layers of artificial neural networks, so that these detectors are useful for the task performed by the higher layers of that neural network. At the same time, the traditional form…

1h

Digital logic for soft devices [Engineering]

Although soft devices (grippers, actuators, and elementary robots) are rapidly becoming an integral part of the broad field of robotics, autonomy for completely soft devices has only begun to be developed. Adaptation of conventional systems of control to soft devices requires hard valves and electronic controls. This paper describes completely…

1h

Modeling cocaine traffickers and counterdrug interdiction forces as a complex adaptive system [Sustainability Science]

Counterdrug interdiction efforts designed to seize or disrupt cocaine shipments between South American source zones and US markets remain a core US “supply side” drug policy and national security strategy. However, despite a long history of US-led interdiction efforts in the Western Hemisphere, cocaine movements to the United States through…

1h

Diverse fate of ubiquitin chain moieties: The proximal is degraded with the target, and the distal protects the proximal from removal and recycles [Biochemistry]

One of the enigmas in the ubiquitin (Ub) field is the requirement for a poly-Ub chain as a proteasomal targeting signal. The canonical chain appears to be longer than the distance between the two Ub-binding proteasomal receptors. Furthermore, genetic manipulation has shown that one receptor subunit is sufficient, which suggests…

1h

A U2-snRNP-independent role of SF3b in promoting mRNA export [Biochemistry]

To ensure efficient and accurate gene expression, pre-mRNA processing and mRNA export need to be balanced. However, how this balance is ensured remains largely unclear. Here, we found that SF3b, a component of U2 snRNP that participates in splicing and 3′ processing of pre-mRNAs, interacts with the key mRNA export…

1h

Repertoires of G protein-coupled receptors for Ciona-specific neuropeptides [Biochemistry]

Neuropeptides play pivotal roles in various biological events in the nervous, neuroendocrine, and endocrine systems, and are correlated with both physiological functions and unique behavioral traits of animals. Elucidation of functional interaction between neuropeptides and receptors is a crucial step for the verification of their biological roles and evolutionary processes….

1h

O-GlcNAcylation of core components of the translation initiation machinery regulates protein synthesis [Biochemistry]

Protein synthesis is essential for cell growth, proliferation, and survival. Protein synthesis is a tightly regulated process that involves multiple mechanisms. Deregulation of protein synthesis is considered as a key factor in the development and progression of a number of diseases, such as cancer. Here we show that the dynamic…

1h

IKs ion-channel pore conductance can result from individual voltage sensor movements [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The IKs current has an established role in cardiac action potential repolarization, and provides a repolarization reserve at times of stress. The underlying channels are formed from tetramers of KCNQ1 along with one to four KCNE1 accessory subunits, but how these components together gate the IKs complex to open the…

1h

Spontaneous driving forces give rise to protein-RNA condensates with coexisting phases and complex material properties [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Phase separation of multivalent protein and RNA molecules underlies the biogenesis of biomolecular condensates such as membraneless organelles. In vivo, these condensates encompass hundreds of distinct types of molecules that typically organize into multilayered structures supporting the differential partitioning of molecules into distinct regions with distinct material properties. The interplay..

1h

Earth history and the passerine superradiation [Evolution]

Avian diversification has been influenced by global climate change, plate tectonic movements, and mass extinction events. However, the impact of these factors on the diversification of the hyperdiverse perching birds (passerines) is unclear because family level relationships are unresolved and the timing of splitting events among lineages is uncertain. We…

1h

Uniquely human CHRFAM7A gene increases the hematopoietic stem cell reservoir in mice and amplifies their inflammatory response [Immunology and Inflammation]

A subset of genes in the human genome are uniquely human and not found in other species. One example is CHRFAM7A, a dominant-negative inhibitor of the antiinflammatory α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR/CHRNA7) that is also a neurotransmitter receptor linked to cognitive function, mental health, and neurodegenerative disease. Here we show…

1h

Hierarchy of clinical manifestations in SAVI N153S and V154M mouse models [Immunology and Inflammation]

Studies over the past decade have revealed a central role for innate immune sensors in autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. cGAS, a cytosolic DNA sensor, detects both foreign and host DNA and generates a second-messenger cGAMP, which in turn binds and activates stimulator of IFN genes (STING), leading to induction of…

1h

Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) loss causes neurodegeneration by altering protein turnover in the first postnatal weeks [Medical Sciences]

Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is one of the most abundant and enigmatic enzymes of the CNS. Based on existing UCH-L1 knockout models, UCH-L1 is thought to be required for the maintenance of axonal integrity, but not for neuronal development despite its high expression in neurons. Several lines of evidence…

1h

Hepatic posttranscriptional network comprised of CCR4-NOT deadenylase and FGF21 maintains systemic metabolic homeostasis [Medical Sciences]

Whole-body metabolic homeostasis is tightly controlled by hormone-like factors with systemic or paracrine effects that are derived from nonendocrine organs, including adipose tissue (adipokines) and liver (hepatokines). Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is a hormone-like protein, which is emerging as a major regulator of whole-body metabolism and has therapeutic potential…

1h

Horizontal gene transfer allowed the emergence of broad host range entomopathogens [Microbiology]

The emergence of new pathogenic fungi has profoundly impacted global biota, but the underlying mechanisms behind host shifts remain largely unknown. The endophytic insect pathogen Metarhizium robertsii evolved from fungi that were plant associates, and entomopathogenicity is a more recently acquired adaptation. Here we report that the broad host-range entomopathogen…

1h

Critical symbiont signals drive both local and systemic changes in diel and developmental host gene expression [Microbiology]

The colonization of an animal’s tissues by its microbial partners creates networks of communication across the host’s body. We used the natural binary light-organ symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous bacterial partner, Vibrio fischeri, to define the impact of colonization on transcriptomic networks in the host. A…

1h

Loss of postnatal quiescence of neural stem cells through mTOR activation upon genetic removal of cysteine string protein-{alpha} [Neuroscience]

Neural stem cells continuously generate newborn neurons that integrate into and modify neural circuitry in the adult hippocampus. The molecular mechanisms that regulate or perturb neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we have found that mouse hippocampal radial glia-like (RGL) neural stem cells express the…

1h

Pejvakin-mediated pexophagy protects auditory hair cells against noise-induced damage [Neuroscience]

Noise overexposure causes oxidative stress, leading to auditory hair cell damage. Adaptive peroxisome proliferation involving pejvakin, a peroxisome-associated protein from the gasdermin family, has been shown to protect against this harmful oxidative stress. However, the role of pejvakin in peroxisome dynamics and homeostasis remains unclear. Here we show that sound…

1h

Macroscale intrinsic network architecture of the hypothalamus [Neuroscience]

Control of multiple life-critical physiological and behavioral functions requires the hypothalamus. Here, we provide a comprehensive description and rigorous analysis of mammalian intrahypothalamic network architecture. To achieve this at the gray matter region (macroscale) level, macroscale connection (macroconnection) data for the rat hypothalamus were extracted from the primary literature. The.

1h

The STEP61 interactome reveals subunit-specific AMPA receptor binding and synaptic regulation [Neuroscience]

Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is a brain-specific protein phosphatase that regulates a variety of synaptic proteins, including NMDA receptors (NAMDRs). To better understand STEP’s effect on other receptors, we used mass spectrometry to identify the STEP61 interactome. We identified a number of known interactors, but also ones including the…

1h

Phospholipid membranes drive abdominal aortic aneurysm development through stimulating coagulation factor activity [Physiology]

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is an inflammatory vascular disease with high mortality and limited treatment options. How blood lipids regulate AAA development is unknown. Here lipidomics and genetic models demonstrate a central role for procoagulant enzymatically oxidized phospholipids (eoxPL) in regulating AAA. Specifically, through activating coagulation, eoxPL either promoted or…

1h

Histone 2B monoubiquitination complex integrates transcript elongation with RNA processing at circadian clock and flowering regulators [Plant Biology]

HISTONE MONOUBIQUITINATION1 (HUB1) and its paralog HUB2 act in a conserved heterotetrameric complex in the chromatin-mediated transcriptional modulation of developmental programs, such as flowering time, dormancy, and the circadian clock. The KHD1 and SPEN3 proteins were identified as interactors of the HUB1 and HUB2 proteins with in vitro RNA-binding activity….

1h

Chemical synthesis rewriting of a bacterial genome to achieve design flexibility and biological functionality [Systems Biology]

Understanding how to program biological functions into artificial DNA sequences remains a key challenge in synthetic genomics. Here, we report the chemical synthesis and testing of Caulobacter ethensis-2.0 (C. eth-2.0), a rewritten bacterial genome composed of the most fundamental functions of a bacterial cell. We rebuilt the essential genome of…

1h

The Science of Science Communication III [Introductions]

Three National Academy of Sciences colloquia have sought to create the science of science communication as a unique discipline, fostering collaboration across disciplines and between researchers and practitioners. Each colloquium has engaged researchers from the social, behavioral, and decision sciences needed to connect the scientific community with those who depend…

1h

Science, health, and cultural literacy in a rapidly changing communications landscape [Colloquium Paper]

There is a gap between how many scientists communicate and how most people understand and interpret messages. This article argues that the extensive science communications literature needs to be joined by the health literacy literature and anthropological work on cultural variations in hearing and understanding messages. Rapid changes and differences…

1h

Prion protein quantification in human cerebrospinal fluid as a tool for prion disease drug development [Applied Biological Sciences]

Reduction of native prion protein (PrP) levels in the brain is an attractive strategy for the treatment or prevention of human prion disease. Clinical development of any PrP-reducing therapeutic will require an appropriate pharmacodynamic biomarker: a practical and robust method for quantifying PrP, and reliably demonstrating its reduction in the…

1h

Precise small-molecule cleavage of an r(CUG) repeat expansion in a myotonic dystrophy mouse model [Applied Biological Sciences]

Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is an incurable neuromuscular disorder caused by an expanded CTG repeat that is transcribed into r(CUG)exp. The RNA repeat expansion sequesters regulatory proteins such as Muscleblind-like protein 1 (MBNL1), which causes pre-mRNA splicing defects. The disease-causing r(CUG)exp has been targeted by antisense oligonucleotides, CRISPR-based approaches,…

1h

Energetic regulation of coordinated leader-follower dynamics during collective invasion of breast cancer cells [Applied Physical Sciences]

The ability of primary tumor cells to invade into adjacent tissues, followed by the formation of local or distant metastasis, is a lethal hallmark of cancer. Recently, locomoting clusters of tumor cells have been identified in numerous cancers and associated with increased invasiveness and metastatic potential. However, how the collective…

1h

Ephemeral states in protein folding under force captured with a magnetic tweezers design [Applied Physical Sciences]

Magnetic tape heads are ubiquitously used to read and record on magnetic tapes in technologies as diverse as old VHS tapes, modern hard-drive disks, or magnetic bands on credit cards. Their design highlights the ability to convert electric signals into fluctuations of the magnetic field at very high frequencies, which…

1h

Spontaneous ribosomal translocation of mRNA and tRNAs into a chimeric hybrid state [Biochemistry]

The elongation factor G (EF-G)–catalyzed translocation of mRNA and tRNA through the ribosome is essential for vacating the ribosomal A site for the next incoming aminoacyl-tRNA, while precisely maintaining the translational reading frame. Here, the 3.2-Å crystal structure of a ribosome translocation intermediate complex containing mRNA and two tRNAs, formed…

1h

Structures of ligand-occupied {beta}-Klotho complexes reveal a molecular mechanism underlying endocrine FGF specificity and activity [Biochemistry]

The three members of the endocrine fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family designated FGF19, FGF21, and FGF23 mediate their pleiotropic cellular effects by binding to and activating binary complexes composed of an FGF receptor (FGFR) bound to either α-Klotho or β-Klotho receptors. Structural analyses of ligand-occupied Klotho extracellular domains have provided…

1h

Peptidoglycan hydrolase of an unusual cross-link cleavage specificity contributes to bacterial cell wall synthesis [Biochemistry]

Bacteria are surrounded by a protective exoskeleton, peptidoglycan (PG), a cross-linked mesh-like macromolecule consisting of glycan strands interlinked by short peptides. Because PG completely encases the cytoplasmic membrane, cleavage of peptide cross-links is a prerequisite to make space for incorporation of nascent glycan strands for its successful expansion during cell…

1h

Papain-like cysteine proteases prepare plant cyclic peptide precursors for cyclization [Biochemistry]

Cyclotides are plant defense peptides that have been extensively investigated for pharmaceutical and agricultural applications, but key details of their posttranslational biosynthesis have remained elusive. Asparaginyl endopeptidases are crucial in the final stage of the head-to-tail cyclization reaction, but the enzyme(s) involved in the prerequisite steps of N-terminal proteolytic release…

1h

Cryoprotectant-free cryopreservation of mammalian cells by superflash freezing [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Cryopreservation is widely used to maintain backups of cells as it enables the semipermanent storage of cells. During the freezing process, ice crystals that are generated inside and outside the cells can lethally damage the cells. All conventional cryopreservation methods use at least one cryoprotective agent (CPA) to render water…

1h

Reaction intermediates during operando electrocatalysis identified from full solvent quantum mechanics molecular dynamics [Chemistry]

Electrocatalysis provides a powerful means to selectively transform molecules, but a serious impediment in making rapid progress is the lack of a molecular-based understanding of the reactive mechanisms or intermediates at the electrode–electrolyte interface (EEI). Recent experimental techniques have been developed for operando identification of reaction intermediates using surface infrared…

1h

Inner Workings: Newborn stars don’t have enough dust to build planets. What are the missing ingredients? [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Building a planet is a mysterious process. New worlds emerge from the disk of leftover dust and gas that swirls around an infant star, but it’s still not clear how planets form or how quickly they grow. Astronomers have typically had difficulty peering into the dusty planet nurseries formed from…

1h

Tropical cyclone activity affected by volcanically induced ITCZ shifts [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Volcanic eruptions can affect global climate through changes in atmospheric and ocean circulation, and therefore could impact tropical cyclone (TC) activity. Here, we use ensemble simulations performed with an Earth System Model to investigate the impact of strong volcanic eruptions occurring in the tropical Northern (NH) and Southern (SH) Hemisphere…

1h

Predicting future invaders and future invasions [Ecology]

Invasive alien species are a great threat to biodiversity and human livelihoods worldwide. The most effective way to limit their impacts and costs is to prevent their introduction into new areas. Identifying invaders and invasions before their occurrence would arguably be the most efficient strategy. Here, we provide a profiling…

1h

Communicating uncertainty in policy analysis [Colloquium Paper]

The term “policy analysis” describes scientific evaluations of the impacts of past public policies and predictions of the outcomes of potential future policies. A prevalent practice has been to report policy analysis with incredible certitude. That is, exact predictions of policy outcomes are routine, while expressions of uncertainty are rare….

1h

Punishing and toxic neighborhood environments independently predict the intergenerational social mobility of black and white children [Economic Sciences]

We use data on intergenerational social mobility by neighborhood to examine how social and physical environments beyond concentrated poverty predict children’s long-term well-being. First, we examine neighborhoods that are harsh on children’s development: those characterized by high levels of violence, incarceration, and lead exposure. Second, we examine potential supportive or…

1h

Nontoxic nanopore electroporation for effective intracellular delivery of biological macromolecules [Engineering]

We present a simple nanopore-electroporation (NanoEP) platform for delivery of nucleic acids, functional protein, and Cas9 single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins into both adherent and suspension cells with up to 80% delivery efficiency and >95% cell viability. Low-voltage electric pulses permeabilize a small area of cell membrane as a cell comes into…

1h

Cone photoreceptor classification in the living human eye from photostimulation-induced phase dynamics [Engineering]

Human color vision is achieved by mixing neural signals from cone photoreceptors sensitive to different wavelengths of light. The spatial arrangement and proportion of these spectral types in the retina set fundamental limits on color perception, and abnormal or missing types are responsible for color vision loss. Imaging provides the…

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Ammonia emission control in China would mitigate haze pollution and nitrogen deposition, but worsen acid rain [Environmental Sciences]

China has been experiencing fine particle (i.e., aerodynamic diameters ≤ 2.5 µm; PM2.5) pollution and acid rain in recent decades, which exert adverse impacts on human health and the ecosystem. Recently, ammonia (i.e., NH3) emission reduction has been proposed as a strategic option to mitigate haze pollution. However, atmospheric NH3…

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Night-sky radiometry can revolutionize the characterization of light-pollution sources globally [Environmental Sciences]

The city emission function (CEF), describing the angular emission from an entire city as a light source, is one of the key elements in night-sky radiance models. The CEF describes the rate at which skyglow depends on distance and is indispensable in any prediction of light-pollution propagation into nocturnal environments….

