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Uber Recruits Some Rich Friends to Drive Its Autonomous Cars

Toyota, Japanese auto supplier Denso, and the Softbank Vision Fund are investing $1 billion in Uber's self-driving car unit.

1h

Why mass shootings don't lead to gun control

Mass shootings happen with numbing frequency in the United States. Despite the extraordinary tragedy of these events, such as the shooting at Columbine High School twenty years ago this week, little progress has been made in policy and law to prevent them from happening again.

8h

Image of the Day: Pretty Jellies

The genomes of jellyfish are compared with those of other Cnidarian species that don't have a free-swimming stage.

9h

'MalwareTech' security researcher pleads guilty

In 2017, Marcus Hutchins went from relatively unknown, to being a worldwide hero, to facing criminal charges all in a span of a few months. After he shut down the rapidly spreading …

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7min

Question on the future of cosmetic surgery

I was wondering what the future potentials will be for the future of cosmetic surgery. In my particular I have some asymmetric features in my face that I would like to improve. I realize everyone has some asymmetry and although I think my face is more asymmetric than most it's not an incredible outlier from the average. Still I'm somewhat self conscious, particularly about my jaw. I don't know if

7min

How to biohack your cells to fight cancer – Greg Foot

submitted by /u/mind_bomber [link] [comments]

7min

Gadget Lab Podcast: Your Right to Repair Your Gadgets

We talk with right-to-repair advocate Nathan Proctor. Also: Samsung’s Galaxy Fold woes, and a preview of the next Sony PlayStation.

9min

Continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Nine years ago tomorrow — April 20, 2010 — crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast, and reveals the key role that marsh grasses play in the overall recovery of these important coastal wetlands.

15min

A universal framework combining genome annotation and undergraduate education

Scientists and educators have developed a framework for using new genome sequences as a training resource for undergraduates interested in learning genome annotation. This strategy will both make the process of determining gene functions more efficient and help train the next generation of scientists in bioinformatics.

15min

Scientists Create Material With “Artificial Metabolism”

Slime Mold Scientists just got one step closer to creating living machines — or at least machines that mimic biological life as we know it. A new biomaterial built in a Cornell University bioengineering lab uses synthetic DNA to continuously and autonomously organize, assemble, and restructure itself in a process so similar to how biological cells and tissues grow that the researchers are calling

15min

Our leaders are ignoring global warming to the point of criminal negligence. It's unforgivable | Tim Winton

Humanity survived the cold war because no one pushed the button. On climate change, the button has been pushed again and again About this series Support Guardian Australia’s independent journalism with a one-off or recurring contribution I’ve been asking myself a question – and even posing it makes me queasy. Is it too late – are we beyond saving? Continue reading…

15min

Scientists Find Genetic Variants That Prevent Obesity, Diabetes

Drug Discovery Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered genetic variants, or mutations, that protect people from obesity and its symptoms — and they think the discovery could lead to new weight-loss medications. “A powerful emerging concept is that genetic variants that protect against disease can be used as models for the development of medicines that are more effective and s

22min

Why Lil Dicky made this star-studded Earth Day music video

Lil Dicky is a rapper and comedian who released his debut album in 2015. His new music video, "Earth," features artists such as Justin Bieber, Ariana Grande, Ed Sheehan, Kevin Hart, and Leonardo DiCaprio. All proceeds of the music video will go to environmental causes, Dicky said. None Lil Dicky dropped a new Earth Day-themed music video today that's being called the "We Are the World" of the dig

40min

How Did a Neck Crack Leave a Woman Partially Paralyzed?

For a young woman in the U.K., an accidental neck crack had a devastating outcome.

42min

Behold, the face of a Neolithic dog

A forensic artist in Scotland has made a hyper realistic model of an ancient dog. It was based on the skull of a dog dug up in Orkney, Scotland, which lived and died 4,000 years ago. The model gives us a glimpse of some of the first dogs humans befriended. Scottish historians and artists have created a highly detailed model of the type of dogs raised and revered by a group of Neolithic humans. Th

51min

Lethal Listeria Outbreak: Why Is This Bug So Dangerous?

One person has died in connection with a Listeria outbreak tied to sliced deli meats and cheeses. Why is this bacterium so dangerous?

53min

IBM Pulls the Plug on Drug-Discovering Watson AI

Bye, Watson On Thursday, STAT published a story claiming that IBM is halting sales of Watson for Drug Discovery — a service that uses the company’s Watson AI to analyze connections between genes, drugs, and diseases on the hunt for useful new medications — citing as its source a person familiar with IBM’s internal decision-making. “We are focusing our resources within Watson Health to double down

58min

What They Left Behind: Legacies of the Recently Departed

Some gems from the life’s work of people remembered in obituaries in The New York Times.

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New automation features are coming to macOS in Shortcuts—but not for every app

Screen Time is also headed for macOS 10.15, a report says.

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Report: FTC considering oversight of Facebook's Zuckerberg

Federal regulators are reportedly considering seeking some kind of oversight of Mark Zuckerberg's leadership of Facebook over the social network giant's mishandling of users' personal information.

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Honda slows Accord, Civic production as buyers shift to SUVs

Honda is slowing production of Accord and Civic cars as U.S. buyers continue to favor SUVs and trucks.

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A universal framework combining genome annotation and undergraduate education

As genome sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, resulting in an exponential increase in data, the need for efficiency in predicting gene function is growing, as is the need to train the next generation of scientists in bioinformatics. Researchers in the lab of Lukas Mueller, a faculty member of the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), have developed a strategy to fulfill both of these needs, benefitin

1h

A universal framework combining genome annotation and undergraduate education

As genome sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, resulting in an exponential increase in data, the need for efficiency in predicting gene function is growing, as is the need to train the next generation of scientists in bioinformatics. Researchers in the lab of Lukas Mueller, a faculty member of the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), have developed a strategy to fulfill both of these needs, benefitin

1h

Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Nine years ago tomorrow—April 20, 2010—crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast, and reveals the key role that marsh grasses play in the overall recovery of these important coastal wetlands.

1h

Flint residents are using fruits and vegetables to combat lead poisoning

Nexus Media News The ongoing trauma in Michigan can't ever be undone, but locals are trying to do what they can to cope. Community activists in Flint, Michigan are helping residents recover and heal from the lead poisoning crisis.

1h

The Government Wants to Make an Example out of Mark Zuckerberg

Target Acquired After seemingly countless privacy scandals rocked Facebook in recent years, federal regulators are considering taking a more aggressive approach — including potentially holding CEO Mark Zuckerberg responsible for the social media giant’s misconduct. The news comes from anonymous sources close to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)’s ongoing, confidential probe into Facebook’s busin

1h

The Hubble Just Took a Gorgeous New Image of the Southern Crab Nebula's Wonky Gas Bubbles

Twenty years after revealing this nebula's wonky hourglass shape, the Hubble Space Telescope returns its gaze to the Southern Crab Nebula to capture a stunning anniversary image.

1h

Two Neutron Stars Collide, Forming a Magnetar

In October 2017, astronomers announced the first detection of gravitational waves from the merger of two neutron stars earlier that year. The event also rung in the era of multi-messenger astronomy, as more than 70 telescopes observed the event’s afterglow in optical light, X-rays, gamma rays, and more. Now, an X-ray signal dubbed XT2 from a galaxy 6.6 billion light-years away has revealed another

2h

How Passing Asteroids Reveal the Secrets of Distant Stars

Stars in the night sky appear as tiny points of light because they are too far away for your eyes to resolve. But even through powerful telescopes, stars still appear as mere points because they are too small to see their true physical size at vast distances. Now, a group of astronomers from over 20 different institutions has found a way to combine a unique telescope array with passing asteroids t

2h

Premature Commercialization in Suicide Prediction

A Swedish company called Emotra make a device to detect someone's risk of suicide based on measuring the body's autonomic responses to certain sounds. It's called EDOR®. I've been blogging about this machine for the past 18 months (1, 2, 3) because such a product, if it worked, would be very important. It could help save countless lives. Unfortunately, I don't think EDOR® has been proven to be eff

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Gene Wolfe, Acclaimed Science Fiction Writer, Dies at 87

His four-book series “The Book of the New Sun” is considered one of the major works of the genre.

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The Ancient Math That Sets the Date of Easter and Passover

Let’s get some things straight. Passover is a springtime Jewish festival celebrating the early Israelites’ exodus from Egypt and freedom from slavery. Jews observe it by hosting a ritual dinner, called a seder, and then by abstaining from eating all leavened bread for about a week. (Some of us abstain from some other stuff , too.) Instead, we eat matzo , a thin, unleavened cracker. Easter is a sp

2h

Sodium batteries are one step closer to saving you from a mobile phone fire

New flexible electrodes help solid-state batteries last longer

2h

Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life

Chemists have developed a new, light-based method for modifying peptides at the C-terminal position. The method introduces the structural diversity needed for drug design in this class of bioactive compounds.

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China’s Military Built an Autonomous Amphibious Landing Vehicle

Marine Lizard China has announced what local media is calling the “world’s first armed amphibious drone boat.” The 39-foot-long Marine Lizard is designed to assist land assault operations and can form a web with other drone ships and airborne drones in order to act in tandem with them. It can reach a maximum of 50 knots (roughly 57 mph) in the water thanks to a diesel hydrojet engine — and on lan

2h

'Einstein's Unfinished Revolution' Looks At The Quantum-Physics-And-Reality Problem

A century after the birth of quantum mechanics, no one is sure what it is telling us about the nature of reality — and Lee Smolin's book adds to a stream of excellent works on the topic. (Image credit: Bettmann Archive)

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A universal framework combining genome annotation and undergraduate education

On April 3, 2019, researchers from the Boyce Thompson Institute published a framework for using new genome sequences as a training resource for undergraduates interested in learning genome annotation. This strategy will both make the process of determining gene functions more efficient and help train the next generation of scientists in bioinformatics.

2h

Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Nine years ago tomorrow — April 20, 2010 — crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coast, and reveals the key role that marsh grasses play in the overall recovery of these important coastal wetlands.

2h

Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication

The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. But researchers have discovered the dolphins actually are social and can make hundreds of different sounds, a finding that could help uncover how communication evolved in marine mammals.

2h

Triplet superconductivity demonstrated under high pressure

Researchers have demonstrated a theoretical type of unconventional superconductivity in a uranium-based material, according to a new study.

2h

Marijuana users weigh less, defying the munchies

New evidence suggests that those who smoke cannabis, or marijuana, weigh less compared to adults who don't. The findings are contrary to the belief that marijuana users who have a serious case of the munchies will ultimately gain more weight.

2h

On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours

A research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours. This chip can be a cell-based drug screening platform for exploring critical pharmacological patterns of antibiotic interactions, along with potential applications in screening other cell-type agents and guidance for clinical therapies.

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Model can predict tariff impact ahead of time

New research explores the complexity of tariffs as a trade tool in a global economy. A global trade war initially launched with Trump Administration tariffs on Chinese steel in 2018 indeed boosted domestic steel production. But as analysts learned how higher costs would affect downstream manufacturers—and later affect demand for domestic steel—stock prices for US steelmakers tumbled by almost 50

2h

Mueller Helped Trump Keep His Most Important Secrets

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report has settled—or all but settled—important questions about the Trump-Russia matter. Did Russia intervene in the 2016 election with the conscious and articulated intent to help elect Donald Trump? Yes. How important were these interventions to the outcome? Large, possibly decisive. Did the Trump campaign know that Russia was doing the intervening? From the beg

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A Soda Company’s Long Obsession With Outer Space

Think about the dreaminess of twilight, when the sun has slipped below the horizon, and the darkening sky is streaked with dusky purples and blues. There, among the emerging stars and the silvery moon, lustrous as a pearl, you see it—an ad for a soda company. This was the future envisioned by PepsiCo, specifically the corporation’s division in Russia. According to a recent story by Futurism’s Jon

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46 Corporations Working On Autonomous Vehicles

submitted by /u/pmp301 [link] [comments]

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Negative calorie foods don't exist, and these biologists have the flaming lizard poop to prove it

Health Bearded dragons are much more cooperative than humans. It’s hard to convince humans to eat precisely measured portions of celery and let you collect the resulting feces and urine, though admittedly not impossible.

