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Artificial intelligence can diagnose PTSD by analyzing voices

A specially designed computer program can help to diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans by analyzing their voices.

8h

'Longevity gene' responsible for more efficient DNA repair

Explorers have dreamt for centuries of a Fountain of Youth, with healing waters that rejuvenate the old and extend life indefinitely.

3h

Kinesiske forskere laver aber med (mere) menneskelig intelligens

Nyt gen-eksperiment presser grænserne for, hvad der er etisk forsvarligt, siger ekspert.

11h

How People with Substance Use Disorders Can Lend a Hand in Addiction Research

Clinical trials are essential for testing new treatments, and those who suffer from SUDs are essential to their success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2min

Soft bedding poses grave danger to sleeping babies, study shows

Almost 70% of babies who died from sleep-related suffocation between 2011 and 2014 did so because of soft bedding, a new study reveals. The finding underscores physicians' urgent message to new parents that babies should sleep only in cribs or bassinets free of blankets, toys and other potential hazards.

5min

Nursing, dental, and medical students train together to improve kids' oral health

Nursing, medical, and dental students can work as a team to improve their knowledge of pediatric oral health — and how to work with their fellow health professionals, finds new research led by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The study appears in the Journal of Dental Education.

5min

6min

Semiconductor firm to buy, expand upstate NY chip plant

An Arizona-based semiconductor supplier will purchase GlobalFoundries' computer chip manufacturing plant in the Hudson Valley, adding 150 new jobs and preserving hundreds of others as part of a $720 million expansion plan, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Monday.

7min

Neonics hinder bees' ability to fend off deadly mites, study reveals

A University of Guelph study is the first to uncover the impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees' ability to groom and rid themselves of deadly mites.

7min

If Thanos Actually Wiped Out Half of All Life, How Would Earth Fare in the Aftermath?

The aftereffects of such a mass extinction don’t require a supervillain’s intelligence to understand

7min

Neonics hinder bees' ability to fend off deadly mites, study reveals

A University of Guelph study is the first to uncover the impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees' ability to groom and rid themselves of deadly mites.

10min

Machine learning gathers analyst emotion for better investing

A new method can extract sentiment information from analyst reports to help make better investment decisions. Unstructured text is one of the largest data sources used to communicate investor thoughts and opinions in financial markets. Text data analytics transform these unstructured text data into meaningful data that can provide insights, such as stock market trading patterns. There is increasi

13min

How People with Substance Use Disorders Can Lend a Hand in Addiction Research

Clinical trials are essential for testing new treatments, and those who suffer from SUDs are essential to their success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

14min

Neonics hinder bees' ability to fend off deadly mites

A new study is the first to uncover the impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees' ability to groom and rid themselves of deadly mites.

14min

Debate on daylight saving time and school start time

A switch to permanent daylight saving time will undo any positive effects on sleep of delaying school start times, according to researchers.

14min

Geomagnetic jerks finally reproduced and explained

The Earth's magnetic field experiences unpredictable, rapid, and intense anomalies that are known as geomagnetic jerks. The mechanisms behind this phenomenon had remained a mystery until the recent research. Scientists have now created a computer model for these geomagnetic jerks, and provided an explanation for their appearance.

14min

From coal to gas: How the shift can help stabilize climate change

A transition from coal-based energy to cleaner-burning gas has long been viewed as a staple of many climate action plans, despite concerns over leakage and possible harmful emissions. A recent study finds that not only is such a shift central to meeting climate targets and stabilizing global temperature rise, but that the benefits of cleaner-burning gas outweigh its possible risks.

14min

New technique produces longer-lasting lithium batteries

Researchers have developed a new method for safely prolonging battery life by inserting a nano-coating of boron nitride (BN) to stabilize solid electrolytes in lithium metal batteries. The team focused on solid, ceramic electrolytes, which show promise in improving safety and energy density, compared with conventional, flammable electrolytes in Li-ion batteries. Rechargeable solid-state lithium ba

14min

20 Things You Didn't Know About Rainbows

Everyone sees their own rainbow, and the number of colors in yours may be different from mine.

20min

The Grim Origins of 'Gluten-Free'

It took an act of war for doctors to learn how to treat celiac disease.

20min

How People with Substance Use Disorders Can Lend a Hand in Addiction Research

Clinical trials are essential for testing new treatments, and those who suffer from SUDs are essential to their success — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

24min

Sand tiger sharks return to shipwrecks off N.C. coast

A study reveals shipwrecks off North Carolina's coast are important habitats for sand tiger sharks, whose population plummeted in the 1980 and 1990s. Photos taken months and even years apart by scuba divers show female sand tiger sharks returning to the same shipwrecks. The photos were uploaded to the citizen-science program Spot A Shark USA which used specialized software to ID the sharks.

29min

Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution

If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. Anoles—diminutive little tree lizards—spend much of their day …

35min

How an Oil Spill 50 Years Ago Inspired the First Earth Day

Before Earth Day made a name for the environmental movement, a massive oil spill put a spotlight on the dangers of pollution

37min

Rutgers develops new tool to help psychiatrists encourage patients to quit smoking

Psychiatrists often disregard their patients' smoking even though tobacco use accounts for 50% of deaths among people with mental illness, a Rutgers-led study finds.

40min

Neonics hinder bees' ability to fend off deadly mites, U of G study reveals

A University of Guelph study is the first to uncover the impact of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees' ability to groom and rid themselves of deadly mites.

40min

When Families Feud Over Vaccines

Colleen Brown of Cleveland, Ohio, has been known to post on Facebook now and again about the dangers of not vaccinating kids—local news stories about schools closing because a student has been exposed to the measles, she says, that kind of thing. A few years back, she remembers, she shared an article on her Facebook page about a 2015 measles outbreak that originated at Disneyland and resulted in

43min

Mazda CX-5 SUV Diesel Is a Go in the USA

Promised for the US market since 2010, the Mazda Skyactiv-D diesel is almost here. But it gets so-so mileage (for a diesel). The post Mazda CX-5 SUV Diesel Is a Go in the USA appeared first on ExtremeTech .

44min

Say 'aloha!' to this not-actually-extinct Hawaiian flower

Science Megapixels: It was rediscovered by a drone. The hibiscus Hibiscadelphus woodii wasn't extinct—it was just hiding. Researchers in Kaua'i recently rediscovered it via drone.

50min

‘Virtual’ cardio system improves alternative heart test

A new mathematical model may pave the way for getting better information from ballistocardiograms, report researchers. Every heart beat sends blood flowing throughout the human body. While an electrocardiogram uses a contact approach to measure the electrical activity of the heart, a ballistocardiogram is a non-contact way of measuring the mechanical effect of the blood flow through the cardiovas

56min

Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution

If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. Anoles — diminutive little tree lizards — spend much of their day shuttling in and out of shade. But, according to a new study, this behavioral 'thermoregulation' isn't just affecting their body temperature. Surprisingly, it's also slowing their evolution.

57min

Samsung is Delaying the Galaxy Fold’s Launch After Broken Screens

Folding Business Samsung’s game-changing Galaxy Fold — essentially a $1980 seven inch tablet that can fold in half like a book — has had a rough start. Review units of the phone started breaking just a single day into testing. First the Verge reported that Samsung had delayed the launch in China. And now, according to the Wall Street Journal , the sale of the device has been delayed “by at least

59min

Why responsible sourcing of DRC minerals has major weak spots

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is rich in minerals such as coltan, tantalum, tin and gold. All are coveted for their widespread use in modern technologies, like semiconductors for cars and mobile phones.

1h

How artificial intelligence systems could threaten democracy

U.S. technology giant Microsoft has teamed up with a Chinese military university to develop artificial intelligence systems that could potentially enhance government surveillance and censorship capabilities. Two U.S. senators publicly condemned the partnership, but what the National Defense Technology University of China wants from Microsoft isn't the only concern.

1h

Older adults starting dialysis die at higher rates than previously thought

Study found more than half of older adults with end-stage kidney disease died within a year of starting dialysis.Nearly one in four older dialysis patients (23%) succumbed to the disease within a month of starting treatment.Analysis reveals markedly higher death rates than previous reports of dialysis outcomes among older patients.Findings can help patients and clinicians make better-informed deci

1h

Snake-inspired robot slithers even better than predecessor

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new and improved snake-inspired soft robot that is faster and more precise than its predecessor.

1h

Droplet trains reveal how nature navigates blood traffic

IBS Scientists report that they discovered spontaneous oscillations in microfluidic droplet networks. The scientists have successfully modeled network channels similar to our blood capillaries in the simplest way containing one or two loops. They also suggest that collision between blood cells and irregularity of thickness can dampen oscillations in the biological networks. This study can help us

1h

Heterogeneous catalyst goes enzymatic

IBS Researchers demonstrated enzyme-like heterogeneous catalysis for the first time. They developed a highly active heterogeneous TiO2 photocatalyst incorporated with many single copper atoms. They used this catalyst for the photocatalytic hydrogen production, and found that the catalyst is as active as the most active and expensive Pt-TiO2 catalyst.

1h

Researchers outline how humans reduce uncertainty in social situations

A new perspective paper from Brown University scientists establishes a framework to apply rigorous mathematical models of uncertainty originally developed for non-social situations, such as whether or not to purchase a lottery ticket, to social scenarios such as determining an interviewer's opinion of an interviewee.

