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nyheder2019april23

Forty-six years of Greenland Ice Sheet mass balance from 1972 to 2018 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

We reconstruct the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet using a comprehensive survey of thickness, surface elevation, velocity, and surface mass balance (SMB) of 260 glaciers from 1972 to 2018. We calculate mass discharge, D, into the ocean directly for 107 glaciers (85% of D) and indirectly for 110…

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Trump’s Twitter Meeting, an Ethereum Thief, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Socioeconomic deprivation increases risk of developing chronic kidney disease in England

A study of 1.4 million adults in England has found that the most socioeconomically deprived are 68% more likely to develop advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) than the least deprived, so experience poorer health outcomes and quality of life.

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CBD reduces impairment caused by cannabis

The more cannabidiol (CBD) in a strain of cannabis, the lower the impairment to brain function, finds a new UCL-led brain imaging study.

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Cannabis addiction influenced by genetic makeup

Some people may be more genetically prone to cannabis addiction, finds a new UCL-led study.

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Zoologists discover two new bird species in Indonesia

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with partners from Halu Oleo University (UHO) and Operation Wallacea, have discovered two beautiful new bird species in the Wakatobi Archipelago of Sulawesi, Indonesia.

10min

In silico learning of tumor evolution through mutational time series [Genetics]

Cancer arises through the accumulation of somatic mutations over time. Understanding the sequence of mutation occurrence during cancer progression can assist early and accurate diagnosis and improve clinical decision-making. Here we employ long short-term memory (LSTM) networks, a class of recurrent neural network, to learn the evolution of a tumor…

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Correction for Tang and Dubayah, Light-driven growth in Amazon evergreen forests explained by seasonal variations of vertical canopy structure [Corrections]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Light-driven growth in Amazon evergreen forests explained by seasonal variations of vertical canopy structure,” by Hao Tang and Ralph Dubayah, which was first published February 21, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1616943114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:2640–2644). The authors wish to note the following: “It has come to our…

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Intrinsic mutant HTT-mediated defects in oligodendroglia cause myelination deficits and behavioral abnormalities in Huntington disease [Neuroscience]

White matter abnormalities are a nearly universal pathological feature of neurodegenerative disorders including Huntington disease (HD). A long-held assumption is that this white matter pathology is simply a secondary outcome of the progressive neuronal loss that manifests with advancing disease. Using a mouse model of HD, here we show that…

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Variation in sequence dynamics improves maintenance of stereotyped behavior in an example from bird song [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Performing a stereotyped behavior successfully over time requires both maintaining performance quality and adapting efficiently to environmental or physical changes affecting performance. The bird song system is a paradigmatic example of learning a stereotyped behavior and therefore is a good place to study the interaction of these two goals. Through…

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Evolution of social norms and correlated equilibria [Evolution]

Social norms regulate and coordinate most aspects of human social life, yet they emerge and change as a result of individual behaviors, beliefs, and expectations. A satisfactory account for the evolutionary dynamics of social norms, therefore, has to link individual beliefs and expectations to population-level dynamics, where individual norms change…

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Human mutations highlight an intersubunit cation-{pi} bond that stabilizes the closed but not open or inactivated states of TRPV channels [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

An adequate response of a living cell to the ever-changing environment requires integration of numerous sensory inputs. In many cases, it can be achieved even at the level of a single receptor molecule. Polymodal transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been shown to integrate mechanical, chemical, electric, and thermal stimuli….

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A neural signature of pattern separation in the monkey hippocampus [Neuroscience]

The CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampus are considered key for disambiguating sensory inputs from similar experiences in memory, a process termed pattern separation. The neural mechanisms underlying pattern separation, however, have been difficult to compare across species: rodents offer robust recording methods with less human-centric tasks,…

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Gravitational instabilities in binary granular materials [Physics]

The motion and mixing of granular media are observed in several contexts in nature, often displaying striking similarities to liquids. Granular dynamics occur in geological phenomena and also enable technologies ranging from pharmaceuticals production to carbon capture. Here, we report the discovery of a family of gravitational instabilities in granular…

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Circulating heparin oligosaccharides rapidly target the hippocampus in sepsis, potentially impacting cognitive functions [Medical Sciences]