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Boston Dynamics Unveils SpotMini You’ll Actually Be Able to Buy

New Best Friend We’ve seen Boston Dynamics’ SpotMini climb stairs , pull heavy loads , and even dance like no one’s watching — and now, we’re finally getting a look at the version of the robo-dog that could one day do all those things on your command. On Thursday, Boston Dynamics’ CEO Marc Raibert unveiled the production version of SpotMini at a TechCrunch -hosted startup showcase. He claims the

2h

New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR

Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrier to moving therapies to the clinic. Now, a group of scientists have developed a reliable method to do just that.

2h

Autonomous microfluidic actuators for periodic sequential flow generation

Control of periodic sequential flows of multisolutions is invaluable in a variety of technology and science applications, but it requires complex and expensive external controllers. Here, we present microfluidic systems that autonomously regulate periodic sequential flows without any user instructions or dynamic external controllers. The systems consist of astable and monostable actuators that mi

2h

Heat flowing from cold to hot without external intervention by using a "thermal inductor"

The cooling of boiling water all the way down to freezing, by thermally connecting it to a thermal bath held at ambient temperature without external intervention, would be quite unexpected. We describe the equivalent of a "thermal inductor," composed of a Peltier element and an electric inductance, which can drive the temperature difference between two bodies to change sign by imposing inertia on

2h

Direct observation of valley-coupled topological current in MoS2

The valley degree of freedom of electrons in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides has been extensively studied by theory (–), optical (–), and optoelectronic (–) experiments. However, generation and detection of pure valley current without relying on optical selection have not yet been demonstrated in these materials. Here, we report that valley current can be electrically induced and

2h

Room temperature polariton lasing in quantum heterostructure nanocavities

Ultralow-threshold coherent light emitters can be achieved through lasing from exciton-polariton condensates, but this generally requires sophisticated device structures and cryogenic temperatures. Polaritonic nanolasers operating at room temperature lie on the crucial path of related research, not only for the exploration of polariton physics at the nanoscale but also for potential applications

2h

Combinatorial optimization by simulating adiabatic bifurcations in nonlinear Hamiltonian systems

Combinatorial optimization problems are ubiquitous but difficult to solve. Hardware devices for these problems have recently been developed by various approaches, including quantum computers. Inspired by recently proposed quantum adiabatic optimization using a nonlinear oscillator network, we propose a new optimization algorithm simulating adiabatic evolutions of classical nonlinear Hamiltonian s

2h

A polyaromatic receptor with high androgen affinity

Biological receptors distinguish and bind steroid sex hormones, e.g., androgen-, progestogen-, and estrogen-type hormones, with high selectivity. To date, artificial molecular receptors have been unable to discriminate between these classes of biosubstrates. Here, we report that an artificial polyaromatic receptor preferentially binds a single molecule of androgenic hormones, known as "male" horm

2h

Origin of giant negative piezoelectricity in a layered van der Waals ferroelectric

Recent research on piezoelectric materials is predominantly devoted to enhancing the piezoelectric coefficient, but overlooks its sign, largely because almost all of them exhibit positive longitudinal piezoelectricity. The only experimentally known exception is ferroelectric polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride) and its copolymers, which condense via weak van der Waals (vdW) interaction and show nega

2h

Energy renormalization for coarse-graining polymers having different segmental structures

Multiscale coarse-grained (CG) modeling of soft materials, such as polymers, is currently an art form because CG models normally have significantly altered dynamics and thermodynamic properties compared to their atomistic counterparts. We address this problem by exploiting concepts derived from the generalized entropy theory (GET), emphasizing the central role of configurational entropy s c in th

2h

Dual-gradient enabled ultrafast biomimetic snapping of hydrogel materials

The design of materials that can mimic the complex yet fast actuation phenomena in nature is important but challenging. Herein, we present a new paradigm for designing responsive hydrogel sheets that can exhibit ultrafast inverse snapping deformation. Dual-gradient structures of hydrogel sheets enable the accumulation of elastic energy in hydrogels by converting prestored energy and rapid reverse

2h

Climbing-inspired twining electrodes using shape memory for peripheral nerve stimulation and recording

Peripheral neuromodulation has been widely used throughout clinical practices and basic neuroscience research. However, the mechanical and geometrical mismatches at current electrode-nerve interfaces and complicated surgical implantation often induce irreversible neural damage, such as axonal degradation. Here, compatible with traditional 2D planar processing, we propose a 3D twining electrode by

2h

A Global Deal For Nature: Guiding principles, milestones, and targets

The Global Deal for Nature (GDN) is a time-bound, science-driven plan to save the diversity and abundance of life on Earth. Pairing the GDN and the Paris Climate Agreement would avoid catastrophic climate change, conserve species, and secure essential ecosystem services. New findings give urgency to this union: Less than half of the terrestrial realm is intact, yet conserving all native ecosystem

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New York City's old buildings need serious upgrades to meet new emissions standards

Technology New York City passed a carbon tax for large structures. ‘Mass retrofitting’ is sure to follow. Cow burps, tailpipes, the energy used to charge your phone—the list of sources for greenhouse gas emissions is long. But one overlooked source are the warming pollutants…

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Thermodynamic magic enables cooling without energy consumption

Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. Intriguingly, the process initially appears to contradict the fundamental laws of physics.

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‘Global deal for nature’ fleshed out with specific conservation goals

‘Global deal for nature’ fleshed out with specific conservation goals ‘Global deal for nature’ fleshed out with specific conservation goals, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01253-z To maintain a liveable planet, governments need to protect 30% of Earth's land and sea and sustainably manage another 20%, say researchers.

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New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR

Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrier to moving therapies to the clinic. Now, a group of scientists have developed a reliable method to do just that.

3h

Through thick and thin: Neutrons track lithium ions in battery electrodes

Lithium-ion batteries are expected to have a global market value of $47 billion by 2023, but their use in heavy-duty applications such as electric vehicles is limited due to factors such as lengthy charge and discharge cycles. Engineers are examining how the lithium moves in battery electrodes, important in designing batteries that charge and discharge faster.

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Photos of the Week: Water Festival, Candy Candidate, Uruguayan Gaucho

Fashion in Pakistan, Ivanka Trump in Ethiopia, ongoing protests in Sudan, Passover in Israel, a huge election in Indonesia, Holy Week celebrations in Spain, an aircraft with the world’s longest wingspan, Notre-Dame cathedral ablaze in Paris, Easter preparations in Ukraine, performances at Coachella, spring skiing in Siberia, and much more

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The Family Weekly: 20 Years After Columbine

(Andrew Shawaf / Getty / Shutterstock / The Atlantic) This Week in Family Many of the teenagers who survived the Columbine school shooting 20 years ago today are now parents, raising children in a time when mass shootings feel so common that even kindergartners are put through active-shooter drills. Some parents are still struggling with their own healing and post-traumatic stress, and deciding h

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Puerto Rico Will Stop Burning Coal Next Year

Spring Cleaning Puerto Rico has a plan in motion to shut down its coal-burning power plants by next year. The Puerto Rico Energy Public Policy Act, recently signed by Puerto Rico’s governor Ricardo Roselló, puts the island on track to completely ditch non-renewable energy sources by 2050, according to The Rising — a heartening sign that Puerto Rico plans to rebuild its infrastructure to be as env

3h

Listen to Brutal Death Metal Made by a Neural Network

Death Metal In a project called “Relentless Doppelganger,” a neural network is grinding out the blast beats, super-distorted guitars, and bellowing vocals of death metal. The best part of all: it’s streaming its brutal creations 24 hours a day on YouTube — an intriguing and public example of AI that’s now able to generate convincing imitations of human art. Dadabots The neural network is the work

3h

Thermodynamic magic enables cooling without energy consumption

Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. Intriguingly, the process initially appears to contradict the fundamental laws of physics.

3h

Discovery may help explain why women get autoimmune diseases far more often than men

New evidence points to a key role for a molecular switch called VGLL3 in autoimmune diseases, and the major gap in incidence between women and men. Building on past research showing that women have more VGLL3 in their skin cells than men, a team studied it further in mice. They show that having too much VGLL3 in skin cells pushes the immune system into overdrive, leading to an autoimmune response

3h

Russian blue chips prove their pricing potential

Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and London Business School have carried out research into the dynamics of the prices for Russian companies' stocks and depositary receipts. The research indicates that, thanks to their price differences, there are opportunities for profitable trading with zero or, at least, minimum risk.

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The Era of Electric Airplanes is Here

submitted by /u/savuporo [link] [comments]

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Mueller Report Fallout Pressures Democrats to Impeach Trump

Congressional Democrats have punted on the question of impeaching Donald Trump. The Mueller report makes that calculus much harder.

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Twelve Epic Migratory Journeys Animals Take Every Spring

As temperatures rise and foliage blooms in the north, creatures from insects to whales set out for long treks across the planet

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The geomorphology, color, and thermal properties of Ryugu: Implications for parent-body processes

The near-Earth carbonaceous asteroid 162173 Ryugu is thought to have been produced from a parent body that contained water ice and organic molecules. The Hayabusa2 spacecraft has obtained global multicolor images of Ryugu. Geomorphological features present include a circum-equatorial ridge, east-west dichotomy, high boulder abundances across the entire surface, and impact craters. Age estimates f

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The Perverse Paradox of the Mueller Report

On Thursday morning, the report that had been compiled over the past 22 months by Special Counsel Robert Mueller was released, in a “lightly redacted” digital format, to the American public. By Thursday evening, cheeky reviews of the 448-page compendium (title: The Mueller Report ; author: US GOVERNMENT) had popped up on Goodreads . One went like this : “The previous owner used a black highlighte

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Netflix's random play button is what we've all been waiting for – CNET

The company is reportedly testing a feature that could put a stop to endless Netflix scrolling.

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Hurricane Michael Was A Category 5, NOAA Finds — The First Since Andrew In 1992

With winds of 160 mph, the October hurricane was the strongest on record to make landfall on the Florida Panhandle, where communities are still trying to recover. NOAA upgraded it from a Category 4. (Image credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Mice Gene-Edited While Still in the Womb

CRISPR reagents injected into the amniotic fluid inactivated a gene in the fetuses that would normally cause lung disease and kill the mice a few hours after birth.

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I'm Vox reporter David Roberts. AMA about my recent reporting on Barcelona's superblocks and the future of urban sustainability.

Hello, reddit! I’m David Roberts, a journalist at Vox. I’ve spent 15 years writing about the dangers of climate change and the many ways to address it, from renewable energy to nuclear power to electric vehicles to microgrids . In the last few years, I’ve gotten more interested in another piece of the sustainability puzzle: urban design. Research already shows that, in addition to their many othe

4h

How NASA Earth data aids America, state by state

For six decades, NASA has used the vantage point of space to better understand our home planet and improve lives. A new interactive website called Space for U.S. highlights some of the many ways that NASA's Earth observations help people strengthen communities across the United States and make informed decisions about public health, disaster response and recovery, and environmental protection.

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The French Ambassador Is Retiring Today. Here’s What He Really Thinks About Washington.

Kate Warren Gérard Araud, the charmingly blunt French ambassador to the United States, is famous for two things: the lavish parties he hosts at his Kalorama mansion, and his willingness to say (and tweet) things that other ambassadors might not even think, much less state in public. Araud ends his nearly five-year tenure in Washington today, and when I spoke with him last week, he was, even by hi

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The Columbine Blueprint

On that day two decades ago, news spread from Columbine quickly, and widely. By the time the killers concluded their shooting spree by turning their guns on themselves, less than an hour after firing their first shots, the attack had already become a media event unprecedented in the history of mass shootings. Local news stations and CNN began broadcasting the scene live to viewers around the coun

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The City That Apps Built, or Destroyed

Updated on April 19 at 1:28 p.m. ET. There has never been a town like the one San Francisco is becoming, a place where a single industry composed almost entirely of rich people thoroughly dominates the local economy. Much of the money that’s been squished out of the rest of the world gets funneled by the internet pipes to this little sliver of land on the Pacific Ocean, jutting out into the glory

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Professor: Total Surveillance Is the Only Way to Save Humanity

Big Brother The Oxford philosopher who posited 15 years ago that we might be living in a computer simulation has another far-out theory, this time about humanity’s future — and it’s not exactly optimistic. On Wednesday, Nick Bostrom took the stage at a TED conference in Vancouver, Canada, to share some of the insights from his latest work, “ The Vulnerable World Hypothesis .” In the paper, Bostro

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Researchers report high performance solid-state sodium-ion battery

Solid-state sodium-ion batteries are far safer than conventional lithium-ion batteries, which pose a risk of fire and explosions, but their performance has been too weak to offset the safety advantages. Researchers Friday reported developing an organic cathode that dramatically improves both stability and energy density.