1h

From coal to gas: How the shift can help stabilize climate change

A transition from coal-based energy to cleaner-burning gas has long been viewed as a staple of many climate action plans, despite concerns over leakage and possible harmful emissions. A recent study published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that not only is such a shift central to meeting climate targets and stabilizing global temperature rise, but that the benefits of cleaner-burning g

1h

Transgender adults more likely to report worse health-related quality of life

Transgender adults were more likely to report worse health-related quality of life compared with cisgender adults. This study used data from a large national health survey with an optional sexual orientation and gender identity module, which 36 US states and territories used at least once from 2014 through 2017.

1h

Wakeup call: Pervasiveness of sexual harassment and its effect on female physics students

A recent study revealed that sexual harassment in physics is insidious and experienced at a significantly higher rate than is generally acknowledged. The study also found that gender harassment, one type of sexual harassment, is correlated with two harmful psychological patterns: a diminished sense of belonging and the imposter phenomenon.

1h

Not drinking water associated with consuming more calories from sugary drinks

This study examined how drinking water was associated with the amount of calories children, adolescents and young adults consume from sugar-sweetened beverages, including sodas, fruit drinks and sports drinks. Among 8,400 participants in a nationally representative survey (ages 2-5, 6-11 and 12-19 years), about one-fifth reported no water intake on a given day.

1h

Brain regions linked to memory and emotion help humans navigate smell

Using varying combinations of banana and pine scents, University of Pennsylvania professor Jay Gottfried discovered that three key brain regions help humans navigate from one odor to the next. The work points to the existence of a grid-like hexagonal architecture in the olfactory brain, similar to mapping configurations previously found to support spatial navigation in animals.

1h

Not drinking water may boost kids' consumption of sugary beverages

Kids and young adults who drink no water throughout the day may consume twice the amount of calories from sugary drinks than those who drink water, according to Penn State researchers.

1h

Neuroscientists reverse some behavioral symptoms of Williams syndrome

In a study of mice, MIT neuroscientists have found that impaired myelination underlies the hypersociability seen in patients with Williams syndrome.

1h

Geomagnetic jerks finally reproduced and explained

The Earth's magnetic field experiences unpredictable, rapid, and intense anomalies that are known as geomagnetic jerks. The mechanisms behind this phenomenon had remained a mystery until the recent research of a CNRS researcher. Working with a colleague in Denmark, they created a computer model for these geomagnetic jerks, and provided an explanation for their appearance. Their research was publis

1h

Blood samples to help select the right early phase clinical trials for cancer patients

Scientists could help match cancer patients with no other treatment options to clinical trials with experimental medicines, by analyzing the genetic faults in a sample of their blood, according to research published in Nature Medicine today (Monday).

1h

Human influence on climate change is traced back to the 19th century

A new study shows that human influence on climate change can be traced back to the late 19th century based on summer-winter temperature difference.

1h

Study: Reducing energy required to convert CO2 waste into valuable resources

Surplus industrial carbon dioxide creates an opportunity to convert waste into a valuable commodity. Excess CO2 can be a feedstock for chemicals typically derived from fossil fuels, but the process is energy-intensive and expensive. University of Illinois chemical engineers have assessed the technical and economic feasibility of a new electrolysis technology that uses a cheap biofuel byproduct to

1h

Overlooked molecular machine in cell nucleus may hold key to treating aggressive leukemia

Many people fighting a very aggressive form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) don't survive more than five years. These very sick patients are often unable to receive the only cure — a bone marrow transplant. Now, an international team of scientists report in Nature Cell Biology on a long-overlooked part of a leukemic cell's internal machinery, where they may have found a key to treating the aggres

1h

Advance in CAR T-cell therapy eliminates severe side effects

An advance in the cancer treatment known as CAR T-cell therapy appears to eliminate its severe side effects, making the treatment safer and potentially available in outpatient settings.

1h

Permanent daylight savings may cancel out changes to school start times

Several states in the US, including California, Washington, Florida, and North Carolina, are now considering doing away with the practice by making daylight savings time (DST) permanent. But, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on April 22 say, permanent DST would make it harder to wake up in the winter. It would also undermine efforts in many states to give teens more time to sle

1h

New technique produces longer-lasting lithium batteries

Columbia Engineering researchers have developed a new method for safely prolonging battery life by inserting a nano-coating of boron nitride (BN) to stabilize solid electrolytes in lithium metal batteries. The team focused on solid, ceramic electrolytes, which show promise in improving safety and energy density, compared with conventional, flammable electrolytes in Li-ion batteries. Rechargeable s

1h

Surrey academics weigh into the debate on daylight saving time and school start time

A switch to permanent daylight saving time will undo any positive effects on sleep of delaying school start times, according to researchers from the University of Surrey.

1h

To get teens off junk food, tap into their outrage

Exposing teenagers to the junk food industry’s manipulative marketing techniques may offer a way to tap into their natural desire to rebel—against the snack makers themselves. “Anyone who has spent time around teenagers knows how powerful their feelings of outrage can be,” says coauthor David Yeager, an associate professor of psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. “But what nobody had f

1h

Save 50% on a Google Pixel 3 or Pixel 3 XL – CNET

Huge savings when you buy Google's flagship and activate it on Google Fi.

1h

Mueller Makes It Clear: Trump Was Worse Than a 'Useful Idiot'

The Mueller report exposes the extent to which not just Russia but Donald Trump's own associates grifted the president.

1h

Cracks Are Deepening in Erdoğan’s Ruling Party

ISTANBUL—In the summer of 2001, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, a charismatic former mayor of Istanbul, promised to transform Turkish politics. “The period of ego-centered politics is over,” he said , announcing the founding of the Justice and Development Party (AKP). “We will not obey nor idolize anyone. A team will administer the party. The leader will not overshadow it. Those who come by election will g

1h

Chiral twisted van der Waals nanowires

Chiral twisted van der Waals nanowires Chiral twisted van der Waals nanowires, Published online: 22 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1147-x A tunable interlayer twist that evolves naturally during synthesis of van der Waals nanowires made from layered crystals of germanium sulfide could produce new electronic structure and correlation phenomena.

1h

Disembodied pig brains revived: Your questions answered

Disembodied pig brains revived: Your questions answered Disembodied pig brains revived: Your questions answered, Published online: 22 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01289-1 From consciousness to death to cryonics, Nature’s news team answers reader questions about a remarkable piece of research.

1h

Dynamic polymer network points the way to truly recyclable plastics

Dynamic polymer network points the way to truly recyclable plastics Dynamic polymer network points the way to truly recyclable plastics, Published online: 22 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01209-3 Crosslinked polymer networks known as thermoset plastics have many applications, but can’t be reshaped or recycled. A thermoset with reorganizable crosslinks retains its useful properties, but has r

1h

Wary of Chinese Espionage, Houston Cancer Center Chose to Fire 3 Scientists

The director of the National Institutes of Health said that 55 similar investigations into possible foreign exploitation of American research are happening nationwide.

1h

NASA Is Gearing up to Visit a Shattered, Volcanic Asteroid

Step Two NASA just approved the preliminary designs for its Psyche spacecraft, which may move into construction next month. Its mission? Explore a mysterious asteroid, also named Psyche, which scientists believe to be the metallic, volcanic core of a Mars-like planet that shattered in the early days of the Solar System. First Contact When Psyche the spacecraft launches, as Smithsonian reports it’

1h

SpaceX suffers serious setback with crew capsule accident

SpaceX has suffered a serious setback in its effort to launch NASA astronauts into orbit this year, with the fiery loss of its first crew capsule.

1h

Wakeup call: Pervasiveness of sexual harassment and its effect on female physics students

A survey of 471 undergraduate women who attended the 2017 American Physical Society's Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (CUWiP) revealed that sexual harassment in physics is insidious and experienced at a significantly higher rate than is generally acknowledged. Nearly three-quarters of respondents had experienced sexual harassment in their physics programs in the last two years.

1h

Just 10% of U.S. plastic gets recycled. A new kind of plastic could change that

The material can easily be separated from additives to produce pristine recycled plastic

1h

A personal air-quality tracker that lets you know what you're breathing | Romain Lacombe

How often do you think about the air you're breathing? Probably not enough, says entrepreneur and TED Fellow Romain Lacombe. He introduces Flow: a personal air-quality tracker that fits in your hand and monitors pollution levels in real time. See how this device could help you track and understand pollution street by street, hour by hour — and empower you to take action to improve your health.

1h

Asia's diabetes epidemic preferentially kills women, the middle-aged: Study

Diabetes has reached epidemic proportions in Asia and has dramatically increased the risk of premature death, especially among women and middle-aged people, a multinational study led by Vanderbilt University researchers has found.

1h

Promise of liquid biopsy in cancer biomarker detection and prenatal screening

The promise and challenges of liquid biopsy, an emerging, noninvasive method for targeted disease diagnosis and detection of cancer biomarkers to enable improved and personalized therapy, is the focus of a new special issue of Genetic Testing and Molecular Biomarkers, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. publishers.

1h

From coal to gas: How the shift can help stabilize climate change

A transition from coal-based energy to cleaner-burning gas has long been viewed as a staple of many climate action plans, despite concerns over leakage and possible harmful emissions. A recent study published in the journal Nature Climate Change finds that not only is such a shift central to meeting climate targets and stabilizing global temperature rise, but that the benefits of cleaner-burning g

1h

Geomagnetic jerks finally reproduced and explained

The Earth's magnetic field experiences unpredictable, rapid, and intense anomalies that are known as geomagnetic jerks. The mechanisms behind this phenomenon had remained a mystery until the recent discovery of a CNRS researcher. Working with a colleague in Denmark, they created a computer model for these geomagnetic jerks, and provided an explanation for their appearance. Their research was publi

1h

Human influence on climate change is traced back to the 19th century

Climate change poses a serious challenge to the human society and it is generally believed that humans are themselves to blame. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has concluded that, with high confidence, human activities are responsible for the continuing rise of global mean surface air temperature since the 1950s.