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Disease mortality in domesticated animals is predicted by host evolutionary relationships [Evolution]

Infectious diseases of domesticated animals impact human well-being via food insecurity, loss of livelihoods, and human infections. While much research has focused on parasites that infect single host species, most parasites of domesticated mammals infect multiple species. The impact of multihost parasites varies across hosts; some rarely result in death,…

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Promises and perils of gene drives: Navigating the communication of complex, post-normal science [Colloquium Paper]

In November of 2017, an interdisciplinary panel discussed the complexities of gene drive applications as part of the third Sackler Colloquium on “The Science of Science Communication.” The panel brought together a social scientist, life scientist, and journalist to discuss the issue from each of their unique perspectives. This paper…

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Small-molecule factor B inhibitor for the treatment of complement-mediated diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]

Dysregulation of the alternative complement pathway (AP) predisposes individuals to a number of diseases including paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and C3 glomerulopathy. Moreover, glomerular Ig deposits can lead to complement-driven nephropathies. Here we describe the discovery of a highly potent, reversible, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of factor

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Nanobody-based CAR T cells that target the tumor microenvironment inhibit the growth of solid tumors in immunocompetent mice [Medical Sciences]

Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy has been successful in clinical trials against hematological cancers, but has experienced challenges in the treatment of solid tumors. One of the main difficulties lies in a paucity of tumor-specific targets that can serve as CAR recognition domains. We therefore focused on developing…

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Photothermal-responsive nanosized hybrid polymersome as versatile therapeutics codelivery nanovehicle for effective tumor suppression [Medical Sciences]

Effective cancer therapies often demand delivery of combinations of drugs to inhibit multidrug resistance through synergism, and the development of multifunctional nanovehicles with enhanced drug loading and delivery efficiency for combination therapy is currently a major challenge in nanotechnology. However, such combinations are more challenging to administer than single drugs…

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Target identification reveals lanosterol synthase as a vulnerability in glioma [Medical Sciences]

Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remains an incurable childhood brain tumor for which novel therapeutic approaches are desperately needed. Previous studies have shown that the menin inhibitor MI-2 exhibits promising activity in preclinical DIPG and adult glioma models, although the mechanism underlying this activity is unknown. Here, using an integrated…

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Diffusing wave microrheology of highly scattering concentrated monodisperse emulsions [Physics]

Motivated by improvements in diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) for nonergodic, highly optically scattering soft matter and by cursory treatment of collective scattering effects in prior DWS microrheology experiments, we investigate the low-frequency plateau elastic shear moduli Gp′ of concentrated, monodisperse, disordered oil-in-water emulsions as droplets jam. In such experiments, the…

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Arabidopsis and Chlamydomonas phosphoribulokinase crystal structures complete the redox structural proteome of the Calvin-Benson cycle [Plant Biology]

In land plants and algae, the Calvin–Benson (CB) cycle takes place in the chloroplast, a specialized organelle in which photosynthesis occurs. Thioredoxins (TRXs) are small ubiquitous proteins, known to harmonize the two stages of photosynthesis through a thiol-based mechanism. Among the 11 enzymes of the CB cycle, the TRX target…

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Structural analysis of Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 (PSR2) reveals a conserved modular fold contributing to virulence [Plant Biology]

Phytophthora are eukaryotic pathogens that cause enormous losses in agriculture and forestry. Each Phytophthora species encodes hundreds of effector proteins that collectively have essential roles in manipulating host cellular processes and facilitating disease development. Here we report the crystal structure of the effector Phytophthora suppressor of RNA silencing 2 (PSR2)….

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On the future of transportation in an era of automated and autonomous vehicles [Colloquium Paper]

Automated vehicles (AVs) already navigate US highways and those of many other nations around the world. Current questions about AVs do not now revolve around whether such technologies should or should not be implemented; they are already with us. Rather, such questions are more and more focused on how such…

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The mixed effects of online diversity training [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

We present results from a large (n = 3,016) field experiment at a global organization testing whether a brief science-based online diversity training can change attitudes and behaviors toward women in the workplace. Our preregistered field experiment included an active placebo control and measured participants’ attitudes and real workplace decisions…

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Conflict across representational gaps: Threats to and opportunities for improved communication [Colloquium Paper]

Often, the senders and receivers of scientific communication have different knowledge bases. While such communication is essential for solving the complex social and technological problems that affect multiple stakeholders, a diversity of knowledge among communicators can create representational gaps (rGaps). rGaps occur when senders make assumptions that receivers do not,…

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Scientific communication in a post-truth society [Colloquium Paper]

Within the scientific community, much attention has focused on improving communications between scientists, policy makers, and the public. To date, efforts have centered on improving the content, accessibility, and delivery of scientific communications. Here we argue that in the current political and media environment faulty communication is no longer the…

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Science audiences, misinformation, and fake news [Colloquium Paper]

Concerns about public misinformation in the United States—ranging from politics to science—are growing. Here, we provide an overview of how and why citizens become (and sometimes remain) misinformed about science. Our discussion focuses specifically on misinformation among individual citizens. However, it is impossible to understand individual information processing and acceptance…

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How to communicate large-scale social challenges: The problem of the disappearing American corporation [Colloquium Paper]

Social science has distinct advantages and challenges when it comes to communicating its findings to the public. Its topics are often highly accessible to the general public, yet its findings may be counterintuitive and politically contentious. Conveying recent changes in the organization of the American economy provides an illustration of…

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Science and Culture: Can climate change games boost public understanding? [Sustainability Science]

In 2014, ecologist Josh Lawler watched as his 8-year-old son became engrossed in video games. The games’ hold made him wonder: Could researchers exploit the medium to teach players—both children and adults—about climate change? “I figured we’re having trouble getting the message about climate change out,” says Lawler, who is…

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Evaluating science communication [Colloquium Paper]

Effective science communication requires assembling scientists with knowledge relevant to decision makers, translating that knowledge into useful terms, establishing trusted two-way communication channels, evaluating the process, and refining it as needed. Communicating Science Effectively: A Research Agenda [National Research Council (2017)] surveys the scientific foundations for accomplishing th

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Reflections on an interdisciplinary collaboration to inform public understanding of climate change, mitigation, and impacts [Colloquium Paper]

We describe two interdisciplinary projects in which natural scientists and engineers, as well as psychologists and other behavioral scientists, worked together to better communicate about climate change, including mitigation and impacts. One project focused on understanding and informing public perceptions of an emerging technology to capture and sequester carbon dioxide…

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Correction for Andexer et al., Biosynthesis of the immunosuppressants FK506, FK520, and rapamycin involves a previously undescribed family of enzymes acting on chorismate [Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY Correction for “Biosynthesis of the immunosuppressants FK506, FK520, and rapamycin involves a previously undescribed family of enzymes acting on chorismate,” by Jennifer N. Andexer, Steven G. Kendrew, Mohammad Nur-e-Alam, Orestis Lazos, Teresa A. Foster, Anna-Sophie Zimmermann, Tony D. Warneck, Dipen Suthar, Nigel J. Coates, Frank E. Koehn, Jerauld…

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Correction for Rodriguez-Iturbe et al., Tree clusters in savannas result from islands of soil moisture [Correction]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Tree clusters in savannas result from islands of soil moisture,” by Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe, Zijuan Chen, Ann Carla Stave, and Simon Asher Levin, which was first published March 14, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1819389116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:6679–6683). The authors note that the author name Ann Carla Stave…

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Correction to Supporting Information for Thomson et al., Relational mobility predicts social behaviors in 39 countries and is tied to historical farming and threat [SI Correction]

PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for “Relational mobility predicts social behaviors in 39 countries and is tied to historical farming and threat,” by Robert Thomson, Masaki Yuki, Thomas Talhelm, Joanna Schug, Mie Kito, Arin H. Ayanian, Julia C. Becker, Maja Becker, Chi-yue Chiu, Hoon-Seok Choi, Carolina M….

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The Time Tim Cook Stood His Ground Against the FBI

The agency wanted a backdoor to crack the iPhone of Syed Farook, a suspect in the 2015 San Bernardino shooting. The Apple CEO said no.

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FIU scientists discover new arsenic-based broad-spectrum antibiotic

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health threats of our time. There is a pressing need for new and novel antibiotics to combat the rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria.Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are part of an international team that has discovered a new broad-spectrum antibiotic that contains arsenic. Arsinothricin is a natural product made by so

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The fluid that feeds tumor cells

MIT biologists have found that the nutrient composition of the interstitial fluid that normally surrounds pancreatic tumors is different from that of the culture medium normally used to grow cancer cells.

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CubeSats prove their worth for scientific missions

Only a few years ago, the astronomy and heliophysics communities were skeptical about whether CubeSats could reliably obtain scientific data. But these breadloaf-size satellites have proven their ability to return useful data. During the APS April Meeting 2019, Christopher S. Moore will describe how the twin Miniature X-ray Solar Spectometer CubeSats measure soft X-rays from the Sun. These were th

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Google’s AI Experts Try to Automate Themselves

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Bunz Pays Users For Their Personal Data – Google and Facebook Be Warned

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An AI Invented a Weird Sport Called “Speedgate”

Speedgate Digital product agency AKQA says it has taught an artificial intelligence to invent a sport by feeding it data about 400 existing ones, TechCrunch reports . The resulting never-played-before sport, called “Speedgate,” is an unusual mix of soccer and rugby — with a touch of Quidditch. Speedgate is by turns familiar and bizarre. Two opposing teams of six players pass and eventually kick o

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SpaceX's recovered core booster damaged in rough seas

A SpaceX rocket booster that landed on an ocean platform after last week's launch has been damaged in rough seas.

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How to defend the Earth from asteroids

A mere 17-20 meters across, the Chelyabinsk meteor caused extensive ground damage and numerous injuries when it exploded on impact with Earth's atmosphere in February 2013.

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CubeSats prove their worth for scientific missions

Only a few years ago, the astronomy and heliophysics communities were skeptical about whether CubeSats could reliably obtain scientific data. But these breadloaf-size satellites have proven their ability to return useful data.

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Daily briefing: Digital memories of Notre-Dame

Daily briefing: Digital memories of Notre-Dame Daily briefing: Digital memories of Notre-Dame, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01256-w Detailed 3D mapping of the monument lives on after destructive blaze, a global measles uptick, life-expectancy of a neutron.

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Testosterone and cortisol modulate the effects of empathy on aggression in children

The study conducted in the UPV/EHU's Department of Basic Psychological Processes and their Development on 139 eight-year-old children has concluded that low levels of testosterone and high levels of empathy may explain the low levels of aggressive behaviour in girls; and that the low levels of empathy and high levels of cortisol may account for high levels of aggressive behaviour in boys.

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C-Path, CDISC develop therapeutic area standard to foster meaningful research for HIV

The Critical Path Institute (C-Path) and CDISC are pleased to announce the release of a global Therapeutic Area Standard that specifies how to structure commonly collected data and outcome measurements in clinical trials for HIV. The standard, released in the form of User Guide for data managers, statisticians, programmers and study managers, covers the areas of prevention, vaccines and treatment

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AI performs as well as experienced radiologists in detecting prostate cancer

UCLA researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence system to help radiologists improve their ability to diagnose prostate cancer.

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Large federal program aimed at providing better health care underfunds primary care

Despite a mandate to help patients make better-informed health care decisions, a ten-year research program established under the Affordable Care Act has funded a relatively small number of studies that examine primary care, the setting where the majority of patients in the US receive treatment.

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This is how a motorcycle shock works

Technology The modern high-performance shock is a wonder of linear response and tunability. How did the valve washers get stacked in our favor? We take a look inside the modern high-performance motorcycle shock and explain how damping and valving work to make motorcycles perform better.

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The history of plastic in the sea

A metal box which has been dragged around the ocean first discovered a plastic bag sixty years ago.

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Survey jointly commissioned by SPIE and OSA assesses level of harassment at scientific meetings

In a new professional conduct survey jointly commissioned by The Optical Society (OSA) and SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, over 9% of respondents say they experienced harassment at meetings or events hosted by the scientific societies. Of those who experienced harassment, 63% were women.

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Fortunately, There Are Incredible 3D Scans of Notre Dame

From Bits to Atoms The world watched in horror Monday night while flames tore through the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. As flames consumed the roof and toppled its iconic central spire, it seemed as though the historic church could be lost forever — but it’s possible, thanks to cutting-edge imagining technology, that all hope may not be lost. Thanks to the meticulous work of Vassar art historian

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The pressure to prescribe: Antibiotic stewardship in the outpatient setting

Outpatient healthcare providers inappropriately prescribed antibiotics to 40 percent of patients in a major Veterans Affairs healthcare system, a higher figure than in previous studies examining outpatient antibiotic use, according to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology pub

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Probing the mystery of drug resistance: New hope for leukemia's toughest cases

Alejandro Gutierrez, MD, a researcher at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center has made it his mission to figure out why leukemia treatments cure some patients but not others. He and 15 colleagues report progress on two important fronts: They shed light on how leukemia cells become resistant to drugs, and they describe how two drugs used in combination may overcome th

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How a river returns to life after a cataclysmic volcanic eruption

How a river returns to life after a cataclysmic volcanic eruption How a river returns to life after a cataclysmic volcanic eruption, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01227-1 Entombed by debris nearly 40 years ago, a river in the northwestern United States runs again.

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CRISPR Research Moves Out Of Labs And Into Clinics Around The World

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The Decades-Long War on Smog

What history tells us about addressing today’s pressing air pollution problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Decades-Long War on Smog

What history tells us about addressing today’s pressing air pollution problems — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rind bacteria may be key to cheese allergy relief

Some aged cheeses cause allergy-like reactions in many people, but new research identifies bacteria that could reduce those unpleasant side effects. The answer to alleviating the unpleasant reactions that result from eating ripened cheeses could lie in the bacteria that populate the cheese’s rind, says Stephan Schmitz-Esser, associate professor of animal science at Iowa State University. Research

2h

Early ocean plastic litter traced to 1960s

Scientists "accidentally" record the history of ocean plastic, including what may have been the first plastic bag to be fished out of the ocean.

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Notre Dame’s stonework isn’t flammable but may be structurally damaged

The stone vault in the roof of Notre Dame means it was more resilient to fire than many other cathedrals but heat may still have warped the building’s stonework

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The Family That Feels Almost No Pain

An Italian clan's curious insensitivity to pain has piqued the interest of geneticists seeking a new understanding of how to treat physical suffering

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The First Known Interstellar Meteor May Have Hit Earth in 2014

The 3-foot-wide rock rock visited us three years before 'Oumuamua.

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Why these towns are trying to save an 'agricultural pest'

Animals In Colorado’s Front Range, advocates capture and relocate prairie dogs before their burrows are bulldozed. Extermination—by farmers, ranchers, developers, and government officials—and habitat loss have wiped prairie dogs from about 98 percent of their historic 368 million…

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Writing the Pulitzer-Winning The Overstory Changed Richard Powers’s Life

“Writing The Overstory quite literally changed my life, starting with where and how I live,” the author Richard Powers told the Chicago Review of Books . Before writing the book, Powers had been living and teaching in Palo Alto, between tech-centric Silicon Valley and California’s old-growth forests. An encounter with a giant redwood shook him; in a Guardian profile, he describes it as a kind of

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Why Has Game of Thrones Sidelined Tyrion?

This story contains spoilers through Season 8, Episode 1 of Game of Thrones . “I used to think you were the cleverest man alive.” Sansa Stark may as well have been speaking for the audience as she dissed Tyrion Lannister during Game of Thrones ’s Season 8 premiere . In a show full of schemers, Tyrion’s ruses once not only had a tendency to work, but also carried an element of righteousness: He wa

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Taco Bell Competitor Embraces Plant-Based “Meat” in its Tacos

Meatless Monday The American chain franchise Del Taco just announced that it will be the first fast-food taco joint to sell plant-based Beyond Meat as an alternative to beef, starting on April 25. The move doubles the number of fast food chains to feature plant-based meat alternatives from one to, uh, two — earlier this month, Burger King announced that it had partnered with Impossible Foods to c

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Do Microdoses of LSD Change Your Mind?

A rigorous study has intriguing results — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Don’t Count on 23andMe to Detect Most Breast Cancer Risks, Study Warns

The DNA testing company, which has 10 million customers, misses nearly 90 percent of people with risky BRCA mutations. It says the criticism is overblown.

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Fossilised Bacteria in Meteorite From Mars is Proof of Life, Study Claims

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The Coming Obsolescence of Animal Meat

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Do Microdoses of LSD Change Your Mind?

A rigorous study has intriguing results — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Koll på påsken i skolan – tro eller tradition?