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Warming: Plants are also stressed out

What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope. Now, researchers have found that GUN1 — a gene that integrates numerous chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signaling pathways — also plays an important role in how proteins are made in damaged chlo

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Breakthrough for children with serious epileptic seizures

Emergency medicine doctors now have a better way to treat severe epileptic seizures in children, thanks to a new study. Prolonged epileptic seizures are the most common neurological emergency in children seen by hospitals. The seizures are potentially fatal: up to five percent of affected children die, and a third suffer long-term complications from brain damage. Crucially, the longer the seizure,

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More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead

Researchers have developed a model that can predict salmonella outbreaks several months in advance, and its results come as a warning ahead of the Easter long weekend.

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Airbnb's explosive growth jolts hotel industry's bottom line

New research finds Airbnb is taking an increasing share of business away from the hotel industry.

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$200 off a 4k Vizio television and other deals worth watching

Gadgets The low-down on the day's best bargains. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Universities Crack Down on Love in the Lab

In a controversial first, Princeton University bans relationships between faculty and grad students campus-wide.

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Amazing New Rocket Engine Sucks up Atmospheric Oxygen for Fuel

Air-Breathing Rocket U.K. aerospace manufacturer Reaction Engines is preparing a potentially revolutionary rocket engine for a real-world test within the next 18 months. The Synergistic Air-Breathing Rocket Engine (SABRE) runs partially on oxygen collected from the atmosphere rather than relying on heavy fuel. That means serious weight savings, according to the European Space Agency — such that a

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With Widespread Deforestation, North Korea Faces an Environmental Crisis

Depleted topsoil from lost trees makes farming difficult, exacerbating hunger in the hermit state — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Find new inspiration with these time-tested approaches to creativity

Beethovan and Picasso are the perfect examples for mastering the creative process. Behind each of their works are countless studies and sketches. The lesson? Never erase anything, keep iterating, and find new paths to familiar destinations. The Runaway Species: How human creativity remakes the world List Price: $28.00 New From: $13.99 in Stock Used From: $7.97 in Stock

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Commentary: Modifications to Medicare rules could support care innovation for dialysis

Public health researchers suggest adjustments to recently proposed rule changes on how Medicare pays for dialysis services.

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The Mueller Report Could Alienate the Voters Republicans Need

Beyond all the revelations about Russian entanglements and possible obstruction of justice, Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report crystallizes two cardinal rules about governance in Donald Trump’s Washington. One is that Trump will shatter any boundaries of law, morality, or custom in his exercise of presidential power. The second is that Republicans—not only in Congress, but now also in the ex

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Exclusive: Major U.S. cancer center ousts ‘Asian’ researchers after NIH flags their foreign ties

Chinese American community fears ethnic targeting at MD Anderson by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and National Institutes of Health

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Coincidence helps with quantum measurements

Through randomly selected measurements, physicists can determine the quantum entanglement of many-particle systems. With the newly developed method, quantum simulations can be extended to a larger number of quantum particles. Researchers now report on the first successful demonstration of this method.

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In rare cases, immune system fails despite HIV suppression

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is usually effective at suppressing HIV, allowing the immune system to recover by preventing the virus from destroying CD4+ T cells. Scientists have now identified a rare, paradoxical response to ART called extreme immune decline, or EXID. Five individuals evaluated at the NIAID experienced a significant decline in CD4+ T cell levels despite suppression of HIV below de

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Young children judge others based on facial features as much as adults do

Just like adults, children by the age of 5 make rapid and consistent character judgements of others based on facial features, such as the tilt of the mouth or the distance between the eyes. Those facial features also shape how children behave toward others.

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Early intervention programs for mood and anxiety disorders improve patient outcomes

Researchers examined the impact of Canada's only early intervention program for youth with mood and anxiety disorders. Results suggest that treatment at the First Episode Mood and Anxiety Program (FEMAP) at London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC) leads to improvements in patients' symptoms and functioning, access to psychiatric care in the most appropriate settings and fewer visits to the emergency d

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David Thouless obituary

Nobel prize-winning physicist who challenged accepted thinking in key areas David Thouless, who has died aged 84, won half of the 2016 Nobel prize in physics , the other half being shared by Duncan Haldane and me. David and I solved an interesting theoretical problem by introducing some new ideas with important implications, and so unknowingly created a new field in the discipline. Our main innova

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Exploring what happens inside fires and explosions

The inside of a fire might be the last place one would explore, but a new method to do just that could lead to advances in fighting fires, creating cleaner engines and even space travel.

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From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine

Researchers meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens.

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A Robot Wrote (Part of) This Article

A Robot Wrote (Part of) This Article Researchers develop a new technique that uses artificial intelligence to summarize long scientific papers. Bios_robotlab_writing_robot.jpg A robot arm reproducing the calligraphic scripts of the Bible during an exhibition at ZKM Media Museum in Karlsruhe, Germany. Image credits: Mirko Tobias Schäfer Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Technology Friday, April 19, 20

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Solar Energy Isn't Just for Electricity

It can also provide carbon-free heat for a wide variety of industrial processes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mice Inherit Cancer Susceptibility Via Epigenetic Changes in Sperm

Mouse fathers whose sperm lacks the gene Kdm6a pass down altered methylation patterns to male offspring, along with a better chance of developing tumors and dying.

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Climate Change Could Cause Fukushima-Style Meltdowns in the US

Unprepared Most nuclear power plants in the United States are not prepared for the increase in flooding and severe weather that climate change will soon bring. Of the roughly 60 operational plants in the U.S., 90 percent have at least one design flaw that will render them susceptible to flood damage and storm surge, according to Bloomberg . If preventative measures aren’t taken and upgrades made,

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Using the physics of airflows to locate gaseous leaks more quickly in complex scenarios

Engineers are developing a smart robotic system for sniffing out pollution hotspots and sources of toxic leaks. Their approach enables a robot to incorporate calculations made on the fly to account for the complex airflows of confined spaces rather than simply 'following its nose.'

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Exploring what happens inside fires and explosions

The inside of a fire might be the last place one would explore, but a new method to do just that could lead to advances in fighting fires, creating cleaner engines and even space travel.

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From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine

Researchers meticulously measured the optical birefringence of highly aligned cellulose nanofibers, paving the way for sharper television, computer, and smartphone screens.

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Solar Energy Isn't Just for Electricity

It can also provide carbon-free heat for a wide variety of industrial processes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Weak honey bee colonies may fail from cold exposure during shipping

Cold temperatures inside honey bee colonies may cause colony losses during and after long-distance hauling, according to a preliminary study.

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How to hack your deadline: Admit it's uncertain

Embracing the uncertainty of deadlines could be key to more successful projects, researchers have found.

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Denver Is Voting on Whether to Decriminalize Psychedelic Mushrooms

Trip to the Polls Denver, Colorado may become the first city in the U.S. to decriminalize shrooms — if a new initiative gets voted through. It’s only one city, but the vote suggests that Americans are coming around to a more progressive view on recreational — and potentially therapeutic — psychoactive drugs. Changing Minds If passed, Initiative 301 would decriminalize personal use and possession

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Tiny Knee Bone, Once Lost in Humans, Is Making a Comeback

The fabella disappeared from our lineage millions of years ago, but over the last century, its presence in people's knees has become more common.

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Your vote matters — help decide the future of education innovation

Upvote/downvote each of the videos below! As you vote, keep in mind that we are looking for a winner with the most engaging social venture pitch – an idea you would want to invest in. Lumina Foundation and Big Think have partnered to bring this entrepreneurial competition to life, and we hope you'll participate! We have narrowed down the competition to four finalists and will be announcing an aud

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Living room conservation: Gaming and virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation

Gaming and virtual reality could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education and participation. This is what an interdisciplinary team strive to achieve by developing a virtual reality game dedicated to insect and plant species.

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How bacteria build an enzyme that destroys climate-changing laughing gas

New research reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide. Alongside carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), commonly known as 'laughing gas', is now a cause for great concern, and there is much international focus on reducing emissions. It is hoped that the findings wi

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Phase Separation in Liquid Metal Nanoparticles

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Navy’s Newest Nemesis: Hypersonic Weapons

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Cafe X COO talks 'the right moment' for robot baristas

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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This Space Roomba Could Clean the ISS While Astronauts Sleep

Worst Job Ever Wiping down the inside of the International Space Station is an arduous task. But luckily, thanks to a private company specializing in airplane sanitizing tech called GermFalcon, astronauts aboard the ISS might be able to skip that chore in the future: an autonomous, Roomba-style space cleaner called GermRover could one day blast the walls with powerful sterilizing UV rays to kill

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Living room conservation: Gaming and virtual reality for insect and ecosystem conservation

Gaming and virtual reality could bridge the gap between urban societies and nature, thereby paving the way to insect conservation by the means of education and participation. This is what an interdisciplinary team strive to achieve by developing a virtual reality game dedicated to insect and plant species.

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Brain Restoration System Explores Hazy Territory between Being Dead or Alive

An experiment that restored cellular function to pigs’ brains hours after death holds the potential for advancing neuroscience research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain Restoration System Explores Hazy Territory between Being Dead or Alive

An experiment that restored cellular function to pigs’ brains hours after death holds the potential for advancing neuroscience research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Brain Restoration System Explores Hazy Territory between Being Dead or Alive

An experiment that restored cellular function to pigs’ brains hours after death holds the potential for advancing neuroscience research — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Report: FTC considering oversight of Facebook's Zuckerberg

Federal regulators are reportedly considering seeking some kind of oversight of Mark Zuckerberg's leadership of Facebook over the social network giant's mishandling of users' personal information.

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Researchers report high performance solid-state sodium-ion battery

Solid-state sodium-ion batteries are far safer than conventional lithium-ion batteries, which pose a risk of fire and explosions, but their performance has been too weak to offset the safety advantages. Researchers Friday reported developing an organic cathode that dramatically improves both stability and energy density.

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Study finds that quitting smoking during pregnancy lowers risk of preterm births

Dartmouth-led study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth.

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Study: Opioid dose variability may be a risk factor for opioid overdose

Patients prescribed opioid pain medications whose doses varied over time were three times more likely to experience an overdose than patients prescribed stable opioid doses, according to an observational study from Kaiser Permanente published today in JAMA Network Open. The study also showed that patients who discontinued long-term opioid therapy for three or more months had half the risk of opioi

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Study examines privacy policies, data sharing of popular apps for depression, smoking cessation

This study looked at the privacy practices of popular apps for depression and smoking cessation. Researchers assessed the content of privacy policies and compared disclosures regarding data sharing with commercial third parties to actual behavior for 36 apps.

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Light, physical activity reduces brain aging

Incremental physical activity, even at light intensity, is associated with larger brain volume and healthy brain aging.

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Association of quitting smoking during pregnancy, risk of preterm birth

This study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth.

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Pharmacy closures associated with declines in cardiovascular medication adherence

How pharmacy closures are associated with declines in cardiovascular medication adherence for statins, β-blockers and oral anticoagulants among adults 50 or older was the focus of this analysis of prescription claims.

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People with heart disease at risk when pharmacies close

New research shows that when pharmacies close, people stop taking widely used heart medications — like statins, beta-blockers and oral anticoagulants — that have known cardiovascular and survival benefits.

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This comet stuffed inside a meteorite is the ultimate cosmic turducken

Space And it could teach us about the early solar system. It’s hard to imagine the cosmos putting its own spin on the classic turducken dish, but it looks like scientists have found it.

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Housework could keep brain young, research suggests

Even light exertions can slow down ageing of the brain, activity-tracker data indicates Even light activity such as household chores might help to keep the brain young, researchers say, adding to a growing body of evidence that, when it comes to exercise, every little helps. The findings mirror upcoming guidance from the UK chief medical officers, and existing US guidelines , which say light acti

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Hurricane Michael gets an upgrade to rare Category 5 status

Hurricane Michael, which devastated a swath of the Florida Panhandle last fall, has been upgraded to a Category 5 storm, only the fourth to make recorded landfall in the United States and the first since 1992.

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How hip-hop helps us understand science | Danielle N. Lee

In the early 1990s, a scandal rocked evolutionary biology: scientists discovered that songbirds — once thought to be strictly monogamous — engaged in what's politely called "extra-pair copulation." In this unforgettable biology lesson on animal infidelity, TED Fellow Danielle N. Lee shows how she uses hip-hop to teach science, leading the crowd in an updated version of Naughty by Nature's hit "O

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New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR

Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrier to moving therapies to the clinic. Now, a group of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes and the Innovative Genomics

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New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR

Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrier to moving therapies to the clinic. Now, a group of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes and the Innovative Genomics

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Scientists uncover a link between RNA editing and chloroplast-to-nucleus communication

What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? How will plants fare in more extreme weather conditions? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope.

