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nyheder2019april18

Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore

Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.

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Farewell to “Watson For Drug Discovery”

STAT is reporting that IBM has stopped trying to sell their “Watson for Drug Discovery” machine learning/AI tool, according to sources within the company. I have no reason to doubt that – in fact, I’ve sort of been expecting it. But no one seems to have told IBM’s website programming team, because the pages touting the product are still up (at least they are as I write this). They’re worth taking

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Glowing millipede genitalia help scientists tell species apart

Sometimes, it's really easy for scientists to tell species of animals apart—they'll be obviously different shapes or colors. Other times, different species will look nearly identical to the naked eye. In those cases, scientists need to turn to techniques like DNA analysis to tell them apart. Or, like researchers at the Field Museum discovered when studying some near-identical millipedes, you can s

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The art of protein blacksmithing

Biological physicists took inspiration from the mighty blacksmith to refine their computational models of how proteins fold. These models will help structural biologists who design drugs and other therapies.

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Investigators incorporate randomized trial within dialysis care delivery

The Time to Reduce Mortality in ESRD (TiME) trial was a large pragmatic trial demonstration project designed to determine the benefits of hemodialysis sessions that are longer than many patients currently receive.The trial was conducted through a partnership between academic investigators and 2 large dialysis provider organizations using a highly centralized implementation approach.Although the tr

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Lasers make magnets behave like fluids

Researchers have discovered how magnets recover after being blasted by a laser. It turns out, they act a bit like oil and water in a jar.

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Green material for refrigeration identified

Researchers have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners.

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Blood pressure drug shows promise for treating Parkinson's and dementia in animal study

A prescribed drug to treat high blood pressure has shown promise against conditions such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and forms of dementia in studies carried out in mice and zebrafish.

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Pediatric endocrinologist gives iconic 'Mona Lisa' a second medical opinion

A doctor refutes the most recent hypothesis that 'Lisa' had hypothyroidism and psychomotor retardation.

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Researchers use gene editing with CRISPR to treat lethal lung diseases before birth

Using CRISPR gene editing, researchers have thwarted a lethal lung disease in an animal model in which a harmful mutation causes death within hours after birth. This proof-of-concept study showed that in utero editing could be a promising new approach for treating lung diseases before birth.

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Forecasting contagious ideas: 'Infectivity' models accurately predict tweet lifespan

Estimating tweet infectivity from the first 50 retweets is the key to predicting whether a tweet will go viral, according to a new study.

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Scientists create a "lifelike" material that has metabolism and can self-reproduce

Scientists at Cornell University devise a material with 3 key traits of life. The goal for the researchers is not to create life but lifelike machines. The researchers were able to program metabolism into the material's DNA. None Cornell University engineers have created an artificial material that has three key traits of life — metabolism, self-assembly and organization. The engineers were able

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India Blew up a Satellite. Now A “Space Fence” Is Tracking Its Debris

Explosive Demonstration Last month, India demonstrated its capabilities as a spacefaring nation and drew international criticism when it used a missile to blew up one of its own satellites. The launch happened to coincide with Lockheed Martin’s test run of a new space monitoring technology called the Space Fence, which can detect and track any unregistered objects orbiting the Earth. According to

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US health agency pours $350 million into fight against opioid crisis

US health agency pours $350 million into fight against opioid crisis US health agency pours $350 million into fight against opioid crisis, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01288-2 Research grants will support four teams working across several states to find the best strategies to combat opioid abuse.

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Research provides important insight on the brain-body connection

A study conducted by University of Arkansas researchers reveals that neurons in the motor cortex exhibit an unexpected division of labor, a finding that could help scientists understand how the brain controls the body and provide insight on certain neurological disorders.

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This paper-thin indoor antenna lets you enjoy free ultra HD TV

You can get it now for just $16.99. This paper-thin indoor antenna lets you enjoy free ultra HD TV and you can get it now for just $16.99.

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Morphing origami takes a new shape, expanding use possibilities

Researchers have created a new type of origami that can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics.

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Artificial intelligence speeds efforts to develop clean, virtually limitless fusion energy

Scientists are applying deep learning — a powerful new version of the machine learning form of artificial intelligence — to forecast sudden disruptions that can halt fusion reactions and damage the doughnut-shaped tokamaks that house the reactions.

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Rare 'Bubble Boy Disease' Likely Cured with New Gene Therapy

Eight infants with a severe immune disorder, known as "bubble boy disease," appear to be cured of the disease thanks to an experimental gene therapy.

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Genetic Risk Score Developed for Obesity

The tool weighs millions of variants to determine how susceptible a person is to becoming obese.

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Archaeological society tries to stem continuing controversy over #MeToo scandal

Other scientific societies plan to update harassment policies in response

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Expert: AI-Generated Music Is A “Total Legal Clusterf*ck”

AI-Generated Music If you train a music-generating artificial intelligence exclusively on tracks by Beyoncé, do you owe the pop star a cut of any resulting songs’ profits? And is it even legal to use copyrighted songs to train an AI in the first place? Those are just a couple of the questions The Verge poses in a fascinating new story about AI-generated music published Wednesday. And while the pu

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Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity

More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.

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How do we make moral decisions?

When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Yet, why we make such decisions has been widely debated. Are we motivated by feelings of guilt or fairness? Some people may rely on principles of both guilt and fairness and may switch their moral rule depending on the circumstances, according to a Radboud University — Da

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Can science writing be automated?

A neural network developed at MIT and elsewhere can "read" scientific research papers and generate plain-English summaries of their contents.

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Spacewatch: Israel's private moon mission crash-lands

Beresheet spacecraft hit moon’s surface at 500km per hour and would have been destroyed on impact Israel’s Beresheet lander has failed in its attempt to become the first privately funded mission to land on the moon. The 150kg spacecraft began its descent on 11 April but ran into difficulties about 14km above the lunar surface, when the main engine shut down unexpectedly. The spacecraft was still

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Three-dimensional imaging identifies nutrient exchange in the human placenta

New three-dimensional imaging of the human placenta has been developed to help understand the reasons for fetal growth restriction.

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Scientists Discover 1.8 Million Hidden Southern California Earthquakes

Southern California is famous for its sandy beaches, wine country, theme parks and Hollywood glitz. And also its earthquakes. Now, researchers have identified more than 1.8 million previously unknown earthquakes that hit Southern California between 2008 and 2017. The findings suggest these truly tiny earthquakes — as small as just 0.3 magnitude on the Richter scale — happen every 174 seconds, yet

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We Might All Have Synesthesia, New Study Suggests

Oh, to be a synesthete, those rare people with access to an extra layer of perception. Sounds have colors. Words have taste. Colors play music. The list goes on. The phenomenon isn't totally understood by scientists, but the general idea is that those with synesthesia experience sensory inputs differently than the rest of us. It's no wonder that synesthesia is common among artists. But for those o

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Meet the Bajau sea nomads — they can reportedly hold their breath for 13 minutes

The Bajau people travel in small flotillas throughout the Phillipines, Malaysia, and Indonesia, hunting fish underwater for food. Over the years, practicing this lifestyle has given the Bajau unique adaptations to swimming underwater. Many find it straightforward to dive up to 13 minutes 200 feet below the surface of the ocean. Unfortunately, many disparate factors are erasing the traditional Baj

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The amount of energy produced from a '60 foot wide PV System' built along all interstate, freeway, expressway & principal arterial roads within the U.S. would power the entire U.S. Ground Transportation Fleet (excluding rail) with 100% solar (if said fleet was converted into electric) [OC].

Imagine we converted all internal combustion engine cars, trucks, and buses in the U.S. to electric. How large of a PV system would it take to run the entire U.S. electric ground fleet on 100% solar? How much would the PV system cost and how much money + petroleum would we save on fuel? Answer: a 1.133 TW-pDC PV system would cost approximately $3.39 trillion, would produce over 1.47 trillion kWh/

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Facebook says more Instagram passwords exposed than thought

Millions more Instagram users were affected by a password security lapse than parent company Facebook acknowledged nearly four weeks ago.

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Netflix unveils plans for New York production hub

Netflix announced plans Thursday to create a New York City production center for its original programs that could lead to thousands of new jobs.

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Consumer version of BlackBerry Messenger will go dark on May 31

The consumer version of BlackBerry Messenger (BBM) will be shutting down on May 31, 2019, after a nearly 14-year run, it was announced on Thursday.

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The Mueller Report Confirms We’re Living in a Cyberpunk Dystopia

Harm to Ongoing Matter When the Justice Department released a heavily-redacted version of the Mueller Report Thursday, the conversation quickly devolved into partisan bickering. Only time will tell what the report means for the Trump administration. But what’s immediately clear is that concepts that were once restricted to fictional cyberpunk dystopias — from government hackers to botnet propagan

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High entropy alloys as a bold step forward in alloy development

High entropy alloys as a bold step forward in alloy development High entropy alloys as a bold step forward in alloy development, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09700-1 Diluting a base element with small amounts of another has served as the basis for developing alloys for thousands of years since the advent of bronze. Today, a fundamentally new idea where alloys have no si

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Publisher Correction: A network of chaperones prevents and detects failures in membrane protein lipid bilayer integration

Publisher Correction: A network of chaperones prevents and detects failures in membrane protein lipid bilayer integration Publisher Correction: A network of chaperones prevents and detects failures in membrane protein lipid bilayer integration, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09912-5 Publisher Correction: A network of chaperones prevents and detects failures in membrane pr

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Publisher Correction: Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation

Publisher Correction: Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation Publisher Correction: Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09797-4 Publisher Correction: Nitric oxide-dependent anaerobic ammonium oxidation

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Reconstitution of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide pathway for assembly of high-mannose N-glycans

Reconstitution of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide pathway for assembly of high-mannose N- glycans Reconstitution of the lipid-linked oligosaccharide pathway for assembly of high-mannose N- glycans, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09752-3 Attachment of the oligosaccharide Man9GlcNAc2 is required for glycoprotein folding and secretion but synthesizing this compound for stru

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L amino acid transporter structure and molecular bases for the asymmetry of substrate interaction

L amino acid transporter structure and molecular bases for the asymmetry of substrate interaction L amino acid transporter structure and molecular bases for the asymmetry of substrate interaction, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09837-z L-Amino acid Transporters (LATs) are asymmetric amino acid exchangers. Here the authors determine the crystal structure of a prokaryotic L

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Author Correction: Environment-responsive nanophores for therapy and treatment monitoring via molecular MRI quenching

Author Correction: Environment-responsive nanophores for therapy and treatment monitoring via molecular MRI quenching Author Correction: Environment-responsive nanophores for therapy and treatment monitoring via molecular MRI quenching, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09887-3 Author Correction: Environment-responsive nanophores for therapy and treatment monitoring via mole

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Self-organization of Plk4 regulates symmetry breaking in centriole duplication

Self-organization of Plk4 regulates symmetry breaking in centriole duplication Self-organization of Plk4 regulates symmetry breaking in centriole duplication, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09847-x During centriole duplication, Plk4 regulates formation of a single daughter centriole adjacent to the mother centriole, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, the authors show tha

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Dishevelled-3 conformation dynamics analyzed by FRET-based biosensors reveals a key role of casein kinase 1

Dishevelled-3 conformation dynamics analyzed by FRET-based biosensors reveals a key role of casein kinase 1 Dishevelled-3 conformation dynamics analyzed by FRET-based biosensors reveals a key role of casein kinase 1, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09651-7 Dishevelled (DVL) is the key component of Wnt signaling pathway that acts as a signaling hub. Here, authors study the

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Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods

Researchers recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of the 24 diets tested, only three were positive for low concentrations of total mercury, and only one of those contained detectable methylmercury.

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Firms are better off revealing their environmental practices

Firms that value and practice environmental transparency in their reporting to stakeholders are in general better economic performers than those whose practices are more opaque.

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Life-threatening foot disease found in endangered huemul deer in Chile

Scientists report the first cases of foot disease for endangered huemul deer in Chilean Patagonia. Culturally iconic, the huemul deer is featured alongside the condor on Chile's coat of arms and is a symbol of biodiversity in the region.

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New software aims to reduce variability in ELISA biomarker tests

A new computational approach has been developed to reduce variability in common research biomarker tests, a promising step in improving the ability of biomedical researchers and basic scientists to reproduce data and facilitate more consistent results across laboratories and long-term projects.

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New research, April 8-14, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change mitigation Perception of public opinion on global warming and the role of opinion deviance Stories vs. facts: triggering emotion and action-taking on climate change (open access) The role of na

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Asian nations in early tobacco epidemic: study

Asian countries are in the early stages of a tobacco smoking epidemic with habits mirroring those of the United States from past decades, setting the stage for a spike in future deaths from smoking-related diseases.

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Bringing Joy Back To Childbirth

[En español] In the US alone, 3 million new moms suffer from postpartum depression, or PPD. Most moms agree that, despite the discomfort during pregnancy and the pain during labor, childbirth is a joyful experience. And I imagine that must be true as many women around the world have more than one child. However, postpartum […]

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Americans' energy use surges despite climate change concern

Americans burned a record amount of energy in 2018, with a 10% jump in consumption from booming natural gas helping to lead the way, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says.

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NASA's 1st female astronaut candidate, Jerrie Cobb, dies

NASA's first female astronaut candidate, pilot Jerrie Cobb, has died.

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By Protecting the Presidency, Mueller Has Hurt the Country

There is much in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report to concern the American public. It recounts a tale of Russian electoral interference that everyone (save President Donald Trump) now recognizes as extensive. And it details a course of obstructive conduct by the president that borders on criminality. Yet Mueller reached no conclusion about the president’s behavior, and that is an even great

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A mother lode of protection

Now research conducted in mice offers new hope that neonatal herpes infections might eventually be avoidable by stimulating an immune response in mothers.

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Project Sidewalk helps users map accessibility around Seattle and other cities

UW researchers have led the development of Project Sidewalk, an online crowdsourcing game that lets anyone with an internet connection use Google Street View to virtually explore neighborhoods and label curb ramps, missing or rough sidewalks, obstacles and more.

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Elizabeth Warren wants public lands to create jobs—and clean energy

Environment These 650 million acres matter. Americans may not realize that they collectively own about 650 million acres of public land and water in this country in the form of national parks, wildlife refuges,…

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Tech startups Pinterest, Zoom soar in Wall Street debut

Pinterest got off to a flying start on Wall Street Thursday in the market debut for the San Francisco-based visual discovery service, a positive sign for the wave of Silicon Valley firms planning stock listings.

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IPOs help communities prosper, new research shows

Companies that go public on the stock market provide an economic boost to the local communities where they're based, according to new research from Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business.

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New variety of zebra chip disease threatens potato production in southwestern Oregon

Named after the dark stripes that form inside potatoes after they are cut and fried, zebra chip disease is a potentially devastating affliction that can result in yield losses up to 100% for farmers.

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Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger

Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

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Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of the 24 diets tested, only three were positive for low concentrations of total mercury, and only one of those contained detectable methylmercury. The study was published in Topics in Companion Animal Medicine.

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New York’s Aggressive Climate Law Takes Aim at Skyscrapers

The city's new rules compel the owners of big buildings to dramatically reduce their carbon emissions as part of a broad package of climate reforms.

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New variety of zebra chip disease threatens potato production in southwestern Oregon

Named after the dark stripes that form inside potatoes after they are cut and fried, zebra chip disease is a potentially devastating affliction that can result in yield losses up to 100% for farmers.

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Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger

Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

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Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of the 24 diets tested, only three were positive for low concentrations of total mercury, and only one of those contained detectable methylmercury. The study was published in Topics in Companion Animal Medicine.

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Diabetes drug may reverse heart failure

Researchers have demonstrated that the recently developed antidiabetic drug empagliflozin can treat and reverse the progression of heart failure in non-diabetic animal models. Their study also shows that this drug can make the heart produce more energy and function more efficiently.

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How superstitions spread

Superstitious beliefs may seem irrational, but they can nevertheless catch on in a society. Using an evolutionary approach to studying the emergence of coordinated behaviors, biologists showed how a jumble of individual beliefs, including superstitions, can coalesce into an accepted social norm.

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Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish

A new study suggests reefs suffering coral bleaching can still be productive, as fish dependent on reefs get a bulk of their food delivered via the currents flowing past.

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Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells

New research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells.

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Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species

The iconic 'death roll' of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study.

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Best Cars of the 2019 New York Auto Show

With new neighbors (Hudson Yard), NYIAS rocks. Plenty of compact cars suited for crowded metro New York. Or the Mercedes-Benz GLS, the champion highway cruiser. The post Best Cars of the 2019 New York Auto Show appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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News at a glance

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Waning immunity

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Why cities?