Det svenska skolväsendet har genomgått en drastisk förändring över de senaste hundra åren. Från fokus på att fostra goda kristna medborgare till en skola vilande på konfessionsfri grund med kulturell och etnisk mångfald. Så varför ska skolan i det sekulära Sverige över huvud taget uppmärksamma de religiösa högtider som en gång var? – Tro och traditioner och kulturarv, det finns med som bagage hos

2h

New role for innate immune sensor: Suppressing liver cancer

UT Southwestern researchers have found that a protein in the body's innate immune system that responds to gut microbes can suppress the most common type of liver cancer.

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Despite transition period, maximal running shoes may still increase risk of injury

A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to "maximal" running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time.

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2017 pneumonic plague outbreak in Madagascar characterized by scientists

Plague is an endemic disease in Madagascar. Each year there is a seasonal upsurge between September and April, especially in the Central Highlands, which stand at an elevation of more than 800m. In 2017, an unprecedented pneumonic plague outbreak hit the main island, primarily affecting the capital Antananarivo and the main port city of Toamasina.

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Female farmers and extension workers should lead in reducing gender inequality in agriculture

Julien Lamontagne-Godwin, lead author of a new paper, published in the Journal of Agricultural Education and Education, says a network of 'trained and knowledge-rich female lead 'contact" farmers' could be trialled to understand its potential role in improving the dissemination of agricultural information to women in farm households.

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Magic mouthwash effective treatment for mouth sore pain caused by radiation therapy

'Magic mouthwash,' an oral rinse containing diphenhydramine, lidocaine and antacids, significantly reduced pain from oral mucositis, mouth sores, in patients receiving radiation therapy for cancers of the head and neck when compared to plaecbo. These were the findings of a multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial, led by Robert Miller, M.D., an emer

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PCV10 pneumococcal vaccine has big impact in kenya, even among unvaccinated individuals

A vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major cause of childhood illness and mortality in the developing world, sharply reduced the incidence of serious pneumococcal disease among children in a large Kenyan community after it was introduced in 2011, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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TESS discovers its first Earth-sized planet

NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, TESS, has discovered its first Earth-sized exoplanet. The planet, named HD 21749c, is the smallest world outside our solar system that TESS has identified yet.

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Scientists report new approach to reduce or prevent renal fibrosis

Renal fibrosis, the abnormal accumulation of fibrotic material within the kidney, hinders kidney function and may lead to eventual renal failure. Using genetically altered mice, researchers from Duke University investigated the mechanisms of interaction between the T cells, angiotensin receptors (AT1), and macrophages to understand their role in impeding renal fibrosis. A report in The American Jo

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Workplace wellness programs may help people change certain behaviors but do little to improve overall

First major multisite randomized controlled trial of a workplace wellness program shows mixed results at 18 months.Program led employees to increase exercise and improve weight-management habits, but it had no effect on health outcomesProgram did not improve worker absenteeism, tenure or job performance.Program did not reduce employees' use of health care services or health care spending in the sh

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JAMA Pediatrics editorial: New lead testing recommendations inconclusive, but do not mean screening

An NYU pediatrician and researcher writes in JAMA Pediatrics that new recommendations on testing children for lead are inconclusive, but do not mean that we should abandon screening children for elevated lead levels.

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USPSTF recommendation statement on screening for elevated blood lead levels in children, pregnant women

This recommendation from the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) updates its 2006 statement regarding screening for elevated blood lead levels in children and pregnant women.

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What is effect of workplace wellness program on employee health, job performance, economics?

Employees of a large multistate warehouse retail company working in locations with a workplace wellness program reported some better health behaviors after 18 months than coworkers in locations without wellness programming. However, there were no statistically significant differences in other measures.

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Bacteria harness viruses to distinguish friend from foe

Bacterial cells that normally colonize our guts can distinguish themselves from other bacterial species using what's traditionally considered their enemy — a virus. Researchers report April 16, 2019, in the journal Cell Reports that some bacteria use viruses that have infected them (i.e., phages) for self-recognition and thereby show greater fitness, repelling competitors that lack this adaptatio

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In mice, feeding time influences the liver's biological clock

The timing of food intake is a major factor driving the rhythmic expression of most genes in the mouse liver, researchers report April 16, 2019 in the journal Cell Reports. The findings demonstrate that body-wide signals driven by rhythmic food intake significantly contribute to driving rhythms in liver metabolic functions and gene expression independently of the liver and clock.

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Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment

Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. It is also a leading cause of cancer-related death in children and young adults. Scientists have 'reverse engineered' brain cancer stem cells gene by gene, uncovering multiple potential targets for this hard-to-treat cancer.

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New study proves for the first time that intestinal bacteria grow in pregnant women

In a new study, published in Cell Reports, researchers at the Azrieli Faculty of Medicine of Bar-Ilan University found that progesterone regulates the microbial composition during pregnancy in a way that may facilitate appropriate transmission of beneficial species to the newborn.

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Viruses Have a Secret, Altruistic Social Life – Facts So Romantic

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine’s Abstractions blog. Researchers are beginning to understand the ways in which viruses strategically manipulate and cooperate with one another. Photograph by nobeastsofierce / Flickr Social organisms come in all shapes and sizes, from the obviously gregarious ones like mammals and birds down to the more cryptic socializers like bacteria. Evolutionary

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Elon Musk’s Question for Super-Smart AI: What’s Outside the Simulation?

Wake Up, Neo In an interview with MIT researcher Lex Fridman, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk reiterated his belief that we’re all living inside a simulation. When Fridman asked him what his first question would be for the first-ever artificial general intelligence system, Musk replied: “What’s outside the simulation?” Pong of my People Musk has floated the possibility that we’re all living in a “

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Alleged AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 50th Anniversary Edition Processor Leaked

Well, what do we have here? It appears as though AMD is getting ready to launch a special version of its Ryzen 7 2700X processor to commemorate 50 years in the semiconductor business, a milestone …

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Challenging the conventional wisdom about the Canadian electorate

It is well-known that the major Canadian political parties now use political marketing tools to segment the electorate and target specific groups of voters. According to a new study appearing in the journal Heliyon. published by Elsevier, positional issues play a greater role in Canadian electoral politics than previously assumed.

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First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

This could be a crucial year for the powerful gene-editing technique CRISPR as researchers start testing it in patients to treat diseases such as cancer, blindness and sickle cell disease. (Image credit: Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library)

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Three-year trial shows support for recognizing peer reviewers

Three-year trial shows support for recognizing peer reviewers Three-year trial shows support for recognizing peer reviewers, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01162-1 Thousands of Nature referees have chosen to be publicly acknowledged.

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Help NASA’s Laser-Scanning Satellite by Measuring Trees With Your Phone

ICESat-2 measures elevation from orbit as part of NASA's climate research, but the agency would like some data from the ground to verify those readings. So, it's rolled out a new tool in the GLOBE Observer app for iPhone and Android. The post Help NASA’s Laser-Scanning Satellite by Measuring Trees With Your Phone appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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New study proves for the first time that intestinal bacteria grow in pregnant women

Bar-Ilan University researchers have found that these bacteria "sense" pregnancy and "understand" the need to move to the next generation in order to assist babies in breaking down the sugar in mother's milk.

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Bacteria harness viruses to distinguish friend from foe

Bacterial cells that normally colonize our guts can distinguish themselves from other bacterial species using what's traditionally considered their enemy—a virus. Researchers report April 16 in the journal Cell Reports that some bacteria use viruses that have infected them (i.e., phages) for self-recognition and thereby show greater fitness, repelling competitors that lack this adaptation.

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In mice, feeding time influences the liver's biological clock

The timing of food intake is a major factor driving the rhythmic expression of most genes in the mouse liver, researchers report April 16th in the journal Cell Reports. The findings demonstrate that body-wide signals driven by rhythmic food intake significantly contribute to driving rhythms in liver metabolic functions and gene expression independently of the liver and clock.

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Billions at stake as Apple vs Qualcomm trial begins

How much are iPhone chips worth? That more or less is the question to be decided by a US court as Apple seeks billions in damages from former chip supplier Qualcomm.

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New study proves for the first time that intestinal bacteria grow in pregnant women

Bar-Ilan University researchers have found that these bacteria "sense" pregnancy and "understand" the need to move to the next generation in order to assist babies in breaking down the sugar in mother's milk.

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Bacteria harness viruses to distinguish friend from foe

Bacterial cells that normally colonize our guts can distinguish themselves from other bacterial species using what's traditionally considered their enemy—a virus. Researchers report April 16 in the journal Cell Reports that some bacteria use viruses that have infected them (i.e., phages) for self-recognition and thereby show greater fitness, repelling competitors that lack this adaptation.

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In mice, feeding time influences the liver's biological clock

The timing of food intake is a major factor driving the rhythmic expression of most genes in the mouse liver, researchers report April 16th in the journal Cell Reports. The findings demonstrate that body-wide signals driven by rhythmic food intake significantly contribute to driving rhythms in liver metabolic functions and gene expression independently of the liver and clock.

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New Samsung handset: Innovation hinges on folding screen

When Samsung said this year it would launch a smartphone with a folding screen, the big question was whether the innovation was something people actually wanted or needed.

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Climate change to blame for Hurricane Maria's extreme rainfall

Hurricane Maria dropped more rain on Puerto Rico than any storm to hit the island since 1956, a feat due mostly to the effects of human-caused climate warming, new research finds.

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Could robots make a documentary about a 5K race?

A 5K race can offer both victory and heartbreak, but capturing those moments on video requires both planning ahead and making on-the-spot decisions about where the camera operators should be.

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Six-decade plankton study charts rise of ocean plastic waste

Handwritten journals from 50s show how plastic problem has grown to global emergency A trove of data showing when the Atlantic began choking with plastic has been uncovered in the handwritten logbooks of a little-known but doggedly persistent plankton study dating back to the middle of the last century. From fishing twine found in the ocean in the 50s, then a first carrier bag in 1965, it reflect

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How Donald Trump Resurrected the 9/11 Loyalty Test

Updated April 16, 2019 at 1:01 p.m. EST President Donald Trump has brought the 9/11 loyalty test back to the center of American politics. Late last week, the president tweeted—and pinned—a short clip of Representative Ilhan Omar of Minnesota speaking at an event, where she described the September 11 attacks as “some people did something.” The speech was spliced with footage of the Twin Towers bei

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Atlantic Readers on Reading (and Rereading) Slaughterhouse-Five

The Meaning of Slaughterhouse-Five , 50 Years Later “Fifty years have passed since the publication of Slaughterhouse-Five, ” James Parker wrote last month . “It’s the same age as me. And the older I get, and the more lumps fall off my brain, the more I find that rereading is the thing.” Like James Parker, I delight in the rereading of Slaughterhouse-Five , which I do every year with my high-schoo

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Challenging the conventional wisdom about the Canadian electorate

According to a new study appearing in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, positional issues play a greater role in Canadian electoral politics than previously assumed.

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Ocean plastic increased 10-fold since 2000

British data finds fishing industry a major contributor to marine plastic pollution. Nick Carne reports.

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The artificial muscles that will power robots of the future | Christoph Keplinger

Robot brains are getting smarter and smarter, but their bodies are often still clunky and unwieldy. Mechanical engineer Christoph Keplinger is designing a new generation of soft, agile robot inspired by a masterpiece of evolution: biological muscle. See these "artificial muscles" expand and contract like the real thing and reach superhuman speeds — and learn how they could power prosthetics that

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What it means to 'know your audience' when communicating about science

Communication experts love to tell people to know their audience, but it is not always clear what they're meant to know.

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The 50 most common occupations and their likelihood of automation

submitted by /u/Artemistical [link] [comments]

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Do you think AGI is more likely to destroy or save humanity?

Or anything in between. submitted by /u/Onearmplanche [link] [comments]

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The Private Space Industry Is Breaking Out of Earth’s Orbit

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Artificial intelligence can help with medical treatments, not miracle

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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What Do We Really Know About Neanderthals?

Revolutionary discoveries in archaeology show that the species long maligned as knuckle-dragging brutes deserve a new place in the human story

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How partisan politics could take a bite out of your wallet

When individuals lack the skill or time to build an investment portfolio, they frequently invest in mutual funds. Ideally, mutual funds maximize client wealth by investing their clients' assets in funds that best match the client's investment strategy (low-risk, short-term, etc.).

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Study finds white sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present

New research from Monterey Bay Aquarium and partner institutions published today in Nature Scientific Reports challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in the ocean. The study "Killer Whales Redistribute White Shark Foraging Pressure On Seals" shows how the great white hunter becomes the hunted, and the elephant seal, the common prey of sharks and orcas, emerg

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Tree dens play a critical role in panda lifestyle

In a paper recently published in the journal Biological Conservation, an international team of conservationists highlights the importance of tree dens for pandas raising infants in native habitats. The study, conducted in Fengtongzai and Foping Nature Reserves in China, analyzed the difference in microhabitats of cave dens and tree dens used by female pandas. The result of the research suggests th

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The dirt on soil loss from the Midwest floods

As devastating images of the 2019 Midwest floods fade from view, an insidious and longer-term problem is emerging across its vast plains: The loss of topsoil that much of the nation's food supply relies on.

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Marijuana legalization – a rare issue where women are more conservative than men

Surveys show that on issue after issue, women are more liberal than men, save for one: Men are more likely than women to support the legalization of marijuana.

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Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children

Children of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy could be at increased risk of type 1 diabetes themselves, according to a new study led by a team at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) that was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ).

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Study finds natural variation in sex ratios at birth and sex ratio inflation in 12 countries

An international team of researchers, led by UMass Amherst biostatistician Leontine Alkema and her former Ph.D. student Fengqing Chao, developed a new estimation method for assessing natural variations in the sex ratio at birth (SRB) for all countries in the world.

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Climate change to blame for Hurricane Maria's extreme rainfall

Hurricane Maria dropped more rain on Puerto Rico than any storm to hit the island since 1956, a feat due mostly to the effects of human-caused climate warming, new research finds.

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A thorough characterization of structural variants in human genomes

Human genomes vary quite a bit from individual to individual. These differences include single nucleotide changes, or "spelling mistakes" in the DNA sequence, but even more variation comes from structural variants, which include additions, deletions and rearrangements of large segments of DNA. A recent study used multiple advanced technologies to dive deeper than ever before to comprehensively cha

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Study reveals brain marker for angry dreams

Researchers have identified a pattern of brain activity that reflects anger experienced during dreaming according to a new study carried out on healthy adults and published in The Journal of Neuroscience. The study helps to clarify the neural basis of dream emotions.

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Novel biomarkers for noninvasive diagnosis of NAFLD-related fibrosis

With an estimated 25% of people worldwide affected by nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), there is a large unmet need for accurate, noninvasive measures to enhance early diagnosis and screening of hepatic fibrosis.

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Sony enters Japan's taxi-hailing market with S.Ride app

The S in S.Ride stands for “simple, smart, and speedy,” according to a company press release. The app actually comes from Minna no Taxi, which translates as "Everybody's Taxi," a joint venture …

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Study finds white sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present

New research from Monterey Bay Aquarium and partner institutions published today in Nature Scientific Reports challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in the ocean. The study "Killer Whales Redistribute White Shark Foraging Pressure On Seals" shows how the great white hunter becomes the hunted, and the elephant seal, the common prey of sharks and orcas, emerg

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Tree dens play a critical role in panda lifestyle

In a paper recently published in the journal Biological Conservation, an international team of conservationists highlights the importance of tree dens for pandas raising infants in native habitats. The study, conducted in Fengtongzai and Foping Nature Reserves in China, analyzed the difference in microhabitats of cave dens and tree dens used by female pandas. The result of the research suggests th

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Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?

As growth makes neighborhoods more crowded for humans, it's also concentrating carnivores like bobcats and coyotes into the remaining green spaces, leading them to interact with each other more frequently than they do in wild areas, according to research in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C.

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Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?

As growth makes neighborhoods more crowded for humans, it's also concentrating carnivores like bobcats and coyotes into the remaining green spaces, leading them to interact with each other more frequently than they do in wild areas, according to research in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Washington, D.C.

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The high price endangered animals pay for charisma

"Wanted: beautiful, intelligent companion well-versed in the art of conversation." It's a familiar story, but don't expect a fairy-tale ending. In this instance, we're talking about a transaction that condemns one of the protagonists to life imprisonment in a cage – or an untimely death in transit at the hands of traffickers. Not exactly a match made in heaven.

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The high price endangered animals pay for charisma

"Wanted: beautiful, intelligent companion well-versed in the art of conversation." It's a familiar story, but don't expect a fairy-tale ending. In this instance, we're talking about a transaction that condemns one of the protagonists to life imprisonment in a cage – or an untimely death in transit at the hands of traffickers. Not exactly a match made in heaven.