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Kangaroo Rats Channel Jackie Chan to Evade Rattlesnakes [Video]

First ever high-speed video of interaction contains big surprises — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists uncover a link between RNA editing and chloroplast-to-nucleus communication

What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? How will plants fare in more extreme weather conditions? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope.

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John McAfee Vows to Reveal Bitcoin’s Creator

Maker Unmasked Infamous tech entrepreneur John McAfee says he’s going to tell the world who created Bitcoin — and if he keeps his word, he’ll be answering perhaps the biggest lingering question in cryptocurrency. On Wednesday, McAfee took to Twitter to announce his plan to continue sharing clues about the true identity of “ Satoshi Nakamoto ,” the pseudonymous handle used by the creator of Bitcoi

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Notre Dame's Architectural Legacy

This religious center, cultural icon and UNESCO World Heritage Site is also an engineering marvel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Notre Dame's Architectural Legacy

This religious center, cultural icon and UNESCO World Heritage Site is also an engineering marvel — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The role of digital technologies in mobilizing the alt-right

In "Misogynistic Men Online: How the Red Pill Helped Elect Trump," published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Pierce Alexander Dignam and Deana A. Rohlinger examine the transformation of online alt-right forums from marginal spaces of misogynistic collective identity to sites of political mobilization. Dignam and Rohlinger focus on how the sudden political pivot of one of these s

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Mesopotamian King Sargon II envisioned ancient city Karkemish as western Assyrian capital

In "A New Historical Inscription of Sargon II from Karkemish," published in the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, Gianni Marchesi translates a recently discovered inscription of the Assyrian King Sargon II found at the ruins of the ancient city of Karkemish. The inscription, which dates to around 713 B.C., details Sargon's conquest, occupation, and reorganization of Karkemish, including his rebuild

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Networking for introverted scientists

Networking for introverted scientists Networking for introverted scientists, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01296-2 Networking is a crucial skill for all scientists. Ruth Gotian offers tips for those who struggle to make it work.

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New variety of zebra chip disease threatens potato production in southwestern Oregon

Named after the dark stripes that form inside potatoes after they are cut and fried, zebra chip disease is a potentially devastating affliction that can result in yield losses up to 100 percent for farmers. Researchers identified a new haplotype, designated haplotype F, that causes zebra chip symptoms in potato.

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New concept for novel fire extinguisher in space

Researchers have developed a new concept of fire extinguishing, named Vacuum Extinguish Method. VEM is based on the 'reverse' operation of the conventional fire extinguishing procedure: It sucks the combustion products, even flame and the firing source itself, into a vacuum chamber to clean up the firing zone. This concept is advantageous for space use, as it prevents the spread of harmful combust

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The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt

Scientists analyzed bits of beer vessels from an ancient Peruvian brewery to learn what the beer was made of and where the materials to make the vessels came from. They learned that production was local and that the ingredients for the beer included pepper berries that would grow even in droughts. The authors argue that this steady, reliable access to beer helped maintain unity in the empire.

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How bacteria build an enzyme that destroys climate-changing laughing gas

New research reveals how soil bacteria build the only known enzyme for the destruction of the potent global warming and ozone-depleting gas nitrous oxide. Alongside carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane, the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), commonly known as 'laughing gas', is now a cause for great concern, and there is much international focus on reducing emissions. It is hoped that the findings wi

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'Jeopardy!' Legend Ken Jennings on James Holzhauer: 'It's Absolutely Insane'

In a WIRED interview, the "Jeopardy!" record-holder explains what makes Holzhauer great—and what would happen if the two faced off.

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What Is Passover?

Passover is one of the most important Jewish holidays. It begins on April 19 this year.

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The Books Briefing: Money, Money, Money

Capitalism, the German sociologist Jens Beckert argues, is based on fantasy: People (and institutions) spend, save, and earn money in hopes of achieving an imagined life. But the future of capitalism and the financial market—and the ability to achieve that fantasy—is shrouded in uncertainty. So how does one understand it? Through literature, as Beckert suggests. Sally Rooney’s sophomore novel, No

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Cyberchase and Citizen Science

Why don’t kids like math and science? Based on my many years of teaching elementary math and science, I know that when kids are bored with these subjects, it’s usually because they don’t see the point of how these subjects could be useful or interesting in the context of their real lives. Kids want to apply their math and science skills to make things happen! One great way to help them do this and

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Citizen Science in Nebraska

In Nebraska, scientists working for the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission are increasingly relying on casual researchers and citizen scientists to better understand three creatures in particular: spotted skunks, salamanders, and regal fritillary and monarch butterflies. Why? The populations of these species have either declined or are in jeopardy, and scientists want to get a current population c

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How advanced would molecular assemblers be ? In terms of their function ?

If they turned out to be feasible What would they be able to do in the field of biotechnology ? submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

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Cross Section: Barry Smith – Science Weekly podcast

Coffee is a drink adored the world over. But have you ever wondered why a fresh brew smells better than it tastes? Prof Barry Smith has spent his career pondering how the senses work together to produce flavour perception and so Graihagh Jackson invited him into the studio to talk taste Coffee is a drink adored the world over. But have you ever wondered why a fresh brew smells better than it tast

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The role of digital technologies in mobilizing the alt-right

In 'Misogynistic Men Online: How the Red Pill Helped Elect Trump,' published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Pierce Alexander Dignam and Deana A. Rohlinger examine the transformation of online alt-right forums from marginal spaces of misogynistic collective identity to sites of political mobilization. Dignam and Rohlinger focus on one of these semianonymous forums, the Red Pill,

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New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR

Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrier to moving therapies to the clinic. Now, a group of scientists at the Gladstone Institutes and the Innovative Genomics

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Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity

More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. Now researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.

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Logging hit ‘fast forward’ on an entire river’s erosion

The effects of logging show that human activity can significantly erode bedrock, causing geology to fast forward, according to new research. Geologic time is supposed to be slow, and the most solid object should be bedrock. But the new study, which focuses on a picturesque river in central Washington state called the Teanaway River, upends both concepts. “In the last century, we have more river i

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Find greater success by embracing ‘soft’ deadlines

New research on project management finds that embracing uncertainty around deadlines can lead to greater success. The work offers a way to peek under the hood of deadlines, map out their uncertainty, and fold it into a project management system. “Our society tends to think of deadlines as less flexible than other aspects of a project, but in reality, that’s often not the case…” “Our society tends

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Self-driving cars could make for more pollution

The benefits of self-driving cars will likely make us want to drive more. Those extra miles could partially or completely offset any potential energy savings, research finds. Previous studies have shown that greater fuel efficiency induces some people to travel extra miles, and those added miles can partially offset fuel savings—a behavioral change known as the rebound effect. The ability to use

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Cross Section: Barry Smith – Science Weekly podcast

Coffee is a drink adored the world over. But have you ever wondered why a fresh brew smells better than it tastes? Prof Barry Smith has spent his career pondering how the senses work together to produce flavour perception and so Graihagh Jackson invited him into the studio to talk taste. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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Salt takes a quick step before falling out of water

When a drop of sea spray lands on a rock and heats under the midday sun, the salt crystalizes and falls out of the evaporating water as a crystal—helping to power the Earth's atmosphere and leaving a delicious kernel of spice for dinner.

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‘Invisible Women’ spotlights a gaping and dangerous gender data gap

‘Invisible Women’ explains how neglecting to collect or use data on women harms their health and safety.

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How do we make moral decisions?

Some people may rely on principles of both guilt and fairness and may switch their moral rule depending on the circumstances, according to a new study on moral decision-making and cooperation.

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Här är maten som ersätter superfoods

I stället för att lägga extra pengar och tid på att hitta exotiska pulver och bär – så kallade superfoods – kan du hitta samma näringsinnehåll i några helt vanliga livsmedel. – Det är lättillgängligt och billigt – men också riktig superfood om man tittar på antioxidantinnehållet, säger Hanna Eneroth, nutritionist på Livsmedelsverket.

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Study tracks unpredictability of intimate partner violence

In situations of intimate partner violence, not knowing what will come next is sometimes a stronger predictor of a woman's health outcomes than violence frequency and severity, research at UT Health San Antonio suggests.

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Plants are also stressed out

What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope. Now, Salk Institute researchers have found that GUN1 — a gene that integrates numerous chloroplast-to-nucleus retrograde signaling pathways — also plays an important role in how proteins are made

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Mesopotamian King Sargon II envisioned ancient city Karkemish as western Assyrian capital

In 'A New Historical Inscription of Sargon II from Karkemish,' published in the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, Gianni Marchesi translates a recently discovered inscription of the Assyrian King Sargon II found at the ruins of the ancient city of Karkemish. The text implies that Sargon may have been planning to make Karkemish a western capital of Assyria, from which he could administer and control

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Discovery may help explain why women get autoimmune diseases far more often than men

New evidence points to a key role for a molecular switch called VGLL3 in autoimmune diseases, and the major gap in incidence between women and men. Building on past research showing that women have more VGLL3 in their skin cells than men, a team studied it further in mice. They show that having too much VGLL3 in skin cells pushes the immune system into overdrive, leading to an autoimmune response

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America Needs to Think Outside the Box When It Comes to Great Power Conflict

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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When Your Friend Moves to the Other Side of the World

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who met in junior college in India, and who knew each other for only 10 months before one of them moved to Canada. They say they were just "study buddies" when they parted ways—their fri

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How to Cook With Weed—and a Dash of Tasty, Tasty Science

Mac and cheese. Peanut butter and jelly. Asparagus and … cannabis oil with a citrusy terpene profile? Welcome to the heady world of cannabis cuisine.

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Dame Emma Thompson: 'If I could fly cleanly, I would'

Actress Dame Emma Thompson defends her decision to fly to London from the US to attend a climate change protest.

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Race Replay: Dominator vs. Boosted for the #9 Spot | Street Outlaws

#10 Boosted calls out Dominator's #9 spot on The List! Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery

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What Makes the Impossible Burger Look and Taste Like Real Beef?

People eat animals that eat plants. If we just eliminate that middle step and eat plants directly , we would diminish our carbon footprint, decrease agricultural land usage, eliminate health risks associated with red meat, and alleviate ethical concerns over animal welfare. For many of us, the major hurdle to executing this plan is that meat tastes good. Really good. By contrast, a veggie burger

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Creating a cloak for grid data in the cloud

Delivering modern electricity is a numbers game. From power plant output to consumer usage patterns, grid operators juggle a complex set of variables to keep the lights on. Cloud-based tools can help manage all of these data, but utility owners and system operators are concerned about security. That concern is keeping them from using the cloud—a collective name for networked Internet computers tha

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Big increase in kids swallowing foreign objects

Two decade US study finds potentially dangerous ingestions have doubled. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Barrow researcher discovers critical RNA processing aberrations

Research by a Barrow Neurological Center scientist on mechanisms of dysfunctional RNA processing in ALS and frontaltemporal dementia (FTD) was published in the April issue of Acta Neuropathologica. The research was conducted by Dr. Rita Sattler and her graduate student Stephen Moore in her laboratory at the Department of Neurobiology at Barrow Neurological Institute, which is dedicated to understa

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Look inside the coolest engines at the New York Auto Show

Cars Gratuitous photos from the show floor. Get personal with some of the latest engines.

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The Predator That Makes Great White Sharks Flee in Fear

The great white shark—a fast, powerful, 16-foot-long torpedo that’s armed to the teeth with teeth—has little to fear except fear itself. But also: killer whales. For almost 15 years, Salvador Jorgensen from the Monterey Bay Aquarium has been studying great white sharks off the coast of California. He and his colleagues would lure the predators to their boats using bits of old carpet that they had

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Terry Gilliam Has Finally Slain His Giant

It’s hardly shocking that Terry Gilliam might see a bit of himself in Don Quixote. The director and Monty Python member has made a career of tilting at windmills, mounting ambitious film projects, such as Brazil and The Adventures of Baron Munchausen , that are often plagued by studio meddling and budget overruns and end up feeling like implausible gambits. But for three decades , the giant that

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Elon Musk’s Boring Company Inches Closer to Making Hyperloop a Reality

The company filed a sprawling environmental report for the Loop, a proposed network of tunnels that would move people from Baltimore to Washington in 15 minutes.