1h

New technique produces longer-lasting lithium batteries

The grand challenge to improve energy storage and increase battery life, while ensuring safe operation, is becoming evermore critical as we become increasingly reliant on this energy source for everything from portable devices to electric vehicles. A Columbia Engineering team led by Yuan Yang, assistant professor of materials science and engineering, announced today that they have developed a new

1h

Reducing energy required to convert CO2 waste into valuable resources

Surplus industrial carbon dioxide creates an opportunity to convert waste into a valuable commodity. Excess CO2 can be a feedstock for chemicals typically derived from fossil fuels, but the process is energy-intensive and expensive. University of Illinois chemical engineers have assessed the technical and economic feasibility of a new electrolysis technology that uses a cheap biofuel byproduct to

1h

Researchers outline how humans reduce uncertainty in social situations

Do my friends find me funny? Am I making a good impression during this job interview? For most, such questions and concerns are a routine part of life.

1h

Mixing grass varieties may reduce insect infestations in lawns

A simple change in the choice of grass varieties for lawns of St. Augustinegrass could be a key tool for fending off fall armyworm infestations, according to new research. While no single St. Augustinegrass cultivar rises above the rest in resisting infestation, mixing varieties may confer some benefits, as fall armyworms clearly preferred single-cultivar plantings in a series of lab tests.

1h

Catalyst renders nerve agents harmless

A team of scientists has studied a catalyst that decomposes nerve agents, eliminating their harmful and lethal effects.

1h

Insights on marijuana and opioid use in people with cancer

A new study reveals that many people with cancer use marijuana, and rates of use in the US have increased over time. The study also found that patients with cancer are more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer.

1h

DNA is managed like climbers' rope to help keep tangles at bay

Scientists have uncovered a process in cells that prevents DNA from becoming tangled, which resembles a method used to control climbers' ropes.

1h

Sand tiger sharks return to shipwrecks off N.C. coast

Photos taken months, and in some cases years, apart by scuba divers show female sand tiger sharks returning to the same shipwrecks off the North Carolina coast, a new study co-led by scientists at Duke University reveals.

1h

Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution

If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. Anoles—diminutive little tree lizards—spend much of their day shuttling in and out of shade. But, according to a new study in Evolution led by assistant professor Martha Muñoz at Virginia Tech and Jhan Salazar at Universidad Icesi, this behavioral "thermoregulation" is

1h

Catalyst renders nerve agents harmless

A team of scientists has studied a catalyst that decomposes nerve agents, eliminating their harmful and lethal effects.

1h

Photonics: The curious case of the disappearing cylinders

A pair of researchers describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating. Their findings could enable invisibility of natural materials at optical frequency and eventually lead to a simpler way of enhancing optoelectronic devices, including sensing and communication technologies.

1h

Towards atomic and close-to-atomic scale manufacturing

submitted by /u/Buck-Nasty [link] [comments]

1h

Sand tiger sharks return to shipwrecks off N.C. coast

Photos taken months, and in some cases years, apart by scuba divers show female sand tiger sharks returning to the same shipwrecks off the North Carolina coast, a new study co-led by scientists at Duke University reveals.

1h

Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution

If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. Anoles—diminutive little tree lizards—spend much of their day shuttling in and out of shade. But, according to a new study in Evolution led by assistant professor Martha Muñoz at Virginia Tech and Jhan Salazar at Universidad Icesi, this behavioral "thermoregulation" is

1h

Better labor practices could improve archaeological output

Archaeological excavation has, historically, operated in a very hierarchical structure, according to archaeologist Allison Mickel. The history of the enterprise is deeply entangled with Western colonial and imperial pursuits, she says. Excavations have been, and often still are, according to Mickel, led by foreigners from the West, while dependent on the labor of scores of people from the local co

1h

Mixing grass varieties may reduce insect infestations in lawns

A simple change in the choice of grass varieties for many lawns in the United States could be a key tool for fending off fall armyworm infestations, according to new research.

1h

How does wildlife fare after fires?

Fire ecologists and wildlife specialists at La Trobe University have made key discoveries in how wildlife restores itself after bushfires, and what Australian conservationists can do to assist the process.

1h

Was the restaurant really that bad—or was it just the rain?

There are a few things that will result in poor customer reviews of a restaurant: bad service, bad food—and bad weather.

1h

Theory meets application: Machine learning techniques for geothermal exploration

When Jing Yang, assistant professor of electrical engineering, began looking for practical applications to her machine learning research, partnering with Chris Marone, professor of geosciences, for his work on safe and efficient geothermal exploration and energy production, was a perfect fit.

1h

Mixing grass varieties may reduce insect infestations in lawns

A simple change in the choice of grass varieties for many lawns in the United States could be a key tool for fending off fall armyworm infestations, according to new research.

1h

Those home-delivered meal kits are greener than you thought, new study concludes

Meal kit services, which deliver a box of pre-portioned ingredients and a chef-selected recipe to your door, are hugely popular but get a bad environmental rap due to perceived packaging waste.

1h

How does wildlife fare after fires?

Fire ecologists and wildlife specialists at La Trobe University have made key discoveries in how wildlife restores itself after bushfires, and what Australian conservationists can do to assist the process.

1h

Rewriting the textbook on fossil fuels: New technologies help unravel nature's methane recipes

Experts say scientific understanding of deep hydrocarbons has been transformed, with new insights gained into the sources of energy that could have catalyzed and nurtured Earth's earliest forms of life.

1h

1h

Video Appears to Show SpaceX Dragon Capsule Exploding During Test

An “Anomaly” A video posted to Twitter Sunday appears to show SpaceX’s Crew Dragon capsule exploding in a massive ball of smoke — during a Saturday test when it had previously been reported that the spacecraft suffered an “anomaly.” SpaceX declined to comment about the video’s veracity on the record, but provided a statement to Futurism saying that “the initial tests completed successfully but th

1h

The stone faces and human problems on Easter Island

In 1981, UCLA archaeology graduate student Jo Anne Van Tilburg first set foot on the island of Rapa Nui, which is commonly called Easter Island, eager to explore her interest in rock art by studying the iconic stone heads that enigmatically survey the landscape.

1h

Parents using both e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes may be more motivated to quit

A study by MassGeneral Hospital for Children researchers finds that parents who use both traditional cigarettes and e-cigarettes may be more receptive to smoking cessation interventions than parents who only smoke traditional cigarettes.

1h

Sand tiger sharks return to shipwrecks off N.C. coast

A study co-led by Duke University reveals shipwrecks off North Carolina's coast are important habitats for sand tiger sharks, whose population plummeted in the 1980 and 1990s. Photos taken months and even years apart by scuba divers show female sand tiger sharks returning to the same shipwrecks. The photos were uploaded to the citizen-science program Spot A Shark USA which used specialized softwar

1h

Island lizards are expert sunbathers, and researchers find it's slowing their evolution

If you've ever spent some time in the Caribbean, you might have noticed that humans are not the only organisms soaking up the sun. Anoles — diminutive little tree lizards — spend much of their day shuttling in and out of shade. But, according to a new study in Evolution led by assistant professor Martha Muñoz at Virginia Tech and Jhan Salazar at Universidad Icesi, this behavioral 'thermoregulati

1h

Bacteria use their enemy — phage — for 'self-recognition'

Scientists discovered that cells can distinguish themselves from closely related competitors through the use of a virus, and the harboring of phage in bacterial genomes benefits host cells when facing competitors in the environment.

1h

Social-Media Silence in Sri Lanka

Today the Sri Lankan government named a culprit in Sunday’s coordinated bomb blasts, which killed almost 300 people at Easter services and in hotels in multiple cities. The group, called National Thowheeth Jama’ath, is a local variation on a jihadist theme, and according to the very sparse dossiers on it from before yesterday, it focused on desecrating Buddhist statues. Blowing up churches and ho

1h

Five killed as buildings collapse in strong Philippine quake

At least five people were killed when buildings collapsed near Manila after a powerful earthquake set skyscrapers swaying and drove terrified locals into the street.

1h

Techathlon podcast: Supervillains vs. CEOs, streaming stats, and the week’s biggest tech news

Technology Play along with our podcast and you won't win great prizes, but you might laugh and learn something. Learn about the latest tech news while playing along with our game.

1h

Repelling charges prevent Cooper pairs from 'island hopping' in insulating state

New research shows how Cooper pairs — quasiparticles that make superconductivity possible — can also play an opposite role in an exotic type of insulating materials known as Cooper pair insulators.

1h

Hole-forming protein may suppress tumor growth

A gene called gasdermin E, which is downregulated in many cancers, aids cells in dying in an unexpected way, and may also suppress tumor growth.

1h

How does wildlife fare after fires?

Fire ecologists and wildlife specialists have made key discoveries in how wildlife restores itself after bushfires, and what conservationists can do to assist the process.

1h

Photonics: The curious case of the disappearing cylinders

A pair of researchers describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating. Their findings could enable invisibility of natural materials at optical frequency and eventually lead to a simpler way of enhancing optoelectronic devices, including sensing and communication technologies.

1h

Empathy often avoided because of mental effort

Even when feeling empathy for others isn't financially costly or emotionally draining, people will still avoid it because they think empathy requires too much mental effort, according to new research.

1h

Was the restaurant really that bad — Or was it just the rain?

There are a few things that will result in poor customer reviews of a restaurant: bad service, bad food — and bad weather. A study of 32 Florida restaurants found that customers left more negative remarks on comment cards on days when it was raining than on days when it was dry.