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Jake Can’t Find the Crab | Deadliest Catch

After pushing Sig and Mandy out of the mud pit, Captain Jake Anderson learns the crab are on the move as well. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/

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Signs of despair rise among Gen X-ers

Indicators of despair—depression, suicidal ideation, drug use, and alcohol abuse—are rising among Americans in their late 30s and early 40s across most demographic groups, according to new research. These findings suggest that the increase in “deaths of despair” researchers have observed among low-educated middle-aged white Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964) in recent studies may begin to impact the y

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The Children of the Children of Columbine

A fter 20 years of telling it, the story of the day you survived a school shooting can get a little rote, admits Renee Oakley, 35. She and her husband, Ben, 36, both lived through the shooting at Columbine High School on April 20, 1999. “I’ve always been able to tell it as though I’m reading a story to somebody,” Renee told me over a car Bluetooth speaker as she drove through Seattle with Ben, wh

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Enough With the Mouse Behavioral Models?

This piece in STAT is well worth a read. The author, Adam Rosenberg of Rodin Therapeutics, is ready to ditch rodent-centric models for human CNS disease, and I can see where he’s coming from. I’ve often said that when I think back on my Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia drug discovery days (back when I was first starting out), and I remember all those compounds I made whose crucial assays were things

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Corals in the Red Sea offer long-term view of the south Asian summer monsoon

When it comes to understanding future climate, the south Asian summer monsoon offers a paradox. Most climate models predict that as human-caused global warming increases, monsoon rain and wind will become more intense — but weather data collected in the region shows that rainfall has actually declined over the past 50 years.

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'PRO-cision Medicine' aims to turn patient-reported outcome ratings into personalized care

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are an important target for efforts to improve healthcare — focusing on the most important problems and outcomes identified by patients themselves. A special supplement to Medical Care presents a toolkit of methods to help personalize care for patients with cancer using a 'PRO-cision Medicine' approach. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolte

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Mass drug administrations can grant population protection against malaria

Researchers have provided the first evidence that mass drug administration (MDA) can grant community-level protection against Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) malaria.

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Every third housing estate resident feels trapped

Involuntary staying, a type of housing trap, is a common experience among people living on housing estates, since around one in three residents feel that they are trapped in their current residential arrangements. More than half of them would like to move away from their current neighborhoods. According to the residents own estimation, the most common cause for involuntary staying is economic but

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The scientists are developing a technology for water purification by electric discharges

The environment around us is becoming increasingly polluted. This includes one of our most precious natural resources — water. Clean water is essential to human survival. Due to increased pollution, water treatment methods are becoming increasingly important as well.

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Microscopy in the body

Biotechnologists, physicists, and medical researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed technology for microscopic imaging in living organisms. A miniaturized multi-photon microscope, which could be used in an endoscope in future, excites the body's own molecules to illuminate and enables cells and tissue structures to be imaged without the use of synthetic

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Researchers identify a new biomarker for personalized treatments against cancer

Many treatments against cancer, such as TRAIL, aim to trigger a type of cell death known as apoptosis.A team at IRB Barcelona, headed by Antonio Zorzano, has demonstrated that the protein TP53INP2 induces apoptosis in chemotherapy treatments.

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Boeing crashes and Uber collision show passenger safety relies on corporate promises, not regulators' tests

Advanced technologies deliver benefits every day. But, sometimes interactions with technology can go awry and lead to disaster.

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Malaysia arrests Vietnam poachers, seizes tiger, bear parts

Malaysian authorities have arrested two suspected poachers from Vietnam and seized body parts from tigers and bears, a minister said Tuesday, as the country clamps down on rampant wildlife trafficking.

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The Electrifying Mission of the First Private Lunar Spacecraft

In September 2007, I was joined on stage by Larry Page, Buzz Aldrin, and the deputy administrator of NASA to announce a $30 million Google Lunar XPRIZE . The challenge we set was for a private team to build and launch a vehicle that could fly and land on the Moon, send back photos and videos, rove half a kilometer, and send back more photos and videos. Here is a throwback video to the announcemen

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Malaysia arrests Vietnam poachers, seizes tiger, bear parts

Malaysian authorities have arrested two suspected poachers from Vietnam and seized body parts from tigers and bears, a minister said Tuesday, as the country clamps down on rampant wildlife trafficking.

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Maths shows the nature of 'tipping points' for climate and eco crises

Humans need to be wary of breaching a 'point of no return' that leads to ecological disaster such as loss of rainforests or irreversible climate change, according to the most detailed study of its kind.

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The new plan for destroying invasive pythons

Male pythons surgically implanted with inch-long radio transmitters that are then tracked by plane every two weeks. The hope is the male will lead to a female.

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New method to create ultrafast 3-D images of nanostructures

Lensless microscopy with X-rays, or coherent diffractive imaging, is a promising approach. It allows researchers to analyse complex three-dimensional structures, which frequently exist in nature, from a dynamic perspective. Whilst two-dimensional images can already be generated quickly and in an efficient manner, creating 3-D images still presents a challenge. Generally, three-dimensional images o

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Statins may not lower cholesterol enough in half those who take them

A study of more than 165,000 people suggests that fewer than half of those who start taking statins reach cholesterol targets within two years

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Bankers are already preparing for a world without cash

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PS5: Everything we know about new PlayStation, including release date, features, price and backwards compatibility

When is the PS5 out? What will it look like? Will it play PlayStation 4 games? And how much faster is it going to be? Everything that has been revealed about the new console – and what hasn't

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Sequencing of snailfish from Mariana Trench reveals clues on how it adapted to live in such deep water

A large team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has learned more about a type of snailfish that lives in the deepest parts of the ocean. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the researchers describe sequencing the genome of the fish and what they learned from their study.

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Amid intense drought, deadly rains lash Afghanistan

Torrential rainstorms have lashed drought-stricken Afghanistan in recent days, bringing widespread flooding that has killed at least five people and washed away homes including in the capital Kabul, officials said Tuesday.

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Corals in the Red Sea offer long-term view of south Asian summer monsoon

When it comes to understanding future climate, the south Asian summer monsoon offers a paradox. Most climate models predict that as human-caused global warming increases, monsoon rain and wind will become more intense—but weather data collected in the region shows that rainfall has actually declined over the past 50 years.

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Why climate change will dull autumn leaf displays

Every autumn we are treated to one of nature's finest seasonal annual transitions: leaf colour change and fall.

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The new plan for destroying invasive pythons

Male pythons surgically implanted with inch-long radio transmitters that are then tracked by plane every two weeks. The hope is the male will lead to a female.

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Sequencing of snailfish from Mariana Trench reveals clues on how it adapted to live in such deep water

A large team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China has learned more about a type of snailfish that lives in the deepest parts of the ocean. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution, the researchers describe sequencing the genome of the fish and what they learned from their study.

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Once upon a time in America

Digging in poverty reveals the wealth of nations.

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The internet of thoughts is coming

A bot-enabled interface between human brains and cloud storage is likely within decades, a team of researchers say. Andrew Masterson reports.

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The Stunning Loneliness of Megacities at Night

Photographer Aristotle Roufanis' large-scale images are made using thousands of photographs of metropolises after dark.

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Device tests thousands of stem cells super fast

A new “lab-on-a-chip” can examine thousands of individual live cells over a weeklong period, performing experiments that would take more than 1 million steps in a laboratory. The credit-card-sized, microfluidic device not only saves time and money, but also offers a new glimpse into how single stem cells react to different molecules and environments. When researchers examined neural stem cells on

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Bernie Sanders Pierces the Fox News Bubble

On Monday night, Fox News aired a town hall with Bernie Sanders, a front-runner in the 2020 Democratic primaries. The self-described “democratic socialist” took a risk appearing on the populist-right network. It paid off. Overall, the senator from Vermont set forth several of his platform’s most popular planks, avoided gaffes, and answered almost every question to audience applause. Three moments

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Former NASA astronaut Owen Garriott dies

Former NASA astronaut Owen Garriott has died at his home in Huntsville, Alabama.

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The Private Space Industry Is Breaking Out of Earth’s Orbit

Hopes for the first ever privately-funded moon landing were dashed last Thursday after the Israeli spacecraft Beresheet crashed on its final descent. But despite the disappointment, the episode signals the start of a new phase in private space exploration as it breaks out of Earth’s orbit. The Israeli effort was led by non-profit SpaceIL , which formed to compete in the $30 million Google Lunar X

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How inflammation causes gastric cancer

Researchers have solved the decades-old mystery of how stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer. Using mouse models and human cancer cell lines, they showed that inflammation resulting from bacterial infection leads to the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, which ultimately form gastric tumors. By blocking the protein pathway responsible for this proliferation, they prev

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Scientists crack the code to regenerate plant tissues

A group of scientists from Tokyo University of Science have discovered a new way to regenerate flowering plant tissues, opening possibilities of mitigating global food shortage problem.

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What Earth's gravity reveals about climate change

On March 17, 2002, the satellite duo GRACE was launched to map the Earth's gravity field more precisely than ever before. The measurements make it possible to monitor the terrestrial water cycle, the mass balance of ice sheets and glaciers or changes in sea levels. This helps to better understand important trends in the global climate system. A review in the journal Nature Climate Change now prese

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Fast and selective optical heating for functional nanomagnetic metamaterials

In a recent article published in Nanoscale, researchers from the Nanomagnetism group at nanoGUNE demonstrate the use of hybrid magnetic-plasmonic elements to facilitate contactless and selective temperature control in magnetic functional metamaterials.

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When it comes to learning, what's better: The carrot or the stick?

Does the potential to win or lose money influence the confidence one has in one's own decisions? Researchers (UNIGE) investigated confidence bias in a learning context through a system of monetary punishment and reward. They demonstrated that we become more confident in our choices when learning to seek rewards. However, this confidence evolves into over-confidence. Moreover, the monetary gains ma

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The little-known bush foods about to change the world

In Africa and Australia quiet slow-food revolutions are underway, bringing equality, social justice, nutrient security – and awesome flavours. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Posthumous Cassini data sheds light on Titan’s lakes

Liquid hydrocarbons to the north and south of Saturn’s moon formed differently. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Stolen tomb fragment returned to Egypt

Expert eye notices vital missing piece of an ancient prize. Nick Carne reports

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Grid unlock: simple fixes, better modelling are keys to reliable energy supply

Two presentations at a recent conference point to a more efficient, less expensive power supply. Richard A Lovett reports.

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Hovedspring tilladt: Svømmehaller med 50 meters dybde på vej

I Polen bliver svømmehal med 45 meters dybde åben for borgerne, mens briternes svømmehal på 50 meter er målrettet olie- og rumfartsindustrien.

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Scientists Might Have Just Figured Out Where Nightmares Come From

Nightmare Factory Nothing ruins a good night’s sleep like a dream about your teeth falling out or taking a calculus test while naked. Thankfully, scientists are getting to the bottom of bad dreams, according to new research that tracks the neurological basis of nightmares. Biological Culprit The research, expected to be published Tuesday in the journal JNeurosci , tracks down which part of the br

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These Wisps Around Black Holes Could Reveal How the Cosmic Beasts Eat

The international team responsible for the first-ever image of a black hole's shadow already has plans to take a better, more detailed image.

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To Prevent Women from Dying in Childbirth, First Stop Blaming Them

Two-thirds of all U.S. maternal deaths are considered preventable. Racism—not race—is a critical factor — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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White sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present

New research challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in the ocean. The research team documented encounters between white sharks and orcas at Southeast Farallon Island off California. In every case examined by the researchers, white sharks fled the island when orcas arrived and didn't return there until the following season. Elephant seal colonies in the Fara

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Tree dens play a critical role in panda lifestyle

An international team of conservationists highlights the importance of tree dens as a choice for pandas raising infants in native habitats. The study analyzed the difference in microhabitats of cave dens and tree dens used by female pandas. The result of the research suggests that conservation efforts need to take into account species use of microhabitats and habitat features as well as overall ec

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Common sleep myths compromise good sleep and health

People often say they can get by on five or fewer hours of sleep, that snoring is harmless, and that having a drink helps you to fall asleep. These are, in fact, among the most widely held myths about sleeping that not only shape poor habits, but may also pose a significant public health threat.

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Certain microbes may reduce allergy-like reactions in many people

A small percentage of humans can suffer allergy-like reactions to certain varieties of ripened cheese due to histamine, a byproduct of the prolonged fermentation process. A researcher is studying bacterial strains that could reduce histamine, allowing susceptible diners to enjoy the cheese without unpleasant side effects.

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Facing up to injustice in genome science

Facing up to injustice in genome science Facing up to injustice in genome science, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01166-x Researchers from under-represented groups are making genomics more inclusive by working with communities that have been overlooked or abused.

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Indigenous groups look to ancient DNA to bring their ancestors home

Indigenous groups look to ancient DNA to bring their ancestors home Indigenous groups look to ancient DNA to bring their ancestors home, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01167-w Local communities and geneticists are working together to sequence DNA from remains that were taken from their homelands decades ago.

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US sees sharp rise in number of kids swallowing small objects

US sees sharp rise in number of kids swallowing small objects US sees sharp rise in number of kids swallowing small objects, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01202-w Coins remain the most common item ingested by children under the age of six.

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Working with marginalized groups demands time and respect — and researchers must give both

Working with marginalized groups demands time and respect — and researchers must give both Working with marginalized groups demands time and respect — and researchers must give both, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01163-0 All those in the research enterprise must support efforts to conduct just, equitable and inclusive research.

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Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water

Researchers have demonstrated a successful prototype of one critical component for affordable small-scale desalination: an inexpensive solar evaporator, made of wood.

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New study explains how inflammation causes gastric cancer

Researchers from Kanazawa University and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development have solved the decades-old mystery of how stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer. Using mouse models and human cancer cell lines, they showed that inflammation resulting from bacterial infection leads to the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, which ultimately form gastric tu

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Why comic-style information is better at preparing patients for cardiac catheterization

Before undergoing surgery, patients must be fully informed about what the procedure entails. The complex nature of the information involved means that patients often feel overwhelmed rather than well informed. Researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to show that patients scheduled to undergo cardiac catheterization may find comic-style information helpful. The research

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Astronomers discover third planet in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system

The SDSU-led research has been published in the Astronomical Journal.

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The Atlantic Creating Podcast Examining Hurricane Katrina, Hosted by Vann Newkirk

Washington, D.C. (April 16, 2019)— The Atlantic is beginning production on an ambitious narrative podcast examining Hurricane Katrina, reported and hosted by staff writer Vann R. Newkirk II , under the leadership of executive producer Katherine Wells . The podcast will be a limited-run series and will launch in the fall. “Katherine is a tremendously talented producer and editor, with a deep under

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Razer's new eGPU box packs more power and Chroma RGB support

Razer's back with another external GPU case, and this time it's beefier than ever. Like other eGPUs, the Razer Core X Chroma is designed to bring desktop-level graphics to …

4h

Logitech’s latest universal remote gives Alexa the keys to your home theater

The device costs $250 and is available starting today.

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How to stay safe on your motorcycle without looking like a stormtrooper

Technology Tips for a casual look. We look at some options for a protective, yet casual gear kit for your next ride.

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New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible

Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible. This development has the potential to improve battery performance for consumer electronics, solar grid storage, and electric vehicles.

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Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water

Researchers have demonstrated a successful prototype of one critical component for affordable small-scale desalination: an inexpensive solar evaporator, made of wood.

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Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?

A new citizen science study shows how urbanization may affect interactions between carnivores in small suburban forest patches, using camera trap images from Raleigh, N.C., and Washington, D.C.

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Hjärta utskrivet med 3D-printer

Israeliska forskare har visat upp ett hjärta skapat med en 3D-skrivare. Hjärtat är stort som ett kaninhjärta och består av alla nödvändiga delar. Men det är en lång väg kvar tills det fungerar på plats i en människa.

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Astronomers discover third planet in the Kepler-47 circumbinary system

Astronomers have discovered a third planet in the Kepler-47 system, securing the system's title as the most interesting of the binary-star worlds. Using data from NASA's Kepler space telescope, a team of researchers, led by astronomers at San Diego State University, detected the new Neptune-to-Saturn-size planet orbiting between two previously known planets.

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The first direct search for inelastic boosted dark matter with a terrestrial detector

A team of researchers in the Republic of Korea, the U.S., Brazil, Indonesia and the U.K. have recently carried out a direct search for inelastic boosted dark matter (IBDM) using a terrestrial detector. Their study, published in Physical Review Letters (PRL), is the first ever to search experimentally for IBDM using a terrestrial detector.

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What Is the Point of a Period?

Age-old taboos against menstruation have led to a lack of research on how women's cycles work, with serious consequences for their health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists: Tech Is Giving Humanity a Shorter Attention Span

Pay Attention A new study published in Nature Communications on Monday found that humanity’s collective attention span is getting shorter — a remarkable side effect likely attributable to technology. “The world has become increasingly well connected in the past decades,” researcher Philipp Lorenz-Spreen said in a press release . “This means that content is increasing in volume, which exhausts our

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Bacterial mix helps predict future change

Understanding how bacterial metacommunities homogenize could help scientists predict future changes to ecosystems.