Sepsis induces heparanase-mediated degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx, a heparan sulfate-enriched endovascular layer critical to vascular homeostasis, releasing highly sulfated domains of heparan sulfate into the circulation. These domains are oligosaccharides rich in heparin-like trisulfated disaccharide repeating units. Using a chemoenzymatic approach, an undecasaccharide containing a uni

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Intergenerational transmission of the positive effects of physical exercise on brain and cognition [Neuroscience]

Physical exercise has positive effects on cognition, but very little is known about the inheritance of these effects to sedentary offspring and the mechanisms involved. Here, we use a patrilineal design in mice to test the transmission of effects from the same father (before or after training) and from different…

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DNA methylation analysis and editing in single mammalian oocytes [Developmental Biology]

Mammalian oocytes carry specific nongenetic information, including DNA methylation to the next generation, which is important for development and disease. However, evaluation and manipulation of specific methylation for both functional analysis and therapeutic purposes remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate evaluation of specific methylation in single oocytes from its sibling first…

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A pair of native fungal pathogens drives decline of a new invasive herbivore [Applied Biological Sciences]

Two North American fungal pathogens caused a coepizootic leading to localized collapse of an outbreak population of the newly invasive planthopper pest, the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula), in the eastern United States. The pathogens partitioned the habitat, with the majority of L. delicatula on tree trunks killed by Batkoa major,…

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Correction for Khoddami et al., Transcriptome-wide profiling of multiple RNA modifications simultaneously at single-base resolution [Corrections]

BIOCHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY Correction for “Transcriptome-wide profiling of multiple RNA modifications simultaneously at single-base resolution,” by Vahid Khoddami, Archana Yerra, Timothy L. Mosbruger, Aaron M. Fleming, Cynthia J. Burrows, and Bradley R. Cairns, which was first published March 14, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1817334116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:6784–6789). The authors note that…

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Correction for Drollette et al., Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities [Corrections]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities,” by Brian D. Drollette, Kathrin Hoelzer, Nathaniel R. Warner, Thomas H. Darrah, Osman Karatum, Megan P. O’Connor, Robert K. Nelson, Loretta A. Fernandez, Christopher M. Reddy, Avner Vengosh,…

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Preventing adolescent stress-induced cognitive and microbiome changes by diet [Neuroscience]

Psychological stress during adolescence may cause enduring cognitive deficits and anxiety in both humans and animals, accompanied by rearrangement of numerous brain structures and functions. A healthy diet is essential for proper brain development and maintenance of optimal cognitive functions during adulthood. Furthermore, nutritional components profoundly affect the intestinal community…

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Global warming has increased global economic inequality [Sustainability Science]

Understanding the causes of economic inequality is critical for achieving equitable economic development. To investigate whether global warming has affected the recent evolution of inequality, we combine counterfactual historical temperature trajectories from a suite of global climate models with extensively replicated empirical evidence of the relationship between historical temperature fluctuati

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QnAs with Stephen R. Forrest [QnAs]

The smartphone revolution capitalized on generations of advancements in inorganic semiconductor design. Engineers and materials scientists shrank electronic components, primarily manufactured from silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide, and combined them with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that could be assembled into pocket-sized computers. Progress in optoelectronic technologies, which combine o

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Photoelectric conversion on Earth’s surface via widespread Fe- and Mn-mineral coatings [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Sunlight drives photosynthesis and associated biological processes, and also influences inorganic processes that shape Earth’s climate and geochemistry. Bacterial solar-to-chemical energy conversion on this planet evolved to use an intricate intracellular process of phototrophy. However, a natural nonbiological counterpart to phototrophy has yet to be recognized. In this work, we…

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Baboons’ gut makeup is determined mostly by soil, not genetics

The microorganisms within the soil colonize the primates’ guts

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Zoologists discover two new bird species in Indonesia

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with partners from Halu Oleo University (UHO) and Operation Wallacea, have discovered two beautiful new bird species in the Wakatobi Archipelago of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Details of their discovery—of the Wakatobi white-eye and the Wangi-wangi white-eye—have been published today (April 24) in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, which is the

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Zoologists discover two new bird species in Indonesia

Zoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with partners from Halu Oleo University (UHO) and Operation Wallacea, have discovered two beautiful new bird species in the Wakatobi Archipelago of Sulawesi, Indonesia. Details of their discovery—of the Wakatobi white-eye and the Wangi-wangi white-eye—have been published today (April 24) in the Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society, which is the

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1 part of the brain connects sound and action in mice

Researchers have identified a portion of the brain in mice that integrates sound, action, and reward expectation. Researchers have known that signals that sounds generate go from the ears to the brain stem, thalamus, and auditory cortex. How other brain areas use the signals for decision-making and action has been unclear. In a series of studies, researchers in the lab of Santiago Jaramillo, a pr

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Bacteria reveal strong individuality when navigating a maze

Researchers demonstrate that genetically identical cells exhibit differing responses in their motility towards chemical attractants. Average values hide the full picture when it comes to describing the behavior of bacteria.

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Why unique finches keep their heads of many colors

There appears to be an underlying selection mechanism at work among Gouldian finches — a mechanism that allows this species to produce and maintain individuals with red heads, black heads, and yellow heads.

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More evidence that blood tests can detect the risk of Alzheimer's

A new study confirms that a simple blood test can reveal whether there is accelerating nerve cell damage in the brain. The researchers analyzed neurofilament light protein (NFL) in blood samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease. The study suggests that the NFL concentration in the blood could be able to indicate if a drug actually affects the loss of nerve cells.

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Nanocomponent is a quantum leap

Researchers have developed a nanocomponent that emits light particles carrying quantum information. Less than one-tenth the width of a human hair, the minuscule component makes it possible to scale up and could ultimately reach the capabilities required for a quantum computer or quantum internet.

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Nasa lander 'detects first Marsquake'

It is the first seismic signal ever detected on the surface of a body other than Earth and its Moon.

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SMAD3 directly regulates cell cycle genes to maintain arrest in granulosa cells of mouse primordial follicles

SMAD3 directly regulates cell cycle genes to maintain arrest in granulosa cells of mouse primordial follicles SMAD3 directly regulates cell cycle genes to maintain arrest in granulosa cells of mouse primordial follicles, Published online: 24 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42878-4 SMAD3 directly regulates cell cycle genes to maintain arrest in granulosa cells of mouse primordial follicles

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2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin abolishes circadian regulation of hepatic metabolic activity in mice

2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin abolishes circadian regulation of hepatic metabolic activity in mice 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin abolishes circadian regulation of hepatic metabolic activity in mice, Published online: 24 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42760-3 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin abolishes circadian regulation of hepatic metabolic activity in mice

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Doctors can ignore your DNR order if you're pregnant

Health Laws around the country restrict treatment decisions for incapacitated women who are also pregnant. An analysis, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, identified laws around the country that restrict treatment decisions for incapacitated…

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NASA’s Mars InSight lander may have the first recording of a Marsquake

NASA’s InSight mission appears to have detected a Marsquake for the first time.

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A new window into macaque brain connections

Researchers can now see how the two sides of the living brain mirror each other thanks to a new combination-imaging technique. The method dubbed 'opto-OISI' takes advantage of rapidly developing high-resolution optical technologies to help make sense of the trillions of connections in the brain.

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How 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut

A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists have discovered.

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Avengers: Endgame Is a Perfect Goodbye

This review avoids serious spoilers about Avengers: Endgame , but mild plot descriptions do follow. The biggest surprise of Avengers: Endgame may be its leisurely pace. All right, perhaps that’s not the film’s most shocking twist. Considering the movie is the 22nd entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and that it purports to bid farewell to at least some of its major characters, Avengers: Endga

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Shallow magnitude 5.9 earthquake hits remote India

American seismologists say a magnitude 5.9 earthquake has shaken a remote part of India near the border with China in a region that has experienced huge quakes in the past.

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Twitter shares lift off as profits soar; Trump weighs in

Twitter shares flew higher Tuesday after a surprisingly robust quarterly report, which sparked a fresh tirade from President Donald Trump over his claims of unfair treatment by social media.

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey meets with President Trump – CNET

Twitter says Dorsey discussed the "health of the public conversation ahead of the 2020 US elections."