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Retraction

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Response to Comment on "Ghost cytometry"

Di Carlo et al . comment that our original results were insufficient to prove that the ghost cytometry technique is performing a morphologic analysis of cells in flow. We emphasize that the technique is primarily intended to acquire and classify morphological information of cells in a computationally efficient manner without reconstructing images. We provide additional supporting information, inc

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Samarium supersensors

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Motion measurement

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Conflict in the air

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Thoughtful service

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The geomorphology, color, and thermal properties of Ryugu: Implications for parent-body processes

The near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu is thought to have been produced from a parent body that contained water ice and organic molecules. The Hayabusa2 spacecraft has obtained global multicolor images of Ryugu. Geomorphological features present include a circum-equatorial ridge, east-west dichotomy, high boulder abundances across the entire surface, and impact craters. Age estimates f

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Thirst regulates motivated behavior through modulation of brainwide neural population dynamics

Physiological needs produce motivational drives, such as thirst and hunger, that regulate behaviors essential to survival. Hypothalamic neurons sense these needs and must coordinate relevant brainwide neuronal activity to produce the appropriate behavior. We studied dynamics from ~24,000 neurons in 34 brain regions during thirst-motivated choice behavior in 21 mice as they consumed water and beca

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Spontaneous behaviors drive multidimensional, brainwide activity

Neuronal populations in sensory cortex produce variable responses to sensory stimuli and exhibit intricate spontaneous activity even without external sensory input. Cortical variability and spontaneous activity have been variously proposed to represent random noise, recall of prior experience, or encoding of ongoing behavioral and cognitive variables. Recording more than 10,000 neurons in mouse v

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Probing entanglement in a many-body-localized system

An interacting quantum system that is subject to disorder may cease to thermalize owing to localization of its constituents, thereby marking the breakdown of thermodynamics. The key to understanding this phenomenon lies in the system’s entanglement, which is experimentally challenging to measure. We realize such a many-body–localized system in a disordered Bose-Hubbard chain and characterize its

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Probing Renyi entanglement entropy via randomized measurements

Entanglement is a key feature of many-body quantum systems. Measuring the entropy of different partitions of a quantum system provides a way to probe its entanglement structure. Here, we present and experimentally demonstrate a protocol for measuring the second-order Rényi entropy based on statistical correlations between randomized measurements. Our experiments, carried out with a trapped-ion qu

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Giant piezoelectricity of Sm-doped Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 single crystals

High-performance piezoelectrics benefit transducers and sensors in a variety of electromechanical applications. The materials with the highest piezoelectric charge coefficients ( d 33 ) are relaxor-PbTiO 3 crystals, which were discovered two decades ago. We successfully grew Sm-doped Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 -PbTiO 3 (Sm-PMN-PT) single crystals with even higher d 33 values ranging from 3400 to 4100

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Hayabusa2 arrives at the carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu–A spinning top-shaped rubble pile

The Hayabusa2 spacecraft arrived at the near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu in 2018. We present Hayabusa2 observations of Ryugu’s shape, mass, and geomorphology. Ryugu has an oblate "spinning top" shape, with a prominent circular equatorial ridge. Its bulk density, 1.19 ± 0.02 grams per cubic centimeter, indicates a high-porosity (>50%) interior. Large surface boulders suggest a rubble-

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The surface composition of asteroid 162173 Ryugu from Hayabusa2 near-infrared spectroscopy

The near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu, the target of the Hayabusa2 sample-return mission, is thought to be a primitive carbonaceous object. We report reflectance spectra of Ryugu’s surface acquired with the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS3) on Hayabusa2, to provide direct measurements of the surface composition and geological context for the returned samples. A weak, narrow absorption feature cen

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Deconstructing waters diffuse OH stretching vibrational spectrum with cold clusters

The diffuse vibrational envelope displayed by water precludes direct observation of how different hydrogen-bond topologies dictate the spectral response of individual hydroxy group (OH) oscillators. Using cold, isotopically labeled cluster ions, we report the spectral signatures of a single, intact water (H 2 O) molecule embedded at various sites in the clathrate-like cage structure adopted by th

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Three-orders-of-magnitude variation of carrier lifetimes with crystal phase of gold nanoclusters

We report a three-orders-of-magnitude variation of carrier lifetimes in exotic crystalline phases of gold nanoclusters (NCs) in addition to the well-known face-centered cubic structure, including hexagonal close-packed (hcp) Au 30 and body-centered cubic (bcc) Au 38 NCs protected by the same type of capping ligand. The bcc Au 38 NC had an exceptionally long carrier lifetime (4.7 microseconds) com

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Intrinsic apoptosis shapes the tumor spectrum linked to inactivation of the deubiquitinase BAP1

Malignancies arising from mutation of tumor suppressors have unexplained tissue proclivity. For example, BAP1 encodes a widely expressed deubiquitinase for histone H2A, but germline mutations are predominantly associated with uveal melanomas and mesotheliomas. We show that BAP1 inactivation causes apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells, fibroblasts, liver, and pancreatic tissue but not in melano

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Unbiased detection of CRISPR off-targets in vivo using DISCOVER-Seq

CRISPR-Cas genome editing induces targeted DNA damage but can also affect off-target sites. Current off-target discovery methods work using purified DNA or specific cellular models but are incapable of direct detection in vivo. We developed DISCOVER-Seq (discovery of in situ Cas off-targets and verification by sequencing), a universally applicable approach for unbiased off-target identification t

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Cytosine base editor generates substantial off-target single-nucleotide variants in mouse embryos

Genome editing holds promise for correcting pathogenic mutations. However, it is difficult to determine off-target effects of editing due to single-nucleotide polymorphism in individuals. Here we developed a method named GOTI (genome-wide off-target analysis by two-cell embryo injection) to detect off-target mutations by editing one blastomere of two-cell mouse embryos using either CRISPR-Cas9 or

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Cytosine, but not adenine, base editors induce genome-wide off-target mutations in rice

Cytosine and adenine base editors (CBEs and ABEs) are promising new tools for achieving the precise genetic changes required for disease treatment and trait improvement. However, genome-wide and unbiased analyses of their off-target effects in vivo are still lacking. Our whole-genome sequencing analysis of rice plants treated with the third-generation base editor (BE3), high-fidelity BE3 (HF1-BE3

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New Products

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Comment on "Ghost cytometry"

Ota et al . (Reports, 15 June 2018, p. 1246) report using pseudo-random optical masks and a spatial-temporal transformation to perform blur-free, high–frame rate imaging of cells in flow with a high signal-to-noise ratio. They also claim sorting at rates of 3000 cells per second, based on imaging data. The experiments conducted and results reported in their study are insufficient to support these

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Amygdala ensembles encode behavioral states

Internal states, including affective or homeostatic states, are important behavioral motivators. The amygdala regulates motivated behaviors, yet how distinct states are represented in amygdala circuits is unknown. By longitudinally imaging neural calcium dynamics in freely moving mice across different environments, we identified opponent changes in activity levels of two major, nonoverlapping pop

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Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

Scientists have gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development.

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Samarium supersensors

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Motion measurement

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Your expressive face tells the story of human evolution — conveying emotion was essential

A panel of eight experts in the evolution of the human face have collaborated on a new summary of how we've changed. Their paper promotes the importance of social interaction as a factor in the structure of our visages. We can visually express more than 20 categories of emotion. Early humans not so much. None Your face is not yours alone — written there are traces of your parents, grandparents, a

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Experimental Gene Therapy Frees "Bubble-Boy" Babies from a Life of Isolation

Treatment restores immune-system function in young children with severe disorder — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The Democrats’ Plan to Summon Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller might not be done just yet. Democrats have demanded that the special counsel appear in person before Congress to testify about his 448-page report and explain his decision to leave open the question of whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice in the investigation over whether his campaign conspired with the Russians during the 2016 election. An hour before the redacted rep

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Mueller’s Damning Portrait of Trump

The president lies wantonly and profligately—to the press, to his aides, and above all to the public. He tries to interfere in investigations. He acts as if he has something to hide. He reacts petulantly to being told no, and repeatedly pressures staffers even after being rejected. Those words are not taken from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report , but they might as well be. Over 448 pages,

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Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers

A powerful computational study of southern California seismic records has revealed detailed information about a plethora of previously undetected small earthquakes, giving a more precise picture about stress in the earth's crust.

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Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

Scientists have gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development.

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These beetles have successfully freeloaded for 100 million years

An ancient and rare beetle fossil is the oldest example of a social relationship between two animal species.

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'Induced' driving miles could overwhelm potential energy-saving benefits of self-driving

The benefits of self-driving cars will likely induce vehicle owners to drive more, and those extra miles could partially or completely offset the potential energy-saving benefits that automation may provide, according to a new study.

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When the Large Hadron Collider Turns on, It May Trap Dark Matter

Eyes Peeled When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) turns back on and starts smashing particles again sometime in 2021, it may also point us in the direction of dark matter. For years, scientists have been trying and failing to spot the invisible stuff that makes up the majority of matter in the universe. But now researchers have a new target: a comparatively heavy and long-lived particle that may b

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Facebook says more Instagram passwords exposed than thought

Millions more Instagram users were affected by a password security lapse than parent company Facebook acknowledged nearly four weeks ago.

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Is Going Solar Worth It for Your Home? Use This Solar Cost Calculator to Find Out

In theory, using solar energy in private homes has always been a no brainer. Why pay the electric company an arm and a leg every month when sunlight is free? Unfortunately, putting theory into practice hasn’t always been that simple. In the past, high installation costs meant very few people could actually afford to make the switch. And the ones who could afford what solar cost still had to ask t

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Airline Warns of Measles After Flight Attendant Falls Into Coma

The woman was hospitalized after contracting the disease, and passengers on a flight from J.F.K. to Tel Aviv are told to watch for symptoms.

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Goddess of Fire

In the Hawaiian religion, Pele is the goddess of volcanoes, fire, and lightning. She is believed to have created the Hawaiian islands, and is considered to be a sacred, primordial force. Like many native Hawaiians of his generation, Keoni Kaholoʻaʻā, a park ranger at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, wasn’t exposed to much information about his indigenous roots. “I never grew up learning the cultur

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The Mueller Report Is Much Worse For Trump Than Barr Let On

The Mueller report clearly shows that Donald Trump attempted to obstruct justice, regardless of what the attorney general says.

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A Mystery Agent Is Doxing Iran's Hackers and Dumping Their Code

Iranian intelligence seems to be getting its own taste of a Shadow Brokers-style leak of secrets.

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New variety of zebra chip disease threatens potato production in southwestern Oregon

Named after the dark stripes that form inside potatoes after they are cut and fried, zebra chip disease is a potentially devastating affliction that can result in yield losses up to 100% for farmers. Swisher et al. identified a new haplotype, designated haplotype F, that causes zebra chip symptoms in potato. Prior to this discovery, 'only haplotypes A and B were known to cause zebra chip symptoms

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This ancient hypercarnivore had three sets of razor-sharp teeth

Animals A paleontologist found the giant fossil in a drawer on this lunch break. Paleontologists at Ohio University just identified a terrifying fossil as the oldest known hyaenodont, a group of extinct carnivorous mammals. The scientists described…

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How Do I Know If My Tap Water Is Safe?

Everyday Einstein explains what contaminates our water, how it gets there, and what we can do to test it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Machine Learning Is Giving Retro Games Cutting-Edge Graphics

Retro Rewind Your favorite classic video games are getting a killer makeover. But it’s not big-name game developers making the improvements: it’s independent modders. Most game updates require teams of designers and coders working for months or even years, according to a fascinating new feature in The Verge , but now many are using machine learning to expedite the process — allowing a single high

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The Mueller Report Is an Impeachment Referral

The redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report released on Thursday runs 448 pages. But its most important implication can be summarized in a single sentence: There is sufficient evidence that President Donald Trump obstructed justice to merit impeachment hearings. A basic principle lies at the heart of the American criminal-justice system: The accused is entitled to a fair defen

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The Indelible Awfulness of E. L. James’s The Mister

It is strange, when you pause to think about it, that E. L. James is still out there being glowingly profiled as a transgressive, taboo-busting warrior for women’s desire, given that her fictional worlds position female characters somewhere between the saintly Dorothea Brooke and the wimple-wearing Maria von Trapp. Her women are blushing, impoverished virgins, pristine of heart and fragile of app

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Giant Robots & Power Suits

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Data mining digs up hidden clues to major California earthquake triggers

A powerful computational study of southern California seismic records has revealed detailed information about a plethora of previously undetected small earthquakes, giving a more precise picture about stress in the earth's crust.

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Preliminary study suggests mercury not a risk in dog foods

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, recently investigated levels of methylmercury in a small sampling of commercial dog foods and found good news for dog owners. Of the 24 diets tested, only three were positive for low concentrations of total mercury, and only one of those contained detectable methylmercury.

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Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger

Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research has found.

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Brain's imperfect execution of mathematically optimal perception

Human perception is based on mathematically optimal principles, but the brain implements those principles imperfectly, suggests new research.

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See the “Colossus” Firefighting Robot That Helped Save Notre Dame

Blaze-Battling Bot When soaring temperatures and a roof on the brink of collapse made it too dangerous for humans to continue battling the Notre Dame blaze on Monday, the Paris Fire Brigade called in a firefighting robot named Colossus — a stunning demonstration of how high-tech robots are helping emergency responders stay safe on the job. “It was a terrible situation, but it’s really amazing to

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Electric skyrmions charge ahead for next-generation data storage

A team of researchers has observed chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions, in a material with reversible electrical properties — a combination that could lead to more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information, even after they've been turned off.

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Algorithms spot millions of California’s tiniest quakes in historical data

Algorithms spot millions of California’s tiniest quakes in historical data Algorithms spot millions of California’s tiniest quakes in historical data, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01258-8 Project identifies reams of i mperceptible tremors that can help to image fault lines in unprecedented detail.

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Fish under threat release chemicals to warn others of danger

Fish warn each other about danger by releasing chemicals into the water as a signal, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found.

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The brain's imperfect execution of mathematically optimal perception

Human perception is based on mathematically optimal principles, but the brain implements those principles imperfectly, suggests new research by Elina Stengård and Ronald van den Berg of the University of Uppsala, Sweden. They present their findings in PLOS Computational Biology.

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Bioengineers program cells as digital signal processors

Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells. The research, described online today in the journal Science, dramatically expands the chemical, physical and environmental cues engineers can use to prompt programmed responses from engineered organisms.

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Bioengineers add cooperative molecules to their toolkit for programming signal processing

Synthetic biologists have added a new toolset powered by self-assembling molecules and predictive modeling will allow researchers to construct the complex computation and signal processing found in eukaryotic organisms, including human cells.

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Scientists identify almost 2 million previously 'hidden' earthquakes

Using powerful computers and a technique called template matching, scientists identify millions of previously unidentified tiny earthquakes.

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RNA sequencing used to discover novel genes and pathways in celiac disease

Researchers at the Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Center at MassGeneral Hospital for Children have discovered novel genes and pathways related to early stages in the development of celiac disease and the ongoing inflammation and comorbidities associated with the condition.

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New immune pathway involved in resistance to parasite worms found in undercooked pork

Scientists from Lancaster University have discovered that immune responses originally found to prevent fungal infections are also important in eliminating Trichinella spiralis, a round worm and the causative agent of Trichinosis. People acquire trichinellosis by consuming raw or undercooked meat infected with the Trichinella parasite, particularly wild game meat or pork.

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Searching for the surface of water through a single molecule

By observing the spectroscopic behavior of single water molecules embedded in a super-cold, cage-like molecular structure, researchers have revealed key features that underlie the diffuse vibrational spectra of hydrogen-oxygen bonds that make studying the two-dimensional surface structure of water a challenge.

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Better performance for mixed tin-lead perovskite solar cells

Using a new solution chemistry, researchers have made mixed tin-lead perovskite solar cells more efficient.

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Samarium-doped crystals with 'giant' piezoelectricity

By introducing trace amounts of the element samarium (Sm), researchers greatly enhanced the performance of piezoelectric crystals used in advanced piezoelectric devices like sensors, a new study reports.

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Cataloging Southern California's tiny hidden earthquakes

Nearly 1.8 million tiny tremblors have been added to the catalog of total seismic events in Southern California over the past decade, reports a new study, which details the most comprehensive earthquake catalog to date.

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Coincidence helps with quantum measurements

Through randomly selected measurements, Austrian physicists can determine the quantum entanglement of many-particle systems. With the newly developed method, quantum simulations can be extended to a larger number of quantum particles. In the Science Magazine, the researchers report on the first successful demonstration of this method developed by physicists from Innsbruck, Austria.

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How the hepatitis B virus establishes persistent infection

New research sheds light on how a hepatitis B viral protein stimulates the expansion of immune cells that impair antiviral responses, according to a study published April 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Haitao Guo of the Indiana University School of Medicine, Bin Wang and Jiming Zhang of Fudan University, and colleagues. The findings potentially explain how the hepatitis B virus (H

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Harmonization of resting-state functional MRI data across multiple imaging sites

Harmonization method developed to reduce site-related differences between neuroimaging data from individual imaging sites and publicly released big data of multiple psychiatric disorders from many imaging sites.

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The FASEB Journal: DNA repair gene linked to male infertility

A key DNA repair gene known as X-ray repair cross-complementing group 1, or XRCC1, plays a vital role in maintaining genomic stability and is highly expressed in the early stages of sperm cell development (also known as spermatogenesis). To date, however, the exact mechanisms of XRCC1 have been unclear.