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This oral appliance could help you (and your partner) sleep better

Researchers measured a novel treatment for sleep apnea developed at Hiroshima University Hospital with positive results. By measuring patients lying down flat, the researchers stimulated sleep conditions and measured the patient's airways using 3D imaging. The study confirmed that the treatment is effective at opening the airways and warrants further collaboration between dentists and doctors in t

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Uninformed, overwhelmed clients; unrealistic agency expectations

Contracted private agencies provide approximately 33 percent of foster care placement services and 59 percent of family preservation services. State child welfare agencies are increasingly turning to them for a range of services. While turnover and burnout among child welfare case managers is well-understood, little is known about the challenges private agency therapists experience working in chil

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How partisan politics could take a bite out of your wallet

mutual funds maximize client wealth by investing their clients' assets in funds that best match the client's investment strategy (low-risk, short-term, etc.).However, research by SDSU finance professor, Dr. Yaoyi Xi, and Dr. M. Babajide Wintoki of the University of Kansas, indicates that one of the factors influencing how mutual fund managers invest their clients' money may have more to do with ho

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Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings

Eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients.

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Rutgers researchers discover crucial link between brain and gut stem cells

Researchers at Rutgers University have identified a new factor that is essential for maintaining the stem cells in the brain and gut and whose loss may contribute to anxiety and cognitive disorders and to gastrointestinal diseases.

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A biosynthetic dual-core cell computer

Researchers have integrated two CRISPR-Cas9-based core processors into human cells. This represents a huge step towards creating powerful biocomputers.

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Fertile Ground: The Long-Neglected Science of Female Reproductive Health

When the discussion of reproductive health is dominated by the political will to control it, gaps in medical research get overshadowed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Unhealthful Data Gaps: Female Reproductive Health

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Many popular tech products on Amazon are boosted by fake reviews, an investigation finds

The consumer education group called Which? found a lot of tech categories on Amazon are flooded with products from virtually unknown brands, all boosted by product reviews that appear to be …

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Speedgate Is the First Sport Created By AI

Nvidia and a design agency called AKQA fed neural networks data about sports that already exist, and they came up with a new one. The post Speedgate Is the First Sport Created By AI appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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We Could Soon Watch a Black Hole in Action, Gobbling Up Matter in Real Time

The huge team behind the Event Horizon Telescope already made news with their first image of a black hole. But they've got bigger ambitions.

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DNA afslører: Stonehenge blev rejst af 'tyrkiske' bønder

De stenaldermennesker, som byggede det britiske sten-monument, stammer fra Anatolien.

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A biosynthetic dual-core cell computer

Researchers have integrated two CRISPR-Cas9-based core processors into human cells. This represents a huge step towards creating powerful biocomputers.

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Half of patients on statins fail to reach 'healthy' cholesterol level after 2 years

Half of patients prescribed statins in primary care fail to reach 'healthy' cholesterol levels after two years of treatment with these drugs.

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Mid-life resting heart rate of 75 plus beats/minute linked to doubling in early death risk

A resting heart rate of 75 beats per minute in mid-life is linked to a doubling in the risk of an early death from all causes — at least among men.

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Physicists improve understanding of heat and particle flow in the edge of a fusion device

Physicists have discovered valuable information about how plasma flows at the edge inside doughnut-shaped fusion devices. The findings mark an encouraging sign for the development of machines to produce fusion energy for generating electricity without creating long-term hazardous waste.

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The Odd Physics of Rey's Backflip in *Star Wars: Episode IX*

The trailer for *Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker* didn't disappoint: The universe's physics remain as quirky as ever.

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Lil Nas X's 'Old Town Road' Already Encapsulates 2019

The song belongs to a species of rare musical supernovae that have the power to bring the internet together around one anthem.

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Mysterious star 21 Comae reinvestigated with MOST satellite

Astronomers have employed the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope to conduct a new investigation of the enigmatic variable star 21 Comae whose nature is still widely debated. Results of the new study, presented in a paper published April 9, could help us better understand this mysterious object.

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The Coming Obsolescence of Animal Meat

SAN FRANCISCO—The thought I had when the $100 chicken nugget hit my expectant tongue was the one cartoon villains have when they entrap a foreign critter and roast him over a spit: It tastes like chicken . That’s because it was chicken—albeit chicken that had never laid an egg, sprouted a feather, or been swept through an electrified-water bath for slaughter. This chicken began life as a primordi

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The forgotten scientists who paved the way to the double helix

The forgotten scientists who paved the way to the double helix The forgotten scientists who paved the way to the double helix, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01176-9 Jan Witkowski lauds a book highlighting half-obscured researchers whose work led to the structure of DNA.

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01179-6 How Nature reported the working conditions of deep-sea fishers in 1969, and the calorific content of German and British diets during the First World War.

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Newly translated Cherokee cave writings reveal sacred messages

Cherokee inscriptions highlight the tribe’s rituals nearly 200 years ago in what’s now a tourist cave in Alabama.

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DNDi and Atomwise collaborate to advance drug development using AI for neglected diseases

Atomwise Inc., a biotech company using artificial intelligence (AI) for drug discovery, and the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi), a not-for-profit research and development organization working to deliver new treatments for neglected diseases, today announced that promising drug-like compounds have been discovered in a program to develop first-in-class treatments for Chagas disease. T

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Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives

Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that.Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in pat

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Saturn’s Moon Titan is Covered in Earth-Like Lakes

Alien Lake District By analyzing data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft’s last flyby in 2017, scientists found that Saturn’s largest moon Titan is covered with lakes similar to those found on Earth. Precipitation refills some of the lakes once they drain over time, just like on Earth, confirming a long-standing theory about the moon’s geology. But there’s one obvious difference from Earth: Titan’s l

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Maps reveal massive clouds in star-forming region

Astronomers have made the first high-resolution, radio telescope observations of the molecular clouds within a huge star-forming region of the outer Milky Way. “This region is behind a nearby cloud of dust and gas,” says Charles Kerton, an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State University and a member of the study team. “The cloud blocks the light and so we have to use infrare

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Go Subterranean With This DARPA Challenge

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Unhealthful Data Gaps: Female Reproductive Health

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Inconceivable: The Science of Women's Reproductive Health

What we don’t know, why we don’t know it, and where we go from here — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Aphid soldiers found to sacrifice themselves to protect their colony from predators

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found that soldier aphids willingly sacrifice their own lives when they attempt to protect their colony from predators. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group outlines their study of the small insects and what they found.

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Climate change threatens endangered sparrows

A new study finds that some sparrow species will likely go extinct within the century due to climate change.

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Google searches reveal popular bird species

Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest.

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Aphid soldiers found to sacrifice themselves to protect their colony from predators

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Japan has found that soldier aphids willingly sacrifice their own lives when they attempt to protect their colony from predators. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group outlines their study of the small insects and what they found.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Kan vi redde klimaet med spejle i rummet og aerosoler i atmosfæren?

En læser vil gerne vide, om vi kan nå at redde Jorden, hvis vi bruger geoengineering? Lektor på DTU Kemiteknik vurderer muligheden.

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Bigger food portions make preschoolers overeat

Preschoolers may not be as good at resisting large portions of everyday foods as previously thought, according to a new study. Researchers examined whether the portion size effect—the tendency to eat more when portions are larger—affects children between the ages of three and five. The researchers found that when they served the children larger portions of typical meals or snacks, they consumed m

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The Least Popular Birds in the U.S. Deserve Some Love

When I was in sixth grade, the cool girls at my school drew up a document they called the popularity pyramid. Everyone was sorted into a handful of social categories; suffice it to say, I, along with the plurality of the class, was relegated to the lowest tranche and designated a Loser Beyond Belief. Now a pair of scientists are doing something similar with the birds of the United States. In a pa

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Sex-selective abortions may have stopped the birth of 23 million girls

A huge analysis suggests sex-selective abortions have led to at least 23 million fewer girls born worldwide, but birth ratios are now returning to normal

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Tree dens play a critical role in panda lifestyle

In a paper recently published in the journal Biological Conservation, an international team of conservationists highlights the importance of tree dens as a choice for pandas raising infants in native habitats. The study, conducted in Fengtongzai Reserve in China, analyzed the difference in microhabitats of cave dens and tree dens used by female pandas. The result of the research suggests that cons

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Study finds white sharks flee feeding areas when orcas present

New research from Monterey Bay Aquarium and partner institutions published in Nature Scientific Reports challenges the notion that great white sharks are the most formidable predators in the ocean. The research team documented encounters between white sharks and orcas at Southeast Farallon Island off California. In every case examined by the researchers, white sharks fled the island when orcas arr

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Up in arms: Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones

Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones to handle larger payloads.

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Simple test can indicate prolonged symptoms following pediatric sports-related concussion

Researchers have found that abnormal performance on the Romberg balance test can indicate that children and adolescents will experience prolonged symptoms following sports-related concussion.

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Megalith tombs were family graves in European Stone Age

Archeologists have discovered kin relationships among Stone Age individuals buried in megalithic tombs on Ireland and in Sweden. The kin relations can be traced for more than ten generations and suggests that megaliths were graves for kindred groups in Stone Age northwestern Europe.

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Long-term study shows gender-based abortions lead to skewed gender population numbers

A team of researchers from Singapore, the United Nations Population Division, and the U.S. has found that abortions based on gender lead to larger-than-thought distortions in gender ratios. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their five-year study of population and gender ratios and what they found.

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How to know if your heavy period is a sign of a bleeding disorder

Health Though rare, many women with undiagnosed disorders don't realize they're unusual. Up to 15 per cent of these have an underlying bleeding disorder and yet most have never been diagnosed, leaving thousands of women to suffer from a treatable problem.

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Homeschooled children are far more socially engaged than you might think

2011 and 2017, the number of children homeschooled in Australia grew by more than 80%. In Queensland, it nearly quadrupled during this period. This suggests one in 200 Australian students were home educated in 2017.

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Can multiple carnivores coexist in cities?

A new citizen science study shows how urbanization may affect interactions between carnivores in small suburban forest patches, using camera trap images from Raleigh, N.C., and Washington, D.C.

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Microplastics have even been blown into a remote corner of the Pyrenees

Microplastics have been discovered in a remote area of the French Pyrenees mountains. The particles travelled through the atmosphere and were blown into the once pristine region by the wind, according to a new study published in Nature Geoscience.

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Unlocking earth's climate past: A new tracer identifies weathering intensity over time

Researchers at Columbia's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Nanjing University have developed a more accurate way to study the global carbon cycle—specifically, one of the most important ways CO2 is removed from the atmosphere. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, reports on a substantial advance in understanding the process by which minerals called sil

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Spinning new targets for accelerators

Bob Zwaska, a scientist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermilab, was watching a contestant on the cooking show Chopped spin sugar for their dessert when he realized the same principle might be applicable to accelerator targets.

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Cute jumping spider named for children's author

A spider expert at the Manchester Museum has confirmed a new species of jumping spider discovered in a park in Hong Kong. The unique spider bears a striking resemblance to a caterpillar leading it to be named Uroballus Carlei, after author of the ubiquitous children's book The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle. The book celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, the same year that Carle turns 90

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Cute jumping spider named for children's author

A spider expert at the Manchester Museum has confirmed a new species of jumping spider discovered in a park in Hong Kong. The unique spider bears a striking resemblance to a caterpillar leading it to be named Uroballus Carlei, after author of the ubiquitous children's book The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eric Carle. The book celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, the same year that Carle turns 90

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No evidence 'hardened' schools are safe from gun violence

Hardening of schools seems to be a questionable endeavor, given the dearth of evidence regarding effectiveness, says a Ball State University researcher.

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Microplastics found in 'pristine' Pyrenees mountains

Scientists from Scotland and France spent five months monitoring the secluded site in the Pyrenees.

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The 12-hour rule: A guide to healthier headspace

There's no shortage of good advice in the world. But how to actually follow it? When it comes to your own wellbeing, learn to schedule your 'me time' with precision. Only this way, says Jillian Michaels, can you center yourself and retain a sense of joy. The 6 Keys: Unlock Your Genetic Potential for Ageless Strength, Health, and Beauty List Price: $28.00 New From: $13.78 in Stock Used From: $9.49

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FDA Takes On Misleading GMO Labeling

The FDA has released its guidelines for voluntary labeling of food products with respect to whether or not they contain ingredients that either are, or are derived from, genetically modified organisms (GMOs). The guidelines, if nothing else, are a good way for consumers to become more savvy to all the ways in which companies can use food labels that are technically truthful, but are designed to d

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Stock Picks From Space

Israel G. Vargas O ne summer day in 2009, Tom Diamond packed his black Infiniti sedan with a week’s worth of clothes, his synthesizer, and his amp. He had just left his job as a director at a consultancy that helped financial firms monitor their investments. He was heading from Chicago to Buena Vista, Colorado, to visit his brother, Alex, who worked for DigitalGlobe, a company that sells satellit

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Image of the Day: Aphid Nurses

To their own detriment, aphid nymphs release body fluids that clot up a plant's wound caused by insects predating on the gall where the colony lives.

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Extinction Rebellion London protest: Arrests top 200

Extinction Rebellion campaigners enter their second day of blocking traffic in central London.

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Exclusive: What to Expect From Sony's Next-Gen PlayStation

Don't expect it anytime in 2019, but the next PlayStation console is well on its way—and it's packing ray-tracing support and a loadtime-killing solid-state hard drive.

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Zojirushi Multicooker EL-CAC60 Review: A Great Instant Pot-Alternative

The company famous for its rice cookers introduces a 6-quart multicooker to take on the Instant Pots of the world. And it's pretty great.

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How jackdaws remember what they did where and when

Corvids are capable of cognitive feats that almost resemble those of humans. Neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) intend to find out how their brain manages to fulfill such complex tasks – although its structure is completely different than that of the human brain. For a year, the researchers have been training two jackdaws in a complex behavioural experiment, where the birds learn to

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How autonomous ships can lead to safer waterways

Even radar, navigation systems, GPS tracking and radio communications don't prevent ships from colliding. In 2017, collisions and groundings made up nearly 40% of all marine accidents, and over half of the total casualties. These incidents were primarily caused by human error.

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Shocking economics

Modern macroeconomics has failed to produce an understanding of economies in times of crisis. Modern macroeconomics are still based on the assumption of equilibria, but a shock pushes economies out of a state of equilibrium. . This model therefore fails when dealing with economies in times of crisis.

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Indian scientists make deepest radio images of the sun

The sun is the brightest object in the sky, and probably the most studied celestial object. Surprisingly, it still hosts mysteries that scientists have been trying to unravel for decades, for example, the origin of coronal mass ejections which can potentially affect the Earth. Led by Dr. Divya Oberoi and his Ph.D. students, Atul Mohan and Surajit Mondal, a team of scientists at the National Centre

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NEOWISE celebrates five years of asteroid data

NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission released its fifth year of survey data on April 11, 2019. The five years of NEOWISE data have significantly advanced scientists' knowledge of asteroids and comets in the solar system, as well as the stars and galaxies beyond.

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Researchers explore energy-saving catalysts that operate at room temperature

NIST researchers have explored in unprecedented detail a new breed of catalysts that allow some chemical reactions, which normally require high heat, to proceed at room temperature. The energy-saving catalysts use sunlight or another light source to excite localized surface plasmons (LSPs)—oscillations of groups of electrons on the surface of certain metal nanoparticles, such as gold, silver and a

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How jackdaws remember what they did where and when

Corvids are capable of cognitive feats that almost resemble those of humans. Neuroscientists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) intend to find out how their brain manages to fulfill such complex tasks – although its structure is completely different than that of the human brain. For a year, the researchers have been training two jackdaws in a complex behavioural experiment, where the birds learn to

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Renewable is the future

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Samsung Galaxy Fold Impressions!

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Measles has made a shocking return to the US. Can it be stopped?

Measles outbreaks across the US are forcing public health officials to take drastic action to get people vaccinated, threatening fines or even jail time

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Getting a smart tattoo without a needle

A tattoo that is warning you for too many hours of sunlight exposure, or is alerting you for taking your medication? Next to their cosmetic role, tattoos could get new functionality using intelligent ink. That would require more precise and less invasive injection technique. Researchers of the University of Twente now develop a micro-jet injection technology that doesn't use needles at all. Instea

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Flying cars: Automating the skies means playing with our lives

Recent research suggests that flying cars could eventually be a sustainable way to free up roads. The first models are set to hit our skies in 2019 as personal playthings, while industry sees them as taxis and commuter vehicles of the future.

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Farms create lots of data, but farmers don't control where it ends up and who can use it

Most of us are familiar with cases of data being used in ways that go beyond consumer expectations – just think of the Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal.