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What’s Known About the SpaceX Crew Dragon Accident

During engine tests of SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft this past Saturday, the vehicle experienced what the company has characterized as an "anomaly."

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Magnets make the Leatherman Free P2 multitool shockingly easy to use one-handed

Gadgets Clever engineering touches make it usable with one-hand. Leatherman's Free P2 has 19 tools you can get at with one hand.

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‘Audacious’ science ideas win huge funding boosts after selection by TED group

Protein design team and other science projects raise tens of millions of dollars from a network of donors

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Like Guns, Social Media Is a Weapon That Should Be Regulated

In the wake of the massacres in Sri Lanka, the government imposed a social media blackout. This may be a turning point in the way we think about how to control big platforms.

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Census and Sensibility

What We’re Following Today It’s Tuesday, April 23. ‣ The Supreme Court heard arguments in a case that will determine whether a citizenship question is allowed to appear on the 2020 census. (J. Scott Applewhite / AP) More Fallout From the Mueller Report: Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s inquiry into Russian interference in the 2016 election might be over, but Republicans aren’t done with it yet. S

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Smallpox: The World's First Eradicated Disease

Prior its eradication in 1980, smallpox killed hundreds of millions of people globally.

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Water walking: The new mode of rock skipping

Researchers not only reveal the physics of how elastic spheres interact with water, but they also lay the foundation for the future design of water-walking drones.

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Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!

Our actions are driven by 'internal states' such as anxiety, stress or thirst — which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. Little is known about how such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, including sub-cortical structures such as the amygdala. Scientists have now used a deep brain imaging technique to monitor amygdala activity in active mice and revealed the neuro

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Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles

While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers use a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape.

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The first Marsquake has been detected

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Japan Releases Video of Its Spacecraft Bombing an Asteroid

Look Out Below We now know what it looks like when a spacecraft lobs a bomb at an asteroid. Earlier in April, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) directed its Hayabusa2 spacecraft to toss an explosive at the Ryugu asteroid from about 1,640 feet above its surface. Now, JAXA has released a video of the launch taken from the spacecraft’s perspective — and while the craft takes cover before

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Why the huge growth in AI spells a big opportunity for transdisciplinary researchers

Why the huge growth in AI spells a big opportunity for transdisciplinary researchers Why the huge growth in AI spells a big opportunity for transdisciplinary researchers, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01251-1 My journey from civil engineer to sociologist and sustainability researcher gave me the ideal mix of skills for working in artificial intelligence, says Ehsan Nabav

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Supply Chain Hackers Snuck Malware Into Videogames

An aggressive group of supply chain hackers strikes again, this time further upstream.

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Dr. David Hamburg, Leader in Conflict Resolution, Dies at 93

As a behavioral scientist and president of the Carnegie Corporation, he took on policy issues that bring about “hatred and violence and ignorance.”

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Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles

While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers use a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape.

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Scientists Simulated Every Single Atom of a Single Gene

Close-Up Scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory say they built a simulation that models the behavior of every single atom in a single human gene. That means a billion moving parts all at once — a feat so complex that the scientists say they need to wait for a new generation of supercomputers if they want to model an entire chromosome or, better yet, the human genome. All the same, the m

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NASA Just Detected the First Marsquake on the Red Planet

The InSight Lander has been listening for marsquakes since December.

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Learn the tricks of social media marketing pros with this $29 bundle

From livestreaming to influencer marketing. Learn the tricks of social media marketing pros—from livestreaming to influencer marketing—with this $29 bundle.

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Teen Says Apple’s Facial Recognition Got Him Wrongfully Arrested

Sounds About Right A New York teen suing Apple for $1 billion claims its facial-recognition system falsely linked him to a series of thefts and caused him to be arrested for a crime he didn’t commit. The twist: an Apple spokesperson told Gizmodo that such a facial recognition system doesn’t even exist. If Apple is telling the truth, it’s possible the lawsuit filed on Monday is based on mere specu

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Energy's future is solar plus storage

submitted by /u/everyEV [link] [comments]

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Even light rain increases your risk of a deadly car crash

Even light rain significantly increases your risk of a fatal car crash, a new study finds.