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Giant tortoises migrate unpredictably in the face of climate change

Researchers use GPS to track the timing and patterns of giant tortoise migration over multiple years. The tortoises often take the same migration routes over many years in order to find optimal food quality and temperatures. The timing of this migration is essential for keeping their energy levels high, and climate change could disrupt a tortoise's ability to migrate at the right time.

3h

Electric skyrmions charge ahead for next-generation data storage

A team of researchers has observed chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions, in a material with reversible electrical properties — a combination that could lead to more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information, even after they've been turned off.

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General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out

Researchers have found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep. They traced this neural circuitry back to a cluster of cells at the base of the brain responsible for churning out hormones to regulate bodily functions, mood, and sleep. The finding could lead to better drugs capable of putting people to sleep with fewer side effects.

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Hubble celebrates its 29th birthday with unrivaled view of the Southern Crab Nebula

This incredible image of the hourglass-shaped Southern Crab Nebula was taken to mark the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's 29th anniversary in space. The nebula, created by a binary star system, is one of the many objects that Hubble has demystified throughout its productive life. This new image adds to our understanding of the nebula and demonstrates the telescope's continued capabilities.

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Adding human touch to unchatty chatbots may lead to bigger letdown

Sorry, Siri, but just giving a chatbot a human name or adding humanlike features to its avatar might not be enough to win over a user if the device fails to maintain a conversational back-and-forth with that person, according to researchers. In fact, those humanlike features might create a backlash against less responsive humanlike chatbots.

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Taming the genome's 'jumping' sequences

Scientists have discovered how a family of proteins that regulates the activity of transposable elements in the genome allows them to make inheritable changes to the growing fetus.

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NASA Detects Universe’s Earliest Molecule for the First Time

Scientists have long suspected that helium hydride was the first molecule in the universe, but no one has ever detected it in space until now. NASA researchers have spotted helium hydride many light years away in a planetary nebula. The post NASA Detects Universe’s Earliest Molecule for the First Time appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Tiny Star Flares 10 Times Brighter Than the Sun

On August 13, 2017, the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) telescope spotted an intense solar flare from a tiny star barely bigger than Jupiter. But despite this sun's diminutive size, the flare gave off as much energy as 80 billion megatons of TNT. That's 10 times as powerful as the strongest flare ever observed on our own sun. It’s also the coolest star ever observed to give off such a hot fl

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Scientists Uncover California's Hidden Earthquakes

Nearly two million tiny tremors could help explain the inner workings of key faults — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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this kia habaniro uses artificial intelligence to know when you are sad

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Stop & Shop Strike Raises Concerns About Automation

submitted by /u/alacritythief [link] [comments]

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Tiny Earthquakes Shake Southern California Every 3 Minutes

Scientists discover 1.8 million previously undetected earthquakes in the Golden State.

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To amp up solar cells, scientists ditch silicon

New perovskite tandem cell promises to be cheaper than conventional ones, and almost as efficient

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How long do vaccines last? The surprising answers may help protect people longer

Scientists are developing vaccines that produce more durable immune responses and debating when booster shots are needed

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Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction

The American Bumblebee – a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario – is critically endangered, according to a new study. The finding found the native North American species, Bombus pensylvanicus, is facing imminent extinction from Canada, considered the highest and most at-risk classification before extinction.

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Tiny Earthquakes Happen Every Few Minutes In Southern California, Study Finds

A new catalog of Southern California earthquakes is 10 times larger than its predecessor list. The details of frequent, small quakes help scientists study what triggers large, destructive ones. (Image credit: Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

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More than a million tiny earthquakes revealed in Southern California

By putting millions of tiny quakes on record, scientists hope to learn more about what triggers the big ones.

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Scientists identify almost two million previously 'hidden' earthquakes

Poring through 10 years' worth of Southern California seismic data with the scientific equivalent of a fine-tooth comb, Caltech seismologists have identified nearly two million previously unidentified tiny earthquakes that occurred between 2008 and 2017.

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Bioengineers add cooperative molecules to their toolkit for programming signal processing

Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. Synthetic biologists have been able to reconstruct and mimic simpler forms of this cellular signal processing. But now, a new toolset powered by self-assembling molecules and predictive modeling will allow researchers to construct the complex co

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New method enables quantum simulations on larger systems

Through randomly selected measurements, Austrian physicists can now determine the quantum entanglement of many-particle systems. With the newly developed method, quantum simulations can be extended to a larger number of quantum particles. In Science, physicists from Innsbruck, Austria, report on the first successful demonstration of this method.

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IPOs help communities prosper, new research shows

Companies that go public on the stock market provide an economic boost to the local communities where they're based, according to new research from Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business.

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Mount Sinai researchers discover that diabetes drug may reverse heart failure

Study finds drug could have new applications in non-diabetics.

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General anesthesia hijacks sleep circuitry to knock you out

In a study published online April 18 in Neuron, researchers found that general anesthesia induces unconsciousness by hijacking the neural circuitry that makes us fall sleep. They traced this neural circuitry back to a cluster of cells at the base of the brain responsible for churning out hormones to regulate bodily functions, mood, and sleep. The finding could lead to better drugs capable of putti

3h

Scientists Uncover California's Hidden Earthquakes

Nearly two million tiny tremors could help explain the inner workings of key faults — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

3h

Bioengineers add cooperative molecules to their toolkit for programming signal processing

Elaborate molecular networks inside living cells enable them to sense and process many signals from the environment to perform desired cellular functions. Synthetic biologists have been able to reconstruct and mimic simpler forms of this cellular signal processing. But now, a new toolset powered by self-assembling molecules and predictive modeling will allow researchers to construct the complex co

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Google offers Android users choice to satisfy EU

Google on Thursday said users of its hugely popular Android devices would be offered a choice of five browsers and search engines as part of the company's effort to meet EU competition concerns.

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The Mysterious Function of a Neuronal Echo

Image courtesy Wikimedia Commons How do we visualize the brain in action? When one brain cell communicates with its partners, the message is fleeting. Action potentials, the basic currency of neuronal communication, are there and gone again in a millisecond burst of electricity. The transient nature of neuronal activity makes the job of a neuroscientist particularly tricky, like an anthropologist

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42,000-Year-Old Foal Entombed in Ice Still Had Liquid Blood in Its Veins

It's the oldest liquid blood on record, say scientists who want to clone the ice age horse.

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Breast cancer: Reducing this amino acid could make drugs more effective

New research in cell cultures and mice reveals a surprising link between the essential amino acid leucine and resistance to tamoxifen in breast cancer.

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Electric skyrmions charge ahead for next-generation data storage

A team of researchers led by Berkeley Lab has observed chirality for the first time in polar skyrmions, in a material with reversible electrical properties — a combination that could lead to more powerful data storage devices that continue to hold information, even after they've been turned off.

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Giant tortoises migrate unpredictably in the face of climate change

Researchers use GPS to track the timing and patterns of giant tortoise migration over multiple years. The tortoises often take the same migration routes over many years in order to find optimal food quality and temperatures. The timing of this migration is essential for keeping their energy levels high, and climate change could disrupt a tortoise's ability to migrate at the right time.

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Pig experiment raises ethical questions around brain damage

The brain is more resilient than previously thought. In a groundbreaking experiment published in this week's issue of Nature, neuroscientists created an artificial circulation system that successfully restored some functions and structures in pig brains. The result challenges the notion that mammalian brains are fully and irreversibly damaged by a lack of oxygen.

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The coolest cars from the 2019 New York Auto Show

Technology You need to see the 'HabaNiro.' Exciting new concept cars and cool bits of technology from the 2019 New York Auto Show.

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Giant tortoises migrate unpredictably in the face of climate change

Galapagos giant tortoises, sometimes called Gardeners of the Galapagos, are creatures of habit. In the cool dry season, the highlands of the volcano slopes are engulfed in cloud which allows the vegetation to grow despite the lack of rain. On the lower slopes, however, there is no thick fog layer, and vegetation is not available year round. Adult tortoises thus spend the dry season in the higher r

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Giant tortoises migrate unpredictably in the face of climate change

Galapagos giant tortoises, sometimes called Gardeners of the Galapagos, are creatures of habit. In the cool dry season, the highlands of the volcano slopes are engulfed in cloud which allows the vegetation to grow despite the lack of rain. On the lower slopes, however, there is no thick fog layer, and vegetation is not available year round. Adult tortoises thus spend the dry season in the higher r

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Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

submitted by /u/E3Ligase [link] [comments]

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Artificial intelligence is helping old video games look like new

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA

History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered.

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Researchers use 3D printer to print glass

For the first time, researchers have successfully 3D printed chalcogenide glass, a unique material used to make optical components that operate at mid-infrared wavelengths. The ability to 3D print this glass could make it possible to manufacture complex glass components and optical fibers for new types of low-cost sensors, telecommunications components and biomedical devices.

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Intentions attributed to other people change how we see their actions

Our apparent ability to see the intent in other's behavior leads us to cling to our false judgements.

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Decline in measles vaccination is causing a preventable global resurgence of the disease

In 2000, measles was declared to be eliminated in the United States. Today, the US and many other countries are experiencing outbreaks of measles because of declines in measles vaccine coverage. Without renewed focus on vaccination efforts, the disease may rebound in full force, according to infectious diseases experts.

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Trump Still Hasn’t Condemned Russia for Meddling in the 2016 Election

President Donald Trump had plenty to say on Twitter in the run-up to Attorney General William Barr’s news conference, and then after the publication of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Thursday. He reiterated what he’s said from the start: “No Collusion – No Obstruction!” One thing he didn’t do? Acknowledge what his intelligence agencies, as well as their counterparts in Britain and Ger

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The First Reparations Attempt at an American College Comes From Its Students

When sordid revelations surfaced in recent years of how the sale of hundreds of enslaved laborers in 1838 saved Georgetown University from the cliff of financial ruin, the college quickly cobbled together a multipronged response. It held a ceremony to deliver an official apology. It summoned a working group to study how to make penance for the wrongdoing. It began giving descendants of the 272 en

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Israeli team investigating 'chain of events' in lunar crash

The Israeli start-up behind last week's failed lunar landing said Thursday that it is still investigating a malfunction that caused the spacecraft to plummet to the moon's surface.

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Making digital tissue imaging better

A low-tech problem troubles the high-tech world of digital pathology imaging: There are no reliable standards for the quality of digitized tissue slides comprising the source material for computers reading and analyzing vast numbers of images. Poor-quality slides get mixed in with accurate slides, potentially confusing a computer program trying to learn what a cancerous cell looks like. Researcher

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Uber, Lyft implement new safety measures

Uber and Lyft instituted new safety features and policies this week. The move follows the death of Samantha Josephson, a student at the University of South Carolina, who was kidnapped and murdered …

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IPO mania: Zoom zooms, Pinterest pins down Wall Street

There's some tech jubilance in the air on Wall Street and in Silicon Valley as a pair of newly public companies—Zoom and Pinterest—are seeing their stocks soar on their first trading day.

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Mandy Gets the Northwestern Back on Track | Deadliest Catch

With the crab now on the run, Captain Sig puts his faith in daughter Mandy to close out the king crab season. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/D

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Glowing genitalia reveal the identity of mysterious millipedes

Ultraviolet light produces different colors that help scientists tell species apart

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The best air purifiers for your home

Gadgets Gadgets that trap allergens, odors, and bacteria. Breathe easier with an air purifier in your home when you rid your air of allergens, odors, and bacteria.

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A Genetic Risk Score Tries to Predict Whether a Child Will Become Obese

A still-controversial test could be administered to toddlers to gauge their chances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A Genetic Risk Score Tries to Predict Whether a Child Will Become Obese

A still-controversial test could be administered to toddlers to gauge their chances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Bee-wildering! Hives of Notre-Dame in miraculous survival

Some 200,000 bees inhabiting hives in Notre-Dame cathedral survived the inferno that engulfed the heritage landmark in a miraculous escape, their beekeeper said Thursday.

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Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells

New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells.

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Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction

The American Bumblebee—a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario—is critically endangered, according to a new study led by York University.

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Bee-wildering! Hives of Notre-Dame in miraculous survival

Some 200,000 bees inhabiting hives in Notre-Dame cathedral survived the inferno that engulfed the heritage landmark in a miraculous escape, their beekeeper said Thursday.

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Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells

New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells.

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Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction

The American Bumblebee—a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario—is critically endangered, according to a new study led by York University.

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Scientists advance creation of 'artificial lymph node' to fight cancer, other diseases

In a proof-of-principle study in mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report the creation of a specialized gel that acts like a lymph node to successfully activate and multiply cancer-fighting immune system T-cells. The work puts scientists a step closer, they say, to injecting such artificial lymph nodes into people and sparking T-cells to fight disease.

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How superstitions spread

Ancient Roman leaders once made decisions about important events, such as when to hold elections or where to build new cities, based on the presence or flight patterns of birds. Builders often omit the thirteenth floor from their floor plans, and many pedestrians go well out of their way to avoid walking under a ladder.

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Folding faults and seismic risk in the Kunlun range, Northwest Tibet

The tectonic deformation and growth pattern of the western Kunlun, which is the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, are not currently well understood. The surface rupture caused by an earthquake can provide a unique opportunity to investigate the impact of coseismic faulting on landscape evolution, to refine regional deformation models, and to understand future seismic risk.

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Getting More Consistent Results by Knowing the Quality of Your Protein

Download this guide from NanoTemper to learn how to identify and evaluate the quality of your protein samples!

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Can ginkgo biloba seeds fight skin infections?

Extracts from the seeds of the Ginkgo biloba tree show antibacterial activity on pathogens that can cause skin infections such as acne, psoriasis, dermatitis, and eczema, a new study finds. The findings show that the extracts inhibit the growth of Cutibacterium acnes , Staphylococcus aureus , and Streptococcus pyogenes . A nearly 200-year-old copy of a 16th-century text on traditional Chinese med

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Keder du dig allerede? Vi mister opmærksomheden for nyheder hurtigere og hurtigere

Populære historier bliver skiftet ud og glemt hurtigere end tidligere, viser undersøgelse.

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Ny dinosaur fylder hul i evolutionshistorien

Mongolsk fund viser, at kendt dino-art alligevel ikke opstod i Asien.

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Cell-killing proteins suppress listeria without killing cells

New North Carolina State University research shows that key proteins known for their ability to prevent viral infections by inducing cell death can also block certain bacterial infections without triggering the death of the host cells.

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Estimating the efficacy and cost of curative gene therapy for beta-thalassemia

Gene therapy offers the promise of a cure for beta-thalassemia and a new study has shown that it is associated with fewer complications and hospital admissions over 2 years than treatment by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

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‘Bubble Boys’ Cured in Medical Breakthrough Using Gene Therapy

submitted by /u/WhatTommyZeGermans [link] [comments]

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Elon Musk’s “Loop Project” Is One Step Closer to Breaking Ground

Loop-the-Loop Nearly two years after Elon Musk first claimed his Boring Company had permission to build an East Coast hyperloop, the project is finally starting to come to fruition. Sort of, anyway. On Wednesday, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) shared a draft environmental assessment for the Washington D.C. to Baltimore Loop Project, a scaled-down version of Musk’s initial vision. Thi

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Newly proposed system of measurement could help determine community sustainability

A newly proposed system of measurement known as the community sustainability assessment system, or CSAS, could be used to define what it means to be a sustainable community as well as evaluate the impact of individual communities on global sustainability, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Firms are better off revealing their environmental practices, new research shows

Is honesty the best policy when it comes to being green?

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A Genetic Risk Score Tries to Predict Whether a Child Will Become Obese

A still-controversial test could be administered to toddlers to gauge their chances — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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This Genetic Mutation Makes People Feel Full — All the Time

Two new studies confirm that weight control is often the result of genetics, not willpower.

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Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping

Cold temperatures inside honey bee colonies may cause colony losses during and after long-distance hauling, according to a preliminary study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

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Study: Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species

The iconic "death roll" of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study published in Ethology, Ecology & Evolution and coauthored by a researcher at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot

Antimicrobial paints offer the promise of extra protection against bacteria. But Northwestern University researchers caution that these paints might be doing more harm than good.

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China Is Sending Teens to a Simulated Mars Colony

Mars Colony It sounds like the premise to a young adult novel: a totalitarian government sends its kids to a special facility to train them for life on Mars. But this strange project isn’t fictional — it’s China’s C-Space base. “We are trying to come up with solutions,” C-Space founder Bai Fan told AFP of the project, adding that “the base is still on [Earth], it’s not on Mars, but we have chosen

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14 Must-Read Moments From the Mueller Report

Attorney General William Barr released Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited report on his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election on Thursday. Though some of the findings have been redacted, the report will give the public a clearer sense of what the special counsel found—and whether Barr’s short summary, made public in late March, was accurate. The repo

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Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping

Cold temperatures inside honey bee colonies may cause colony losses during and after long-distance hauling, according to a preliminary study by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists.