1h

Repelling charges prevent Cooper pairs from 'island hopping' in insulating state

Superconductors are able to conduct electricity with zero resistance thanks to Cooper pairs, electron duos that team up and skate through a material unimpeded. In 2007, Brown University researchers made the surprising discovery that Cooper pairs can also exist in insulating materials, helping to block the flow of current rather than enabling it. Now that same lab group has revealed the forces invo

1h

TED 2019: The $50 lab burger transforming food

submitted by /u/The_Ebb_and_Flow [link] [comments]

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3-D printing gets sporty, the future of 3-D printing

submitted by /u/jessiFranks [link] [comments]

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Last Night's *Game of Thrones* Leaked Early Online

Also, this weekend's box office totals are bleak.

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Catalyst renders nerve agents harmless

A team of scientists including researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has studied a catalyst that decomposes nerve agents, eliminating their harmful and lethal effects. The research was published Friday, April 19, in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

2h

Will Netflix eventually monetize its user data?

Even in the wake of a recent mixed earning report and volatile stock prices, Netflix remains the media success story of the decade. The company, whose user base has grown rapidly, now boasts almost 150 million global subscribers.

2h

FEFU scientists are developing brand-new method to heal brain cancer

Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in cooperation with colleagues from Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center (Moscow), Switzerland, and Sweden for the first time studied proteins, which constitute WNT signaling pathway of the cancer stem cells of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM CD133+ CSCs), one of the most aggressive brain tumors. Researchers revealed a number of proteins, which

2h

Survey shows half of all American workplaces offer health and wellness programs

Workplace health promotion programs are increasing in the US, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Gillings School of Global Public Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and RTI International. Nearly half of all workplaces in the nation offer some level of health promotion or wellness programs and 17% of workplaces with 50 or more employee

2h

Rewriting the textbook on fossil fuels: New technologies help unravel nature's methane recipes

Experts say scientific understanding of deep hydrocarbons has been transformed, with new insights gained into the sources of energy that could have catalyzed and nurtured Earth's earliest forms of life.Abiotic hydrocarbons have been a major focus of the Deep Carbon Observatory program — a 10-year exploration of Earth's innermost secrets, concluding in October.

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Mixing grass varieties may reduce insect infestations in lawns

A simple change in the choice of grass varieties for lawns of St. Augustinegrass could be a key tool for fending off fall armyworm infestations, according to new research. While no single St. Augustinegrass cultivar rises above the rest in resisting infestation, mixing varieties may confer some benefits, as fall armyworms clearly preferred single-cultivar plantings in a series of lab tests.

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Nintendo's Revolutionary Game Boy Handheld Gaming Console Just Turned 30

Long before anyone played Angry Birds and Temple Run on a tablet or smartphone, and way before Switch dazzled us with Breath of the Wild, there was an 8-bit handeld console called the Game …

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Toshiba's breakthrough algorithm realizes world's fastest, largest-scale combinatorial optimization

Toshiba Corporation has realized a major breakthrough in combinatorial optimization—the selection of the best solutions from among an enormous number of combinatorial patterns—with the development of an algorithm that delivers the world's fastest and largest-scale performance, and an approximately 10-fold improvement over current methods. Toshiba's new method can be applied to such daunting but es

2h

Thousands protest China-backed mega-dam in Myanmar

Thousands of people in northern Myanmar took to the streets on Monday to protest against the proposed reinstatement of a Chinese-backed mega-dam they say will cause huge environmental damage and bring little benefit to the country.

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'You're unallocated!' and other BS companies use to obscure reality

Corporate America has invented many ways to avoid letting the public know it's laying people off – or telling employees themselves "You're fired."

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Light-based computer hardware that can compete with silicon

A team of researchers at NTT Corporation has developed a way to use light-based computer hardware that allows it to to compete with silicon. In their paper published in the journal Nature Photonics, the group describes their research, the devices they created and how well they worked.

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New Medicare rules benefit poorer patients

New Medicare reimbursement rules provide some relief to safety-net hospitals, shifting the burden of financial penalties toward hospitals serving wealthier patient populations, according to a new study. The new rules also reduce the burden of such penalties on hospitals in states that have more generous Medicaid programs. In an effort to reduce health-care costs, Medicare issues financial penalti

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Those home-delivered meal kits are greener than you thought

Meal kit services, which deliver a box of pre-portioned ingredients and a chef-selected recipe to your door, are hugely popular but get a bad environmental rap due to perceived packaging waste.

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Study suggests overdiagnosis of schizophrenia

In a small study of patients, researchers report that about half the people referred to the clinic with a schizophrenia diagnosis didn't actually have schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe and disabling disorder marked by disordered thinking, feelings and behavior. People who reported hearing voices or having anxiety were the ones more likely to be misdiagnosed.

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From 2D to 1D: Atomically quasi '1D' wires using a carbon nanotube template

Researchers have used carbon nanotube templates to produce nanowires of transition metal monochalcogenide (TMM), which are only 3 atoms wide in diameter. These are 50 times longer than previous attempts and can be studied in isolation, preserving the properties of atomically quasi '1D' objects. The team saw that single wires twist when perturbed, suggesting that isolated nanowires have unique mech

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Researchers make synthetic polymers inside of living cells

A team of researchers at the University of Edinburgh has demonstrated that it is possible to create synthetic polymers inside of living cells. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the group describes how they pulled off this feat and suggest their work opens the door to new possibilities for modulating cellular function.

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Artificial receptor distinguishes between male and female hormones

Chemists at Tokyo Tech's Laboratory for Chemistry and Life Science have designed and developed a capsule-shaped synthetic receptor that can distinguish between male and female steroid hormones. Namely, the receptor displays unusually high binding affinity toward androgenic male hormones in water.

2h

Revealed: why lightning strikes twice

Unprecedented monitoring finds short-lived cloud structures that enable repeat strikes. Nick carne reports.

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Close up with a comet

Massive archive of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko images placed online.

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It may be ancient, but the coelacanth is an airhead

Researchers probe why the world’s most famous Lazarus species has a skull much larger than its brain. Nick Carne reports.

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Mug shots: children as young as five make judgements based on faces

Study finds character assessment according to appearance begins early in life. Natalie Parletta reports.

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Disney princess inspires dark matter detector

Using supercooled water could be a nifty way of finding the mysterious substance that makes up most of the universe. Richard Lovett reports.

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Slime mold absorbs substances to memorize them

In 2016, CNRS scientists demonstrated that the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, a single-cell organism without a nervous system, could learn to no longer fear a harmless but aversive substance and could transmit this knowledge to a fellow slime mold. In a new study, a team from CNRS and the Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier has shown what might support this memory, and in fact, it could be

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Researchers make synthetic polymers inside of living cells

A team of researchers at the University of Edinburgh has demonstrated that it is possible to create synthetic polymers inside of living cells. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the group describes how they pulled off this feat and suggest their work opens the door to new possibilities for modulating cellular function.

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Modified 'white graphene' for eco-friendly energy

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU), together with colleagues from the United States and Germany, have found a way to obtain inexpensive catalysts from hexagonal boron nitride or "white graphene." The technology can be used in the production of environmentally friendly hydrogen fuel.

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Artificial receptor distinguishes between male and female hormones

Chemists at Tokyo Tech's Laboratory for Chemistry and Life Science have designed and developed a capsule-shaped synthetic receptor that can distinguish between male and female steroid hormones. Namely, the receptor displays unusually high binding affinity toward androgenic male hormones in water.

2h

Five things to consider before you hire a tutor for your child

Private tutoring is a growing business, with people spending hundreds of billions of dollars. But is it worth it? And how does a person pick among all the options?

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China’s Electric Buses Save More Diesel Than All Electric Cars Combined

Tesla and other electric cars are great for the environment. However, they pale in comparison to electric buses. According to a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), electric buses will save an astounding 270,000 barrels of diesel demand in 2019—every single day. The vast majority of electric buses are found in China, where many mega-cities are closing in on 100 percent electric-powere

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Preserve fertility? Trans teens face tough decision

Although most teenagers aren’t actively considering parenthood, fertility is a consideration for transgender teens in transition, say researchers. Their recent research sheds light on how difficult this choice can be for such young adults (aged 15 to 24), and highlights the need to establish standardized protocols for primary care doctors when counseling transgender patients as they consider sex

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Slime mold absorbs substances to memorize them

In 2016, CNRS scientists demonstrated that the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, a single-cell organism without a nervous system, could learn to no longer fear a harmless but aversive substance and could transmit this knowledge to a fellow slime mold. In a new study, a team from CNRS and the Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier has shown what might support this memory, and in fact, it could be

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How to Watch the Dazzling Lyrid Meteor Shower (Unless the Moon Gets in the Way)

Springtime stargazers are in for a treat; the Lyrid meteor shower will peak in a dazzling show tonight and early tomorrow morning (April 22-23).

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Cpu in 2030 equal human synapses

Hi there, according to many futurist, Moores law and chip fabrication processes in classical computing, via smart ways and doping the silicon, I read the 1000 dollar cpu in 2030 will equal human synapse. Can anyone share the research paper or article that is very thorough, as well as insights if you are a professional, or if opinions or guesses some form of data based analysis? Will this be backe

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How artificial intelligence systems could threaten democracy

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Mercury has a massive solid inner core

The distribution of Mercury’s mass and small stutters in the planet’s spin suggest it has a giant solid inner core.

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Study shows the difference between classical flows and superfluid helium in 3-D counter-flow

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science, the University of Rome, CNRS and the University of Helsinki have recently carried out a study investigating the difference between 3-D anisotropic turbulence in classical fluids and that in superfluids, such as helium. Their findings, published in Physical Review Letters (PRL), are supported by both theory and experimental evidence.