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A biosynthetic dual-core cell computer

ETH researchers have integrated two CRISPR-Cas9-based core processors into human cells. This represents a huge step towards creating powerful biocomputers.

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Variations in the 'fogginess' of the universe identify a milestone in cosmic history

Large differences in the 'fogginess' of the early universe were caused by islands of cold gas left behind when the universe heated up after the big bang, according to an international team of astronomers.

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This scientist thinks she has the key to curb climate change: super plants

Dr Joanne Chory hopes that genetic modifications to enhance plants’ natural carbon-fixing traits could play a key role – but knows that time is short, for her and the planet If this were a film about humanity’s last hope before climate change wiped us out, Hollywood would be accused of flagrant typecasting. That’s because Dr Joanne Chory is too perfect for the role to be believable. The esteemed

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Weatherwatch: the science behind lightning's crackle

Brontophonic sounds can give lightning a unique hiss, separate from the deep rumble of thunder What does lightning sound like? The obvious answer is in the boom of thunder : an explosion of expanding, superheated air. But there are more subtle and less understood noises associated with lightning, known as brontophonic sounds, which are heard far less frequently. Two features make these sounds dis

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Teleselskaber: Bredbåndspulje ser bort fra teknologineutralitet

Nye hastighedskrav i bredbåndspuljen sætter de facto princippet om teknologineutralitet ud af kraft. Sådan lyder det fra TDC og 3 i forbindelse med, at Bredbåndspuljen åbner for nye ansøgninger om lidt.

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A biosynthetic dual-core cell computer

ETH researchers have integrated two CRISPR-Cas9-based core processors into human cells. This represents a huge step towards creating powerful biocomputers.

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Exploding Aphids Plaster Holes in Their Home With Bodily Fluids

If you’ve ever complained about DIY home repairs, spare a thought for the colonial aphid, Nipponaphis monzeni , for whom the task of fixing the house can be spectacularly fatal. It fixes holes in its nest by suicidally erupting and, in its death throes, plastering its bodily fluids over the openings. Each of these aphids is a white bead, just half a millimeter across. In large numbers, they can c

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Gener afslører risikoen for hjertesvigt

Læger kan med genetiske undersøgelser se, om hjerteproblemer i familien kan gå i arv.

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The solid that remains flexible at temperatures close to absolute zero

The solid that remains flexible at temperatures close to absolute zero The solid that remains flexible at temperatures close to absolute zero, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01223-5 A spongy form of graphene can also maintain its resilience when subjected to extreme heat.

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'Holy Stairs' Opened for 1st Time in Nearly 300 Years. But Did Jesus Really Climb Them?

Legend has it that Jesus walked up the steps in Jerusalem on his way to trial, before his crucifixion.

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Doctors are losing faith in IBM Watson's AI doctor

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Is automation going to destroy jobs in the oilpatch and in Estevan?

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Stenålderns europeiska megalitgravar var familjegravar

Kunskapen om jordbruk och boskapsskötsel spreds till Europa under den neolitiska stenåldern omkring 9 000 år före vår tideräkning (fvt) och nådde nordvästra Europa och Skandinavien omkring 4 000 år fvt. Med början ungefär 4 500 fvt framträder megalitiska gravmonument längs den europeiska Atlantkusten. Tusen år senare kommer de även till Skandinavien. Dessa konstruktioner av stora stenblock har fö

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Got a minute? Global attention span is narrowing, study reveals

Research combed from everything from movie tickets to social media finds more to focus on but less time to do so It’s just as you suspected; the information age has changed the general attention span. A recently published study from researchers at the Technical University of Denmark suggests the collective global attention span is narrowing due to the amount of information that is presented to th

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Why electric cars are a hot topic in Australia's forthcoming election

Most parties in Australia's upcoming election want more electric cars, but providing enough charging points across such a vast country has proven difficult

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Cassini reveals surprises with Titan's lakes

On its final flyby of Saturn's largest moon in 2017, NASA's Cassini spacecraft gathered radar data revealing that the small liquid lakes in Titan's northern hemisphere are surprisingly deep, perched atop hills and filled with methane.

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Solar evaporator offers a fresh route to fresh water

About a billion people around the world lack access to safe drinking water. Desalinating salty water into drinkable water can help to fill this dangerous gap. But traditional desalination systems are far too expensive to install and operate in many locations, especially in low-income countries and remote areas.

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Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras

In a recent study, researchers developed a novel graphene-enabled photodetector that operates at room temperature, is highly sensitive, fast, has a wide dynamic range, and covers a broad range of THz frequencies. The researchers have achieved a solid understanding of how the PTE effect gives rise to a THz-induced photoresponse, which is valuable for further detector optimization.

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China, India economic development key to achieving MDG for safe drinking water

From 2000 to 2015, the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) produced mixed and debatable results. But there was at least one clear MDG victory: safe drinking water.

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Today's Biggest Threat: The Polarized Mind

To counter it, we call for a mobilization of mindfulness practices and dialogue groups on the scale of a public works program for human civility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Gallery: America's Most Endangered Rivers of 2019

The nonprofit American Rivers lists these 10 waterways as the most at-risk in the country.

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Can You Still Get the Measles If You've Been Vaccinated?

If you've been vaccinated, can you still catch the disease?

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New method of studying sediment could predict climate change impact

Sedimentary deposits tell a story about how the Earth responded to a changing climate in the past and are an important tool for predicting what climate change will mean for the future. A new study by a University of Arkansas researcher focuses on the origins of sediment, an approach that could make interpreting the deposits easier and more accurate.

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Employing 3-D coral reef remote sensing to predict fish biomass

Coral reefs offer many tropical fish a vibrantly encrusted locale of refuge – a respite from the intense pressures of the sea – providing an opportunity for protection, nutrition and even reproduction. At the mercy of a warming ocean due to climate change, reefs are experiencing more frequent and damaging coral bleaching events, leaving fish (and other ocean dwellers) with barren accommodations in

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People with stress disorders like PTSD are at higher risk of heart disease

Those coping with psychological trauma have a greater risk for cardiovascular disease, a large-scale study that goes beyond men and veterans finds.

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Colorado Tried a New Way to Vote: Make People Pay—Quadratically

The state legislature used a method that's designed to capture the intensity of a voter's preference as a way to fix some of traditional voting's big problems.

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Today's Biggest Threat: The Polarized Mind

To counter it, we call for a mobilization of mindfulness practices and dialogue groups on the scale of a public works program for human civility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Today's Biggest Threat: The Polarized Mind

To counter it, we call for a mobilization of mindfulness practices and dialogue groups on the scale of a public works program for human civility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brandekspert: Røggaseksplosioner kan have ført til Notre-Dame-katastrofe

Branden i Notre Dame har kostet den historiske kirke store dele af taget og et 93 meter højt spir. Røggaseksplosioner kan være en del af forklaringen, vurderer dansk ekspert, der tænker på branden i Roskilde Domkirke i 1968.

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Cuttlefish Are Dazzling, But Do They Dream?

The marine mollusks display behavior that resembles sleep, including cycles of rapid eye movement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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James Cook University professor Peter Ridd's sacking ruled unlawful

Physics head dismissed after criticising scientific research about climate change impact on the Great Barrier Reef James Cook University is considering its legal options after the federal circuit court ruled it had unlawfully sacked a professor who had criticised scientific research about the climate change impact on the Great Barrier Reef. Peter Ridd, who was the head of the physics department a

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Scientists Plan To Start Human Trials Testing CRISPR Soon

The powerful gene-editing technique is moving out of the lab and into the clinic. Trials will use CRISPR to try to treat a variety of diseases, ranging from cancer and blindness to blood disorders.

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Cuttlefish Are Dazzling, But Do They Dream?

The marine mollusks display behavior that resembles sleep, including cycles of rapid eye movement — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Too much skin in the game: Derm journal calls out author for duplication

We often praise authors for doing the right thing by retracting with transparency. Here’s a journal that deserves recognition for its handling of a case of duplicate publication. Acta Dermatovenerologica Alpina, Pannonica et Adriatica (ADAPA), a European derm publication, has retracted a 2018 article in smack-down fashion, calling out a co-author for deceit. The paper … Continue reading Too much s

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Seneste Windows-opdateringer gør pc'er langsommere for mange brugere

Mulige kompatibilitetsproblemer mellem opdateringer og antivirus giver voldsom skrive-aktivitet på lagerenheder og problemer med video-streaming.

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Did the ancestor of all humans evolve in Europe not Africa?

A study of some 8-million-year-old teeth found in Greece suggests a controversial idea: that hominins arose in Europe and then moved into Africa later

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Men who have children later in life may prime their kids for longevity

Older dads may change the chromosomes in their sperm so that their children will be able to live longer lives – a phenomenon similar to Lamarckian evolution

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Google’s AI Experts Try to Automate Themselves

Google's AutoML software uses machine learning to generate better machine learning. It competed last week against high-powered data scientists.

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The Images That Could Help Rebuild Notre-Dame Cathedral

Before the tragedy seen all around the world , flames leaping from the top of Notre-Dame Cathedral, there was a smaller one, thousands of miles away in upstate New York. Andrew Tallon, a pioneering architectural historian and father of four, died on November 16, 2018, from brain cancer. He was 49. He had dedicated his life to the study of medieval architecture, its mysteries and resonances, blend

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Why Disney+ Will Be Tough to Beat

As giant companies such as Apple and Disney continue to dramatically announce the details of their new streaming services, only two pressing questions really matter: What exactly is the product, and how much does it cost? The March keynote for Apple TV+ barely answered the first query and ignored the second, broadly promising big-ticket TV with major stars. Intentionally or not, Disney’s recent d

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An Internet for Kids

It might be better to ban kids from the internet. Across the West, governments are pushing for more power to regulate cyberspace even as authoritarian political parties are gaining more official power, portending a future in which what people can say online is subject to the whims of ill-meaning bureaucrats. Often, calls for regulation and even censorship are justified by the highly defensible an

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How the hell are cryptocurrency holders supposed to file their taxes?

Though it wasn’t in time for tax day, US lawmakers are pressuring the IRS to clarify its policies for digital currencies.

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Lufthansa hits Q1 turbulence from rising fuel costs

Shares in Lufthansa tumbled as markets opened Tuesday before rebounding, after Europe's largest airline group blamed a steep first-quarter operating loss on rising fuel prices.

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China seizes nearly 2,750 elephant tusks in huge bust

Chinese authorities have seized 7.5 tonnes of ivory—2,748 elephant tusks—in one of the biggest busts in recent years as the country cracks down on the sale of illegal wildlife products.

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New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible

Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible, according to research from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute just published in Nature Communications. This development has the potential to improve battery performance for consumer electronics, solar grid storage, and electric vehicles.

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China seizes nearly 2,750 elephant tusks in huge bust

Chinese authorities have seized 7.5 tonnes of ivory—2,748 elephant tusks—in one of the biggest busts in recent years as the country cracks down on the sale of illegal wildlife products.

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An Unprecedented Look at Spaceflight’s Effects on the Human Body

Scott Kelly spent a year in orbit while his identical twin and fellow astronaut Mark remained earthbound. By comparing their biological samples, researchers have gleaned unprecedented insights into how the human body changes during a year in microgravity — from gene expression to the aging process.

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Så påverkar livsstilen våra gener

Vad vet du om epigenetik? Forskare vid Lunds universitets Diabetescentrum har sammanfattat det vetenskapliga kunskapsläget inom epigenetik kopplat till fetma och typ 2-diabetes i en översiktsartikel.

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15 Months of Fresh Hell Inside Facebook

Scandals. Backstabbing. Resignations. Record profits. Time Bombs. In early 2018, Mark Zuckerberg set out to fix Facebook. Here's how that turned out.

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New research identifies microbes that may reduce allergy-like reactions in many people

A small percentage of humans can suffer allergy-like reactions to certain varieties of ripened cheese due to histamine, a byproduct of the prolonged fermentation process. An ISU researcher is studying bacterial strains that could reduce histamine, allowing susceptible diners to enjoy the cheese without unpleasant side effects.

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New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible

Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible, according to research from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute just published in Nature Communications. This development has the potential to improve battery performance for consumer electronics, solar grid storage, and electric vehicles.

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High-frequency dynamics of evanescently-coupled nanowire lasers

High-frequency dynamics of evanescently-coupled nanowire lasers High-frequency dynamics of evanescently-coupled nanowire lasers, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42526-x High-frequency dynamics of evanescently-coupled nanowire lasers

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A whole-body FDG PET/MR atlas for multiparametric voxel-based analysis

A whole-body FDG PET/MR atlas for multiparametric voxel-based analysis A whole-body FDG PET/MR atlas for multiparametric voxel-based analysis, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42613-z A whole-body FDG PET/MR atlas for multiparametric voxel-based analysis

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Designed Mutations Alter the Binding Pathways of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

Designed Mutations Alter the Binding Pathways of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein Designed Mutations Alter the Binding Pathways of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42717-6 Designed Mutations Alter the Binding Pathways of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

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Analysis of tractable allosteric sites in G protein-coupled receptors

Analysis of tractable allosteric sites in G protein-coupled receptors Analysis of tractable allosteric sites in G protein-coupled receptors, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42618-8 Analysis of tractable allosteric sites in G protein-coupled receptors

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Antimicrobial agent susceptibilities of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-8 genotypes

Antimicrobial agent susceptibilities of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-8 genotypes Antimicrobial agent susceptibilities of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-8 genotypes, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42425-1 Antimicrobial agent susceptibilities of Legionella pneumophila MLVA-8 genotypes

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Data-driven discovery of a novel sepsis pre-shock state predicts impending septic shock in the ICU

Data-driven discovery of a novel sepsis pre-shock state predicts impending septic shock in the ICU Data-driven discovery of a novel sepsis pre-shock state predicts impending septic shock in the ICU, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42637-5 Data-driven discovery of a novel sepsis pre-shock state predicts impending septic shock in the ICU

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Timing and periodicity of Phanerozoic marine biodiversity and environmental change

Timing and periodicity of Phanerozoic marine biodiversity and environmental change Timing and periodicity of Phanerozoic marine biodiversity and environmental change, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42538-7 Timing and periodicity of Phanerozoic marine biodiversity and environmental change

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Comprehensive comparison of antioxidant properties of tinctures

Comprehensive comparison of antioxidant properties of tinctures Comprehensive comparison of antioxidant properties of tinctures, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42656-2 Comprehensive comparison of antioxidant properties of tinctures

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Nasa, Elon Musk and SpaceX join forces to tackle apocalypse asteroids

submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]

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Publisher Correction: Pattern of Altered Plasma Elemental Phosphorus, Calcium, Zinc, and Iron in Alzheimer’s Disease

Publisher Correction: Pattern of Altered Plasma Elemental Phosphorus, Calcium, Zinc, and Iron in Alzheimer’s Disease Publisher Correction: Pattern of Altered Plasma Elemental Phosphorus, Calcium, Zinc, and Iron in Alzheimer’s Disease, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42217-7 Publisher Correction: Pattern of Altered Plasma Elemental Phosphorus, Calcium, Zinc, and Iron in Alz

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Stem cell-associated heterogeneity in Glioblastoma results from intrinsic tumor plasticity shaped by the microenvironment

Stem cell-associated heterogeneity in Glioblastoma results from intrinsic tumor plasticity shaped by the microenvironment Stem cell-associated heterogeneity in Glioblastoma results from intrinsic tumor plasticity shaped by the microenvironment, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09853-z Cancer stem cells (CSCs) comprise a putative population that can drive growth and resistan

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Biosynthesis of DHGA12 and its roles in Arabidopsis seedling establishment

Biosynthesis of DHGA 12 and its roles in Arabidopsis seedling establishment Biosynthesis of DHGA 12 and its roles in Arabidopsis seedling establishment, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09467-5 Gibberellins are a major class of phytohormones that regulate plant growth and development. Here the authors show that the Arabidopsis GAS2 protein catalyses production of DHGA12, an

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Nodal rings and drumhead surface states in phononic crystals

Nodal rings and drumhead surface states in phononic crystals Nodal rings and drumhead surface states in phononic crystals, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09820-8 3D topological nodal lines that give rise to drumhead surface states could help study a range of exotic topological phenomena. Here, Deng et al. experimentally demonstrate 3D nodal ring dispersion and topological

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Microfluidic multipoles theory and applications

Microfluidic multipoles theory and applications Microfluidic multipoles theory and applications, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09740-7 Microfluidic multipoles use arrays of sources and sinks to confine fluids and reagents without the use of physical channels. Here the authors use conformal mappings to predict both convective and diffusive transport in these flows and 3D

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Learning about climate change uncertainty enables flexible water infrastructure planning

Learning about climate change uncertainty enables flexible water infrastructure planning Learning about climate change uncertainty enables flexible water infrastructure planning, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09677-x Water resources planning requires infrastructure development consider regional climatic uncertainties. Here the authors introduce a new dynamic planning fra

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Microbial and metabolic succession on common building materials under high humidity conditions

Microbial and metabolic succession on common building materials under high humidity conditions Microbial and metabolic succession on common building materials under high humidity conditions, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09764-z Microbes inhabit built environments and could contribute to degradation of surfaces especially in damp conditions. Here the authors explore how

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Selective photoelectrochemical oxidation of glycerol to high value-added dihydroxyacetone

Selective photoelectrochemical oxidation of glycerol to high value-added dihydroxyacetone Selective photoelectrochemical oxidation of glycerol to high value-added dihydroxyacetone, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09788-5 The selective conversion of inexpensive precursors to high-value chemicals presents valuable academic and industrial consequences. Here, the authors show

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Comprehensive genomic and immunological characterization of Chinese non-small cell lung cancer patients

Comprehensive genomic and immunological characterization of Chinese non-small cell lung cancer patients Comprehensive genomic and immunological characterization of Chinese non-small cell lung cancer patients, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09762-1 The relationship between genomic alteration and immune context in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is complex. Here, the aut

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EU presidency: Romanian research minister questions evolution

EU presidency: Romanian research minister questions evolution EU presidency: Romanian research minister questions evolution, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01208-4 EU presidency: Romanian research minister questions evolution

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Coal research institute kept the power on in Ukraine

Coal research institute kept the power on in Ukraine Coal research institute kept the power on in Ukraine, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01206-6 Coal research institute kept the power on in Ukraine

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Brexit: EU conservation suffers too

Brexit: EU conservation suffers too Brexit: EU conservation suffers too, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01204-8 Brexit: EU conservation suffers too

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An adventure in predatory publishing: the contents of two medicine cabinets

An adventure in predatory publishing: the contents of two medicine cabinets An adventure in predatory publishing: the contents of two medicine cabinets, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01207-5 An adventure in predatory publishing: the contents of two medicine cabinets

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Gene-edited livestock: consumers may say no

Gene-edited livestock: consumers may say no Gene-edited livestock: consumers may say no, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01205-7 Gene-edited livestock: consumers may say no

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‘Cities’ reveals common ground between ancient and modern urban life

In the book ‘Cities,’ archaeologist Monica Smith sees the positives in past and present metropolises.