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Study: Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species

The iconic "death roll" of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study published in Ethology, Ecology & Evolution and coauthored by a researcher at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

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Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot

Antimicrobial paints offer the promise of extra protection against bacteria. But Northwestern University researchers caution that these paints might be doing more harm than good.

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CEBAF turns on the charm

The world's most advanced particle accelerator for investigating the quark structure of the atom's nucleus has just charmed physicists with a new capability. The production of charm quarks in J/ψ (J/psi) particles by CEBAF at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility confirms that the facility has expanded the realm of precision nuclear physics research with electro

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Hubble celebrates its 29th birthday with unrivaled view of the Southern Crab Nebula

This incredible image of the hourglass-shaped Southern Crab Nebula was taken to mark the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's 29th anniversary in space. The nebula, created by a binary star system, is one of the many objects that Hubble has demystified throughout its productive life. This new image adds to our understanding of the nebula and demonstrates the telescope's continued capabilities.

4h

Ginkgo seed extracts show antibacterial activity on skin pathogens

Extracts from the seeds of the Ginkgo biloba tree show antibacterial activity on pathogens that can cause skin infections such as acne, psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema, a study at Emory University finds. Frontiers in Microbiology is publishing the results of laboratory experiments showing that the extracts inhibit the growth of Cutibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes

4h

Researcher uses network science to understand how materials work

Network science is how mathematicians and software designers construct complicated social networks like Facebook. But a group of Florida State University researchers has found that these equations can tell engineers a lot about the composition of different materials.

4h

A City-Sized Star Is Blocking the View of Our Galaxy’s Black Hole

Down In Front When scientists released the first-ever image of a black hole last week, people immediately began asking why astronomers chose to focus on M87*, a black hole in a distant galaxy, instead of the one in the center of our home Milky Way. For that, we may have to thank a Manhattan-sized, ultra-dense neutron star, also known as a magnetar, that’s blocking the view, according to Live Scie

4h

Millipede Genitals Glow Different Colors (But Scientists Can't Explain Why)

Many species of the leggy critters glow under UV light.

4h

Ginkgo seed extracts show antibacterial activity on skin pathogens

Extracts from the seeds of the Ginkgo biloba tree show antibacterial activity on pathogens that can cause skin infections such as acne, psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema, a study at Emory University finds. Frontiers in Microbiology is publishing the results of laboratory experiments showing that the extracts inhibit the growth of Cutibacterium acnes, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes

4h

Cornell scientists engineer artificial material that has three key traits of life

Scientists at Cornell University devise a material with 3 key traits of life. The goal for the researchers is not to create life but lifelike machines. The researchers were able to program metabolism into the material's DNA. None Cornell University engineers have created an artificial material that has three key traits of life — metabolism, self-assembly and organization. The engineers were able

4h

Daily briefing: Is brain death the end?

Daily briefing: Is brain death the end? Daily briefing: Is brain death the end?, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01291-7 Partial revival of pig brains hours after death raises a whole host of scientific and ethical questions. Plus: an experimental gene-therapy success, and lightning’s striking structure.

4h

How to hack your deadline: Admit it's uncertain

Deadlines tend to radiate a sense of existential finality, but project managers know that they're rarely set in stone.

5h

How We Roll: Study Shows We're More Lone Wolves Than Team Players

Results may explain why collective action on climate change and health policy is so difficult — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Team develops new method to explore what happens inside fires and explosions

The inside of a fire might be the last place one would explore, but a new University of Central Florida method to do just that could lead to advances in fighting fires, creating cleaner engines and even space travel.

5h

Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish

Researchers have discovered some good news for fish populations living on coral reefs hit by climate change.

5h

It's A Match: Satellite and Ground Measurements Agree on Warming

The consenus gives confidence to satellite estimates of temperature rise in remote areas with few weather stations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Disappearing bumblebee species under threat of extinction

The American Bumblebee – a species once more commonly seen buzzing around Southern Ontario – is critically endangered, according to a new study led by York University.The finding, published in Journal of Insect Conservation, found the native North American species, Bombus pensylvanicus, is facing imminent extinction from Canada, considered the highest and most at-risk classification before extinct

5h

Decline in measles vaccination is causing a preventable global resurgence of the disease

In 2000, measles was declared to be eliminated in the United States. Today, the US and many other countries are experiencing outbreaks of measles because of declines in measles vaccine coverage. Without renewed focus on vaccination efforts, the disease may rebound in full force, according to a commentary in NEJM by infectious diseases experts at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Dis

5h

Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot

In a new study, Northwestern University researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.

5h

Big Data Has Transformed Agriculture–In Some Places, Anyway

Poorer parts of the world lag far behind in getting the tools they need to thrive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

How We Roll: Study Shows We're More Lone Wolves Than Team Players

Results may explain why collective action on climate change and health policy is so difficult — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Crusader armies were remarkably genetically diverse, study finds

DNA research adds to evidence soldiers heading east struck up relationships with locals Crusader armies were made up of people from remarkably genetically diverse backgrounds, hailing not just from western Europe but also much further east, according to a new study that gives unprecedented insight into the fighters’ lives. The Crusades to the Holy Land were spread over two centuries , with many E

5h

How We Roll: Study Shows We're More Lone Wolves Than Team Players

Results may explain why collective action on climate change and health policy is so difficult — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Read Robert Mueller’s Written Summaries of His Russia Report

Attorney General William Barr released Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s full report on Thursday. Contained therein were the summaries Mueller’s team prepared for the nearly 450-page-long document—presumably, the details he felt were most important for the public to know. The report details Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election and details 10 episodes the special counsel examined related

5h

The Astronomer Who’d Rather Build Space Cameras

In 1965, when James Edward Gunn was in graduate school at the California Institute of Technology, he figured out a way to tell when the universe first lit up with stars. Other astronomers had spotted strange sources of radio waves known as quasars at enormous distances — two-thirds of the way back to the universe’s beginning. Gunn and a fellow graduate student, Bruce Peterson, noticed that the li

5h

Samsung: Please Don’t Peel Protective Layer Off Our Folding Phone

Glitches and Bulges Just days into testing of Samsung’s new futuristic folding smartphone, tech reviewers found their test units glitching and even growing bulges under the display. But Samsung isn’t fazed by the issues: the Galaxy Fold is officially still going on sale on April 26, according to Wall Street Journal tech journalist Joanna Stern. It’s still unclear if Samsung will take further acti

5h

Sea snake and elephant skin have a trick in common

Both elephants and yellow-bellied sea snakes have skin that can create a water sheath around the animal, research finds. In addition, sea snake skin has evolved to permit the animal to thrive as the only pelagic species of venomous sea snake. (Pelagic refers to species residing in the open sea.) The new study, published in the Journal of Morphology , is the first to quantify the water-retention c

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Firms are better off revealing their environmental practices, new research shows

Firms that value and practice environmental transparency in their reporting to stakeholders are in general better economic performers than those whose practices are more opaque.

5h

Oregon researchers map sound, response and reward anticipation in mouse brain

University of Oregon neuroscientists report that two areas of the mouse brain combine representations of what is heard and anticipated, guiding behavior that leads mice to the best reward.

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Study: Infamous 'death roll' almost universal among crocodile species

The iconic 'death roll' of alligators and crocodiles may be more common among species than previously believed, according to a new study published in Ethology, Ecology & Evolution and coauthored by a researcher at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

5h

Big Data Has Transformed Agriculture–In Some Places, Anyway

Poorer parts of the world lag far behind in getting the tools they need to thrive — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Scientists Gene-Edited HIV to Cure “Bubble Boy” Disease

Normal Lives Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have reportedly used HIV to cure infants born with “bubble boy” disease — a remarkable example of hijacking a deadly virus for a new treatment. “The children are cured,” researcher Ewelina Mamcarz told NBC News . “They came to us as little infants, some of them as young as 2 months, with severe infections. Now they are home, livi

5h

Meat needs to justify its place on our tables

Yet we do not all have to go vegetarian to save our health or planet

5h

Why language technology can't handle Game of Thrones (yet)

Researchers have performed a thorough evaluation of four different name recognition tools on popular 40 novels, including A Game of Thrones. Their analyses highlight types of names and texts that are particularly challenging for these tools to identify as well as solutions for mitigating this.

5h

When the physics say 'don't follow your nose'

Engineers at Duke University are developing a smart robotic system for sniffing out pollution hotspots and sources of toxic leaks. Their approach enables a robot to incorporate calculations made on the fly to account for the complex airflows of confined spaces rather than simply 'following its nose.'

5h

Adding human touch to unchatty chatbots may lead to bigger letdown

Sorry, Siri, but just giving a chatbot a human name or adding humanlike features to its avatar might not be enough to win over a user if the device fails to maintain a conversational back-and-forth with that person, according to researchers. In fact, those humanlike features might create a backlash against less responsive humanlike chatbots.

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Scientists advance creation of 'artificial lymph node' to fight cancer, other diseases

In a proof-of-principle study in mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine report the creation of a specialized gel that acts like a lymph node to successfully activate and multiply cancer-fighting immune system T-cells. The work puts scientists a step closer, they say, to injecting such artificial lymph nodes into people and sparking T-cells to fight disease.

5h

Folding faults and seismic risk in the Kunlun range, Northwest Tibet

The tectonic deformation and growth pattern of the western Kunlun, which is the northwestern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, are not currently well understood. The surface rupture caused by an earthquake can provide a unique opportunity to investigate the impact of coseismic faulting on landscape evolution, to refine regional deformation models, and to understand future seismic risk.

5h

Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping

Weak honey bee colonies may fail after being exposed to cold temperature changes that happen during truck shipping.

5h

Researchers use 3D printer to print glass

For the first time, researchers have successfully 3D printed chalcogenide glass, a unique material used to make optical components that operate at mid-infrared wavelengths. The ability to 3D print this glass could make it possible to manufacture complex glass components and optical fibers for new types of low-cost sensors, telecommunications components and biomedical devices.

5h

The overall annual cost of bacterial resistance in French hospitals estimated up to 290 M€

A team of researchers from Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines University (UVSQ), Inserm and Pasteur Institute (Unité Mixte de Recherche 1181 Biostatistique, biomathématique, pharmacoépidémiologie et maladies infectieuses – B2PHI) has been able to provide for the first time an accurate estimate of both the incidence (annual number of new cases) and added direct cost of infections due to antibioti

5h

UCF develops new method to explore what happens inside fires and explosions

The inside of a fire might be the last place one would explore, but a new University of Central Florida method to do just that could lead to advances in fighting fires, creating cleaner engines and even space travel. Associate professor Subith Vasu and doctoral student Zachary Loparo in UCF's Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Advanced Turbomachinery and Energy Resea

5h

"The mice became smarter": new treatment restores aging brains

submitted by /u/swordstool [link] [comments]

5h

Aphid Suicide Squads Save Colonies With Body Ooze

Don’t you just hate it when a moth larva busts in through the wall of your house like some squirmy lepidopteran Kool-Aid man? If you’re a colony of aphids living in a gall, this is a real threat. But luckily there’s a team of heroes ready to spring to action, even sacrifice themselves, to repair that wall and save the rest of the clan. A team of Japanese researchers has been studying this phenomen

6h

The Quest For the Roots of Autism — and What It Says About Us All

As alarm grew over autism prevalence at the turn of this century, there was much public talk of a growing “epidemic.” That language has since softened, and it is now clear that many autistic people were there all along, their condition unrecognized until relatively recently. But what is the cause? The emerging narrative today is that there is no single cause — rather, multiple factors, roughly sor

6h

NASA Prepares to Build Spacecraft Bound for a Metal Asteroid

The Psyche spacecraft, headed to an asteroid with the same name, will explore a metal world thought to be the leftover core of a destroyed planet

6h

Filtering diesel exhaust could make it worse

Health For those with allergies, supposedly cleaner fumes can mean worse lung function Diesel exhaust is dirty, and a big contributor to the 4 to 7 million annual air pollution-caused deaths around the globe. It’s intuitive, then, that any effort to clean…

6h

In New “Chucky” Trailer, Killer Doll Terrorizes With IoT Gadgets

Child’s Play The killer creepy doll Chucky — evil villain of the “Child’s Play” slasher film series from the 80s — is back in a brand new movie set to drop in June. And today a new trailer gives a glimpse at the latest entry of the series, which’ll star Aubrey Plaza and the voice of Mark Hamill. The 2019 twist: this time, the doll is haunting its prey through a smart home system called “Buddi” —

6h

The Mueller Report Is Out. Read It Here

Attorney general William Barr has released the redacted Mueller report to Congress. You can read all 300-plus pages of it right here.

6h

CEBAF turns on the charm

The world's most advanced particle accelerator for investigating the quark structure of the atom's nucleus has just charmed physicists with a new capability. The production of charm quarks in J/ψ (J/psi) particles by CEBAF at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility confirms that the facility has expanded the realm of precision nuclear physics research with electro

6h

Cutting-edge discovery points to potential treatment for NEC in preemies

Cutting-edge discovery in the lab of Catherine Hunter, MD, from Stanley Manne Children's Research Institute at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago offers a new direction toward treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) — a devastating intestinal emergency that occurs in up to 10 percent of premature infants.

6h

How to hack your deadline: Admit it's uncertain

Deadlines tend to radiate a sense of existential finality, but project managers know that they're rarely set in stone.

6h

Ocean currents bring good news for reef fish

A new study suggests reefs suffering coral bleaching can still be productive, as fish dependent on reefs get a bulk of their food delivered via the currents flowing past.

6h

Intentions attributed to other people change how we see their actions

Academics in the School of Psychology at the University of Plymouth have suggested our apparent ability to see the intent in other's behaviour leads us to cling to our false judgements.

6h

Ginkgo seed extracts show antibacterial activity on skin pathogens

Extracts from the seeds of the Ginkgo biloba tree show antibacterial activity on pathogens that can cause skin infections such as acne, psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema.

6h

Research finds pregnant women feel pushed out of their jobs

Florida State University researcher Samantha Paustian-Underdahl found pregnant women experienced decreased encouragement in the workplace to return to their jobs after pregnancy.

6h

Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials

Self-assembling synthetic materials come together when tiny, uniform building blocks interact and form a structure. However, nature lets materials like proteins of varying size and shape assemble, allowing for complex architectures that can handle multiple tasks.

6h

Infection biology: Gut microbe helps thwart Salmonella

LMU researchers have identified a bacterial species in the gut microbiome of the mouse which protects against infection by human-pathogenic Salmonella.

6h

Taming the genome's 'jumping' sequences

EPFL scientists have discovered how a family of proteins that regulates the activity of transposable elements in the genome allows them to make inheritable changes to the growing fetus.

6h

New UCI-led study defines best time to exercise to get the most rejuvenating results

A new study led by researchers from the University of California, Irvine finds exercising in the morning, rather than at night, may yield better results.

6h

Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model

An international research team led by The University of Tokyo modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. Using neurons derived from stem cells, they grew cortical-like spheroids. In a microdevice, the spheroids extended bundles of axons toward each other, forming a physical and electrical connection. Fascicles grew less efficiently when one spheroid was absent, and when a gene relevant to cerebral tra

6h

Rare genetic change provides clues to pancreas development

Researchers have discovered a key clue into the development of the pancreas and brain by studying rare patients born without a pancreas. The study, published in the American Journal of Human Genetics, from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and University of Exeter also identified an unexpected pathway in human pancreas development, and confirmed this in mice. Understanding how the pancreas forms could

6h

Crusaders made love and war, genetic study finds

The first genetic study of ancient human remains believed to be Crusaders confirms that warriors travelled from western Europe to the near East, where they mixed and had families with local people, and died together in battle. Researchers analysed ancient DNA extracted from nine skeletons dating back to the 13th century, which were discovered in a burial pit in Sidon, Lebanon. The results show tha

6h

Can exercise, swimming goggles help protect astronauts against spaceflight-associated changes to eye, vision?

Astronauts on long missions at the International Space Station can experience changes to their eyes and vision that can last for years. This study included 20 men who on three separate days at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston completed exercises while on their back and tilted back head-first (to simulate the effect of exercise in space); 10 of the participants wore swimming goggles.

6h

Low use of hearing aids among older Hispanic/Latino adults in US

This study examined how common hearing aids were and the factors associated with their use among a group of nearly 1,900 adults (average age 60) of Hispanic/Latino backgrounds with hearing loss. The results reveal low use of hearing aids, with only 87 adults (4.6 percent) reporting use.

6h

Certain strains of bacteria associated with diabetic wounds that do not heal

Whether a wound — such as a diabetic foot ulcer — heals or progresses to a worse outcome, including infection or even amputation, may depend on the microbiome within that wound.

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Genetic variants that protect against obesity could aid new weight loss medicines

Around four million people in the UK carry genetic variants that protect them from obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The team say the discovery could lead to the development of new drugs that help people lose weight.

6h

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into how the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development.

6h

Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes

New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations.

6h

Studies identify mechanism key to removal of protein aggregates from cells

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have discovered the mechanism by which cells sense dysfunction of the proteasome — a cellular component that degrades unneeded or defective proteins — and respond in a previously undescribed manner, by editing the amino acid sequence of a key sensing protein.