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From 2-D to 1-D: atomically quasi '1-D' wires using a carbon nanotube template

Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used carbon nanotube templates to produce nanowires of transition metal monochalcogenide (TMM), which are only 3 atoms wide in diameter. These are 50 times longer than previous attempts and can be studied in isolation, preserving the properties of atomically quasi "1D" objects. The team saw that single wires twist when perturbed, suggesting that

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Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization

Plant cell walls, as repositories of fixed carbon, are an important source of biomass, which is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. However, the complex lignin structure makes it a rather inefficient biomass source. Thorough understanding of lignin biosynthesis will improve the efficiency of biomass conversion into biofuels and increase the quality of forage and silage.

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Marine Skin dives deeper for better monitoring

A new and greatly improved version of an electronic tag, called Marine Skin, used for monitoring marine animals could revolutionize our ability to study sea life and its natural environment, say KAUST researchers.

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That must have hurt coming out

Fang in fossil faeces prompts question about human diet. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Huge ancient predator found in a museum drawer

Researchers find previously unknown beast bigger than a polar bear. Samantha Page reports.

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DNA is managed like climbers' rope to help keep tangles at bay

Scientists have uncovered a process in cells that prevents DNA from becoming tangled, which resembles a method used to control climbers' ropes.

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Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization

Plant cell walls, as repositories of fixed carbon, are an important source of biomass, which is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. However, the complex lignin structure makes it a rather inefficient biomass source. Thorough understanding of lignin biosynthesis will improve the efficiency of biomass conversion into biofuels and increase the quality of forage and silage.

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Biomimetics: Artificial receptor distinguishes between male and female hormones

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have revealed that an artificial receptor preferentially binds male steroid hormones from a mixture of male and female hormones in water. Based on their findings, they succeeded in the preparation of a prototype detection system for male hormones at the nanogram level. This achievement could lead to the development of ultrasensitive analytical devices for medical diagnost

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Better labor practices could improve archaeological output

Archaeological excavation has, historically, operated in a very hierarchical structure, according to archaeologist. The history of the enterprise is deeply entangled with Western colonial and imperial pursuits, she says. Excavations have been, and often still are, led by foreigners from the West, while dependent on the labor of scores of people from the local community to perform the manual labor

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Global burden of emergency diseases and conditions

In 2015, about half of the world's 28 million human deaths were the result of medical emergencies, with the bulk of the burden borne by poorer nations, according to a statistical analysis of information from nearly 200 countries.

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Mechanism of a protein upon infection of the 'Fasciola hepatica'

The study also validated ten reference genes in sheep that allow for studying how the immune system behaves when facing this disease.

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Artificial intelligence can diagnose PTSD by analyzing voices

A specially designed computer program can help to diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans by analyzing their voices.

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Sustainable way to increase seed oil yield in crops

Scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15% in laboratory conditions.

2h

Grieving the Future I Imagined for My Daughter

Just after midnight, I felt the first unmistakable contraction. I still had two days until my due date, but I knew it was time to get to the hospital. A bulldozer inside my uterus revved its engine, shifted into high gear, and rammed a baby out into the world less than two hours later. Her name would be Isobel, Izzy for short. She weighed five pounds, three ounces, below the threshold for “normal

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How 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' inspired the cathedral's 19th-century revival

On April 15, people around the world watched in horror as a voracious fire consumed the medieval wooden roof of Paris's Notre Dame cathedral and felled its spire.

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Hole-forming protein may suppress tumor growth

A gene called gasdermin E, which is downregulated in many cancers, aids cells in dying in an unexpected way, and may also suppress tumor growth.

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Catalyst renders nerve agents harmless

A team of scientists has studied a catalyst that decomposes nerve agents, eliminating their harmful and lethal effects. The research was published Friday, April 19, in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

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Repelling charges prevent Cooper pairs from 'island hopping' in insulating state

New research shows how Cooper pairs — quasiparticles that make superconductivity possible — can also play an opposite role in an exotic type of insulating materials known as Cooper pair insulators.

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DNA managed like climbing rope to avoid knots

A process that cells use to unravel knotted strands of DNA – resembling a method used to control climbing ropes – has been uncovered by scientists.

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Building a printing press for new quantum materials

Checking out a stack of books from the library is as simple as searching the library's catalog and using unique call numbers to pull each book from their shelf locations. Using a similar principle, scientists at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory—are teaming with Harvard University and th

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DNA managed like climbing rope to avoid knots

A process that cells use to unravel knotted strands of DNA – resembling a method used to control climbing ropes – has been uncovered by scientists.

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Why some anti-bias training misses the mark

Why some anti-bias training misses the mark Why some anti-bias training misses the mark , Published online: 22 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01301-8 Short online sessions that aim to change biased workplace behaviour have a limited effect, find US researchers.

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New insight into how obesity, insulin resistance can impair cognition

Obesity can break down our protective blood brain barrier resulting in problems with learning and memory, scientists report.

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Group decisions: When more information isn't necessarily better

Modular — or cliquey — group structure isolates the flow of communication between individuals, which might seem counterproductive to survival. But for some animal groups, more information isn't necessarily better, according to new research.

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Biomimetics: Artificial receptor distinguishes between male and female hormones

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have revealed that an artificial receptor preferentially binds male steroid hormones from a mixture of male and female hormones in water. Based on their findings, they succeeded in the preparation of a prototype detection system for male hormones at the nanogram level. This achievement could lead to the development of ultrasensitive analytical devices for medical diagnost

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Minecraft can increase problem solving, collaboration and learning—yes, at school

A video game like Minecraft in schools might trouble some parents. As a Canada research chair in technologies and education, my hope is both parents and educators take the time to learn about how using Minecraft at school could be beneficial.

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Study suggests overdiagnosis of schizophrenia

In a small study of patients referred to the Johns Hopkins Early Psychosis Intervention Clinic (EPIC), Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report that about half the people referred to the clinic with a schizophrenia diagnosis didn't actually have schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is a chronic, severe and disabling disorder marked by disordered thinking, feelings and behavior. People who reported hearin

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Empathy often avoided because of mental effort

Even when feeling empathy for others isn't financially costly or emotionally draining, people will still avoid it because they think empathy requires too much mental effort, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.

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Those home-delivered meal kits are greener than you thought, new study concludes

Meal kit services, which deliver a box of pre-portioned ingredients and a chef-selected recipe to your door, are hugely popular but get a bad environmental rap due to perceived packaging waste.

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UK Gov’t Uses Alexa, Google Assistant to Dispense Info

She still can’t read the day’s headlines in a “newscaster” voice, but Amazon’s Alexa can now tell me the UK’s national minimum wage. Folks in Great Britain …

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Samsung Galaxy Fold review: Do not buy (this time)

Click. Smack. Click. Smack. Click. Smack. I feel bad for the people in my life because everywhere I've been for the past week, the sounds of opening and closing Samsung's …

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Is the grid ready for electric vehicles?

This is a re-post from Yale Climate Connections by Jan Ellen Spiegel Some Americans appear increasingly ready to give up their gas cars for electric vehicles. But are the country’s electric grids prepared for them? The question is a critical one in the quest to address climate change, because transportation is now the single largest sector contributing to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. EVs are wi

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Extinction Rebellion: disruption and arrests can bring social change

Extinction Rebellion burst onto everybody's screens with disruptions and mass arrests across the UK and around the world, in protest against government inaction on climate change. Radical disruptions have been at the heart of Extinction Rebellion's activism since it was founded in 2018 – from January's disruption of London Fashion Week, to the infamous naked protest in Parliament – but the scale o

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Smart cities: The promises and failures of utopian technological planning

Technology and innovation transform the ways that we interact with governments, purchase products and manage our health and lives. This turmoil affects cities, where the accelerating digitalization of our economy has opened the door for more technologies. It has also created the space to design utopian projects that profile the ways technology can be used to improve the quality of urban life.

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Heresy: but what is actually *wrong* with what it says?

submitted by /u/OliverSparrow [link] [comments]

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I just had a maybe good idea

What if we modified something like a venus fly trap to digest much faster and put the extra proteins into a structure that feels and tastes like meat. So we could reduce bug populations and grow meat fruit so we have fewer factory farms? I know the venus fly trap has very specific growing conditions but could it work? I live near some water and we have massive mosquito swarms every year that coul

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USC prof devises 'smart' building materials that move themselves with no motor

As a licensed architect concerned about the environment, Doris Sung became fed up catering to clients wanting steel and glass buildings with no regard to how such designs draw boatloads of energy, exacerbating global climate change.

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NASA Preps Mission to Most Interesting Asteroid in Our Solar System

In 2022, if all goes well, NASA will launch Psyche, a space probe intended to visit the asteroid of the same name. The post NASA Preps Mission to Most Interesting Asteroid in Our Solar System appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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The Birds That Are Helping Save their Own Species

Blackpoll warblers wearing geolocator backpacks are revealing where they rest during migration, biologists preserve these vital spots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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8 Earth Day Galleries to Show Off the Wonders of the World

Let's enjoy the planet in all its glories.

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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor er Skejby Sygehus' helipad placeret oven på et kæmpe gitter?

En læser undrer sig over, hvorfor Aarhus Universitetshospitals nye helikopterlandingsplads ikke bare er bygget direkte oven på taget. Det svarer hospitalets tekniske chef på.

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Marine Skin dives deeper for better monitoring

A pioneering tagging system that monitors the movement and local environment of sea animals reaches deeper depths and higher sensitivities.