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To italienske konsortier skal kæmpe om milliarddyrt hospitalsbyggeri

To entreprenørkonsortier har kvalificeret sig til at give afgive bud på, hvordan akuthuset på hospitalet i Bispebjerg skal opføres og kan dermed få en kontrakt til 1,5 milliarder i hus.

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Elon Musk joins forces with NASA to tackle asteroids

submitted by /u/Star-spangled-Banner [link] [comments]

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We have zero tolerance for unclean water. Air should be no different

Faced with incontrovertible evidence of risk, we adopted the policies that protect us for water-born disease. Now we must do the same for our polluted air

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Aston Martin’s first electric car is finally here

submitted by /u/TransPlanetInjection [link] [comments]

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A struggle for the soul of theoretical physics

A struggle for the soul of theoretical physics A struggle for the soul of theoretical physics, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01171-0 A riposte to the view that mathematics has led physics astray beguiles Jon Butterworth.

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Oslos taxier skal hurtiglade trådløst

PLUS. Et nyt projekt i Oslo vil bygge verdens første trådløse hurtigladestationer til taxier, som de kan få fyldt batteriet op, men de holder og venter på nye kunder.

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Seals, caviar and oil: Caspian Sea faces pollution threat

Seals waddling along the waterfront were once a common sight in Baku Bay, the Caspian Sea home of Azerbaijan's capital.

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Ecuador says hit by 40 million cyber attacks since Assange arrest

Ecuador said on Monday it has suffered 40 million cyber attacks on the webpages of public institutions since stripping Wikileaks founder Julian Assange of political asylum.

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Three things to know as Germany opens massive ocean wind park

German Chancellor Angela Merkel will be joined by French and Norwegian ministers Tuesday to officially open a massive wind farm in the Baltic Sea, a key project for her country's "energy transition".

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Papa roach: Chinese farmer breeds bugs for the table

As farmer Li Bingcai opened the door to his cockroach farm in southwest China, an insect the size of a dart flew into his face.

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YouTube accidentally links Notre-Dame fire to 9/11 attacks

A YouTube fact-check feature which is meant to tackle misinformation accidentally tagged live broadcasts of a fire engulfing Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris with details about the 9/11 terror attacks.

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Foxconn head stepping back, mulling presidential run

The head of Foxconn Technology Group is planning to step away from day-to-day operations at the world's largest electronics provider and said Tuesday that he is mulling a run for president of Taiwan.

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Papa roach: Chinese farmer breeds bugs for the table

As farmer Li Bingcai opened the door to his cockroach farm in southwest China, an insect the size of a dart flew into his face.

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Linkage is a drag: First wheat gene to rapidly convert defective traits for new

When it comes to breeding better wheat varieties, often, though we seek to introduce desirable genes that increase yield, for example; these can come along with less wanted genes than reduce some other vital plant function.

11h

'Lovely' and 'scientific'—Medical student evaluations differ by gender and minority status

In the largest analysis to date of narrative medical school evaluations, researchers at UC San Francisco and Brown University have found significant differences in how female and underrepresented minority medical students are described.

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Linkage is a drag: First wheat gene to rapidly convert defective traits for new

When it comes to breeding better wheat varieties, often, though we seek to introduce desirable genes that increase yield, for example; these can come along with less wanted genes than reduce some other vital plant function.

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Flying cars: automating the skies means playing with our lives

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Rituximab

IV rituximab has been used to treat chronic fatigue syndrome. A large, well-designed new study shows it doesn't work.

11h

Climate change threatens endangered sparrows

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that some sparrow species will go extinct within the century due to climate change.

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New report examines the safety of using dispersants in oil spill clean ups

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists has issued a series of findings and recommendations on the safety of using dispersal agents in oil spill clean-up efforts in a report published this month by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Bliver master saboteret i Danmark?

Efter en række hændelser med saboterede master i Sverige vil en læser gerne vide, om dette også sker i Danmark. Det svarer direktør i Teleindustrien på.

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Climate change threatens endangered sparrows

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that some sparrow species will go extinct within the century due to climate change.

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Honey, I ate the kids: The sweet side of filial cannibalism

As you bite into a chocolate bunny or egg this weekend, consider this: rabbits often eat their own young, and hens their own eggs.

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Honey, I ate the kids: The sweet side of filial cannibalism

As you bite into a chocolate bunny or egg this weekend, consider this: rabbits often eat their own young, and hens their own eggs.

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Huawei says not discussed 5G chipsets with Apple, wins more telco gear contracts

China's Huawei Technologies said on Tuesday it has not held talks with Apple Inc about supplying 5G chipsets, a day after its founder said it was open to selling such chips to the U.S. firm …

12h

The Taiwanese Populist Advancing China’s Interests

TAIPEI—The scene is, on the surface, a familiar one. A populist candidate with unexpected momentum captures nonstop media attention and sees a surge of support online, much of it connected to accounts originating from a rival country. Could he become president? The candidate is not, however, Donald Trump, and the country where the election is taking place is not the United States, or anywhere nea

13h

Snart kan du fange 112 på sms og sociale medier

I fremtiden skal nødopkald kunne foretages med både tale, tekst og video på mange flere platforme end i dag. Sådan lyder ambitionen fra de europæiske alarmcentraler.

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Do you know Wason Selection Task four cards?

submitted by /u/SomeWaltz [link] [comments]

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Friday News Roundup – International

The arrests of Julian Assange and Omar al-Bashir dominated global news headlines this week. (Image credit: AFP/Getty Images)

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Up in arms: Insect-inspired arm technology aims to improve drones

Insect-inspired arm technology from Purdue University aims to improve drones to handle larger payloads.

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Study suggests college students end up in vicious cycle of substance abuse, poor academics, stress

One negative behavior such as substance abuse or heavy alcohol drinking can lead college students toward a vicious cycle of poor lifestyle choices, lack of sleep, mental distress and low grades, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Honey, I ate the kids: The sweet side of filial cannibalism

Why do some animals eat or abandon their offspring? According to researchers at the University of Tennessee and the University of Oxford, these might actually be forms of parental care.Published in Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, their mathematical model shows that when overcrowding threatens offspring survival — which often occurs due to spread of infection or competition for resources — sa

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Climate change threatens endangered sparrows

A new study in The Condor: Ornithological Applications finds that some sparrow species will go extinct within the century due to climate change.

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'Lovely' and 'scientific' — Medical student evaluations differ by gender and minority status

In the largest analysis to date of narrative medical school evaluations, researchers at UC San Francisco and Brown University have found significant differences in how female and underrepresented minority medical students are described.

13h

Common sleep myths compromise good sleep and health

People often say they can get by on five or fewer hours of sleep, that snoring is harmless, and that having a drink helps you to fall asleep. These are, in fact, among the most widely held myths about sleeping that not only shape poor habits, but may also pose a significant public health threat.

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Simple test can indicate prolonged symptoms following pediatric sports-related concussion

Researchers from Children's Hospital Colorado and the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado, have found that abnormal performance on the Romberg balance test can indicate that children and adolescents will experience prolonged symptoms following sports-related concussion.

13h

The Future for Australian Coal

Problems Australia is the worlds’ largest exporter of coal, selling thermal coal for electricity generation and coking coal for smelting world-wide. In 2017 its export of this commodity was valued at over $40 billion , most of it produced in Queensland and New South Wales. In addition, coal is mined for domestic use with about 42.3 million tonnes, valued at over $4 billion being consumed in 2017,

14h

Statins cleared for rheumatoid arthritis patients

Clinical trial allays long-running safety fears. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Nyt råd til husejere: Du kan godt droppe den dyre dampspærre

Hvis der er fornuftig ventilation i loftsrummet er der ingen grund til at kaste mange penge i at installere en dampspærre på den vandrette del af loftet, når man efterisolerer, viser nyt forskningsresultat.

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Scientists print first 3D heart using a patient’s own cells

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

Using new imaging technology, researchers can now record the activity of large populations of brain cells with unprecedented speed, and at new depths.

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US Measles Outbreak Has Exploded With 90 More Cases, With NYC Hit Hardest

There are still people refusing mandatory vaccination during this emergency.

17h

PepsiCo Partnered With a Russian Start-up Trying to Create Orbiting Billboards

The idea to launch billboards into space may have seemed like just another marketing gimmick. Back in January, Discover first reported on a Russian start-up company named StartRocket that said it wanted to use swarms of mini satellites called CubeSats to project ads on the night sky from low-Earth orbit. Readers reacted harshly to the announcement. Some called it “repulsive.” Others urged boycotts

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Indicators of despair rising among Gen X-ers entering middle age

Indicators of despair — depression, suicidal ideation, drug use and alcohol abuse — are rising among Americans in their late 30s and early 40s across most demographic groups, according to new research. These findings suggest that the increase in 'deaths of despair' observed among low-educated middle-aged white Baby Boomers in recent studies may begin to impact the youngest members of Generation

17h

To protect stem cells, plants have diverse genetic backup plans

When it comes to stem cell management, all flowering plants work to maintain the same status quo. Researchers have now identified the various strategies plants use to preserve a single, essential genetic circuit.

17h

Cause of rare genetic metabolic disorder

A new study is the first to identify a rarely-seen type of DNA mutation as the cause of an inherited metabolic disorder. Inherited metabolic disorders — where the body can't break down specific nutrients from food leading to a range of serious health problems — are often caused by a defective gene.

17h

Regular cannabis users require up to 220% higher dosage for sedation in medical procedures

Researchers in Colorado examined medical records of 250 patients who received endoscopic procedures after 2012, when the state legalized recreational cannabis. They found patients who smoked or ingested cannabis on a daily or weekly basis required 14% more fentanyl, 20% more midazolam, and 220% more propofol to achieve optimum sedation for routine procedures, including colonoscopy.

17h

What makes a jellyfish?

Genomic study reveals how jellyfish develop into floating beauties, rather than staying stationary like corals or sea anemones.

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New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

Using new imaging technology, researchers can now record the activity of large populations of brain cells with unprecedented speed, and at new depths.

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Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow

For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.

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The Space Review: Rationale for a national “astroelectricity” program

submitted by /u/Galileos_grandson [link] [comments]

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Brain marker for angry dreams

Researchers have identified a pattern of brain activity that predicts anger experienced during dreaming, according to a new study of healthy adults. The research could potentially inform efforts to understand the neural basis of the emotional content of nightmares, a feature of various mental and sleep disorders.

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Samsung's Foldable Phone, A Microsoft Email Hack, And More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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The Atlantic Daily: Destroyed in the Social-Media Era

What We’re Following (Philippe Wojazer / Reuters) A massive fire erupted at Paris’s Notre-Dame Cathedral today. The nearly 900-year-old Gothic church, which is a tourist hub in the city and one of the most recognizable sites in Europe, was severely damaged—its spire toppling over and its roof collapsing. The photo editor Alan Taylor compiled these 16 photos of the licks of flame and billows of sm

18h

Stonehenge: DNA reveals origin of builders

Ancestors of the people who built Stonehenge travelled west across the Mediterranean to get to Britain.

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We need a reskilling revolution. Here's how to make it happen

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Notre Dame Fire and the Future of History

The fire turned the thousand-year-old roof to ash. But a digital replica of the cathedral could help make its restoration all the more complete.

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Hulu spends $1.43 billion to buy back AT&T stake, values streaming service at $15 billion

Hulu has bought back wireless carrier AT&T Inc's stake in the U.S. entertainment streaming service for $1.43 billion, in a deal that values Hulu at $15 billion, the two companies said on Monday. …

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Why do our faces look the way they do?

New research covers roughly 4 million years of history and integrates many different lines of study to get at the factors that contribute to facial shape. The researchers conclude that the face’s appearance is a combination of biomechanical, physiological, and social influences. The face: it’s personal, yet universal. It’s how we recognize each other and communicate our emotions—and yet there’s m

19h

Researchers Are Unraveling How Ketamine Works as an Antidepressant in the Brain

Ketamine is making headlines left and right, and for good reason. The drug, once popular as both an anesthetic and among party-goers, has recently gained traction as a treatment for depression. In fact, the FDA approved the first ketamine antidepressant just a few weeks ago. Despite its rise, ketamine still has some unresolved issues: its effects don’t last very long and the reasons behind why it

19h

TESS Spacecraft Finds its First Earth-Sized Planet Around Nearby Star

The next generation of exoplanet hunting has arrived in the form of NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet and Survey Satellite. TESS looks at closer and brighter stars than Kepler, the spacecraft that first turned the trickle of exoplanet discoveries into a deluge. While TESS, which launched last year, is just beginning its sky search, it’s already started discovering new planets. Astronomers say they've di

19h

Illuminating the night with curtains of light: the aurora borealis seen from above and below

I've been meaning to write a story about the aurora borealis ever since I captured photos of an astonishing display in January when I was visiting Tromsø, Norway to cover the Arctic Frontiers conference. Finally, the satellite image above offered the perfect excuse. It was captured by the Suomi NPP spacecraft as it orbited above North America on March 28, 2019. The spacecraft has a nighttime senso

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Dietary supplements don't reduce mortality rates, Tufts researchers say

A new study at Tufts University discovered that a variety of supplements do not extend life and can even be dangerous. High doses of vitamin D and calcium were linked to higher rates of cancer and all-cause mortality. Benefits of the vitamins and nutrients were discovered in eating whole foods, not taken in pill or powder form. None Sunlight: the cause of much consternation for skincare advocates

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Continuing PC vaccine in Kenya at full price cost-effective and could save thousands of lives

Continuing the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in Kenya after the country transitions away from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, support is highly cost-effective and estimated to save thousands of children's lives, according to new research published in The Lancet Global Health.

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Dementia more preventable in Asia and Latin America

Close to one in two cases of dementia could be preventable in low- to middle-income countries, finds a new UCL study.The findings, published in The Lancet Global Health, found how improving childhood education and other health outcomes throughout life could reduce the risk of dementia.

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Notre Dame Is Burning. A Digital Archive Could Hold the Key to Restoring It.

While nothing can replace the historic value of the lost artifacts, a recent data-gathering mission captured an incredible wealth of data about the cathedral's structure and construction. The post Notre Dame Is Burning. A Digital Archive Could Hold the Key to Restoring It. appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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How to prime your mind to make creative leaps and new discoveries

Making big, new advances and solving old, intractable problems isn't magic. It takes preparation. One way to know you're on the right track? You'll feel completely stuck, Lightman says. If you want more counterintuitive insights like these that will make you thrive, join Big Think Edge today.