6h

Two studies explore whether time of day can affect the body's response to exercise

Two papers appearing April 18, 2019 in the journal Cell Metabolism confirm that the circadian clock is an important factor in how the body responds to physical exertion. Based on this work alone, it's too early to say when the best time is for you to go for a jog. But at least in the lab, exercise in the evening seems to be more productive, although human lifestyles are much more complicated.

6h

A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA

History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered. The work appears April 18 in The American J

6h

Researchers use genetic profiles to predict obesity risk at birth

Researchers have come up with a scoring system based on genetic markers that predicts an individual's inborn risk for obesity. Using data from the largest existing genome-wide study of obesity, they applied new algorithms to integrate information from more than two million genetic variants affecting body mass index (BMI). The resulting score accurately predicted BMI and obesity in more than 300,00

6h

How superstitions spread

Superstitious beliefs may seem irrational, but they can nevertheless catch on in a society. Using an evolutionary approach to studying the emergence of coordinated behaviors, University of Pennsylvania biologists showed how a jumble of individual beliefs, including superstitions, can coalesce into an accepted social norm.

6h

Samsung to inspect Galaxy Fold phones after reviewer complaints

Samsung announced Thursday it will inspect units of its highly anticipated folding smartphone after some reviewers reported screen damage.

6h

Archaeologists unearth largest Mayan figurine factory to date

Aragón may have gained power as nearby cities collapsed

6h

Letters: ‘My Heart Broke When I Found Out Notre-Dame Was Burning’

The Fire at Notre-Dame On Monday, Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris, France, caught fire . Parts of the structure— which had survived plague and wars of religion, the French Revolution, and the Nazis —were severely damaged , including the iconic spire and wooden roof. The history of sacred structures across the globe can be defined by ruin and repair, Sophie Gilbert wrote ; Rachel Donadio argued that

6h

Giannis Antetokounmpo Is Thinking Like the MVP

Late in a blowout win over the Washington Wizards back in February, Giannis Antetokounmpo of the Milwaukee Bucks snatched an opposing player’s dribble and sprinted the other way. Fans of the 24-year-old MVP front-runner knew what to expect next. Antetokounmpo spanned the court in just a few long strides, sidestepped the last unlucky defender between him and the rim, leapt and stretched out his 6-

6h

Why Europa Is the Place to Go for Alien Life – Issue 71: Flow

I have seen the future of space exploration, and it looks like a cue ball covered with brown scribbles. I am talking about Europa, the 1,940-mile-wide, nearly white, and exceedingly smooth satellite of Jupiter. It is an enigmatic world that is, in many ways, almost a perfect inversion of Earth. It is also one of the most plausible places to look for alien life. If it strikes you that those two st

6h

When Beauty Gets in the Way of Science – Issue 71: Flow

The biggest news in particle physics is no news. In March, one of the most important conferences in the field, Rencontres de Moriond, took place. It is an annual meeting at which experimental collaborations present preliminary results. But the recent data from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), currently the world’s largest particle collider, has not revealed anything new. Forty years ago, particle

6h

It’s 2019. Academic Papers Should Be Free.

As a new librarian in the early 2000s, I believed passionately in the cause of open access and worked hard to bring it about, but the movement made only slight gains at the margins. Almost two decades later, librarians are finally putting publishers on notice and funders are beginning to flex their muscles.

6h

How US–China political tensions are affecting science

How US–China political tensions are affecting science How US–China political tensions are affecting science, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01270-y Conference travel, research visas, science funding and security clearance are all touched by the geopolitics.

6h

Can science writing be automated?

A team of researchers has developed a neural network, a form of artificial intelligence, that can read scientific papers and render a plain-English summary in a sentence or two.

6h

Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore

Paleontologists have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.

6h

North Korea Says It Tested a New Weapon But Won’t Say What It Was

Keep it Vague North Korea is flexing its muscles. On Thursday, the nation announced that it had test-launched a new “tactical guided weapon” — but kept the details vague. The weapon is unlikely to be a long-range ballistic missile that could jeopardize peace talks, according to the Associated Press . Rather, given the fact that the announcement came with new demands for ongoing negotiations with

6h

A genetic scorecard could predict your risk of being obese

A genetic score predicts who is at risk of severe obesity, but experts say lifestyle matters more than genes.

6h

Studies identify mechanism key to removal of protein aggregates from cells

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have discovered the mechanism by which cells sense dysfunction of the proteasome—a cellular component that degrades unneeded or defective proteins—and respond in a previously undescribed manner, by editing the amino acid sequence of a key sensing protein. Proteasome dysfunction can lead to the type of buildup of aberrant proteins that characterize

6h

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development.

6h

Inside the black hole image that made history | Sheperd Doeleman

At the center of a galaxy more than 55 million light-years away, there's a supermassive black hole with the mass of several billion suns. And now, for the first time ever, we can see it. Astrophysicist Sheperd Doeleman, head of the Event Horizon Telescope collaboration, speaks with TED's Chris Anderson about the iconic, first-ever image of a black hole — and the epic, worldwide effort involved in

6h

New genetic ‘risk score’ could predict obesity odds

But scientists warn the risk score comes with risks of its own

6h

Engineering researcher uses network science to understand how materials work

Using network science — part of a larger mathematical field called graph theory — FAMU-FSU Professor of Mechanical Engineering William Oates, former graduate student Peter Woerner and Associate Professor Kunihiko 'Sam' Taira mapped long range atomic forces onto an incredibly complex graph to simulate macroscopic material behavior.

6h

Newly proposed system of measurement could help determine community sustainability

A newly proposed system of measurement known as the community sustainability assessment system, or CSAS, could be used to define what it means to be a sustainable community as well as evaluate the impact of individual communities on global sustainability, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

6h

Hubble celebrates its 29th birthday with unrivaled view of the Southern Crab Nebula

This incredible image of the hourglass-shaped Southern Crab Nebula was taken to mark the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's 29th anniversary in space. The nebula, created by a binary star system, is one of the many objects that Hubble has demystified throughout its productive life. This new image adds to our understanding of the nebula and demonstrates the telescope's continued capabilities.

6h

A history of the Crusades, as told by crusaders' DNA

History can tell us a lot about the Crusades, the series of religious wars fought between 1095 and 1291, in which Christian invaders tried to claim the Near East. But the DNA of nine 13th century Crusaders buried in a pit in Lebanon shows that there's more to learn about who the Crusaders were and their interactions with the populations they encountered. The work appears April 18 in The American J

6h

Studies identify mechanism key to removal of protein aggregates from cells

Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators have discovered the mechanism by which cells sense dysfunction of the proteasome—a cellular component that degrades unneeded or defective proteins—and respond in a previously undescribed manner, by editing the amino acid sequence of a key sensing protein. Proteasome dysfunction can lead to the type of buildup of aberrant proteins that characterize

6h

Flies smell through a Gore-Tex system

A research group led by a scientist of the RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research (BDR) has gained important insights into the nanopores that allow the fruit fly to detect chemicals in the air, and has identified the gene responsible for their development.

6h

Groundbreaking Indian Ocean science mission reaches an end

The British-led Nekton scientific mission on Thursday completed a seven-week expedition in the Indian Ocean aimed at documenting changes beneath the waves that could affect billions of people in the surrounding region over the coming decades.

6h

Architect of China battery EV boom backs fuel-cell vehicles

submitted by /u/TinyHippHo [link] [comments]

6h

Amazon, Google agree to allow each other's streaming apps

Amazon and Google announced Thursday they had agreed to allow each other's streaming media applications to work on their platforms, ending a spat over video between the tech giants.

6h

Video: Is it really 'dry clean only'?

Knowing the do's and don'ts of washing your clothes can be difficult, but chemistry has got your back.

6h

Fearsome ancient carnivore discovered after fossil lingered for decades in museum drawer

Fearsome ancient carnivore discovered after fossil lingered for decades in museum drawer Fearsome ancient carnivore discovered after fossil lingered for decades in museum drawer, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01279-3 Twenty-two-million-year-old bones reveal a meat-eater that ruled long before the big cats.

6h

Apple is making it easier to recycle iPhones in the US

With Earth Day just around the corner, Apple announced it's quadrupling the number of locations US customers can send their iPhones for recycling. The company's recycling …

6h

Barr’s Narrative of Victimhood

What possible reason did Attorney General William Barr have to hold a press conference about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report before the report was released? It was not, based on his brief remarks Thursday morning, to instill public faith in the process, for he did little of that. Nor was it to answer questions from the press, for he did little of that as well—bristling at a few reporters’

6h

Morphing origami could lead to better concert halls and drones

A new type of origami can morph from one pattern to another—or even a hybrid of two patterns—instantly altering many of its structural characteristics. The research could unlock new types of origami-based structures or metamaterials that leverage the characteristics of two types of origami. Scientists have used origami-based structures to create deployable solar arrays for space, adaptable acoust

6h

An interstellar rock may have hit Earth in 2014 but nobody noticed

In 2017 astronomers spotted the first interstellar object in our solar system, ‘Oumuamua, but our planet may have been hit by a meteor from another star in 2014

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Timing of steroid shots before rotator cuff surgery affects infection risk

For patients undergoing arthroscopic surgery to repair a torn rotator cuff, previous steroid injections into the shoulder don't increase the risk of surgical-site infection – unless the injection is administered within one month before surgery, reports a study in the April 17, 2019, issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership wi

6h

Is it really 'dry clean only'? (video)

Knowing the do's and don'ts of washing your clothes can be difficult, but chemistry has got your back. With a quick lesson in textile chemistry, you'll be able to understand the different fabrics that make up your clothes. This week on Reactions, we'll explore whether it's safe to wash your favorite new shirt at home or if you really need to take it to the dry cleaner's: https://youtu.be/FFhBaBXJE

6h

Kidney transplant patients need even better aftercare!

Kidney transplantation is the best renal replacement therapy available. Although survival and quality of life are significantly better compared to dialysis patients, transplant recipients nevertheless have a significantly higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than healthy people. One recently published study [1] shows current data and derives important conclusions for further long-term imp

6h

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine

Scientists at Osaka University determined the intrinsic birefringence of cellulose molecules, which have great potential to improve smartphone and computer screens.

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Facebook “Unintentionally” Uploaded 1.5 Million Email Contacts

Yet Another Glitch Is your data safe with Facebook? After getting caught storing “hundreds of millions” of account passwords in plain text last month — a flabbergasting breach of good data security practices — Facebook has been busted in another security snafu, admitting yesterday that it “unintentionally uploaded” email contacts of some 1.5 million new users since May 2016, Business Insider repo

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Future hypersonics could be artificially intelligent

A test launch for a hypersonic weapon—a long-range missile that flies a mile per second and faster—takes weeks of planning. So, while the U.S. and other states are racing to deploy hypersonic technologies, it remains uncertain how useful the systems will be against urgent, mobile or evolving threats.

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Worldwide study reveals air pollution link to unborn baby growth

Exposure to air pollution is linked to babies' growth during pregnancy, according to a landmark new study.

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Quick learners have speedier neurons

The speed with which a person is able to grasp, process, understand, store, and use information comes down to the speed and timing with which the neurons in the brain fire off, research finds. The closer the gap between the firing of one neuron and the next, the greater the speed with which they receive the information, store it, and act upon it. In other words, when it comes to quick thinking, t

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Novel antibody may suppress HIV for up to four months

Regular infusions of an antibody that blocks the HIV binding site on human immune cells may have suppressed levels of HIV for up to four months in people undergoing a short-term pause in their antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens. Results of the Phase 2, open-label study indicate the antibody, known as UB-421, was safe and did not induce the production of antibody-resistant HIV.

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Physicists Closer to Solving Mystery of Weird Glowing Ring Around Milky Way's Black Hole

Astronomers watched a high-speed gas cloud slam into the atmosphere of the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way.

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The quest to save the banana from extinction

Panama disease, an infection that ravages banana plants, has been sweeping across Asia, Australia, the Middle East and Africa. The impact has been devastating. In the Philippines alone, losses have totalled US$400m. And the disease threatens not only the livelihoods of everyone in this US$44 billion industry but also the 400m people in developing countries who depend on bananas for a substantial p

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Living room conservation: Gaming and virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation

Gaming and virtual reality (VR) could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education, curiosity and life-like participation.

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The quest to save the banana from extinction

Panama disease, an infection that ravages banana plants, has been sweeping across Asia, Australia, the Middle East and Africa. The impact has been devastating. In the Philippines alone, losses have totalled US$400m. And the disease threatens not only the livelihoods of everyone in this US$44 billion industry but also the 400m people in developing countries who depend on bananas for a substantial p

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Living room conservation: Gaming and virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation

Gaming and virtual reality (VR) could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education, curiosity and life-like participation.

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Same-sex couples 73% more likely to get mortgage denial

Mortgage lenders are less likely to approve same-sex couples, research finds. Researchers in Iowa State University’s Ivy College of Business analyzed national mortgage data from 1990 to 2015 and found the approval rate for same-sex couples was 3 to 8 percent lower. The study also includes a smaller dataset with more detail about applicants’ work history and credit worthiness. Based on this data,

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NASA Experiment Might Have Survived Beresheet Lunar Crash

An experimental NASA payload from the Beresheet spacecraft might still be intact someplace on the lunar surface. Researchers plan to begin scouring the likely crash site for signs of the Lunar Retroreflector Array (LRA). The post NASA Experiment Might Have Survived Beresheet Lunar Crash appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Could computer games help farmers adapt to climate change?

Researchers from Sweden and Finland have developed the interactive web-based Maladaptation Game, which can be used to better understand how Nordic farmers make decisions regarding environmental changes and how they negotiate the negative impacts of potentially damaging decisions.

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Nature: When lightning strikes — the LOFAR radio telescope is watching closely

It is still unclear what exactly happens when lightning develops. Based on high-resolution data of the LOFAR radio telescope, an international team of researchers has now discovered needle-shaped structures. They might help to explain why lightning does not always discharge at once, as was thought for a long time, but can strike several times within seconds. Essential foundations for measuring lig

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Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life

EPFL chemists have developed a new, light-based method for modifying peptides at the C-terminal position. The method introduces the structural diversity needed for drug design in this class of bioactive compounds.

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Female medical students report higher rates of feeling intimidated in surgical attachments

A greater number of female medical students have experienced intimidation in their training than their male counterparts, according to a new research study published by researchers at RCSI (Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland).

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Turning an old enemy into a helpful friend

A protein complex that had originally evolved to repress the invasion of foreign DNA sequences in our genome took up a completely new function in directing the formation of fat cells, EPFL scientists have found.

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New CRISPR tool executes multiple edits simultaneously, leading to unique partnership to deliver more precise cancer treatments

Scientists at Christiana Care Health System's Gene Editing Institute and NovellusDx, an Israeli biotechnology company, have deployed a breakthrough CRISPR gene-editing tool to successfully engineer multiple edits simultaneously to fragments of DNA extracted from a human cell, according to a new study published today in The CRISPR Journal. The tool can rapidly reproduce, in a human DNA sample, the

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Media alert: new articles in The CRISPR Journal

The CRISPR Journal announces the publication of its April 2019 issue. The Journal is dedicated to validating and publishing outstanding research and commentary on all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing, including CRISPR biology, technology, and genome editing, and commentary and debate of key policy, regulatory, and ethical issues affecting the field.

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Could computer games help farmers adapt to climate change?

Researchers from Sweden and Finland have developed the interactive web-based Maladaptation Game, which can be used to better understand how Nordic farmers make decisions regarding environmental changes and how they negotiate the negative impacts of potentially damaging decisions.

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Training data for autonomous driving

Autonomous cars must perceive their environment true to reality. The corresponding algorithms are trained using a large number of image and video recordings. For the algorithm to recognize single image elements, such as a tree, a pedestrian or a road sign, these are labeled. Labeling is improved and accelerated by understand.ai, a startup established by computer scientist Philip Kessler, who studi

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Lasers make magnets behave like fluids

For years, researchers have pursued a strange phenomenon: When you hit an ultra-thin magnet with a laser, it suddenly de-magnetizes. Imagine the magnet on your refrigerator falling off.

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Critic’s Pick: Celestial Visions on the Met Roof

High above Manhattan, Alicja Kwade’s planetary sculpture captures the music of the spheres.

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As governments adopt artificial intelligence, there's little oversight and lots of danger

Artificial intelligence systems can – if properly used – help make government more effective and responsive, improving the lives of citizens. Improperly used, however, the dystopian visions of George Orwell's "1984" become more realistic.

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Demonstrating a weak topological insulator in bismuth iodide

Topological insulators are one of the most exciting discoveries of the 21st century. They can be simply described as materials that conduct electricity on their surface or edge, but are insulating in their interior bulk. Their conductive properties are based on spin, a quantum mechanical property, and this suppresses the normal scattering of electrons off impurities in the material, or other elect

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Multistep self-assembly opens door to new reconfigurable materials

Self-assembling synthetic materials come together when tiny, uniform building blocks interact and form a structure. However, nature lets materials like proteins of varying size and shape assemble, allowing for complex architectures that can handle multiple tasks.