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The Birds That Are Helping Save their Own Species

Blackpoll warblers wearing geolocator backpacks are revealing where they rest during migration, biologists preserve these vital spots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Study: Paternity leave for disadvantaged father results in strong family relationships

Enabling disadvantaged fathers to take time off from work via paternity leave may help these men become more engaged parents and improve relationships with mothers, says a new study from Ball State University.

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Slow charge generation plays big role in model material for solar cells

Next-generation devices based on molecular materials have the potential to efficiently use sunlight to produce electricity or to drive chemical reactions. In contrast to commercial solar cells, where absorption of light directly generates charge that can be extracted as electricity, absorption of light by molecular materials creates uncharged energetic states called excitons. The trick to making a

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Oceans have a bunch of ways to lock away carbon

Oceans are the Earth’s largest carbon sink. Now, a new study aims to explain how ocean pumps capture and store it. Knowing the mechanics of how things work will become increasingly important as the planet warms and as we try to get ahead of a runaway climate scenario, says David Siegel, professor of oceanography at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “The whole number is about 10 petagra

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Was Oumuamua an alien spaceship? No. Here’s what it is.

Oumuamua, a quarter-mile long asteroid tumbling through space, is Hawaiian for "scout", or "the first of many". It was given this name because it came from another solar system. Some claimed Oumuamua was an alien technology, but there's no actual evidence for that.

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Pennsylvania residents shoulder health impacts of state's oil and gas waste

More than 80 percent of all waste from Pennsylvania's oil and gas drilling operations stays inside the state, according to a new study that tracks the disposal locations of liquid and solid waste from these operations across 26 years. Numerous human health hazards have been associated with waste from oil and gas extraction, including potential exposure to compounds known to cause cancer.

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Photonics: The curious case of the disappearing cylinders

A pair of researchers at Tokyo Tech describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating. Their findings could enable invisibility of natural materials at optical frequency and eventually lead to a simpler way of enhancing optoelectronic devices, including sensing and communication technologies.

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How does wildlife fare after fires?

Fire ecologists and wildlife specialists at La Trobe University have made key discoveries in how wildlife restores itself after bushfires, and what conservationists can do to assist the process.

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Study exposes reasons behind poor mental health in bisexual people

The largest study of bisexual people in the world to date, led by La Trobe University, has examined why bisexual people experience higher rates of psychological distress than heterosexual and homosexual people.

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Driving chemical reactions by remote control

Students learn in high school that molecules must be in contact to react chemically. But what if that's not always true? It's that idea, which challenges textbook "laws," a team of theorists explored. They showed that even though it is in a completely different container from reactants, a catalyst could make a reaction happen. That is, a catalyst caused nitrous acid to change shape without touchin

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Big Pharma Cuts, Current and Coming

Word came out just before the weekend ( first at Endpoints ) that GlaxoSmithKline is laying off R&D employees at both Stevenage (UK) and Upper Providence (US). Current leadership is re-organizing drug discovery efforts to put more emphasis on oncology, immunology and genetic-linked disease, and this moves seems linked to that. Reports are that overall R&D head count is supposed to increase as the

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What cute dogs can teach us about democracy

Dog lovers agree: Round and fluffy, wrinkled and snub-nosed, or skinny and sleek, dogs are cute.

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'Longevity gene' responsible for more efficient DNA repair

Explorers have dreamt for centuries of a Fountain of Youth, with healing waters that rejuvenate the old and extend life indefinitely.

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Ecologist dissects the science of de-extinction

Spoiler alert: It is not possible to clone a wooly mammoth

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You know nothing. Meet the real John Snow.

Health Forget the mother of dragons. This is the father of epidemiology. Game of Thrones ’ Jon Snow may know nothing, but the real-life John Snow knew a heck of a lot. In fact, the 19th century Snow helped found the entire field of epidemiology…

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Ecologist dissects the science of de-extinction

Spoiler alert: It is not possible to clone a wooly mammoth

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Researchers describe the mechanism of a protein upon infection of the 'Fasciola hepatica'

The study also validated ten reference genes in sheep that allow for studying how the immune system behaves when facing this disease

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Better labor practices could improve archaeological output

In a new paper, 'Essential Excavation Experts: Alienation and Agency in the History of Archaeological Labor,' published in Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, archaeologist AllisonMickel illuminates the ways that nineteenth century archaeologists working in the Middle East managed local labor in ways that reflected capitalist labor management models. Her analysis also reve

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Study highlights global burden of emergency diseases and conditions

In 2015, about half of the world's 28 million human deaths were the result of medical emergencies, with the bulk of the burden borne by poorer nations, according to a statistical analysis of information from nearly 200 countries by a Johns Hopkins Medicine researcher. The analysis, described in April in the journal BMJ Global Health, offered what is believed to be a first-of-its-kind look at the l

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Zillow uses VR to try to make online real estate more authentic – CNET

The 3D Home feature is designed to give a more authentic view to help people fretting over a potentially very expensive purchase.

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Elizabeth Warren Wants College to Be Free

Student debt is a crisis, for students and for graduates living with debt. There’s near-universal bipartisan agreement that reform is desperately needed, but almost as much disagreement about what, exactly, to do about it. On Monday, Senator Elizabeth Warren, one of the Democratic hopefuls vying for the White House in 2020, released a comprehensive college-affordability plan that she believes cou

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Physicians Get Addicted Too

Well past seven one evening in 1988, after the nurses and the office manager had gone home, as he prepared to see the last of his patients and return some phone calls, Dr. Lou Ortenzio stopped by the cupboard where the drug samples were kept. Ortenzio, a 35-year-old family practitioner in Clarksburg, West Virginia, reached for a box of extra-strength Vicodin. The box contained 20 pills, wrapped i

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CRISPR thwarts fatal lung disease in fetal mice

Scientists used CRISPR gene-editing to treat a lethal lung disease in an animal model with a harmful mutation which causes death within hours after birth. The proof-of-concept study, published in Science Translational Medicine , shows that in utero editing could be a promising new approach for treating lung diseases before birth. “We wanted to know if this could work at all,” says co-lead author

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Will design-thinking strategies benefit students after class is dismissed?

As schools focus on building students' capacity to learn and solve problems outside the formal classroom, many educators have embraced "design-thinking" strategies as a promising approach.

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How greed and corruption blew up South Korea’s nuclear industry

Seoul had a solution to the world’s energy problems. Then everything went wrong.

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Image of the Day: Multicolor Brain

A newly developed imaging technology visualizes entire mouse brains in two and three dimensions using multicolor fluorescence microscopy.

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Partially Reviving Dead Pig Brains

I turns out they were only “mostly dead.” Well, it depends on your definition of death. This is an interesting study that has been widely reported, with a surprisingly small amount of hype. The New York Times writes : ‘Partly Alive’: Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs In a study that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something lik

4h

Ancient sculptors made magnetic figures from rocks struck by lightning

Carved ‘potbelly’ stone sculptures suggest people in what’s now Guatemala knew about magnetism more than 2,000 years ago.

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'Heaven's Vault' Is a Rare Videogame About the Art of Translation

The decoding at the core of Inkle Studios' latest is an elegant, simple system, one wrapped in a truly beautiful game.

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Earth vs. asteroids: humans strike back

Incoming asteroids have been scarring our home planet for billions of years. This month humankind left our own mark on an asteroid for the first time: Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft dropped a copper projectile at very high speed in an attempt to form a crater on asteroid Ryugu. A much bigger asteroid impact is planned for the coming decade, involving an international double-spacecraft mission.

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How Old Are Saturn's Rings? The Debate Rages On.

Pinning down the ring system's age has profound implications for the entire Saturnian system.

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What Will Education Look Like In The Future?

submitted by /u/clubso [link] [comments]

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How many jobs will robots eliminate? – Tech News | The Star Online

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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These Creatives Work Together With Algorithms And Robots To Make Their Art

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The Robots Want to Steal (the Boring Parts of) Your Job

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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How India can prepare its workforce for the artificial intelligence era

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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The US is attacking Huawei and China — without its own 5G strategy

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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In Photos: Evidence of a Legendary Massacre in Alaska

Tens of thousands of artifacts and the remains of 28 human bodies reveal details of a massacre in the village of Nunalleq.

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A Dart in a Boy's Eye May Have Unleashed This Legendary Massacre 350 Years Ago

Archaeologists have uncovered a 350-year-old massacre in Alaska that occurred during a war that may have started over a dart game.

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When Lab Experiments Carry Theological Implications

Efforts to create new life-forms—and new universes—will raise profound questions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Earth Day Doodle Celebrates Extreme Animal Life

An endearing animation presents some unusual and marvelous creatures.

5h

The Mystery of Business Casual

The first time I tried on a pair of Allbirds sneakers, I was in the brand’s San Francisco boutique, sitting on a gently curved wooden stool designed to tip forward in aid of shoe-changing. The stool was created by the same people who design the start-up’s shoes, and it made me feel the same combination of familiarity and irritation: Do we really need tech to disrupt the established technology of

5h

Was the restaurant really that bad — Or was it just the rain?

There are a few things that will result in poor customer reviews of a restaurant: bad service, bad food — and bad weather. A study of 32 Florida restaurants found that customers left more negative remarks on comment cards on days when it was raining than on days when it was dry.

5h

Mauritian medical herbs possess antitumor properties

Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) scientists teamed up with colleagues from the UK and Mauritius and experimentally demonstrated that extracts of the endemic (i.e. growing only on this island) medicinal herb leaves Acalypha integrifolia, Eugenia tinifolia, and Labourdonnaisia glauca stop the proliferation of esophageal squamous carcinoma cells, ones of the most deadly cancer type worldwide. A

5h

Why is everyone I see so pessimistic about the future? Why does everyone think we'll end up in a man-made dystopia?