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Water walking—the new mode of rock skipping

Researchers at Utah State University's Splash Lab discovered a new mode of water surface skipping termed "water walking".

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Rock 'n Play recall: 7 safe devices to help your baby sleep

Gadgets The AAP is warning parents to stay away from the popular sleeper. Here are some alternatives to get your little one to snooze. We’ve picked out products—swaddles, white noise machines, swings, bassinets and the like—that can safely help send your baby off to dreamland.

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Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey Met With President Trump

The Twitter CEO says in an internal email that it's "important to meet heads of state in order to listen, share our principles and our ideas."

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Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay

MBARI researchers recently measured high concentrations of carbon dioxide in air blowing out to sea from cities and agricultural areas, including Silicon Valley. In a new paper in PLOS ONE, they calculate that this previously undocumented process could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving into coastal ocean waters by about 20 percent.

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Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients

Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Performance on a simple mobility test is the best predictor of whether an elderly heart attack patient will be readmitted, a Yale-led study reports.

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Apple offers next-day repairs for faulty MacBook keyboards

After years of user complaints, it looks like Apple is starting to prioritize repairs for busted MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards. According to a memo obtained by Mac Rumors, Apple …

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New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals. A team of researchers from Penn State developed the sensor from a protein they recently described and subsequently used it to explore the biology of bacteria th

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Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles

While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers at the University of Illinois used a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape.

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This Wireless Charging Station Table is the Perfect Blend of Elegance and Tech

Wireless charging is pretty cool, technology. Unfortunately, while they are very convenient, wireless chargers have not realized their full potential in terms of design. In fact, most of them look still like electronic hockey pucks, which rarely blend in with your decor. And of course, when you’re not actually using them, they just sit there collecting dust. Fortunately the folks at Fonesalesman

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New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals.

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UPS will start using Toyota's zero-emission hydrogen semi trucks

submitted by /u/philipwhiuk [link] [comments]

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Crypto Thief Stole $54 Million by Guessing Weak Passwords

The Blockchain Bandit For one wildly-successful thief, scoring millions of dollars of cryptocurrency is as simple as guessing weak wallet passwords. Security researchers found that a so-called “blockchain bandit” had hoarded 37,926 Ethereum — worth over $54 million — as of January, according to a new paper they published on Tuesday. The security experts could trace nearly $19 million of that stas

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'It's very concerning': Americans sitting more than ever, study finds

Adolescents sat for eight hours a day in decade to 2016 Americans spend three hours a day sitting watching TV The amount of time Americans spend sitting down has increased by an hour a day in recent years, a new study has found. Americans of all ages increasingly take life sitting down, researchers found, but adolescents sit more than other groups. The study found adolescent Americans typically i

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The Democrats Aren’t Really in Disarray Over What to Do About Mueller

In the five days since Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report dropped, stories about the Democrats’ escalating intra-party conflict have permeated the news media. Mueller’s findings, the narrative goes, have driven a wedge between the members of the party who are clamoring for an impeachment inquiry and the ones who view the matter largely as an unwelcome distraction from their kitchen-tab

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Water walking — The new mode of rock skipping

Utah State University's Splash Lab not only reveals the physics of how elastic spheres interact with water, but it also lays the foundation for the future design of water-walking drones.

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Interior Department Launches Investigation of Potential Ethics Violations Among Staff

The probe, the second in as many weeks, looks into a complaint that Interior Department staff offered agency access to former employers or lobbying clients.

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NASA’s InSight Mars Lander Just Recorded Its First Ever Marsquake

“Mars, I Hear You” In a video uploaded to Twitter on Tuesday afternoon, NASA’s InSight lander showed off a recording of “faint rumbles” that “appear to have come from the inside of the planet” — in other words, likely the first marsquake it’s ever detected. Mars, I hear you. I’ve detected some quiet but distinct shaking on #Mars . The faint rumbles appear to have come from the inside of the plane

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Dengue mosquito is Queensland's biggest threat for spreading Zika virus

Researchers have found that the dengue fever mosquito common to north and central Queensland poses the greatest danger of spreading the Zika virus in Australia. The researchers showed that not only was the dengue mosquito effective at transmitting Zika, the virus was also in the mosquitoes' reproductive organs. This finding suggests that Zika could persist in mosquito populations by females passin