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Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life

Discovering new biological targets is a critical part of our ongoing battle against diseases. Over the years, scientists have made impressive progress towards the understanding of biological systems, constantly identifying novel targets. The structural diversity of these targets requires a broad range of different therapeutic agents.

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The Hunt for Rocket Boosters in Russia's Far North

In Russia's Mezensky district, scavengers search for metal from the the remains of rockets.

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Turning an old enemy into a helpful friend

Half our genome is basically foreign, derived from viruses. Obviously, the invasion of such foreign elements can deregulate critical biological processes, and lead to disease. This is why animals, including humans have evolved a large family of proteins called the KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins (KZFPs). But despite their importance, KZFPs are still largely uncharacterized.

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Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life

Discovering new biological targets is a critical part of our ongoing battle against diseases. Over the years, scientists have made impressive progress towards the understanding of biological systems, constantly identifying novel targets. The structural diversity of these targets requires a broad range of different therapeutic agents.

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Spin flipper upends protons

Protons spin. It's an intrinsic property that can affect experiments at accelerators that use beams of protons. Yet flipping proton spins could offer insights into nuclear physics experiments that study the first moments of the universe in a laboratory setting. A new "spin flipper" magnet assembly efficiently reverses the spin direction of protons circulating in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

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Turning an old enemy into a helpful friend

Half our genome is basically foreign, derived from viruses. Obviously, the invasion of such foreign elements can deregulate critical biological processes, and lead to disease. This is why animals, including humans have evolved a large family of proteins called the KRAB domain-containing zinc finger proteins (KZFPs). But despite their importance, KZFPs are still largely uncharacterized.

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MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora

Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to predators on induction of nematode preys. During its induced lifestyle transition, microRNA-like RNAs may play a critical role, which paves new ways for understanding fungal adaptati

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A Lab-Grown Brain Twitched an Isolated Muscle. Here’s Why That’s Amazing

Floating inside a petri dish in a lab at Cambridge University, a single disjointed muscle twitched. Normally that’s not news. But in this case, the surgically-dissected muscle is controlled by a slice of isolated brain tissue grown entirely inside the lab. As creepy as that sounds, the system doesn’t represent consciousness in a jar. Rather, it’s a massive step forward for a technology called bra

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Capturing energy flow in a plasma by measuring scattered light

Whether studying the core of our sun or the inside of a fusion reactor, scientists need to determine how energy flows in plasma. Scientists use simulations to calculate the flow. The simulations rely on the classical thermal transport model. Despite over 50 years of research, an ad hoc multiplier is often required. Without it, the simulation doesn't match real-world observations. Now, a team devis

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New satellite data sets reveal flood risk for vulnerable populations

Scientists from the University of Bristol have modelled the likelihood of flooding in some of the world's most hazardous zones to an unparalleled degree of accuracy.

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Where does all the ocean garbage go?

The southern Indian Ocean receives more plastic waste than anywhere else in the world, but no one knows where it goes – until now. Mirjam van der Mheen and colleagues explain.

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Volvo taught its cars to warn each other about icy roads

Technology Cool things happen when cars communicate with each other. Just like Waze lets humans warn other human, Volvos in Europe can warn each other about ice and other hazards.

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'Game of Thrones' Breaks Viewership Records

The Season 8 premiere got more eyeballs than last season's finale.

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The first DDoS attack was 20 years ago. This is what we’ve learned since.

On the 20th anniversary of the first distributed denial of service attack, cybersecurity experts say the internet must be redesigned to prevent them.

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New fiber-shaped supercapacitor for wearable electronics

A novel family of amphiphilic core-sheath structured CNT composited fiber, i.e., CNT-gold@hydrophilic CNT-polyaniline (CNT-Au@OCNT-PANI) with excellent electrochemical properties for wearable electronics was explored by Huisheng Peng et al. in Science China Materials.

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New concept for novel fire extinguisher in space

A research team at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed a new concept of fire extinguishing, named Vacuum Extinguish Method. VEM is based on the "reverse" operation of the conventional fire extinguishing procedure; It sucks the combustion products, even flame and the firing source itself into a vacuum chamber to clean up the firing zone. This concept is advantageous for space use, as i

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Management and outcomes of aortic dissection in pregnancy with Marfan Syndrome

In Marfan Syndrome (MFS), aortic dilatation is one of the main cardiovascular manifestations which deteriorate due to the physiological changes during pregnancy. We aimed to assess the up-to-date management and outcomes of aortic root dilation and dissection (AoD) in pregnancy with MFS

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Living room conservation: Gaming & virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation

Gaming and virtual reality could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education and participation. This is what an interdisciplinary team at Florida International University strive to achieve by developing a virtual reality game (desktop version also available) dedicated to insect and plant species. Focused on imperiled bu

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A hole in one for holographic display

Researchers in Korea have designed an ultra-thin display that can project dynamic, multi-colored, 3D holographic images, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

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Early intervention programs for mood and anxiety disorders improve patient outcomes

In a series of studies from Lawson Health Research Institute, Western University and ICES, researchers examined the impact of Canada's only early intervention program for youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Results suggest that treatment at the First Episode Mood and Anxiety Program (FEMAP) at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) leads to improvements in patients' symptoms and functioning, acce

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More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead: University of Sydney research

University of Sydney researchers have developed a model that can predict salmonella outbreaks several months in advance, and its results come as a warning ahead of the Easter long weekend.

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The Irony of Mueller-Report Profiteering

When the Justice Department releases Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report this morning, it will be published on the Special Counsel’s Office website . By federal law, it will be placed in the public domain. That means you’ll be able to download the report for free to read on your computer or smartphone, to print out, or to email to your friends who don’t know where to find it. That’s not stopp

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Why William Barr Will Deliver the Mueller Report to Congress on CD

The humble compact disc takes a starring role in the rollout of the Mueller report. Which makes more sense than you might think.

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Polluter pays—promoting best practice among plastic producers

I've moved around quite a lot, and one thing that's always really difficult to get my head round when I move to a new place is what I can and can't put in my recycling bin. In one place, plastic had to be put out separately; in another, glass wasn't collected at all; in yet another, cardboard couldn't be put in with paper. Unsurprisingly however, it turns out that feeling vexed because your local

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Going to the beach this Easter? Here are four ways we're not being properly protected from jellyfish

The Easter long weekend marks the last opportunity this year for many Australians to go to the beach as the weather cools down. And for some, particularly in Queensland, it means dodging bluebottle tentacles on the sand.

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Nanoscale magnetic imaging of ferritin in a single cell

In life sciences, the ability to measure the distribution of biomolecules inside a cell in situ is an important investigative goal. Among a variety of techniques, scientists have used magnetic imaging (MI) based on the nitrogen vacancy center (NV) in diamonds as a powerful tool in biomolecular research. However, nanoscale imaging of intracellular proteins has remained a challenge thus far. In a re

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Trump Owns the War in Yemen Now

President Donald Trump issued the second veto of his presidency Tuesday to extend U.S. participation in Yemen’s civil war. In so doing, he acted against the will of the American public, the U.S. Senate, and the House of Representatives, allying instead with Saudi Arabia and the autocrats who rule it. The Saudis are leading a brutal military campaign against Houthi rebels in Yemen. U.S. support fo

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Lasers make magnets behave like fluids

Researchers have discovered how magnets recover after being blasted by a laser. It turns out, they act a bit like oil and water in a jar.

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In rare cases, immune system fails despite HIV suppression

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is usually effective at suppressing HIV, allowing the immune system to recover by preventing the virus from destroying CD4+ T cells. Scientists have now identified a rare, paradoxical response to ART called extreme immune decline, or EXID. Five individuals evaluated at the NIAID experienced a significant decline in CD4+ T cell levels despite suppression of HIV below de

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Study shows promise in repairing damaged myelin

A new study shows that a synthetic molecule developed by Oregon Health & Science University scientists stimulates repair of the protective sheath that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The study demonstrates in mice that a synthetic molecule called sobetirome efficiently repairs damaged myelin without side effects.

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Young children judge others based on facial features as much as adults do

Just like adults, children by the age of 5 make rapid and consistent character judgements of others based on facial features, such as the tilt of the mouth or the distance between the eyes. Those facial features also shape how children behave toward others, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Omega-3 expert supports new research that shows omega-6 is good for you

There has been a fierce debate over the last decade or so about the health benefits of omega-6 fatty acids. One side believes they are too ubiquitous in the diet and fuel the inflammation underpinning many of today's chronic diseases. Another side believes that the most consumed omega-6 — linoleic acid (LA) — could be just as important as omega-3s in reducing disease risk.

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Breakthrough for children with serious epileptic seizures

Emergency medicine doctors now have a better way to treat severe epileptic seizures in children, thanks to a New Zealand-Australian study.Prolonged epileptic seizures are the most common neurological emergency in children seen by hospitals. The seizures are potentially fatal: up to five percent of affected children die, and a third suffer long-term complications from brain damage. Crucially, the l

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Someone Listed a T-Rex on eBay, and Paleontologists Are Furious

Clearance Sale Savvy eBay bidders may have noticed a one-of-a-kind item up for auction: the fossil of a baby tyrannosaurus rex that died about 68 million years ago is up for sale for the low, low price of $2.95 million. The fossil, discovered in 2013 by a Montanan named Alan Detrich, has been on display at the University of Kansas Natural History Museum since 2017. But now, in a move that The Gua

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Going to the beach this Easter? Here are four ways we're not being properly protected from jellyfish

The Easter long weekend marks the last opportunity this year for many Australians to go to the beach as the weather cools down. And for some, particularly in Queensland, it means dodging bluebottle tentacles on the sand.

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Folding an acoustic vortex on a flat holographic transducer to form miniaturized selective acoustic tweezers

Acoustic tweezers are based on focused acoustic vortices and hold promise to precisely manipulate microorganisms and cells from the millimeter scale down to the submicron scale, without contact, and with unprecedented selectivity and trapping force. The widespread use of the technique is hindered at present by limitations to the existing systems stemming from performance, miniaturization and the i

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Climate change is hitting hard across New Zealand, official report finds

The major focus on climate change in Environment Aotearoa 2019, a stocktake on New Zealand's environment released today, is a welcome change.

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Amazon, Google agree to allow each other's streaming apps

Amazon and Google announced Thursday they had agreed to allow each other's streaming media applications to work on their platforms, ending a spat over video between the tech giants.

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New climate models predict a warming surge | Science

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When Futurism Led to Fascism—and Why It Could Happen Again

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Mind control, levitation and no pain: the race to find a superman in sport

The US and Soviet Union both believed people could develop superpowers. And, reveals The Men on Magic Carpets, their psychic experiments played out in the sporting arena Candlestick Park, San Francisco, 1964. The wind is whipping off the Bay on a typically cold night at the ballpark. Mike Murphy takes his seat in Section 17. A jazz band pipes up and the vendors shout their wares: Hamm’s or Falsta

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Measuring social, environmental and health inequalities using deep learning and street imagery

Measuring social, environmental and health inequalities using deep learning and street imagery Measuring social, environmental and health inequalities using deep learning and street imagery, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42036-w Measuring social, environmental and health inequalities using deep learning and street imagery

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Why Are Girls Getting Their Periods So Young?

Female puberty is starting earlier and earlier, with worrying consequences for women’s health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Simbakubwa: Mega Carnivore Hiding In A Museum Drawer

Take a polar bear. Take a lion. Mash them together and chuck them in a time machine, sending them back 22 million years to what's now Kenya and you've got the massive carnivore Simbakubwa kutokaafrika. The enormous bitey mammal was identified only after researchers rediscovered partial fossils of it, forgotten in the backroom of a museum. To be clear, Simbakubwa is neither a bear nor a member of t

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This woman counted literal baby steps, and they walk farther than you'd think

Science They may be slow, but they cover entire football fields if left to their own devices. It might seem obvious how babies learn to walk, but psychologist Karen Adolph knows it's more complex—and busier—than you might think.

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Why Are Girls Getting Their Periods So Young?

Female puberty is starting earlier and earlier, with worrying consequences for women’s health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI that spots inequality could monitor living conditions in cities

An algorithm that can detect inequality in cities from Google Street View images, could be used to monitor projects aimed at improving living conditions

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Dog owners are more likely to get the recommended amount of exercise

A UK survey found that 80 per cent of dog owners get their recommended 150 minutes of physical activity a week, but just 62 per cent of people without dogs do

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BBC Earth from Space: satellite images give new view on conservation

The BBC's new documentary, Earth from Space, explores how scientists use satellite imagery to view and understand some of nature's biggest challenges

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Facebook bans UK far-right groups

Social media giant Facebook on Thursday banned various far-right British groups including the English Defence League from its network for promoting hate and violence.

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Tiny, fast, accurate technology on the radar

A tiny, portable radar device could allow visually impaired people, or unmanned moving devices to detect objects in real time.

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Google offers Android users choice to satisfy EU

Google on Thursday said users of its hugely popular Android devices would be offered a choice of five browsers and search engines as part of the company's effort to meet EU competition concerns.

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Four questions: Here there be monsters

On April 10, the world got to see the first image taken of a black hole in space, taken by the Event Horizon Telescope, a worldwide collaboration of astronomers and astrophysicists including a substantial team at the University of Arizona.

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Researchers hunt for 17th century 'witch bottles'

A team of archaeologists and historians from MOLA and the University of Hertfordshire are calling on people who may have discovered 17th century 'witch bottles' during restoration work or know of examples curated at their places of work, to come forward.

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Stress doesn’t stop male lizards from showing off

The physical traits and behaviors that lizards use to attract potential mates and fend off competitors may be so important that they don’t change in the face of stress. A new study shows that low levels of stress-associated hormones don’t affect the blue and black badges on the throats and abdomens of male fence lizards—or the signaling behaviors used to show them off. “Animals in the wild experi

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Platforms Want Centralized Censorship. That Should Scare You

Opinion: Controlling the spread of insidious content online is extremely difficult—but combining efforts across platforms raise serious threats to free expression.

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How the Pacific Pinball Museum Keeps Old Machines Alive

We visit with Michael Schiess, the executive director of the Pacific Pinball Museum who keeps old pinball machines in playable condition.

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Luminescing nanosized crystals are showing promise for peering deeply into body tissues

Investigations of 'quantum dots' for looking deeply into body tissues are rapidly evolving, but more work is required to ensure they are safe, according to a review published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.

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OSIRIS Image Viewer makes available all images of Rosetta's comet 67P

Between 2014 and 2016, the scientific camera system OSIRIS onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft captured almost 70000 images of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. They not only document the most extensive and demanding comet mission to date, but also show the duck-shaped body in all its facets. In a joint project with the Department of Information and Communication at Flensburg University of Applied Sci

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Research provides insights into molecular gas in the massive spiral galaxy NGC 5908

In a recently published research, which is part of a broader observational campaign focused on studying massive spiral galaxies, astronomers have investigated molecular lines of carbon monoxide and its isotopologues in NGC 5908. The study, detailed in a paper published April 10 on arXiv.org, sheds more light on properties of molecular gas in this galaxy, what could be helpful to better understand

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Avoid prolonged antibiotics for “Chronic Lyme”

There is no evidence to suggest that "chronic Lyme" exists, or that long-term antibiotics are required to treat it.

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Recovered carbon black for multicolour fluorescence displays

NUS physicists have discovered that recovered carbon black powder can be transformed by laser treatment to give a wide range of colours for potential display applications.

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New study finds family violence is often poorly understood in faith communities

We learned this month that Prime Minister Scott Morrison has pledged A$10 million in the federal budget for couples counselling and mediation for families impacted by domestic violence.

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Striking a balance between climate action and social equality

At a referendum held in February, residents of Freiburg im Breisgau voted in favour of building a site in their city that will combine environmental and societal targets. The plan is supported by ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability, a network of local and regional governments committed to sustainable development. ICLEI is one of the partners in the EU-funded C-Track 50 project that helps

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Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide around Florida

2018 was the worst year for red tide in more than a decade. A new study reveals what made it so severe.

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Lithium detected in an ancient star gives new clues for Big Bang nucleosynthesis

Researchers from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (Spain) and the University of Cambridge (UK) have detected lithium (Li) in the ancient star J0023+0307, a main-sequence extremely iron-poor dwarf star about 9,450 light years away in the galactic halo.

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The potential of flexible OLEDs as an innovative surface material

High-visibility clothing is an important element of any motorcyclist's safety routine. Such products usually incorporate reflective strips for added visibility at night-time, but thanks to organic electronics, rider safety will now be improved further. Partners of the EU-funded PI-SCALE project are focusing on various applications of OLEDs, including their integration into textile designs.

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Planck reveals link between active galaxies and their dark matter environment

Scientists have used the tiny distortions imprinted on the cosmic microwave background by the gravity of matter throughout the universe, recorded by ESA's Planck satellite, to uncover the connection between the luminosity of quasars – the bright cores of active galaxies – and the mass of the much larger 'halos' of dark matter in which they sit. The result is an important confirmation for our under

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An Alien Meteor May Have Burned Up in the Atmosphere in 2014

That small asteroid or comet may have traveled multiple light years from another solar system to burn up over the Pacific Ocean. The post An Alien Meteor May Have Burned Up in the Atmosphere in 2014 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Will police be pulling over driverless vehicles?