This chocolate is vegetarian while tasting exactly like milk chocolate, it's made from fairtrade cocoa and it is the cheapest in the store. None of those 3 things were true when I first started buying it 6 or 7 years ago. ​ Everywhere I look I see progress. ​ I see Google Fiber slowly chipping away at the ISP monopoly in the US. ​ I see China attempting to drain the swamp of unsafe food and pharm

5h

Bowers & Wilkins’ new Formation speakers are an ultra premium alternative to Sonos

Bowers & Wilkins’ new Formation Suite, a luxury high-end audio system for the whole home, has officially launched today. It is comprised of five very expensive products — with …

5h

The Robots Want to Steal (the Boring Parts of) Your Job

MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson on why the Westworld dystopia is (hopefully) far off and why you should never use a telepresence robot to tell someone they’re dying.

5h

11 Best Upcycled and Recycled Products (2019)

You want shoes, eh? How about shoes made from recycled plastic?

5h

John Legend Is Your New Google Assistant—Listen for Yourself

If you instruct Google Assistant to “talk like a Legend,” it will speak in a simulacrum of the smooth sound of Grammy-winning crooner John Legend.

5h

When Lab Experiments Carry Theological Implications

Efforts to create new life-forms—and new universes—will raise profound questions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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AI generates non-stop stream of death metal

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Microsoft's next-gen console rumored to be more powerful than PS5

Sony’s lead architect Mark Cerny unexpectedly revealed details of the PlayStation 5 last Tuesday. We now know it will be powered by AMD’s 7nm third-generation Ryzen CPU (Zen 2), use a custom …

5h

Hurricane Aftermath Leaves Florida with Years of Major Wildfire Threat

Tinderboxes of storm-felled trees are a growing concern in the Southeast, as climate change also increases fire risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Hurricane Aftermath Leaves Florida with Years of Major Wildfire Threat

Tinderboxes of storm-felled trees are a growing concern in the Southeast, as climate change also increases fire risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Impeachment Is Not the Answer. At Least Not Yet.

What next? The substance of the Mueller report is only now beginning to penetrate through the fog of lies and distortions coming from Attorney General William Barr, backed by his loyal lieutenant, Rod Rosenstein. Even the redacted version makes visible the despicable behavior that emanated from the Trump campaign and the Trump White House, not to mention Donald Trump himself, and the shocking pen

6h

Worry About the Black Students Who Get In

A few weeks back, when New York City announced the minuscule number of black students admitted to its elite specialized high schools, the report generated the usual dialogues around how the system is broken and what, if anything, can be done to fix it. There is no doubt that the numbers are abysmal: Only 12 black students scored high enough on the citywide test to win a seat at my alma mater, Bro

6h

The Next Mayor of Boston?

M ichelle Wu wanted to free the T. On a subfreezing February morning, the Boston city councilor was handing out flyers at the Park Street subway station. In a soft voice, she urged bundled commuters to sign a petition opposing the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority’s proposal for a 6.3 percent fare hike, part of her campaign to make the T free. The gold-domed state house rose behind her.

6h

When a Treatment Costs $450,000 or More, It Had Better Work

Biotech companies aren’t just inventing dazzling new treatments. They’re also getting creative about how to charge for them. Bluebird Bio, a Boston-based firm that’s developing a gene therapy to cure the inherited blood disorder thalassemia, announced in January that it would divide its yet-to-be-released price into five yearly installment payments. The company estimates the value of the treatmen

6h

Why I Made a New Version of ‘What a Wonderful World’

When Louis Armstrong recorded “What a Wonderful World” in 1967, America was in upheaval. The Vietnam War was in full swing, and Martin Luther King Jr. was leading a battle for civil rights. The Summer of Love converged on San Francisco, and artists like Joni Mitchell and The Doors provided the soundtrack to a movement opposing the government, the ongoing war, and the consumerist values of the tim

6h

LA’s Plan to Reboot Its Bus System—Using Cell Phone Data

Ridership on the city's bus system is plummeting, so the transit agency is redesigning it—with the help of location data from about 5 million cell phones.

6h

VR’s True Innovation Isn’t Technological, It’s Human

Where new headsets like the Oculus Quest and HTC Vive Focus Pro really shine is their ability to help us interact more freely with other people.

6h

Inside the Weird, and Booming, Industry of Online Influence

Recently, the business of getting paid to promote a company via your social media has spread pandemic-like.

6h

Waze Wants to Help All of Us Win at Carpooling

The world's premier traffic-busting app has a plan for when traffic never ever gets better: get us all to share commutes, and become … friends?

6h

How the Atari 2600 Led Videogaming's Home Invasion

A nearly endless array of game options helped the cartridge-fed console dominate the living room for years.

6h

'Computer, Enhance': Inside Samsung's Smart New 8K TV

The AI engine that powers this stunning TV can transform any HD or 4K content into impossibly detailed 8K nirvana.

6h

EV Upstart Rivian Is Helping to Drive a New Auto Tech Boom

A explosion of new technologies has companies flooding the auto industry en masse—again.

6h

Kitty Hawk, Flying Cars, and the Challenges of ‘Going 3D’

At a startup run by autonomous vehicle mastermind Sebastian Thrun, the dream of flying cars is starting to become reality. But expect flight delays.

6h

When Workers Control the Code

The emergence of worker-owned apps could save the gig economy from itself.

6h

Dueling Mobile Options for Playing Console Games On the Go

Clip you phone into one of these controllers to play _Fortnite_ and more—with no latency and plenty of joysticking.

6h

New Gaming Gear That Will Light Your Arcade Fire

From a mouse that continuously charges to a luxuriously cushy headset, this desktop gaming equipment will help you unleash your full potential.

6h

Breaking My Phone Addiction—Via My Phone

Welcome to Internet and Technology Addicts Anonymous.

6h

Are We There Yet? A Reality Check on Self-Driving Cars

Fully autonomous cars may never arrive. But we'll all benefit from self-driving tech while we wait.

6h

Angry Nerd: Just Get Out of My Space

Need to rent a car for the day? Take mine. But my bed? I'd rather sell a kidney.

6h

Nissan's EV Hints at World Where Can Auto Designers Go Wild

A back seat that transforms into a throne, front seats that swivel to face one another—Nissan's IMs concept shows what designers do when tech liberates them.

6h

My Search for a Boyhood Friend Led to a Dark Discovery

A surfeit of ugly knowledge is a feature of our age. But when information is everywhere, some things are better left buried.

6h

How Recommendation Algorithms Run the World

Companies use recommendation engines to tell you what to buy, read, and watch. But those algorithms aren’t your friends.

6h

Digital værktøjskasse skal få fjernvarmens it-systemer til at samarbejde

PLUS. Treårigt projekt med 16 partnere og 25 mio. kr. fra Innovationsfonden skal gøre fjernvarmen grønnere og billigere gennem intelligente softwareløsninger, der er komponent-uafhængige.

6h

The M87 black hole image showed the best way to measure black hole masses

The first image of M87’s black hole suggests it is 6.5 billion times the mass of the sun — close to what was expected based on how stars move around it.

6h

Unbuttoned: Hello, Little Microbe. Doesn’t This Jacket Look Yummy?

Now we can trick tiny bugs into eating our clothing. Consumption is finally a good thing.

6h

Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har igen forfejlet sin mission

En 26 sider lang tilsynsrapport retter helt forkert skytset mod læger og sygeplejersker – den tager ikke hensyn til de urimelige arbejdsvilkår, som Sundhedsplatformen har medført. Kritikken bør istedet rettes mod sygehusledelsen og koncernledelsen.

6h

Modified 'white graphene' for eco-friendly energy

Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU), together with colleagues from the United States and Germany, have found a way to obtain inexpensive catalysts from hexagonal boron nitride or "white graphene". The technology can be used in the production of environmentally friendly hydrogen fuel.

7h

Biomimetics: Artificial receptor distinguishes between male and female hormones

Researchers at Tokyo Tech have revealed that an artificial receptor preferentially binds male steroid hormones from a mixture of male and female hormones in water. Based on their findings, they succeeded in the preparation of a prototype detection system for male hormones at the nanogram level. This achievement could lead to the development of ultrasensitive analytical devices for medical diagnost

7h

New pediatric blood pressure guidelines identify more kids at higher risk of premature heart disease

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure.

7h

Black hole breakthrough: a lot done, much more to do

The first direct image of a black hole is another triumph for Einstein's general relativity – but to make further progress we must look for even better theories

7h

Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS

PFAS are a family of chemicals accumulating in the soil, rivers, drinking water and the human body. How much exposure to these substances in clothes, firefighting foam and food wrap is too much? (Image credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

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To save life on Earth, here's the $100 billion-a-year solution

There have been five mass extinctions in the history of the Earth. But in the 21st century, scientists now estimate that society must urgently come to grips this coming decade to stop the very first human-made biodiversity catastrophe.

7h

Who will win the race of most powerful computer DNA vs Quantum

DNA and Quantum promise enormous computing power. Which one do you think will win the race of super computer. submitted by /u/kremata [link] [comments]

7h

Satellites are checking if boats in remote places are fishing legally

The Indonesian government is using tiny internet-providing satellites to check if boats in the middle of the ocean are fishing legally

8h

Efter tragisk plejehjemsbrand: Undlod sprinkleranlæg, fordi brandstation lå tæt på

Plejecenter Farsøhthus, hvor tre beboere omkom i en brand, havde fået dispensation fra at følge kravene om sprinkleranlæg, fordi centret lå tæt på en brandstation. Meningsløs begrundelse, lyder det fra beredskabsdirektør.