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Through thick and thin: Neutrons track lithium ions in battery electrodes

Lithium-ion batteries are expected to have a global market value of $47 billion by 2023. They are used in numerous applications, because they offer relatively high energy density (storage capacity), high operating voltage, long shelf life and little "memory effect"—a reduction in a rechargeable battery's maximum capacity due to incomplete discharges in previous uses. However, factors such as safet

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Captain America's shield

submitted by /u/ooooooo0oof [link] [comments]

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Weapons trade reveals a darker side to dark web

Debates over gun regulations make headlines across the world, but there's an underground operation for weapons that has drawn very little attention — until now. Researchers from Michigan State University crept into the dark web to investigate how firearms are anonymously bought and sold around the world.

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IMF's structural adjustment programs slash bureaucratic quality in developing countries

Bureaucratic quality in developing countries is endangered by the structural adjustment programs imposed by the international financial institutions, a paper by Bocconi's Alexander Kentikelenis and colleagues, in the American Journal of Sociology, states. In particular, the IMF's structural reforms mandating privatization, price deregulation, and reductions in public sector employment jeopardize s

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Marijuana users weigh less, defying the munchies

New evidence from Michigan State University suggests that those who smoke cannabis, or marijuana, weigh less compared to adults who don't. The findings, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, are contrary to the belief that marijuana users who have a serious case of the munchies will ultimately gain more weight.

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Collecting the right quantity of evidence: How the brain makes a difficult decision

New research conducted in the Cognitive Neuroscience group of SISSA shows that a perceptual decision — recognizing an object and taking the appropriate action — is triggered as soon as the brain's processing networks accumulate the exact right quantity of sensory information. The studies uncover fundamental brain mechanisms underlying decision making in an uncertain world.

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Through thick and thin: Neutrons track lithium ions in battery electrodes

Lithium-ion batteries are expected to have a global market value of $47 billion by 2023, but their use in heavy-duty applications such as electric vehicles is limited due to factors such as lengthy charge and discharge cycles. UVA Engineering researchers working at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are examining how the lithium moves in battery electrodes, important in designing batteries that charge

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On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours

A KAIST research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours. This chip can be a cell-based drug screening platform for exploring critical pharmacological patterns of antibiotic interactions, along with potential applications in screening other cell-type agents and guidance for clinical therapies.

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Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization

A team of scientists led by Prof. FU Chunxiang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology completed the identification of bm5 mutant. This was the first time that the locus of maize bm5 mutant had been identified.

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Astronomers Finally Found the Universe’s First Type of Molecule

Happy Hunting Based on scientists’ calculations, the first molecule to ever form from stray atoms in the universe was likely helium hydride, a combination of helium and hydrogen. For decades, physicists have hunted the universe for the elusive molecule. And now an international team of researchers say they’ve finally found it — thereby confirming the presumed first step in the universe’s chemistr

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This Quantum Computer Can See the Future — All 16 of Them

This quantum computer can see many futures at once.

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Tech startups Pinterest, Zoom soar in Wall Street debut

Pinterest got off to a flying start on Wall Street Thursday in the market debut for the San Francisco-based visual discovery service, a positive sign for the wave of Silicon Valley firms planning …

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Triplet superconductivity demonstrated under high pressure

Researchers in France and Japan have demonstrated a theoretical type of unconventional superconductivity in a uranium-based material, according to a study published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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The rise of robots doesn’t have to mean the fall of human workers

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Agencies are ‘stepping up’ to prepare the workforce for AI

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What Is Explainable Artificial Intelligence and Is It Needed?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Bringing the border closer to home, one immersion trip at a time

Many if not most Americans have never crossed the U.S. border with Mexico by land or spent any time in that region.

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War games shed light on real-world strategies

Want to try your hand at negotiating during a crisis? Think you have a plan that could get the U.S. out of Afghanistan? Confident you could keep a nation secure when multi-party international diplomacy is more important than warfare? Strategy-based board games let you test your political and military acumen right at your kitchen table – while also helping you appreciate how decision-makers are lim

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Tech-verdenen gemmer på digitale påskeæg: Hvor mange har du fundet?

Easter eggs bliver i dag også brugt til markedsføring.

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The Nintendo Switch Is Finally Coming to China

The console is headed to shelves in the region thanks to technology company Tencent.

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Successful tests of a cooler way to transport electricity

Like a metal python, the huge pipe snaking through a CERN high-tech hall is actually a new electrical transmission line. This superconducting line is the first of its kind and allows vast quantities of electrical current to be transported within a pipe of a relatively small diameter. Similar pipes could well be used in towns in the future.

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Daily grind: The biography of a stone axe

Tom Breukel analysed some 250 stone axes from the Caribbean and reconstructed their biographies, thus increasing our knowledge of production and trade in the period around the arrival of Columbus. His Ph.D. defence is on 18 April.

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Puerto Rico to Adopt 100% Renewable Energy – The Rising

submitted by /u/fossil112 [link] [comments]

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FBI’s Facial Recognition Programs Under Fire Over Privacy, Accuracy Concerns

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How far are we from ASI and how powerful would it be ?

And could we program the ASI to have common sense and have deeper understanding of goals submitted by /u/Mewto1k [link] [comments]

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Under the Depression Helmet

The past two weeks have been frenetic for Bre Hushaw, who is now known to millions of people as the girl in the depression helmet. Hushaw has been hearing from people all around the world who want to try it, or at least want to know how it works. Her life as a meme began when she agreed to an on-camera interview with the local-news site AZfamily.com for a story headlined “Helmet Approved by FDA t

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To stop wasting fertilizer, find dud spots in corn fields

Big data can help corn farmers pinpoint specific parts of their fields that consistently produce either good or bad yields, research shows. This will not only save them time and money, but also solve one of the most widespread environmental problems facing crop-producing regions—nitrogen loss. “This is the first time anyone has been able to quantify how much small-scale yield variability there is

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On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours

A KAIST research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours. This chip can be a cell-based drug screening platform for exploring critical pharmacological patterns of antibiotic interactions, along with potential applications in screening other cell-type agents and guidance for clinical therapies.

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Researchers find adding rare-earth element to piezoelectric crystals dramatically improves performance

A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Australia has found that adding the rare-earth element samarium to piezoelectric crystals can dramatically improve their performance. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work and how well the altered crystals performed when tested. Jiří Hlinka with Fyzikální ústav Akademie Věd České Republiky has published a Pers

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Tiny pinholes in thin film could pave the way for 3-D holographic displays

Researchers in Korea have designed an ultrathin display that can project dynamic, multi-colored, 3-D holographic images, according to a study published in Nature Communications.

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Scientists discover sustainable way to increase seed oil yield in crops

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15 per cent in laboratory conditions.

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Scientists discover sustainable way to increase seed oil yield in crops

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15 per cent in laboratory conditions.

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On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours

A KAIST research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours. This chip can be a cell-based drug screening platform for exploring critical pharmacological patterns of antibiotic interactions, along with potential applications in screening other cell-type agents and guidance for clinical therapies.

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Fuel cells in bacteria

The exchange of nitrogen between the atmosphere and organic matter is crucial for life on Earth because nitrogen is a major component of essential molecules such as proteins and DNA. One major route for this exchange, discovered only in the 1990s, is the anammox pathway found in certain bacteria. It proceeds via hydrazine, a highly reactive substance used by humans as a rocket fuel. Researchers at

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Even after Hurricane Sandy, many people wouldn’t prepare before a future storm

Health Global warming will put more people in storms' paths who have little experience with natural disasters. Hurricane Sandy tore through the east coast in 2012, killing 48 people, leaving millions without power, and causing billions in damages. On the coast of New Jersey,…

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Fuel cells in bacteria

The exchange of nitrogen between the atmosphere and organic matter is crucial for life on Earth because nitrogen is a major component of essential molecules such as proteins and DNA. One major route for this exchange, discovered only in the 1990s, is the anammox pathway found in certain bacteria. It proceeds via hydrazine, a highly reactive substance used by humans as a rocket fuel. Researchers at

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[in-depth] How it's made: the science behind cultured, clean, and cell-based meat, part 3: bioengineering strategies

The /r/Futurology subreddit frequently features highly upvoted posts on cell-based meat, reflecting the media attention and public interest that has followed the industry. There are many introductory resources to how cell-based meat is produced and what its benefits may be, however, there are no comprehensive resources that fully inform those interested in learning more. Below you’ll find the thi

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The ‘Cuddle Hormone’ Might Help America Take On the Obesity Epidemic

Scientists suspect that one element of the obesity epidemic is that the brains of obese people respond differently to images of delicious, calorically dense foods. Obese individuals’ brains seem to light up at the sight of donuts, pizza, and other calorie bombs, even when they’re no longer hungry . Some studies have suggested that this heightened activity might predispose people to overeating. To

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High School Was Different Before Columbine

Jake Wakefield, who graduated from high school in Fort Collins, Colorado, in 2003, recalls that April 20 was the date of his Senior Ditch Day. One reason for the chosen date was “a tongue-in-cheek thing,” he told me; April 20 is an unofficial cannabis holiday . But he remembered students talking about another reason: “If someone wanted to re-create Columbine, the seniors wouldn’t be there, so we’

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Why Grown-Ups Keep Talking Like Little Kids

I recently had the honor of meeting an award-winning literary sort, a man wry and restrained and overall quite utterly mature, who casually referred to having gone through a phase in his 20s when he’d been “pilly”—that is, when he’d taken a lot of recreational drugs. The word had a wonderfully childish sound to it, the tacked-on y creating a new adjective in the style of happy , angry , and silly

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A scientist used chalk in a box to show that bats use sunsets to migrate

A new device for investigating bat migration suggests that the flying mammals orient themselves by the setting sun.

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Response to Comment on "Ghost cytometry"

Di Carlo et al . comment that our original results were insufficient to prove that the ghost cytometry technique is performing a morphologic analysis of cells in flow. We emphasize that the technique is primarily intended to acquire and classify morphological information of cells in a computationally efficient manner without reconstructing images. We provide additional supporting information, inc

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You’re Not Getting Enough Sleep—and It’s Killing You

At TED 2019, neuroscientist Matthew Walker argued that sleep deprivation is having a catastrophic effect on our health and safety—here are all the ways.

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Moto G7 Review (All 3 Models): Which Moto G is Best?

We review the Motorola Moto G7, Moto G7 Power, and Moto G7 Play, three good reasons to consider a cheaper phone this year.

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Review: Netflix's New Comedy 'Lunatics' Is Dizzying, Tone-Deaf

Australian comic Chris Lilley returns to playing multiple grotesqueries—but fails to update his comedic sensibility to the times.

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When companies file an IPO, local ZIP codes get a boost

After a business files for an initial public offering, or IPO, communities with ZIP codes close to the company’s headquarters benefit, research finds. Specifically, they see a rise in certain home prices and consumer spending—and creations of new businesses and jobs. IPOs are not all good news for communities, however. The study also finds that IPO activity increases the odds that middle-to-lower

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Forget Artificial Intelligence; Think Artificial Life

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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A new alphabet for Europe: Algorithms, big data, and the computer chip

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Supercomputer Mixes Streams with CPU, GPU, and FPGA

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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When coastal hazards threaten your Outer Banks trip

A trip to the Outer Banks is a tradition for some North Carolina families and a bucket-list destination for other tourists. A new study from North Carolina State University asked visitors for their reactions to having travel plans disrupted by coastal hazards like washed-out roads or limited beach access. Would they reschedule? Go somewhere else? Stop visiting the Outer Banks?

9h

Why Good Friday Was Dangerous for Jews in the Middle Ages

As Christinas observe Good Friday they will remember, with devotion and prayer, the death of Jesus on the Cross, but in the Middle Ages this day was dangerous for Jews.

9h

MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora

Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to predators on induction of nematode prey. During its induced lifestyle transition, microRNA-like RNAs may play a critical role, which paves new ways for understanding fungal adaptatio

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From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine

A team at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University has determined the optical parameters of cellulose molecules with unprecedented precision. They found that cellulose's intrinsic birefringence, which describes how a material reacts differently to light of various orientations, is powerful enough to be used in optical displays, such as flexible screens or electronic

9h

Taming the genome's 'jumping' sequences

The human genome is fascinating. Once predicted to contain about a hundred thousand protein-coding genes, it now seems that the number is closer to twenty thousand, and maybe less. And although our genome is made up of about three billion units—base pairs—many of them don't seem to belong to specific genes, and for that reason they were delegated to the dustbin of genetics: they were literally cal

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BRB-seq: The quick and cheaper future of RNA sequencing

RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. Today, such genome-wide expression analyses are a standard tool for genomic studies because they rely on high-throughput technologies, which themselves have become widely available.