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Antibiotic resistance gene transmitted between pets at a UK animal hospital

A gene that enables bacteria to be highly resistant to linezolid, an antibiotic that is used as a last resort for treating infections in humans, has been found in bacterial samples from cats and a dog at a small-animal hospital in the UK for the first time. The new research is being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Net

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Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear

New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms. The findings are presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019).

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Surgical site infection rates differ by gender for certain procedures

Men and women are at differing risks of developing surgical site infections depending on the type of operation they undergo, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019).

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Vaccine-preventable diseases surge in crisis-hit Venezuela

Vaccine-preventable diseases have not just returned, but surged in crisis hit Venezuela, according to new research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019).

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Venezuela estimated to have had 1 million new malaria infections in 2018

New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16, 2019) says that final estimates for 2018 could show more than 1 million cases of malaria in Venezuela alone.

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Pleasant scents might help you quit smoking

Health Research suggests a good sniff could distract you from cravings. Scents like peppermint, lemon, or chocolate could help those trying to quit smoking to quell their nicotine cravings.

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A New Green Revolution: Scientists Are Using CRISPR to Re-domesticate Fruits and Vegetables

Gene editing can potentially cram millennia of agricultural progress into the blink of an eye.

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Microplastic Found Even In The Air In France's Pyrenees Mountains

Tiny fragments broken down from larger pieces of plastic have already been found in rivers, lakes, oceans and in agricultural soil. But very few studies of wind-borne microplastic have ever been done. (Image credit: VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images)

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Author Correction: Evaluation of Hypoglycaemia with Non-Invasive Sensors in People with Type 1 Diabetes and Impaired Awareness of Hypoglycaemia

Author Correction: Evaluation of Hypoglycaemia with Non-Invasive Sensors in People with Type 1 Diabetes and Impaired Awareness of Hypoglycaemia Author Correction: Evaluation of Hypoglycaemia with Non-Invasive Sensors in People with Type 1 Diabetes and Impaired Awareness of Hypoglycaemia, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42218-6 Author Correction: Evaluation of Hypoglycaemia

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Author Correction: The distribution and lifetime of powerful radio galaxies as a function of environment and redshift

Author Correction: The distribution and lifetime of powerful radio galaxies as a function of environment and redshift Author Correction: The distribution and lifetime of powerful radio galaxies as a function of environment and redshift, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41871-1 Author Correction: The distribution and lifetime of powerful radio galaxies as a function of envir

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Author Correction: Variability of crossing phase in older people with Parkinson’s disease is dependent of obstacle height

Author Correction: Variability of crossing phase in older people with Parkinson’s disease is dependent of obstacle height Author Correction: Variability of crossing phase in older people with Parkinson’s disease is dependent of obstacle height, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-40318-x Author Correction: Variability of crossing phase in older people with Parkinson’s disease

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Stimulated Ionic Telegraph Noise in Filamentary Memristive Devices

Stimulated Ionic Telegraph Noise in Filamentary Memristive Devices Stimulated Ionic Telegraph Noise in Filamentary Memristive Devices, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41497-3 Stimulated Ionic Telegraph Noise in Filamentary Memristive Devices

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Publisher Correction: Increase in Interfacial Adhesion and Electrochemical Charge Storage Capacity of Polypyrrole on Au Electrodes Using Polyethyleneimine

Publisher Correction: Increase in Interfacial Adhesion and Electrochemical Charge Storage Capacity of Polypyrrole on Au Electrodes Using Polyethyleneimine Publisher Correction: Increase in Interfacial Adhesion and Electrochemical Charge Storage Capacity of Polypyrrole on Au Electrodes Using Polyethyleneimine, Published online: 16 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42219-5 Publisher Correction: In

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Was King David Truly a Powerful King?

The Hebrew Bible tells numerous stories about King David but there's very little archaeological evidence linked to his existence.

20h

The world's biggest plane has 6 engines and a 385-foot wingspan

Technology Breaking down the Stratolaunch, by the numbers The plane is both longer and wider than a 747.

20h

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: White House Survival Guide

What We’re Following Today It’s Monday, April 15. We messed up—our Friday newsletter had the wrong link to Elaina Plott’s profile of Ivanka Trump. Here’s the right one. ‣ Washington is on edge waiting for the Justice Department to release the Mueller report, expected to happen early this week. But, as The Atlantic reported last month, large parts of the report are expected to be redacted. The ver

20h

The Midwestern Sand Mines Feeding the Fracking Industry

Pure, round and super strong: This is the only sand down for a fracking job.

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Study: Microdosing LSD for 1 month was followed by improved mood, productivity

A recent study collected the self-reports of more than 1,000 people who microdosed LSD or psilocybin regularly for about a month. The results showed that most people experienced more positive moods, less depression and increased productivity. These results are preliminary, and microdosing remains an under-researched area. None Microdosing psychedelic drugs on a regular basis might be a safe way t

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Interior Dept. Opens Ethics Investigation of Its New Chief, David Bernhardt

The department's inspector general has said that she is looking into a "wide assortment" of allegations of conflict of interest and other potential violations.

20h

Indicators of despair rising among Gen X-ers entering middle age

Indicators of despair — depression, suicidal ideation, drug use and alcohol abuse — are rising among Americans in their late 30s and early 40s across most demographic groups, according to new Vanderbilt University research. These findings suggest that the increase in 'deaths of despair' observed among low-educated middle-aged white Baby Boomers in recent studies may begin to impact the youngest

20h

New report examines the safety of using dispersants in oil spill clean ups

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists has issued a series of findings and recommendations on the safety of using dispersal agents in oil spill clean-up efforts in a report published this month by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine.

20h

'Our Planet' Nature Documentary Addresses The 800-Pound Gorilla — Human Impact

The new Netflix series takes a hard look at the effects of our behavior on the natural world. Series producer Alastair Fothergill says that this is a different, more urgent type of show. (Image credit: Sophie Lanfear/Silverback/Netflix)

20h

Microsoft Email Hack Shows the Lurking Danger of Customer Support

Hackers spent months with full access to Outlook, Hotmail, and MSN email accounts—and got in through Microsoft's customer support platform.

20h

Revolution, Napoleon and Now Fire: What Paris' Iconic Notre Dame Cathedral Has Endured

Today's inferno is not the first time that the Notre Dame Cathedral has been in dire straits.

20h

Now let’s find a pair of black holes

Researchers plan to turn the galaxy into a giant detector. Richard A Lovett reports.

20h

There's a Far More Complex Condition Lurking Behind One Girl's High Blood Pressure

Doctors find a surprising cause for a preteen’s stomach pain and high blood pressure.

20h

Witnessing the Fall of Notre-Dame

PARIS—It was Holy Week and nearing end of day, and the setting sun was as fierce red-orange as the terrible blaze engulfing Notre-Dame—Notre-Dame!—when the spire, spindly and delicate during its long life and now consumed by flames, collapsed. It was near 7:50 p.m. The sky was still light. I was standing in a hushed, pained throng along the Quai d’Orléans of the Ile Saint Louis facing the back of

20h

Influential senator asks NSF for data on threat from foreign influences

Senator Chuck Grassley (R–IA) adds third research agency to campaign to monitor potential misuse of tax dollars

20h

Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall

Researchers have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow, a first. The device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic.

21h

Airborne plastic particles blanket remote mountains: study

A secluded mountain region thought to be free of plastic pollution is in fact blanketed by airborne microplastics on a scale comparable to a major city such as Paris, alarmed researchers reported Monday.

21h

Vermont's largest utility wants 100% renewable power by 2030

Vermont's largest electric utility is upping the ante and setting a goal of getting all of its power from renewable sources in just over a decade.

21h

Microsoft overhauls how it investigates office misbehavior

Microsoft is revamping its practices for investigating workplace allegations after a group of women shared stories of discrimination and sexual harassment.

21h

Low-calorie sweetener derived from lactose gets manufacturing boost from yeast

The quest to satisfy the sweet tooth without adding to the waistline has a new weapon in its arsenal: a strain of yeast that can metabolize lactose, the sugar in dairy products, into tagatose, a natural sweetener with less than half the calories of table sugar.

21h

Researchers forge new computational tools to make more accurate predictions of protein structures

Where the village smithy once stood now stands an algorithm, its mighty mathematical hammer pounding proteins into shape.

21h

New microscopy technique peers deep into the brain

Using new imaging technology, researchers can now record the activity of large populations of brain cells with unprecedented speed, and at new depths.

21h

Kenya's Maasai Mara: Facts About the Wildlife, Climate and Culture

Watching more than 2 million wildebeest and other migrating mammals travel hundreds of miles is one of the many spectacular natural events that occur in the Maasai Mara National Reserve.

21h

For old folk, being scammed may foretell Alzheimer’s onset

Two studies find the elderly are at risk from conmen, but are likely to have a loaded weapon nearby. Nick Carne reports.

21h

Lead kills 1st Yellowstone golden eagle fitted with tracker

Officials say the first golden eagle in Yellowstone National Park to be fitted with a tracking device has died of lead poisoning.

21h

Google searches reveal popular bird species

Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have just been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

21h

Commuter spouses have a lot to teach us about the 'stickiness' of traditional marriage

For her new book, sociologist Danielle J. Lindemann, interviewed nearly one hundred commuter spouses—couples who live apart in service to their dual careers—to find out what this unique group might reveal about broader trends in marriage. In Commuter Spouses: New Families in a Changing World – featured today on BBC Capital—Lindemann details what they told her about their unconventional marriages a

21h

North Atlantic warming hole impacts jet stream

The North Atlantic warming hole (NAWH), a region of reduced warming located in the North Atlantic Ocean, significantly affects the North Atlantic jet stream in climate simulations of the future, according to a team of researchers.

21h

Predictability limit: Scientists find bounds of weather forecasting

In the future, weather forecasts that provide storm warnings and help us plan our daily lives could come up to five days sooner before reaching the limits of numerical weather prediction, scientists said.

21h

Lead kills 1st Yellowstone golden eagle fitted with tracker

Officials say the first golden eagle in Yellowstone National Park to be fitted with a tracking device has died of lead poisoning.

21h

Google searches reveal popular bird species

Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have just been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

21h

Leveraging scientists' perceptions for successful interactions with policy makers

Creating new policies that deal with important issues like climate change requires input from geoscientists. Policy makers, media outlets, and the general public are interested in hearing from experts, and scientists are put under increasing amounts of pressure to effectively engage in policy decisions.

21h

Time is money, especially when it comes to giving

Would you be more likely to donate to charity if you could report the gift sooner on your taxes? According to a new article published in the National Tax Journal, the answer is yes.

21h

Physicists improve understanding of heat and particle flow in the edge of a fusion device

Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have discovered valuable information about how electrically charged gas known as "plasma" flows at the edge inside doughnut-shaped fusion devices called "tokamaks." The findings mark an encouraging sign for the development of machines to produce fusion energy for generating electricity without creating l

21h

Climate change could undermine children's education and development in the tropics

Education of children is one of the ambitious goals for sustainable development as a way to alleviate poverty and reduce vulnerability to climate change and natural disasters. Yet, a new study by a University of Maryland researcher published in the April 15, 2019, issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concludes that exposure to extreme heat and precipitation in prena

21h

Researchers conduct first global assessment of the life cycle greenhouse gas emissions from plastics

From campaigns against microplastics to news of the great Pacific garbage patch, public awareness is growing about the outsized effect plastic has on the world's oceans. However, its effect on the air is far less obvious. Plastic production, use, and disposal all emit prodigious amounts of greenhouse gasses, but scientists haven't had a firm grasp on the scope.

21h

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops.

21h

Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia

Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well. A study in animals may set the stage for a new therapy for a subset of patients with hemophilia who now develop antibodies to the standard maintenance treatment and then require on-demand "bypass" therapy.

21h

New study finds simple way to inoculate teens against junk food marketing

In a bid to fight obesity, public-health researchers have been trying for decades to find a way to convince teenagers to skip junk food and eat healthily, to little avail. One of the biggest obstacles is the enormous volume of food marketing kids are exposed to every day. That marketing is designed to foster strong positive associations with junk food in kids' minds and to drive overeating—and res

21h

Blockchain protocol to prevent counterfeit pharmaceutical sales

Researchers want to prevent counterfeit pharmaceuticals from flooding the market.They have recently published a blockchain protocol that could do just that.

21h

Solving the mystery of fertilizer loss from Midwest cropland

Farmers can't predict their annual corn harvest with certainty, but with the help of new research, they can now pinpoint specific parts of their fields that consistently produce either good or bad yields. Not only will this save them time and money; it will solve one of the most widespread environmental problems facing crop-producing regions — nitrogen loss.

21h

Neurobiologists annotate critical neuronal proteins in lamprey genome

The lamprey, an eel-like primitive vertebrate, is a popular organism for neurobiology studies because it has a relatively simple nervous system. It is of particular interest to those studying spinal cord injury because, unlike humans, the lamprey can regenerate nerve connections and recover normal mobility within about 8 weeks following an injury to its spinal cord.

21h

Drug reduces risk of kidney failure in people with diabetes, study finds

A new landmark clinical trial shows that a drug lowers the risk of kidney failure by a third in people with Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease.

21h

Antimicrobial resistance gene: New gene variant is more resistant to hospital antiseptic

A team of investigators has discovered a new, more powerful variant on an antimicrobial resistance gene common among Staphylococcus species. The gene protects the bacteria from an antiseptic compound widely used in healthcare. The team showed that the newly discovered gene occurs in a highly virulent and multi-resistant clone of Staphylococcus epidermidis, found in healthcare settings worldwide.

21h

Asteroids help scientists to measure the diameters of faraway stars

Using the unique capabilities of telescopes specialized on cosmic gamma rays, scientists have measured the smallest apparent size of a star on the night sky to date. The measurements reveal the diameters of a giant star 2,674 light-years away and of a sun-like star at a distance of 700 light-years.

21h

Mechanism of resistance to BRAF inhibitors in melanoma identified

Melanoma is one of the most aggressive types of skin cancer, but recent advances in targeted therapies have improved the prognosis for many patients. Unfortunately, for some patients these positive outcomes are not long lasting, due to the development of drug resistance and tumor recurrence. Researchers have now discovered a mechanism by which melanoma cells become resistant to the commonly used d

21h

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn

Pollen genes mutate naturally in only some strains of corn, according to Rutgers-led research that helps explain the genetic instability in certain strains and may lead to better breeding of corn and other crops.

21h

Gene-based factor VIIa prevents bleeding episodes in animals with hemophilia

Hematology researchers have further refined how a treatment currently used on an urgent basis to control bleeding in hemophilia patients holds promise as a preventive treatment as well. A study in animals may set the stage for a new therapy for a subset of patients with hemophilia who now develop antibodies to the standard maintenance treatment and then require on-demand "bypass" therapy.

21h

G enetic ‘weapon’ picks off pathogens — but spares beneficial microbes

G enetic ‘weapon’ picks off pathogens — but spares beneficial microbes G enetic ‘weapon’ picks off pathogens — but spares beneficial microbes, Published online: 15 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01210-w Structures made of DNA are designed to target the bacteria that cause cholera.

21h

Low-calorie sweetener derived from lactose gets manufacturing boost from yeast

The quest to satisfy the sweet tooth without adding to the waistline has a new weapon in its arsenal: a strain of yeast that can metabolize lactose, the sugar in dairy products, into tagatose, a natural sweetener with less than half the calories of table sugar.

21h

Researchers forge new computational tools to make more accurate predictions of protein structures

Where the village smithy once stood now stands an algorithm, its mighty mathematical hammer pounding proteins into shape.

21h

Dubai to build the world’s largest concentrated solar power plant

A new concentrated solar plant is under construction in Dubai. When it opens next year, it will be the largest plant of its kind on Earth. Concentrated solar power solves the problem of how to store electricity in ways that solar pannels cannot. A Saudi power company will soon begin construction on the world's largest concentrated solar plant . Situated in the United Arab Emirates, the plant will

21h

New study first to identify cause of rare genetic metabolic disorder

A new study from BC Children's Hospital, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and an international team of researchers published in the New England Journal of Medicine is the first to identify a rarely-seen type of DNA mutation as the cause of an inherited metabolic disorder. Inherited metabolic disorders — where the body can't break down specific nutrients from food leading to a range of ser

21h

Google searches reveal popular bird species

Cross-referencing a decade of Google searches and citizen science observations, researchers have determined which of 621 North American bird species are currently the most popular and which characteristics of species drive human interest. Study findings have just been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

21h

Q&A: How Dogs Find Their Way Home

Lost dogs rely on a fine sense of smell to map their location.

21h

Global Health: In African Villages, These Phones Become Ultrasound Scanners

A hand-held device brings medical imaging to remote communities, often for the first time.

21h

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