I had an interesting conversation recently with some police officers about the future of their work in a driverless society. A significant part of their job is vehicle related. Self-driving vehicles won't speed or break the law so what will happen? On the positive side, police will be available to handle other crimes. Also, many police are killed on the road, so deaths will be reduced. They menti

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Scientists Restore Some Function In The Brains Of Dead Pigs

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When Futurism Led to Fascism—and Why It Could Happen Again

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Climate change: Sir David Attenborough warns of 'catastrophe'

The veteran naturalist's BBC programme on climate change is his strongest warning yet on the threat of rising temperatures.

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Triplet superconductivity demonstrated under high pressure

Researchers in France and Japan have demonstrated a theoretical type of unconventional superconductivity in a uranium-based material, according to a study published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Toyota hybrids drive over 60% of the time in zero emissions mode, study finds

A new study carried out by University College Dublin (UCD) academics, published today, has revealed that in typical Irish commuting conditions, Toyota's hybrid powertrain system drives in zero emissions mode (ZEV) for significantly more than half (62 percent) of the time and over 40 percent of the distance covered.

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The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest

The tropical forests of the Andes and Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest biome are separated by almost 1,000 km of drier areas with open vegetation in the Chaco, Cerrado (Brazilian savanna), and Caatinga (Brazilian semiarid) biomes. Today, these tropical forests are not connected, but the fact that they share closely related species and lineages suggests that these biomes were connected in the past. For

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The Cerrado once connected the Andes with the Atlantic Rainforest

The tropical forests of the Andes and Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest biome are separated by almost 1,000 km of drier areas with open vegetation in the Chaco, Cerrado (Brazilian savanna), and Caatinga (Brazilian semiarid) biomes. Today, these tropical forests are not connected, but the fact that they share closely related species and lineages suggests that these biomes were connected in the past. For

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Making a fast ion transporter

An international team of researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan and Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Germany has revealed an ion transport mechanism of sodium/proton antiporter by simulating its motion. Based on the simulations, they have designed a faster transporter by making mutation on "gate" of the transporter.

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Building a better turbine

Imagine a world in which half of our electricity is generated renewably by offshore wind farms. Now imagine a powerful hurricane hitting the coast where that farm is located. If developers, engineers and policy makers haven't prepared for this event the coast could face major consequences such as blackouts and brownouts. This is a scenario that Sanjay R. Arwade, professor of civil and environmenta

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Lab-to-market study explores success

Universities and federal laboratories are the cornerstones of American innovation, developing new products that address important societal issues and drive economic growth.

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Researchers report observation of room-temperature polar skyrmions

An international team of researchers has discovered a way to create and observe room-temperature polar skyrmions. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes creating the polar skyrmions and their observations. Pavlo Zubko, with the London Centre for Nanotechnology, has published a News and Views piece on the work done by the team in the same journal issue.

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A new kind of signal points to neutron star mergers

NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has discovered a bright burst of X-rays in a galaxy 6.6 billion light years from Earth. This event likely signaled the merger of two neutron stars—dense stellar objects packed mainly with neutrons—and could give astronomers fresh insight into how neutron stars are built. When two neutron stars merge they produce jets of high-energy particles and radiation fired in

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New carbon dioxide capture technology is not the magic bullet against climate change

According to a recent major UN report, if we are to limit temperature rise to 1.5 °C and prevent the most catastrophic effects of climate change, we need to reduce global CO₂ emissions to net zero by 2050. This means eliminating fossil fuel use fast – but to cushion that transition and offset the areas in which there is currently no replacement for combustibles, we need to actively remove CO₂ from

9h

Maori loanwords in NZ English are less about meaning, more about identity

Ask the average Kiwi on the street about Māori words in New Zealand English, and most will tell you that more and more are being used in everyday language.

9h

Making a fast ion transporter

An international team of researchers at Institute for Molecular Science in Japan and Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Germany has revealed an ion transport mechanism of sodium/proton antiporter by simulating its motion. Based on the simulations, they have designed a faster transporter by making mutation on "gate" of the transporter.

9h

Microcavity experiment heads to ISS

The second Swinburne Haileybury International Space Station Experiment (SHINE) launched from Wallops Island, Virginia in the US aboard an Antares rocket at 6.46am (AEST), to make its way to the International Space Station (ISS).

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Scientists invent way to trap mysterious 'dark world' particle at Large Hadron Collider

Now that they've identified the Higgs boson, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have set their sights on an even more elusive target.

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'Giant lion' fossil found in Kenya museum drawer

The bones of the huge creature belong to a new species which roamed east Africa 20 million years ago.

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Facebook bans UK far-right groups

Social media giant Facebook on Thursday banned various far-right British groups including the English Defence League from its network for promoting hate and violence.

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Amazon to pull plug on China retail operations: report

Amazon plans to close down its online retail operations that cater to consumers in China in an apparent admission of defeat to local e-commerce rivals such as Alibaba and JD.com, a report said …

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This Ancient 'Warg' Was Scarier Than a Tolkien Beast, Terrorized Kenya 22 Million Years Ago

This newly discovered, but now extinct carnivore lived about 22 million years ago in what is now Kenya. It was larger than a polar bear, the largest land-based carnivore alive today.

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Q&A: What to Know About the Drug-Resistant Fungus, Candida auris

Fungal researcher Christina Cuomo discusses the spread of infections plaguing hospitals across the world.

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Ize on the prize: is Prince Charles the last guardian of British spelling?

There has been much spluttering about the prince’s use of ‘Americanisms’ in a letter to Emmanuel Macron, but the truth is more complicated Bad news for a certain kind of pedantic patriot (look away now, Jacob Rees-Mogg ). Prince Charles has debased the English language – and in a letter to a foreign potentate, no less. Our future king has essentially committed treason by using a ghastly “American

9h

Study finds global action needed to ensure acceptable climate futures

Ensuring a tolerable climate future, one that reduces warming while considering the costs, requires immediate global action, according to an international team of scientists.

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Amazonian soils mapped using indicator species

Understanding the ecology and distributions of species in Amazonia is hampered by lack of information about environmental conditions, such as soils. Plant occurrence data are typically more abundant than soil samples in poorly known areas, and researchers from Finland and Brazil have now developed a method that uses both plant and soil data to produce a map of soil properties.

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Should We Ban Plastic Bags

Probably – but it’s complicated. That is often the unfortunate answer when we ask big questions about how best to manage the world. We want to feel good about ourselves for being good citizens, or at least champion clear policies that are objectively better and effective at achieving our goals. Reality rarely accommodates these desires. Part of the problem is that there are over 7 billion people

9h

Breakthrough research to revolutionise internet communication

A team of University of Otago/Dodd-Walls Centre scientists have created a novel device that could enable the next generation of faster, more energy efficient internet. Their breakthrough results have been published in the world's premiere scientific journal Nature this morning.

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Predicting tvariable carbon dioxide uptake by the ocean

Ocean CO2 uptake is predictable for two years in advance, according to new paper in Science Advances by Dr. Hongmei Li, Dr. Tatiana Ilyina, Dr. Wolfgang A. Müller, and Dr. Peter Landschützer, all scientists in the department "The Ocean in the Earth System" at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M).

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In vivo super-resolution photoacoustic computed tomography by localization of single dyed droplets

Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a non-invasive hybrid imaging technique that excites biological tissues with light and detects the subsequently generated ultrasound to form images. PACT combines the advantages of both optical imaging—high optical contrast, and ultrasonic imaging—high resolution and deep penetration in biological tissues. PACT has been widely used for vascular network m

9h

Amazonian soils mapped using indicator species

Understanding the ecology and distributions of species in Amazonia is hampered by lack of information about environmental conditions, such as soils. Plant occurrence data are typically more abundant than soil samples in poorly known areas, and researchers from Finland and Brazil have now developed a method that uses both plant and soil data to produce a map of soil properties.

9h

New automated biological sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

Professor Thomas Gervais of Polytechnique Montréal and his students Pierre-Alexandre Goyette and Étienne Boulais, in partnership with the team led by Professor David Juncker of McGill University, have developed a new microfluidic process aimed at automating protein detection by antibodies. This work, published in Nature Communications, points to the arrival of new portable instruments to accelerat

9h

Climate protesters want net zero carbon emissions – is it possible?

An increasing number of countries are declaring plans to hit net zero carbon emissions, but doing so will require technology that doesn’t yet exist

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Glowing millipede genitalia give scientists a leg up in the lab

Animals Megapixels: We've got a handy new imaging technique for defining millipede species. Millipedes’ exoskeletons glow fluorescent shades of green, yellow, blue, and pink under ultraviolet lights––and so do their genitalia. A new UV imaging method, described…

9h

Genome analysis shows common origin of Pskov, Novgorod and Yakutia populations

Scientists have for the first time compared complete genome data of different ethnic groups in Russia. Using a special algorithm, they traced the genetic history for some groups. In the future, such data can be used in other important studies. For example, it can help to identify genetic risk factors in various populations of Russian people. The results are published in Genomics.

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AI makes key protein research a million times faster

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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China Finds Phone-Wielding Tourists and Telescopes Don't Mesh

Part scientific instrument and part vacation destination, China's FAST radio telescope welcomed visitors with their radio wave-emitting gadgets—until it didn't.

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Everlane's New Sneaker Treads Lightly on the Environment

The brand known for its fashionable apparel has launched a sneaker made of recycled and sustainably sourced materials.

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When Futurism Led to Fascism—and Why It Could Happen Again

The Italian Futurists praised invention, modernity, speed, and disruption. Sound familiar?

9h

Trump’s Second Term

Of all the questions that will be answered by the 2020 election, one matters above the others: Is Trumpism a temporary aberration or a long-term phenomenon? Put another way: Will the changes brought about by Donald Trump and today’s Republican Party fade away, or will they become entrenched? Trump’s reelection seems implausible to many people, as implausible as his election did before November 20

9h

Lessons learnt from the drift analysis of MH370 debris

The precise last position of Boeing 777 of Malaysia Airlines (MH370) that disappeared from radar screens on 8 March 2014 is still unknown. Multiple large-scale search missions have failed. The discovery of several items of debris along the shore of the western Indian Ocean in the subsequent years brought renewed hope. Shortly after the sighting of the first piece of debris, a flaperon on La Réunio

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New research exposes extent of mineral demand for renewable energy technologies

The growing demand for minerals and metals to build the electric vehicles, solar arrays, wind turbines and other renewable energy infrastructure necessary to meet the ambitious goals of the Paris Climate Agreement could outstrip current production rates for key metals by as early as 2022, according to new research by the UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures.

9h

Genome analysis shows common origin of Pskov, Novgorod and Yakutia populations

Scientists have for the first time compared complete genome data of different ethnic groups in Russia. Using a special algorithm, they traced the genetic history for some groups. In the future, such data can be used in other important studies. For example, it can help to identify genetic risk factors in various populations of Russian people. The results are published in Genomics.

9h

New study shows people used natural dyes to color their clothing thousands of years ago

Even thousands of years ago, people wore clothing with colourful patterns made from plant and animal-based dyes. Chemists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have created new analytical methods to examine textiles from China and Peru that are several thousand years old. In the scientific journal Scientific Reports, they describe the new method, which can reconstruct the spatial di

9h

Organic farming drives sustainable agriculture

The future of farming has to look different from farming today. Tremendously different. Otherwise, we will risk losing even more biodiversity, continue with polluting water bodies, driving erosion and running down soil fertility. And we will never reach the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), many of which directly relate to agriculture.

9h

Five planets revealed after 20 years of observation

Over 4000 exoplanets have been discovered since the first one in 1995, but the vast majority of them orbit their stars with relatively short periods of revolution. Indeed, to confirm the presence of a planet, it is necessary to wait until it has made one or more revolutions around its star. This can take from a few days for the closest to the star to decades for the furthest away: Jupiter for exam

9h

How Old Are Saturn's Rings? The Debate Rages On

Pinning down the ring system’s age has profound implications for the entire Saturnian system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Immigrants pave the way for the gentrification of black neighborhoods

A study using U.S. census data shows primarily Asian and Hispanic immigrants may trigger gentrification in U.S. neighborhoods.

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The Problem Isn't Sharing Misinformation Online; It's Believing It

To counter spurious ideas such as those of the anti-vaxx movement, consider what drives people to accept them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How Old Are Saturn's Rings? The Debate Rages On

Pinning down the ring system’s age has profound implications for the entire Saturnian system — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Image of the Day: Colorful Colonoids

Organoids grown from a mouse's colon will be used to screen drugs for colorectal cancer.

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Synergy of anthropogenic emissions and atmospheric processes may cause severe haze in northern China

Regional severe haze in northern China is characterized by exceedingly high concentrations of fine particulate matter and exhibits extensive temporal and spatial coverage, thus influencing air quality, human health and ecosystems. The causes of these severe haze events, however, are very complex and still debated.

9h

Researchers develop new variant of Maxwell's demon at nanoscale

Maxwell's demon is a machine proposed by James Clerk Maxwell in 1897. The hypothetical machine would use thermal fluctuations to obtain energy, apparently violating the second principle of thermodynamics. Now, researchers at the University of Barcelona have presented the first theoretical and experimental solution of a continuous version of Maxwell's demon in a single molecule system. The results,

10h

Not now, not ever: Working with domestic violence

A textbook designed to prepare students to work with victims and perpetrators of domestic violence has been published by a University of Queensland researcher.

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Why language technology can't handle Game of Thrones (yet)

Researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and the Dutch Royal Academy's Humanities Cluster have performed a thorough evaluation of four different name recognition tools on popular 40 novels, including A Game of Thrones. Their analyses, published in PeerJ Computer Science, highlight types of names and texts that are particularly challenging for these tools to identify as well as solutions f

10h

China to launch asteroid probe, calls for partners

China plans to launch an ambitious asteroid exploration mission and has invited collaborators to put their experiments on the probes, space agency officials said Thursday.

10h

A Living 'Balloon on a String' Discovered in the Deepest Part of the Indian Ocean

Explorers captured a video of this gelatinous creature in a recent dive to the Java Trench in the Indian Ocean.

10h

People Underestimate How Fun It Is to Do the Same Thing Twice

A common, low-stakes living-room scenario: A couple is trying to decide on a movie to watch. There’s an option one-half of the relationship is thrilled about, but the other has already seen it. On those grounds, it’s ruled out. But a new study suggests that this notion that having already seen it—or read it, done it, visited it—automatically precludes a second go-around might be mistaken. Repeati

10h

The Humane Way to Cover School-Shooting Anniversaries

As the first anniversary of the Columbine High School shooting approached, a group of students, teachers, and parents addressed reporters at a forum organized by the local school district. Sue Petrone, who lost her 15-year-old son, Danny Rohrbough, in the suburban-Colorado massacre that took the lives of 12 students and a teacher on April 20, 1999, appealed to journalists to focus on the victims

10h

Därför blir svettiga personer ofta myggbitna

Honmyggor förlitar sig på värme, fukt och kroppslukt i sin jakt på blod. Nu har forskare i Lund och USA upptäckt hur det går till när myggor känner lukten av svett och varför svettiga personer oftare blir bitna. I studien konstaterar forskarlaget att myggorna identifierar mjölksyra, en komponent i svett och en lukt som myggorna attraheras av. Forskarna har studerat gulafebernmyggan ( Aedes aegypt

10h

Marmot Eclipse Rain Jacket Review: Comfy and PFC-Free

Our review of Marmot's new EvoDry jacket with Aquavent tech—a high-performance rain jacket manufactured without dumping carcinogens in groundwater.

10h

Want a Tech Job? Silicon Valley Is Still Your Best Bet

A study finds that tech job listings are growing faster in established hubs, like Silicon Valley, San Francisco, and Austin, than elsewhere, even as competition increases.

10h

This Startup Could Sell You Crypto Tokens—With SEC Backing

Blockstack is proposing an unprecedented initial coin offering under an SEC rule that would allow it to sell shares to small investors.

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California’s cap-and-trade program may vastly overestimate emissions cuts

Landowners could have earned hundreds of millions of dollars for carbon cuts that won’t happen.

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Longer lifespans: A coming crisis or reason to celebrate?

A huge segment of America's population — the Baby Boom generation — is aging and will live longer than any American generation in history. The story we read about in the news? Their drain on social services like Social Security and Medicare. But increased longevity is a cause for celebration, says Ashton Applewhite, not doom and gloom. This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism List Price: $26.

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Fearsome ancient carnivore discovered after fossil lingered for decades in museum drawer

Fearsome ancient carnivore discovered after fossil lingered for decades in museum drawerFearsome ancient carnivore discovered after fossil lingered for decades in museum drawer, …

10h

Texas Baby Born Without Skin: What Can Cause This Condition?

A baby in Texas was born without skin on much of his body, according to news reports.