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MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora

Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to predators on induction of nematode prey. During its induced lifestyle transition, microRNA-like RNAs may play a critical role, which paves new ways for understanding fungal adaptatio

9h

Taming the genome's 'jumping' sequences

The human genome is fascinating. Once predicted to contain about a hundred thousand protein-coding genes, it now seems that the number is closer to twenty thousand, and maybe less. And although our genome is made up of about three billion units—base pairs—many of them don't seem to belong to specific genes, and for that reason they were delegated to the dustbin of genetics: they were literally cal

9h

BRB-seq: The quick and cheaper future of RNA sequencing

RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. Today, such genome-wide expression analyses are a standard tool for genomic studies because they rely on high-throughput technologies, which themselves have become widely available.

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Multiple modes for selectivity of transmembrane transport

LMU researchers utilized a biophysical approach to understand how bacterial import proteins bind and selectively convey their cargoes across membranes. The results reveal an unexpectedly wide variety of transfer mechanisms.

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American astronaut's dreams of seeing space becoming reality

A Mainer who's headed to the International Space Station says she's always dreamed of being in space and "seeing this giant blue ball below me."

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Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

A private cargo ship brought the makings of an Easter feast to the International Space Station on Friday, along with mice and little flying robots.

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Multiple modes for selectivity of transmembrane transport

LMU researchers utilized a biophysical approach to understand how bacterial import proteins bind and selectively convey their cargoes across membranes. The results reveal an unexpectedly wide variety of transfer mechanisms.

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Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication

The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil is something of a mystery. It was thought to be quite solitary, with little social structure that would require communication. But Laura May Collado, a biologist at the University of Vermont, and her colleagues have discovered that the dolphins can actually make hundreds of different sounds to communicate, a finding that could help uncover how communication ev

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Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication

The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil is something of a mystery. It was thought to be quite solitary, with little social structure that would require communication. But Laura May Collado, a biologist at the University of Vermont, and her colleagues have discovered that the dolphins can actually make hundreds of different sounds to communicate, a finding that could help uncover how communication ev

10h

Cities and countries aim to slash plastic waste within a decade

If all goes well, 2030 will be quite a special year.

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Breeze Automation is building soft robots for the Navy and NASA

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Robots Have Arrived on Campus. They Come Bearing Food.

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Forget Artificial Intelligence; Think Artificial Life

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Pain Patients Get Relief from War on Opioids

U.S. agencies warn doctors not to abruptly cut off the medications for long-time users — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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We Need a Space Resources Institute

The moon and other bodies will ultimately be exploited; it’s crucial to do so in a thoughtful and organized way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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'Ramy' Is an Essential Voice for Millennial TV

In Hulu's new comedy, Ramy may at times feel helpless, lost, or uncertain about what to do next. But that's OK—it feels like the real thing.

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Usurp the burp: How seaweed can help curb cow burps (and their emissions)

Agricultural and marine scientists at the University of California have joined forces to combat one of the greatest sources of methane emissions in California: cow burps.

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Weapons trade reveals a darker side to dark web

Debates over gun regulations make headlines across the world, but there's an underground operation for weapons that has drawn very little attention – until now. Researchers from Michigan State University crept into the dark web to investigate how firearms are anonymously bought and sold around the world.

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New Research Reveals a Startling Increase in Pediatric Foreign-Body Ingestions

New research has revealed a significant increase in pediatric foreign-body ingestions over the past 20 years, including life-threatening batteries and magnets.

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An exotic microbe and an unusual extraction process may add up to an economical way to make a promising biofuel

Taking a step closer to a "green" replacement for fossil fuels, a research team that includes a chemical engineer at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a novel process using an unusual solvent and an exotic microorganism that may make it possible to manufacture isobutanol and other biofuels more economically.

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Ready for 6G? How AI will shape the network of the future

With 5G networks rolling out around the world, engineers are turning their attention to the next incarnation.

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We Need a Space Resources Institute

The moon and other bodies will ultimately be exploited; it’s crucial to do so in a thoughtful and organized way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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In Pig Brains, Researchers Spark New Activity After Death

Conventional wisdom tells us that a mammal brain dies minutes after it stops receiving oxygen. But researchers at the Yale School of Medicine successfully revived cellular activity in the brains of pigs slaughtered for meat, raising new questions about the line between life and death.

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Pain Patients Get Relief from War on Opioids

U.S. agencies warn doctors not to abruptly cut off the medications for long-time users — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Opinion: Canada's approach to lunar exploration needs to be strategic or we'll be left behind

Should Canada go to the moon? What's there for Canadians? It is these questions that we should ponder when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently announced that Canada will be participating in the new space exploration vision.

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Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication

The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil was thought to be solitary with little social structure that would require communication. But researchers from the University of Vermont and the University of St. Andrews have discovered the dolphins actually are social and can make hundreds of different sounds, a finding that could help uncover how communication evolved in marine mammals.

11h

Notre Dame: the public and private lives of France's spiritual home

While flames engulfed Notre Dame on the evening of April 15 and the world watched in despair, French president Emmanuel Macron told news cameras that the Paris cathedral was part of the history of all French people:

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Ad-Supported YouTube Music Now Available Google Home

If you’ve ever wondered if you should sign up and pay for a YouTube Music subscription, the good news is that now you won’t have to if you own a Google Home device. This is because …

11h

No One Listens to the President

It’s been another dizzying few days in Washington, starting with yet another border controversy, as President Donald Trump threatened to bus unauthorized immigrants to sanctuary cities , and ending with the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report, which turned out to be far more damning than advertised by Trump’s attorney general. These two very different stories have more in common th

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Trump’s Guardrails Are Gone

One Saturday in June 2017, President Donald Trump called Don McGahn twice at home. The president ordered the White House counsel to fire Robert Mueller, who at that point had been leading the Russia probe for one month. “You gotta do this,” Trump told him. “You gotta call Rod.” In his second call, Trump told McGahn, “Call me back when you do it.” The special counsel’s report—released on Thursday

11h

What the Mueller Report Reveals About the Presidency

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report contains numerous factual revelations and, even with the redactions, rounds out what was so far known about the president’s openness to a political alliance with Russia and his dedication to obstructing any inquiry into “collusion.” Weeks will pass before the full significance of these investigative findings can be assessed. In the meantime, the report is i

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The Real Illegal Immigration Crisis Isn’t on the Southern Border

If curbing illegal immigration is the goal, as politicians in the United States and Europe argue, then no wall or border fence will stop the West’s largest source of such immigrants. They are not the subject of televised debates or of long stories highlighting their plight. Many are invisible, making them hard to count, and little attention is paid to them. Yet focusing on them might yield better

11h

The Disciplines Where No Black People Earn Ph.D.s

Some trends in higher education move up and down—ebbing and flowing with the economy and demographic shifts. And then there are those that are stagnant, ever-present reminders of the work America’s universities still need to do. One of those is the problem of faculty diversity: Less than 6 percent of full-time faculty members at institutions across the country are black. Many factors coalesce to

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The Strategic Move That Gave Bernie Sanders a Fundraising Edge

The 2020 race for the White House will undoubtedly be a battle both of ideology and personality. But it is also shaping up as a clash between two opposing forces: the ever-expanding, $1 billion industry that is a modern presidential campaign, and the Democratic Party’s move away from the top-down approach to fundraising that has fueled American politics for decades. So far, the progressive push t

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Opinion: Why protesters should be wary of '12 years to climate breakdown' rhetoric

I was invited to speak to a group of teenagers on climate strike in Oxford recently. Like many scientists, I support the strikes, but also find them disturbing. Which I'm sure is the idea.

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Harvard cancer lab subject to federal misconduct probe

Sam W. Lee, a Harvard researcher — or perhaps former Harvard researcher — who has lost three papers to retraction, including one from Nature, now has an expression of concern for another article, this one in Molecular and Cellular Biology. The notice for that paper, 2000’s “Overexpression of Kinase-Associated Phosphatase (KAP) in Breast and Prostate … Continue reading Harvard cancer lab subject to

11h

Skjulte fordele: Fire skills du kan 'level up' med computerspil

Actionspil som CS:GO og Fortnite kan gøre dig bedre til at skifte mellem opgaver og give dig falkeblik.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan renser man 170.000 ton forurenet jord?

En læser undrer sig over, hvordan man håndterer tusindvis af ton forurenet jord fra byggepladser. Det svarer Scanfields miljøkonsulent på.

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Airbnb's explosive growth jolts hotel industry's bottom line

Hospitality service Airbnb is fast becoming the 800-pound gorilla that's shaking up the hotel industry and forever changing it.

11h

The herbal supplement kratom comes with risks

The supplement kratom can cause heart racing and agitation.

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Five Questions for Mark Honigsbaum: The Scourge of Pandemics

Mark Honigsbaum, a medical historian and author of "The Pandemic Century," discusses the origins of “vaccine hesitancy,” how poverty and social class intersect with public health, the need for quick reaction to emerging threats, and how climate change is opening new doors for the spread of infectious disease.

11h

The Worst Thing About Instagram Might Be Going Away

The only good social network is evidently toying with the idea of purging the worst thing about social media—and I, for one, couldn’t be more on board.Read more…

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David Attenborough climate change TV show a 'call to arms'

The BBC's Climate Change – The Facts, presented by Sir David Attenborough, is praised by TV critics.

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Extinction risks of a Mediterranean neo-endemism complex of mountain vipers triggered by climate change

Extinction risks of a Mediterranean neo-endemism complex of mountain vipers triggered by climate change Extinction risks of a Mediterranean neo-endemism complex of mountain vipers triggered by climate change, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42792-9 Extinction risks of a Mediterranean neo-endemism complex of mountain vipers triggered by climate change

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Examination of novel 4-aminoquinoline derivatives designed and synthesized by a hybrid pharmacophore approach to enhance their anticancer activities

Examination of novel 4-aminoquinoline derivatives designed and synthesized by a hybrid pharmacophore approach to enhance their anticancer activities Examination of novel 4-aminoquinoline derivatives designed and synthesized by a hybrid pharmacophore approach to enhance their anticancer activities, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42816-4 Examination of novel 4-aminoquinolin

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Systematic assessment of the clinicopathological prognostic significance of tissue cytokine expression for lung adenocarcinoma based on integrative analysis of TCGA data

Systematic assessment of the clinicopathological prognostic significance of tissue cytokine expression for lung adenocarcinoma based on integrative analysis of TCGA data Systematic assessment of the clinicopathological prognostic significance of tissue cytokine expression for lung adenocarcinoma based on integrative analysis of TCGA data, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42

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c-Myb regulates tumorigenic potential of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells

c-Myb regulates tumorigenic potential of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells c-Myb regulates tumorigenic potential of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42684-y c-Myb regulates tumorigenic potential of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cells

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Anthropogenic Effects on Natural Mammalian Populations: Correlation Between Telomere Length and Coal Exposure

Anthropogenic Effects on Natural Mammalian Populations: Correlation Between Telomere Length and Coal Exposure Anthropogenic Effects on Natural Mammalian Populations: Correlation Between Telomere Length and Coal Exposure, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42804-8 Anthropogenic Effects on Natural Mammalian Populations: Correlation Between Telomere Length and Coal Exposure

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Analysis of climate variability, trends, and prediction in the most active parts of the Lake Chad basin, Africa

Analysis of climate variability, trends, and prediction in the most active parts of the Lake Chad basin, Africa Analysis of climate variability, trends, and prediction in the most active parts of the Lake Chad basin, Africa, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42811-9 Analysis of climate variability, trends, and prediction in the most active parts of the Lake Chad basin, Afric

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The critical Barkhausen avalanches in thin random-field ferromagnets with an open boundary

The critical Barkhausen avalanches in thin random-field ferromagnets with an open boundary The critical Barkhausen avalanches in thin random-field ferromagnets with an open boundary, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42802-w The critical Barkhausen avalanches in thin random-field ferromagnets with an open boundary

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Atomistic and experimental study on thermal conductivity of bulk and porous cerium dioxide

Atomistic and experimental study on thermal conductivity of bulk and porous cerium dioxide Atomistic and experimental study on thermal conductivity of bulk and porous cerium dioxide, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42807-5 Atomistic and experimental study on thermal conductivity of bulk and porous cerium dioxide

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Chemists take a closer look at the spot where water meets air

Water, despite its central place in so many processes vital to life on Earth, remains a chemical mystery in many respects. One of those mysteries is the nature of water at the exact point where it comes into contact with air.