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Researchers sequenced giant redwood genomes to kickstart a 23andMe for trees

Environment A future genetic testing kit could help park rangers and researchers manage forests in the face of climate change Today, you can send a tube of spit to a lab to learn about your ancestry and the health risks you’re predisposed to. Soon, scientists hope to create a similar tool for…

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Seven seconds of Spiderman viewing yields a 20% phobia symptom reduction

As the Marvel Avenger Endgame premieres in movie theaters this week, researchers have published a new article in Frontiers in Psychology which reveals that exposure to Spiderman and Antman movie excerpts decreases symptoms of spider and ant phobias, respectively.

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Controlling instabilities gives closer look at chemistry from hypersonic vehicles

While studying the chemical reactions that occur in the flow of gases around a vehicle moving at hypersonic speeds, researchers at the University of Illinois used a less-is-more method to gain greater understanding of the role of chemical reactions in modifying unsteady flows that occur in the hypersonic flow around a double-wedge shape.

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In U.S. first, drug company faces criminal charges for distributing opioids

The nation's sixth-largest drug distributor is facing criminal charges related to failing to report suspicious drug orders, among other things. It marks the first time a drug company has faced criminal charges for distributing opioids. Since 1997, nearly 222,000 Americans have died from prescription opioids, partly thanks to unethical doctors who abuse the system. None A major drug distribution c

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Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

Scientists describe a method of rendering the gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 'immunosilent,' potentially allowing the editing and repair of genes to be accomplished reliably and stealthily.

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Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay

Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent.

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A global database of women scientists is diversifying the face of science

Underrepresentation of women scientists in the public sphere perpetuates the stereotype of the white male scientist and fails both to reflect the true diversity of people practicing science today and to encourage more diversity.

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New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals.

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Experiences of 'ultimate reality' or 'God' confer lasting benefits to mental health

In a survey of thousands of people who reported having experienced personal encounters with God, researchers report that more than two-thirds of self-identified atheists shed that label after their encounter, regardless of whether it was spontaneous or while taking a psychedelic.

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New way to 'see' objects accelerates the future of self-driving cars

Researchers have discovered a simple, cost-effective, and accurate new method for equipping self-driving cars with the tools needed to perceive 3D objects in their path.

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Metformin may help patients maintain weight loss long-term

In the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) clinical trial and its long-term follow-up study, among the persons who lost at least 5 percent of their body weight during the first year, long-term maintenance of weight loss was more likely if they had been assigned to treatment with metformin than with placebo or lifestyle intervention. Being older and losing a greater amount of weight in the first year

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Working out makes hydrogels perform more like muscle

Human skeletal muscles have a unique combination of properties that materials researchers seek for their own creations. They're strong, soft, full of water, and resistant to fatigue. A new study has found one way to give synthetic hydrogels this total package of characteristics: putting them through a vigorous workout.

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Er angstanfald farlige?

Hjertet banker hurtigt, det er svært at få vejret og håndfladerne bliver svedige. Her kan du blive klogere på, hvad der sker i kroppen under et angstanfald.

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Scientists Are Having Trouble Keeping Gene-Hacked Creatures Alive

Fantastic Beasts Armed with CRISPR gene-editing technology, scientists are trying to move away from performing experiments on common model organisms, like fruit flies and zebrafish, which have long defined biological research — by crafting new ones at the genetic level. But scientists who are gene hacking new animals for their research are running into logistical problems, according to Nature New

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Delivery drones finally approved by FAA

submitted by /u/monsieurpooh [link] [comments]

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First ‘marsquake’ detected on red planet

First ‘marsquake’ detected on red planet First ‘marsquake’ detected on red planet, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01330-3 NASA′s InSight lander hears ripples of seismic energy rippling through Mars.

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Off Planet Hikes: The Backpacker’s Guide to the Solar System

Grab a spacesuit and a few months of provisions. We’re taking you on a tour of the Interplanetary Parks Service. Space is harsh. From damaging radiation to deadly gases and drastic temperature changes, pretty much any environment beyond Earth can kill you at a moment’s notice. Yet our cosmic backyard boasts natural wonders that rival the greatest found on terra firma. And, one day, when we have th

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Tesla: We’ll Have Full Self-Driving by 2020. Robo-Taxis, Too.