8h

8h

Bleaching away what ails you: The Genesis II Church is still selling Miracle Mineral Supplement as a cure-all

Miracle Mineral Supplement (MMS) has been sold by the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing as a cure-all to treat conditions and diseases as diverse as autism, cancer, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and malaria. Indeed, it's touted as a cure for nearly all disease. It is, however, basically industrial bleach. As ridiculous and harmful as MMS is, it's a quackery that just won't die, as I realized

8h

A deep-learning model may help predict lung cancer survival and outcomes

A deep-learning model developed using serial image scans of tumors from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) predicted treatment response and survival outcomes better than standard clinical parameters.

9h

Poachers threaten precious Madagascar forest and lemurs

Under a leaden sky, six rangers walk silently in single file through Vohibola, one of the last primary forests in eastern Madagascar.

9h

Greek researchers enlist EU satellite against Aegean sea litter

Knee-deep in water on a picture-postcard Lesbos island beach, a team of Greek university students gently deposits a wall-sized PVC frame on the surface before divers moor it at sea.

9h

Tesla probes car fire in Shanghai

US electric auto maker Tesla said Monday it had launched an investigation after a video circulating in China showed one of its cars suddenly burst into flames in a garage in Shanghai.

9h

Group decisions: When more information isn't necessarily better

In nature, group decisions are often a matter of life or death. At first glance, the way certain groups of animals like minnows branch off into smaller sub-groups might seem counterproductive to their survival. After all, information about, say, where to find some tasty fish roe or which waters harbor more of their predators, would flow more freely and seem to benefit more minnows if the school of

9h

The Giants at the Heart of the Opioid Crisis

Civil suits filed by three states accuse pharmaceutical distributors of flooding the country with opioids while devising systems to evade regulators.

9h

Group decisions: When more information isn't necessarily better

In nature, group decisions are often a matter of life or death. At first glance, the way certain groups of animals like minnows branch off into smaller sub-groups might seem counterproductive to their survival. After all, information about, say, where to find some tasty fish roe or which waters harbor more of their predators, would flow more freely and seem to benefit more minnows if the school of

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10h

Can you solve it? The puzzle that is Donald Trump

Reinventing the tangram The tangram was the first ever puzzle craze – and it is still going strong. You may have come across it before. You are shown a shape, and you must arrange seven pieces – five triangles, a square and a rhomboid – to make that shape. Continue reading…

10h

Greta Thunberg’s visit to Britain is a huge moment for the climate movement | Caroline Lucas

Young people like Greta represent hope in the face of political inaction. Extinction Rebellion must succeed for their sake This afternoon an international sensation is taking to the stage in central London. She’s young, admired around the world and her name is Greta Thunberg . She’s a 16-year-old climate hero and I couldn’t be more proud to be co-hosting her visit. Greta’s rise to fame has been ve

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10h

Big tick energy: how a tiny flea created a revolution in British art

In 1664, scientist Robert Hooke drew a flea and created the first great work of British art. Without it, perhaps, there would be no Stubbs, Constable and Hirst On a January day in 1665 the diarist Samuel Pepys found time to flirt with a servant, go to bed mid-morning with his friend Betty Martin (noting ruefully that he spent “2 s. in wine and cake upon her”), have a massive lunch and finally mak

11h

The European Press Corps Cannot Cover the EU

BRUSSELS—The European Union is a vast entity, stretching across 28 nations, with regulations, directives, and debates that affect each one. Every year, the EU holds several major summits, dozens of high-level ministerial gatherings, and hundreds of committee meetings at the European Parliament. Seeking to project influence and unity, the European Commission, the bloc’s executive arm, holds a dail

11h

Tesla probes car fire in Shanghai

US electric auto maker Tesla said Monday it had launched an investigation after a video circulating in China showed one of its cars suddenly burst into flames in a garage in Shanghai.

11h

New insight into how obesity, insulin resistance can impair cognition

Obesity can break down our protective blood brain barrier resulting in problems with learning and memory, scientists report.

12h

Study provides insights on marijuana and opioid use in people with cancer

A new study reveals that many people with cancer use marijuana, and rates of use in the US have increased over time. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also found that patients with cancer are more likely to use prescription opioids than adults without cancer.

12h

Game of Thrones season 8 episode 3 trailer: 'The Night King is coming' – CNET

Everyone's ready for a battle that seems unwinnable in the dark trailer for next week.

12h

Game of Thrones: The One Where Everyone Contemplates Imminent Death

Every week for the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers will be discussing new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we’ll be posting our thoughts in installments. David Sims: Last week’s episode of Game of Thrones was all about the human stakes of the conflict ahead, and the unlikely alliances and frie

13h

Scientists Create Living, Eating, Growing Machines

submitted by /u/push2019 [link] [comments]

13h

[Question] Reversing the cable-ization of internet streaming

I was griping about the increase in streaming media providers today and was thinking about a way to force providers to house digital content in a sort of consumers library. Is this a legal problem or more a matter of treating the internet as a public utility? Are there public thinkers working through this possibility? I wonder what a sort of streaming library could be like if content from across

13h

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Can emotions be measured?

Just like peach color emerges when we combine 100% R, 94% G, 86% B, Can we have a similar thing in emotions, say: Gratitude (Type 1, Medium Intensity) emerges by the combination of 90% W, 60% X, 20% Y 100% Z; the alphabets denoting the basic units that give rise to different emotions. In the AI researches are there any study on how scientists are trying to create 'emotions' in machines? I had a t

14h

AI threat sees education fund doubled for Hong Kong workers

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

14h

Hope for those with Huntington's – podcast

Robin McKie, the Observer’s science and environment editor, discusses an innovative drug that may soon offer ways to fight Huntington’s disease, while Mark Newnham describes being diagnosed with the inherited condition. Plus: Peter Beaumont describes his trip to the Costa Rican cloud forest, at threat from climate change For Mark Newnham and thousands of others who have been told they have inheri

14h

Austria Drafts Law That Makes It Illegal To Leave Internet Comments Anonymously

Online comments, despite being just words, can be malicious and hurtful, so much so that we’ve seen how internet trolls have driven several celebrities off social media platforms. It …

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Celebrate Earth Day with Citizen Science

Earth Day is April 22, 2019 so take a moment to celebrate our environment and learn more about the biodiversity around us. The first Earth Day was in 1970, and was started to bring attention to environmental protection and preservation. We've selected a few projects related to environmental protection and a global event to participate in, the City Nature Challenge, to encourage focusing on the det

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How much are we sacrificing for automation?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Group decisions: When more information isn't necessarily better

Modular — or cliquey — group structure isolates the flow of communication between individuals, which might seem counterproductive to survival. But for some animal groups, more information isn't necessarily better, according to new SFI research published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B.

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Musk banking on autonomous Tesla taxis

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

16h

Boeing's switch to 'smart machine' inspectors draws heat from union

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

16h

Can this artificial mother-of-pearl make moon houses?

Scientists have invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre—also known as mother-of-pearl— using an innovative component: bacteria. The artificial nacre, made of biologically produced materials, has the toughness of natural nacre, while also being stiff and, surprisingly, bendable. The strongest synthetic materials are often those that intentionally mim

16h

Some water disinfection misses drug-resistant genes

Current water and wastewater disinfecting methods work well to deter bacterial growth, but have varied success in fighting an antibiotic resistance gene, according to new research. Each year, antibiotic-resistant bacteria infect at least 2 million Americans, and at least 23,000 of these people die, according to the Centers for Disease Control. These bacteria can end up in our water, which is why

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We need to talk about death: I was not prepared for how lonely grief would be | Vanessa Billy

When my father died I lost the ability to live normally Six months ago, on 9 October 2018, it was a beautiful and unusually warm day in my native city of Paris. There, in the leafy surroundings of a palliative care centre, my father took his last breath. I was there with my husband. Our three year old, playing in the room next door, was blissfully unaware of what was happening. We had been in Fra

16h

UK government directs £4.6 million to tackling illegal wildlife trade

Efforts to disrupt grey parrot trade in Cameroon and reduce demand for turtle products in Nicaragua are among 14 projects to win funding from the UK government

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TRAPPIST-1’s ‘habitable’ planets might be lousy for life

Two new studies may lead astronomers to redefine the habitable zone for TRAPPIST-1, a system where seven Earth-sized rocky planets orbit a cool star. Since its discovery in 2016, planetary scientists have been excited about TRAPPIST-1. Three of the planets are in the habitable zone, the region of space where liquid water can flow on the planets’ surfaces. The relative size of the TRAPPIST-1 plane

17h

What should we anticipate for U.S. climate policy?

After years as a virtual nonentity in the halls of power, climate change is now a topic of discussion among lawmakers on Capitol Hill. In fact, more than 50 bills aiming to tackle global warming are in various states of readiness. While some proposals, such as the Green New Deal, have become lightning rods for partisan bickering, others show promise for bipartisan progress. In the House of Repres

17h

China unveils colossal Mars training base camp in Gobi desert

submitted by /u/The_Necromancer10 [link] [comments]

17h

Quantum computing is a marathon not a sprint

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

17h

Humanity is halfway done

Suppose there will only ever be 50 trillion people throughout time. What if everybody assumes they are exactly born in the middle? The top 90% believe that the total number of people will be between 10 – 100 trillion. In other words, pretty accurate. Most people are within an order of magnitude. So isn't it irrational to believe that we are born in the first 1% of people who will ever exist? Prob

17h

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