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Joe Biden Is Running for President

Joe Biden is running. The former vice president will make his candidacy official with a video announcement next Wednesday, according to people familiar with the discussions who have been told about them by top aides. Seriously, he’s actually made a decision. It’s taken two years of back-and-forth, it’ll be his third (or, depending on how you count, seventh) try for the White House, and many peopl

12h

Making Sense of Quantum Mechanics

Philosopher David Albert thinks there might be a “clear and straightforward” way of thinking about quantum phenomena — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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“Global Brain Network” — High-Level Project Proposal

submitted by /u/_w1kke_ [link] [comments]

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Zero-gravity robot cleaner could automatically sterilise the ISS

Cleaning the International Space Station is laborious work, so hygiene firm GermFalcon has made a drone that works in zero-gravity to do the job instead

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How maths could fix the problems with India’s voting machines

The world’s biggest election is under way in India. Trust in the machines used to vote is low, but better maths could spot manipulation or errors, says Edd Gent

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Next frontier in study of gut bacteria: mining microbial molecules

The human gut harbors trillions of invisible microbial inhabitants, referred to as the microbiota, that collectively produce thousands of unique small molecules. The sources and biological functions of the vast majority of these molecules are unknown. Yale researchers recently applied a new technology to uncover microbiota-derived chemicals that affect human physiology, revealing a complex network

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Four questions with 'Game of Thrones' expert Lisa Woolfork

Millions of fans just began watching the eighth and final season of the megahit HBO series "Game of Thrones" to see who will emerge from the long winter as the ruler of Westeros.

13h

Most sustainable personal decision (or political strategy) to save the planet

The way people live today destroys the planet in an ever increasing speed. Not only the temperatures and sea level are steering towards a catastrophy, if not apocalypse (tipping point…!). Also the bio diversity is destroyed at a breathtaking pace, and so is the depletion of natural resources and the accumulation of toxic wastes. Our one and only space ship is in dire straits. Some people decide

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Next frontier in study of gut bacteria: mining microbial molecules

The human gut harbors trillions of invisible microbial inhabitants, referred to as the microbiota, that collectively produce thousands of unique small molecules. The sources and biological functions of the vast majority of these molecules are unknown. Yale researchers recently applied a new technology to uncover microbiota-derived chemicals that affect human physiology, revealing a complex network

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Base Editors Cause Off-Target Mutations in RNA

A new study indicates that the modified CRISPR-Cas9 technology will need to be further refined before it can safely be used for research and therapeutic applications.

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Video: Soon, kidneys-on-a-chip will rocket to space station

UW scientists are prepping a kidney-on-a-chip experiment at Cape Canaveral, Florida, awaiting a shuttle launch that will take the chips into space. At an altitude of 250 miles, astronauts will help study how reduced gravity in space affects kidney physiology.

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India could meet air quality standards by cutting household fuel use

India could make a major dent in air pollution by curbing emissions from dirty household fuels such as wood, dung, coal and kerosene, shows a new analysis led by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the India Institute of Technology.

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Study outlines new proposal for probing the primordial universe

Most everybody is familiar with the Big Bang—the notion that an impossibly hot, dense universe exploded into the one we know today. But what do we know about what came before?

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Things are stacking up for NASA's Mars 2020 spacecraft

For the past few months, the clean room floor in High Bay 1 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, has been covered in parts, components and test equipment for the Mars 2020 spacecraft, scheduled for launch toward the Red Planet in July of 2020. But over the past few weeks, some of these components—the spacecraft-rocket-laden landing system and even the stand-in for the rover

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Coming soon to China: the car of the future

Global automakers are positioning for a brave new world of on-demand transport that will require a car of the future—hyper-connected, autonomous, and shared—and China may become the concept's laboratory.

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The Extinction Rebels have got their tactics badly wrong. Here’s why | André Spicer

Hearts and minds will not be won with protest puppetry, guerrilla gardening and talk of ‘climate justice’ Over the past few days, I have watched members of the Extinction Rebellion movement block bridges, disrupt public transport and lock themselves to lorries. I have been moved by their bravery and inspired by their message, but puzzled by their strategy. On the face of it, the rebels have been e

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Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation

Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new can

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Boston Dynamics debuts the production version of SpotMini

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Uber wins $1bn investment from Toyota, SoftBank fund

Japanese car giant Toyota and investment fund SoftBank Vision Fund on Friday unveiled an investment of $1 billion in US company Uber to drive forward the development of driverless ridesharing services.

15h

Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation

Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new can

15h

New book traces expeditions to test Einstein's theory of relativity

No Shadow of a Doubt, a new book by Daniel Kennefick, associate professor of physics at the University of Arkansas, tells the story of two research teams, organized by Arthur Stanley Eddington and Sir Frank Watson Dyson, who tested Einstein's theory of relativity. These expeditions traveled to Brazil and Africa to collect images of stars during the 1919 eclipse, and their results confirmed and bro

15h

Charlie Lee: Banking on the Future of Cryptocurrencies

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

15h

Én gang for alle: Kom hønen eller ægget først?

Spoiler alert: Det gjorde ægget. Og det kom hele 200 millioner år før hønen.

16h

Machine learning is giving retro games cutting-edge graphics

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

16h

Molecular target UNC45A is essential for cancer but not normal cell proliferation

Identifying a protein that plays a key role in cancer cell growth is a first step toward the development of a targeted cancer therapy. It is especially promising when this protein is dispensable for the growth of normal cells. Their discovery that UNC45A fits these criteria has researchers, led by Dr. Ahmed Chadli, of the Georgia Cancer Center at Augusta University, excited about potential new can

17h

Video plus brochure helps patients make lung cancer scan decision

A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in addition to an informational brochure increased patients' knowledge and reduced conflicted feelings about whether to undergo the scan more than the informational brochure alone, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

17h

Q&A with physicist Paul Davies

‘You can’t be a great scientist without being slightly obsessed’

17h

Inga bevis för att fullmånen påverkar oss – förväntanseffekt kan ligga bakom

Trots att många människor upplever att de påverkas av fullmånen har man inte vetenskapligt kunnat bevisa en effekt. Enligt experter i en film som sänds i Vetenskapens värld kan avsaknaden av belägg tyda på att det är en förväntanseffekt som ligger bakom.

17h

Thanos shows us how not to be an economist

The ‘Avengers’ villain sorely needs to undergo some peer review

17h

17h

3D-printed heart.

submitted by /u/DeadSetJet [link] [comments]

18h

Norwich Cathedral peregrine falcons: A photographer's passion

Chris Skipper has been photographing urban peregrines nesting at Norwich Cathedral for nearly a decade.

19h

Ny studie: Mikroplaster från fimpar hittade i fiskar

Mikroplaster från cigarettfimpar har hittats i både fisk och vatten på flaska, det visar forskning från Kanada. – Vi äter och dricker vårt skräp, säger forskaren Lisa Erdle på Torontos universitet till CBC News.

19h

What is “AI robot soccer”?

submitted by /u/Pun1sher- [link] [comments]

19h

Making digital tissue imaging better

A low-tech problem troubles the high-tech world of digital pathology imaging: There are no reliable standards for the quality of digitized tissue slides comprising the source material for computers reading and analyzing vast numbers of images. Poor-quality slides get mixed in with accurate slides, potentially confusing a computer program trying to learn what a cancerous cell looks like. Researcher

19h

Researchers map sound, response and reward anticipation in mouse brain

Neuroscientists report that two areas of the mouse brain combine representations of what is heard and anticipated, guiding behavior that leads mice to the best reward.

20h

Thought Experiment – Contained Cities

I was just inspired by a photo I seen over on /r/RetroFuturism . A futuristic city is mostly contained completely within one single building. For this thought experiment I imagined a smaller city, maybe 100,000 – 200,000 people. The building envelope would be made from a mix of materials, but mostly structural steel beam/girder systems. From road level, the roof height of the building would be ar

20h

Hippo signaling is intrinsically regulated during cell cycle progression by APC/CCdh1 [Cell Biology]

The Hippo-YAP/TAZ signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in growth control during development and regeneration and its dysregulation is widely implicated in various cancers. To further understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying Hippo signaling regulation, we have found that activities of core Hippo signaling components, large tumor suppressor (LATS)…

20h

DNA demethylation by ROS1a in rice vegetative cells promotes methylation in sperm [Plant Biology]

Epigenetic reprogramming is required for proper regulation of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. In Arabidopsis, active DNA demethylation is crucial for seed viability, pollen function, and successful reproduction. The DEMETER (DME) DNA glycosylase initiates localized DNA demethylation in vegetative and central cells, so-called companion cells that are adjacent to sperm…

20h

RNAi expression tuning, microfluidic screening, and genome recombineering for improved protein production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Applied Biological Sciences]

The cellular machinery that supports protein synthesis and secretion lies at the foundation of cell factory-centered protein production. Due to the complexity of such cellular machinery, the challenge in generating a superior cell factory is to fully exploit the production potential by finding beneficial targets for optimized strains, which ideally…

20h

Transcription factors IRF8 and PU.1 are required for follicular B cell development and BCL6-driven germinal center responses [Immunology and Inflammation]

The IRF and Ets families of transcription factors regulate the expression of a range of genes involved in immune cell development and function. However, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of each family member has been limited due to their redundancy and broad effects on multiple lineages of cells. Here,…

20h

Forging tools for refining predicted protein structures [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Refining predicted protein structures with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is one route to producing, entirely by computational means, structural models of proteins that rival in quality those that are determined by X-ray diffraction experiments. Slow rearrangements within the compact folded state, however, make routine refinement of predicted structures by unrestrained…

20h

Electrically induced bacterial membrane-potential dynamics correspond to cellular proliferation capacity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Membrane-potential dynamics mediate bacterial electrical signaling at both intra- and intercellular levels. Membrane potential is also central to cellular proliferation. It is unclear whether the cellular response to external electrical stimuli is influenced by the cellular proliferative capacity. A new strategy enabling electrical stimulation of bacteria with simultaneous monitoring of…

20h

Cystine/glutamate antiporter xCT (SLC7A11) facilitates oncogenic RAS transformation by preserving intracellular redox balance [Cell Biology]

The RAS family of proto-oncogenes are among the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and predict poor clinical outcome. Several mechanisms underlying oncogenic RAS transformation are well documented, including constitutive signaling through the RAF-MEK-ERK proproliferative pathway as well as the PI3K-AKT prosurvival pathway. Notably, control of redox balance has…

20h

Structural insights into RNA recognition by the Chikungunya virus nsP2 helicase [Microbiology]

Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is transmitted to humans through mosquitoes and causes Chikungunya fever. Nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) exhibits the protease and RNA helicase activities that are required for viral RNA replication and transcription. Unlike for the C-terminal protease, the structure of the N-terminal RNA helicase (nsP2h) has not been determined….

20h

Topological descriptions of protein folding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

How knotted proteins fold has remained controversial since the identification of deeply knotted proteins nearly two decades ago. Both computational and experimental approaches have been used to investigate protein knot formation. Motivated by the computer simulations of Bölinger et al. [Bölinger D, et al. (2010) PLoS Comput Biol 6:e1000731] for…

20h

Competitive binding predicts nonlinear responses of olfactory receptors to complex mixtures [Physics]

In color vision, the quantitative rules for mixing lights to make a target color are well understood. By contrast, the rules for mixing odorants to make a target odor remain elusive. A solution to this problem in vision relied on characterizing receptor responses to different wavelengths of light and subsequently…

20h

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

Microfluidics refers to the manipulation of fluids in microscale devices. Commonly called "labs on a chip," microfluidic systems are used to study and analyze very small-scale chemical or biological samples, replacing the extremely expensive and cumbersome instruments used for traditional biological analyses.

20h

RNA sequencing used to discover novel genes and pathways in celiac disease

Researchers have discovered novel genes and pathways related to early stages in the development of celiac disease and the ongoing inflammation and comorbidities associated with the condition.