10h

Liver Illness Strikes Latino Children Like a "Silent Tsunami"

Fatty liver disease, linked to gene interactions with a high-sugar diet, can cause cancer and organ failure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Liver Illness Strikes Latino Children Like a "Silent Tsunami"

Fatty liver disease, linked to gene interactions with a high-sugar diet, can cause cancer and organ failure — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10h

Here's What Scotland's Dogs Looked Like 4,500 Years Ago

The re-created, three-dimensional face of a dog that lived 4,500 years ago in Scotland is so realistic, you almost want to reach out and pet its thick fur.

11h

Why Are So Many Gray Whales Washing Up Dead on California's Coast?

Seven dead gray whales have washed up on Northern California beaches in less than two months, and that has researchers concerned.

11h

How the First Empire of the Andes Ensured a Steady Beer Supply

How the First Empire of the Andes Ensured a Steady Beer Supply Drought-tolerant ingredients and local sourcing of brewing containers meant the beer could flow even in tough times. WariBeerVessel_topNteaser.jpg A Wari drinking vessel Image credits: The Field Museum Culture Thursday, April 18, 2019 – 06:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) – A reliable supply of beer made from pepper be

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The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt

Scientists analyzed bits of beer vessels from an ancient Peruvian brewery to learn what the beer was made of and where the materials to make the vessels came from. They learned that production was local and that the ingredients for the beer included pepper berries that would grow even in droughts. The authors argue that this steady, reliable access to beer helped maintain unity in the empire.

11h

Bedroom confidential: what sex therapists hear from the couch

Sex counsellors have a unique insight into our shared concerns and insecurities. Where once they focused on physical issues, now they are tackling psychological ones Denise Knowles, a sex and relationship therapist with the charity Relate, says patients often say to her: “There are so many options, I don’t know where to start.” Thirty years ago, Knowles was mostly approached with physical problem

11h

We Asked the 2020 Democrats About Climate Change (Yes, All of Them). Here Are Their Ideas.

The New York Times sent a climate policy survey to the 18 declared candidates. They all want to stick to the Paris Agreement. Beyond that, they diverge.

11h

‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars’

Women at the Salk Institute say they faced a culture of marginalization and hostility. The numbers from other elite scientific institutions suggest they’re not alone.

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Rites of Passage: ‘Will You Stay With Me Until I Die?’

My patient had a simple, devastating request. To honor it meant grappling with how a therapist responds to her clients.

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Wild bee species critical to pollination on the decline

More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinizing everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study.

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Wild bee species critical to pollination on the decline

More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinizing everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study.

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Jet shares nosedive after flights grounded, lenders 'hopeful'

Jet Airways shares plunged more than 32 percent on Thursday, hours after the Indian carrier's final flight landed following a decision to ground its entire fleet.

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Strong 6.1-magnitude quake hits Taiwan, injuring 17 people

A 6.1-magnitude earthquake jolted Taiwan on Thursday, the US Geological Survey said, disrupting traffic and injuring 17 people.

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Warm, dry winds may be straining Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf

Wind-induced melting that occurred during the Antarctic autumn may be accelerating the Larsen C ice shelf’s collapse, which could raise sea levels.

11h

Why Won’t Barr Just Release the Mueller Report?

The Justice Department said on Tuesday that it would release Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Thursday, but it didn’t say how. Finally, late on Wednesday, word emerged: Attorney General William Barr will deliver a press conference at 9:30 a.m., followed by the release of the report to Congress and then the public later in the morning. No wonder DOJ waited so long to detail the rollout:

11h

Segregation Is Preventable. Congress Just Isn’t Trying.

When the Supreme Court struck down school segregation 65 years ago in Brown v. Board of Education , it overturned the doctrine that separate institutions for black and white people were constitutional so long as they were equally funded. Yet in the White House and in the halls of Congress, the old approach has shown enormous staying power. For decades, federal lawmakers have poured far more money

11h

‘Search for inspiration’ lands too close to plagiarism, forcing retraction of grief paper

A pair of grief scholars in Denmark have lost a 2018 paper on ghostly apparitions after one of the researchers copied text from another article. The study, “How many bereaved people hallucinate about their loved one? A systematic review and meta-analysis of bereavement hallucinations,” appeared in the Journal of Affective Disorders, an Elsevier publication. Authors … Continue reading ‘Search for i

11h

Københavnsk ITS-løsning skal vise sit værd i Vallensbæk: Særligt to kryds giver problemer

PLUS. Bilisterne i Vallensbæk oplever måske, at trafikken glider lidt nemmere. Kommunen tester en københavnsk ITS-løsning, som bringer en række forskellige data i spil.

11h

The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt

A thousand years ago, the Wari empire stretched across Peru. At its height, it covered an area the size of the Eastern seaboard of the US from New York City to Jacksonville. It lasted for 500 years, from 600 to 1100 AD, before eventually giving rise to the Inca. That's a long time for an empire to remain intact, and archaeologists are studying remnants of the Wari culture to see what kept it ticki

11h

Climate Change Threatens Ice Roads. Satellites Could Help

Diamond mines in Canada have a short window in which to truck in their equipment—satellite sensors could help ice roads keep on truckin’.

11h

Move Over, San Andreas: There’s an Ominous New Fault in Town

An emerging fault system along the Nevada border is shaking up the tech industry’s latest frontier—and only a small group of scientists is paying attention.

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Macron’s pledge to rebuild Notre Dame in five years may be possible

Many have expressed dismay at the “loss” of Notre Dame following Monday’s fire, but thankfully most of the building is still intact thanks to its clever design

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Green material for refrigeration identified

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Green material for refrigeration identified

Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners.

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Blood pressure drug shows promise for treating Parkinson's and dementia in animal study

A prescribed drug to treat high blood pressure has shown promise against conditions such as Parkinson's, Huntington's and forms of dementia in studies carried out in mice and zebrafish at the University of Cambridge.

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Experimental antiplatelet compound for acute stroke shows promise

An experimental compound inhibited clot formation without increased bleeding, a common side effect of current anticlotting therapies, in a phase I study.First-in-human study shows the anticlotting drug was well-tolerated without serious safety concerns in healthy volunteers.Next-phases will gauge effectiveness and safety in patients with acute ischemic strokes.

12h

Natural arsenic with a unique order structure: potential for new quantum materials

Natural arsenic with a unique order structure: potential for new quantum materials Natural arsenic with a unique order structure: potential for new quantum materials, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42561-8 Natural arsenic with a unique order structure: potential for new quantum materials

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Machine learning accurately classifies age of toddlers based on eye tracking

Machine learning accurately classifies age of toddlers based on eye tracking Machine learning accurately classifies age of toddlers based on eye tracking, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42764-z Machine learning accurately classifies age of toddlers based on eye tracking

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Mathematical modelling of the internal circulation anaerobic reactor by Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, simultaneously combined with hydrodynamics

Mathematical modelling of the internal circulation anaerobic reactor by Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, simultaneously combined with hydrodynamics Mathematical modelling of the internal circulation anaerobic reactor by Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1, simultaneously combined with hydrodynamics, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42755-0 Mathematical modelling of the internal

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Efficient Deep Network Architectures for Fast Chest X-Ray Tuberculosis Screening and Visualization

Efficient Deep Network Architectures for Fast Chest X-Ray Tuberculosis Screening and Visualization Efficient Deep Network Architectures for Fast Chest X-Ray Tuberculosis Screening and Visualization, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42557-4 Efficient Deep Network Architectures for Fast Chest X-Ray Tuberculosis Screening and Visualization

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Elevated carbon dioxide levels lead to proteome-wide alterations for optimal growth of a fast-growing cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 11801

Elevated carbon dioxide levels lead to proteome-wide alterations for optimal growth of a fast-growing cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 11801 Elevated carbon dioxide levels lead to proteome-wide alterations for optimal growth of a fast-growing cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 11801, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42576-1 Elevated carbon dioxide levels

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Anti-HERV-WEnv antibodies are correlated with seroreactivity against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in children and youths at T1D risk

Anti-HERV-W Env antibodies are correlated with seroreactivity against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in children and youths at T1D risk Anti-HERV-W Env antibodies are correlated with seroreactivity against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in children and youths at T1D risk, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42788-5 Anti-HERV-W Env antibodies are corre

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Life-stage specific transcriptomes of a migratory endoparasitic plant nematode, Radopholus similis elucidate a different parasitic and life strategy of plant parasitic nematodes

Life-stage specific transcriptomes of a migratory endoparasitic plant nematode, Radopholus similis elucidate a different parasitic and life strategy of plant parasitic nematodes Life-stage specific transcriptomes of a migratory endoparasitic plant nematode, Radopholus similis elucidate a different parasitic and life strategy of plant parasitic nematodes, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.10

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Control of electrical conductivity of highly stacked zinc oxide nanocrystals by ultraviolet treatment

Control of electrical conductivity of highly stacked zinc oxide nanocrystals by ultraviolet treatment Control of electrical conductivity of highly stacked zinc oxide nanocrystals by ultraviolet treatment, Published online: 18 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42102-3 Control of electrical conductivity of highly stacked zinc oxide nanocrystals by ultraviolet treatment

12h

Crunched: are men to blame for the infertility crisis?

The FT digs into the data for the truth about the fertility 'cliff-edge'

12h

Green material for refrigeration identified

Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners.

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Ocean-Clogging Microplastics Also Pollute the Air, Study Finds

Microplastics are known to cause ocean pollution, but a new study suggests airborne plastic particles pollute the air and dry land as well.

12h

Facebook ‘unintentionally uploaded’ email contacts of 1.5 million users

Facebook said it may have uploaded email contacts of 1.5 million new users since May 2016, in another privacy-related issue faced by the social media company.

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Japan's Suzuki in domestic recall of 2 mln vehicles

Japanese small car manufacturer Suzuki announced Thursday it was recalling two million vehicles shipped domestically, citing improper inspections and a series of other faults including false fuel efficiency data.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Bliver alle kroppens celler angrebet under forkølelsen?

En læser vil gerne vide, hvor stor en invasion fra virus, der skal til, før vi bliver syge, og om cellerne kan overleve et angreb. Det svarer professor i virologi på.

13h

Fragile historic buildings open doors to virtual visitors

Digital 3D models made for archaeologists and conservationists of at-risk heritage sites are now online so anyone can walk through them After a major earthquake rocked Mexico City in 2017, the authorities wanted to assess the damage it had caused to the city’s cathedral, the largest and arguably most spectacular building of its kind in Latin America. Rather than have to rely on ladders and winche

13h

Ben-Fur: Romans brought rabbits to Britain, experts discover

Bone found in Roman palace belongs to rabbit that could have been kept as an exotic pet Who brought the first rabbit to Britain? Not, it would seem, the Normans, who were previously thought to have introduced the animal to England in the 11th century. Instead, re-examination of a bone found at a Roman palace more than half a century ago has shown that it belonged to a rabbit that may have been ke

13h

Föreläsningskväll om diabetes

Finns det plåster som kan hjälpa till att läka svåra fotsår, kan diabetes ge sämre hörsel och går det att pigga upp trötta insulinceller? Detta är ett axplock av de frågor som kommer att diskuteras under kvällens föreläsning om diabetes. Välkomna!

13h

How bacteria build an enzyme that destroys climate-changing laughing gas

New research from the University of East Anglia reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide.

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Extinction Rebellion: Climate protests 'diverting' London police

Police rest days are cancelled as more than 1,000 officers are deployed in London.

14h

Boeing conducts final test flight of 737 MAX with software fix

Boeing has conducted a final test flight of a 737 MAX model with an updated anti-stall system prior to its certification by aviation authorities, the aerospace manufacturer said Wednesday.

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Samsung to inspect Galaxy Fold phones after reviewer complaints

Samsung announced Thursday it will inspect units of its highly anticipated folding smartphone after some reviewers reported screen damage.

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Pinterest prices IPO at $19 to begin trading Thursday

Pinterest on Wednesday announced it would price its initial public offering at $19 a share to begin trading on Wall Street the following day.

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Amazon to pull plug on China retail operations: report

Amazon plans to close down its online retail operations that cater to consumers in China in an apparent admission of defeat to local e-commerce rivals such as Alibaba and JD.com, a report said on Thursday.

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Kakapow! Rare world's fattest parrot has record breeding season

The world's fattest parrot, the critically endangered kakapo, has enjoyed a record breaking breeding season, New Zealand scientists said Thursday, with climate change possibly aiding the species' unique mating spree.

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Scientists unearth 220 million-year-old dinosaur fossils in Argentina

A site containing the 220-million-year-old fossilised remains of nearly a dozen dinosaurs has been discovered in western Argentina, researchers said Wednesday.

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Forecasters turn to array of technology to fight floodwaters

An arsenal of new technology is being put to the test fighting floods this year as rivers inundate towns and farm fields across the central United States. Drones, supercomputers and sonar that scans deep under water are helping to maintain flood control projects and predict just where rivers will roar out of their banks.

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Kakapow! Rare world's fattest parrot has record breeding season

The world's fattest parrot, the critically endangered kakapo, has enjoyed a record breaking breeding season, New Zealand scientists said Thursday, with climate change possibly aiding the species' unique mating spree.

14h

California dispute threatens plan to protect Colorado River

A dispute between two major California water agencies is threatening to derail a hard-won agreement designed to protect a river that serves 40 million people in the U.S. West.

14h

Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore

Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear, with a skull as large as that of a rhinoceros and enormous piercing canine teeth, this massive carnivore would have been an intimidating part of the eastern African ecosystems occupied by early apes and monkeys.

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How bacteria build an enzyme that destroys climate-changing laughing gas

New research from the University of East Anglia reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide.

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Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide

The harmful algae that causes red tide is currently at near undetectable levels in Florida waters compared with the much higher concentrations at this time last year. The red tide algae, Karenia brevis, causes respiratory issues, is responsible for massive fish kills and is often blamed for damaging tourism.

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Glowing millipede genitalia help scientists tell species apart

Sometimes, it's really easy for scientists to tell species of animals apart—they'll be obviously different shapes or colors. Other times, different species will look nearly identical to the naked eye. In those cases, scientists need to turn to techniques like DNA analysis to tell them apart. Or, like researchers at the Field Museum discovered when studying some near-identical millipedes, you can s

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Silver Lining as New, 97% Effective Ebola Vaccine Saves Lives in The Current Outbreak

We're not out of the woods yet, but this is incredible.

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Glowing millipede genitalia help scientists tell species apart

Researchers studying near-identical species of millipedes found a new way to tell them apart: shining a blacklight on them. Under the UV light, parts of the different species' genitals will glow different colors. This discovery has allowed scientists to rewrite this part of the millipede family tree.

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How to identify a body: the Marchioness disaster and my life in forensic pathology

In my career, I have investigated many of the UK’s worst disasters. Few cases were as harrowing as the sinking of the Marchioness in 1989, which left scores dead and almost impossible to identify. By Richard Shepherd Warning: this piece contains graphic descriptions of dead bodies. I took a call early one Sunday morning in August 1989 to warn me that there had been a disaster. It was during the s

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A stargazers’ guide to getting the most out of a light-polluted city sky

Only 2% of people in a Campaign to Protect Rural England census had access to a truly dark sky. But there are still ways to see the stars How many stars can you see at night? The Campaign to Protect Rural England says only 2% of people who took part in its star census were able to experience a truly dark sky, defined as when more than 30 stars were visible. More than half failed to see 10 stars. L

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New Climate Models Predict 5°C WARMING

submitted by /u/realestnwah [link] [comments]

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Fødevareforskere: Der er for få frie forskningsmidler på vores område, og det er et stort problem

Politikerne er nødt til at lave reglerne om, så vi kan få mere uafhængig forskning, lyder kritikken.

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Africa’s largest mammalian carnivore had canines ‘the size of bananas’

Simbakubwa kutokaafrika was larger than a polar bear and toothier than a lion

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Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide

2018 was the worst year for red tide in more than a decade. A new study reveals what made it so severe.

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In vivo super-resolution photoacoustic computed tomography by localization of single dyed droplets

Recently, researchers at the Caltech Optical Imaging Laboratory, directed by Lihong Wang, developed a technique for in vivo super-resolution PACT. It breaks the acoustic diffraction limit by localizing the centers of single dyed droplets flowing in blood vessels. This technique resolves brain blood vessels at a six-fold finer resolution. The research has been published in Light: Science and Applic

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Study shows female managers don't mean higher pay for women

A new paper in the European Sociological Review indicates that women's and men's earnings are not affected by the share of female managers in an organization, nor by the sex of workers' individual managers.

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Preschoolers with chronic constipation tend to be picky eaters

In the first study of its kind in the US, researchers found that normally developing preschool children with chronic constipation have underlying sensory issues that contribute to their difficulties with toileting behaviors. These children are often picky eaters who might be overly sensitive to food textures, tastes, or odors. They also might have an exaggerated response to noises, bright lights,

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Late dinner and no breakfast is a killer combination

People who skip breakfast and eat dinner near bedtime have worse outcomes after a heart attack. That's the finding of research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

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The Problem Isn't Sharing Misinformation Online; It's Believing It

To counter spurious ideas such as those of the antivaccine movement, consider what drives people to accept them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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