20h

Making digital tissue imaging better

A low-tech problem troubles the high-tech world of digital pathology imaging: There are no reliable standards for the quality of digitized tissue slides comprising the source material for computers reading and analyzing vast numbers of images. Poor-quality slides get mixed in with accurate slides, potentially confusing a computer program trying to learn what a cancerous cell looks like. Researcher

20h

After heart attack: Late dinner and no breakfast a killer combination

People who skip breakfast and eat dinner near bedtime have worse outcomes after a heart attack.

20h

Preschoolers with chronic constipation tend to be picky eaters

In the first study of its kind in the US, researchers found that normally developing preschool children with chronic constipation have underlying sensory issues that contribute to their difficulties with toileting behaviors. These children are often picky eaters who might be overly sensitive to food textures, tastes, or odors. They also might have an exaggerated response to noises, bright lights,

20h

Experimental antiplatelet compound for acute stroke shows promise

An experimental compound inhibited clot formation without increased bleeding, a common side effect of current anticlotting therapies, in a phase I study. First-in-human study shows the anticlotting drug was well-tolerated without serious safety concerns in healthy volunteers. Next-phases will gauge effectiveness and safety in patients with acute ischemic strokes.

20h

Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements

In the largest study of its kind, researchers have identified the most important risk factors for developing severe infection after knee replacement. Patients who are under 60 years of age, males, those with chronic pulmonary disease, diabetes, liver disease, and a higher body mass index are at increased risk of having the joint replacement redone (known as revision) due to infection.

20h

Achieving sugar reduction targets could cut child obesity and healthcare costs

Reducing the sugar content of certain foods by 2020, in line with UK government policy targets, could cut child obesity and related illness, and save the NHS in England £286 million over 10 years, suggests a new study.

20h

Better method to recycle and renew used cathodes from lithium-ion batteries

Researchers have improved their recycling process that regenerates degraded cathodes from spent lithium-ion batteries. The new process is safer and uses less energy than their previous method in restoring cathodes to their original capacity and cycle performance.

20h

Important insight on the brain-body connection

A study reveals that neurons in the motor cortex exhibit an unexpected division of labor, a finding that could help scientists understand how the brain controls the body and provide insight on certain neurological disorders.

20h

Investigators incorporate randomized trial within dialysis care delivery

The Time to Reduce Mortality in ESRD (TiME) trial was a large pragmatic trial demonstration project designed to determine the benefits of hemodialysis sessions that are longer than many patients currently receive. The trial was conducted through a partnership between academic investigators and 2 large dialysis provider organizations using a highly centralized implementation approach. Although the

20h

BRB-seq: The quick and cheaper future of RNA sequencing

Bioengineers have developed a new method for Bulk RNA Sequencing that combines the multiplexing-driven cost-effectiveness of a single-cell RNA-seq workflow with the performance of a bulk RNA-seq procedure.

20h

Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder

Behavioral problems in young people with severe antisocial behavior — known as conduct disorder — could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centers together, according to new research.

20h

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

Microfluidics refers to the manipulation of fluids in microscale devices. Commonly called "labs on a chip," microfluidic systems are used to study and analyze very small-scale chemical or biological samples, replacing the extremely expensive and cumbersome instruments used for traditional biological analyses.

20h

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

Scientists have developed a technique for measuring the amount of living coral on a reef by analyzing DNA in small samples of seawater.

20h

‘CSI’ conservation uses tiger spit and conch fritters

Scientists have come up with a new way to collect DNA from endangered species—extract it from degraded and left-behind materials, including feces, saliva, and even food products. The near impossibility of collecting DNA samples from rare and elusive animals has hobbled wildlife detectives aiming to protect these endangered species. The researchers say their proof of concept, which appears in Meth

20h

BRB-seq: The quick and cheaper future of RNA sequencing

EPFL bioengineers have developed a new method for Bulk RNA Sequencing that combines the multiplexing-driven cost-effectiveness of a single-cell RNA-seq workflow with the performance of a bulk RNA-seq procedure.

21h

Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder

Behavioural problems in young people with severe antisocial behaviour — known as conduct disorder — could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham.

21h

21h

Apple's next iPhones could feature THREE rear-facing lenses and a host of new camera features

The next generation of iPhones will likely emphasize a slew of new camera features to entice current and future customers, according to one of the top Apple analysts.

21h

Rain on other side of the planet foreshadows California heat

When heavy rain falls over the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia and the eastern Pacific Ocean, it is a good indicator that temperatures in central California will reach 100°F in four to 16 days, according to new research. Heat waves are common in California’s Central Valley, a 50-mile-wide oval of land that runs 450 miles from just north of Los Angeles up to Redding. The valley is home to half of

21h

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21h

We finally know how general anesthesia works

In a new study,researchers found that to knock you out, different anesthesia drugs hijack the neural circuitry that makes you fall sleep. The discovery of general anesthesia 170 years ago was a medical miracle, enabling millions of patients to undergo invasive, life-saving surgeries without pain. General anesthesia drugs induce unconsciousness by activating a tiny cluster of cells at the base of

21h

Gluten-Free Restaurant Foods Are Often Mislabeled

One in three gluten-free dishes tested at restaurants contained gluten—especially GF pizzas and pastas. Christopher Intagliata reports.

21h

A Genius First-of-Its-Kind Device Has Created Electricity From Snowfall

You'd think snowflakes were too light to do anything.

21h

21h

Gluten-Free Restaurant Foods Are Often Mislabeled

One in three gluten-free dishes tested at restaurants contained gluten—especially GF pizzas and pastas. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21h

System restores some pig brain function hours after death

Researchers restored circulation and cellular activity in a pig’s brain four hours after its death, the team reports. The finding challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death. Researchers isolated the brain of a postmortem pig from a meatpacking plant and circulated a specially designed chemical solution. They obser

21h

The Atlantic Daily: Punting on the Obstruction Question

What We’re Following (Katie Martin / The Atlantic ) The Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report was finally released publicly. Was there collusion? Was there obstruction of justice? On the first, the 448-page report found that there was no collusion, but mentioned “multiple links” between Trump campaign officials and Russian contacts. On the second, whether Trump broke any laws by trying to thwar

22h

Gluten-Free Restaurant Foods Are Often Mislabeled

One in three gluten-free dishes tested at restaurants contained gluten—especially GF pizzas and pastas. Christopher Intagliata reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

22h

Publisher Correction: Diattenuation Imaging reveals different brain tissue properties

Publisher Correction: Diattenuation Imaging reveals different brain tissue properties Publisher Correction: Diattenuation Imaging reveals different brain tissue properties, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42189-8 Publisher Correction: Diattenuation Imaging reveals different brain tissue properties

22h

Read the Mueller Report; Change Your Instagram Password

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

22h

Senator McConnell, a Tobacco Ally, Supports Raising Age to Buy Cigarettes

Seeking re-election to a seventh term, the senator cited the rise in teenage vaping as a reason to curtail sales of tobacco and other products.

22h

The Politics & Policy Daily: It’s (Finally) Mueller Time

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, April 18 (and Mueller report time). Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report is finally out. Mueller’s team writes that there are links between Donald Trump’s campaign and the Russian government, but concludes that “the evidence was not sufficient enough to produce criminal charges.” The report also details that the president attempted to thwart the specia

22h

22h

How A 'Snowball Chamber' Might Help Scientists Finally Find Dark Matter

If you enjoy watching videos on the internet, you've likely already witnessed the phenomenon known as supercooling. Basically, the process involves taking ultra-pure water and putting it into a clean, smooth container that lacks any structural defects. If the conditions are right, when you attempt to freeze the water by dropping its temperature below 32 degrees Fahrenheit (0 degrees Celsius), it w

22h

Sex and the Cosmic City

Colonizing space means reproducing there. We still don't know if that's possible.

22h

Engineering researcher uses network science to understand how materials work

Using network science — part of a larger mathematical field called graph theory — a professor mapped long range atomic forces onto an incredibly complex graph to simulate macroscopic material behavior.

22h

Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model

An international research team modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. Using neurons derived from stem cells, they grew cortical-like spheroids. In a microdevice, the spheroids extended bundles of axons toward each other, forming a physical and electrical connection. Fascicles grew less efficiently when one spheroid was absent, and when a gene relevant to cerebral tract formation was knocked-down.

23h

Infection biology: Gut microbe helps thwart Salmonella

Researchers have identified a bacterial species in the gut microbiome of the mouse which protects against infection by human-pathogenic Salmonella.

23h

Engineering researcher uses network science to understand how materials work

Using network science — part of a larger mathematical field called graph theory — a professor mapped long range atomic forces onto an incredibly complex graph to simulate macroscopic material behavior.

23h

Scientists advance creation of 'artificial lymph node' to fight cancer, other diseases

In a proof-of-principle study in mice, scientists report the creation of a specialized gel that acts like a lymph node to successfully activate and multiply cancer-fighting immune system T-cells. The work puts scientists a step closer, they say, to injecting such artificial lymph nodes into people and sparking T-cells to fight disease.

23h

Bioengineers program cells as digital signal processors

Synthetic biologists have added high-precision analog-to-digital signal processing to the genetic circuitry of living cells. The research dramatically expands the chemical, physical and environmental cues engineers can use to prompt programmed responses from engineered organisms.

23h

Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot

Researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium.

23h

Game of Thrones isn't a fantasy, it's a warning

Entertainment It's been about our own future all along. Perhaps we can explain Game of Thrones' enormous success by considering how, at a subconscious, dreamlike level, it deals with humanity’s most profound problem.

23h

Future hypersonics could be artificially intelligent

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

23h

Author Correction: High-resolution record reveals climate-driven environmental and sedimentary changes in an active rift

Author Correction: High-resolution record reveals climate-driven environmental and sedimentary changes in an active rift Author Correction: High-resolution record reveals climate-driven environmental and sedimentary changes in an active rift, Published online: 19 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42749-y Author Correction: High-resolution record reveals climate-driven environmental and sedimenta

23h

Cygnus Spacecraft Heads to Space Station With 40 Mice, Satellites

The remote-operated spacecraft usually has a quick trip to and back from the ISS, but this one will spend more time in space to get things done. The post Cygnus Spacecraft Heads to Space Station With 40 Mice, Satellites appeared first on ExtremeTech .

23h

Partially Revived Dead Pig Heads Prove We Still Don’t Fully Understand Brain Death

Scientists have restored and observed neural activity in pigs more than four hours after they died. Our understanding of how the brain dies previously didn't allow for that idea. The post Partially Revived Dead Pig Heads Prove We Still Don’t Fully Understand Brain Death appeared first on ExtremeTech .

23h

WIRED – ESD Hub

WIRED ESD Hub

23h

How the hepatitis B virus establishes persistent infection

New research sheds light on how a hepatitis B viral protein stimulates the expansion of immune cells that impair antiviral responses. The findings potentially explain how the hepatitis B virus (HBV) establishes and maintains chronic infection, and could lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

23h

Does time of day affect the body's response to exercise?

New research confirms that the circadian clock is an important factor in how the body responds to physical exertion. Based on this work alone, it's too early to say when the best time is for you to go for a jog. But at least in the lab, exercise in the evening seems to be more productive, although human lifestyles are much more complicated.

23h

Genetic variants that protect against obesity could aid new weight loss medicines

Around four million people in the UK carry genetic variants that protect them from obesity, type 2 diabetes and heart disease, suggests new research. The team say the discovery could lead to the development of new drugs that help people lose weight.

23h

Certain strains of bacteria associated with diabetic wounds that do not heal

Whether a wound — such as a diabetic foot ulcer — heals or progresses to a worse outcome, including infection or even amputation, may depend on the microbiome within that wound.

23h

Study shows promise in repairing damaged myelin

A new study shows that a synthetic molecule stimulates repair of the protective sheath that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The study demonstrates in mice that a synthetic molecule called sobetirome efficiently repairs damaged myelin without side effects.

23h

New immune pathway involved in resistance to parasite worms found in undercooked pork

Scientists have discovered that immune responses originally found to prevent fungal infections are also important in eliminating Trichinella spiralis, a round worm and the causative agent of Trichinosis. People acquire trichinellosis by consuming raw or undercooked meat infected with the Trichinella parasite, particularly wild game meat or pork.

23h

10 Krishnamurti quotes on the meaning of life

The Indian philosopher taught that concepts get in the way of observation, and only by ridding yourself of concepts can you experience freedom. Reared to be a Theosophist leader, Krishnamurti rejected that system (along with all others) in formulating his outlook. His books touch upon topics such as education reform, physics, and meditation. None Of all the philosophers on my bookshelves, Jiddu K

23h

What Are Stem Cells?

Embryonic stem cells can morph into any cell in the human body.

23h

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