One board, with two independent processors and OSs, will power the next full-self-drive Autopilot. Tesla's happy news day precedes its won't-be-happy-for-Tesla earnings report and analyst call Wednesday. The post Tesla: We’ll Have Full Self-Driving by 2020. Robo-Taxis, Too. appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Tristan Harris: Tech Is ‘Downgrading Humans.’ It’s Time to Fight Back

The creator of the “time well spent” movement disappeared for a year, but now he’s come back with a new phrase and a plan to stop technology from from destroying free will, creating social anomie, and wrecking democracy.

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This Colorful Picture is Like an Invisibility Cloak for AI

Invisibility Cloak The technology behind sophisticated mass surveillance systems have made enormous strides in recent years. You can’t even jaywalk in some parts of the world without an AI-powered camera snitching on you. New research, though, could throw AI-powered surveillance cameras for a loop. A group of engineers from the university of KU Leuven in Belgium invented a colorful patch you can

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Largest collection of coral reef maps ever made

Scientists offer a new way to accurately map coral reefs using a combination of Earth-orbiting satellites and field observations. This first-ever global coral reef atlas contains maps of over 65,000 square kilometers (25,097 square miles) of coral reefs and surrounding habitats.

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Atomic beams shoot straighter via cascading silicon peashooters

Atomic beams conjure fantasies of gigantic Space Force canons. But there are real tiny atomic beams that shoot out of newly engineered collimators, a kind of tiny silicon peashooter, that could land in handheld devices. The beams streaming out of them create precise inertia much better than a gyroscope's that could help spacecraft navigate the solar system. The atomic beams from the new collimator

4h

Soft tissue makes coral tougher in the face of climate change

A new study has revealed soft tissues that cover the rocky coral skeleton promote the recovery of corals following a bleaching event.

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Scientists propose new theory on Alzheimer's, amyloid connection

'Is amyloid precursor protein the mastermind behind Alzheimer's or is it just an accomplice?' Researchers devised a multi-functional reporter for amyloid precursor protein and tracked its localization and mobility, noticing a strange association between the protein and cholesterol that resides in the cell membrane of synapses. With cholesterol's broad involvement in almost all aspects of neurons'

4h

Grass isn't always greener—here's what to plant instead

Environment Lawn gone. Lawnmowers account for 5 percent of our air pollution. And lawn owners use 10 times the amount of pesticides and fertilizers per acre than farmers use on their crops.

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Fixing a broken heart: Exploring new ways to heal damage after a heart attack

The days immediately following a heart attack are critical for survivors' longevity and long-term healing of tissue. Now researchers at Northwestern University and University of California, San Diego have designed a method to deliver a regenerative material through a noninvasive catheter to the affected area of the heart. Once there, the body's inflammatory response signals the peptides to form na

4h

How to Know If You've Met The One

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen, shares 6 ways to know if you’ve met the love of your life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How to Know If You've Met The One

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen, shares 6 ways to know if you’ve met the love of your life — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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First marsquake detected by NASA’s InSight mission

Faint quake is signal of seismicity in martian interior

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When designing clinical trials for Huntington's disease, first ask the experts

Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments. How best to design clinical trials in which HD patients are willing to participate and comply is a question faced by researchers.

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The buzz about bumble bees isn't good

While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees. The good news is that a new study provides an estimate on bumble bee population and distributions across Michigan in the past century. The bad news is that these results are dramatically low, and they mirror what's happening across the Americas, Europe and Asia, too.

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New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care

Researchers have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care.

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How fish brain cells react to Alzheimer's disease

Researchers have studied the regenerative capacity of zebrafish brain in single cell resolution with the aim of developing novel strategies against Alzheimer's.

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Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

Scientists describe a method of rendering the gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 'immunosilent,' potentially allowing the editing and repair of genes to be accomplished reliably and stealthily.

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Good mousekeeping: En suite bathroom makes for happier mice

Mice have a strong preference to nest away from their own waste, new research has found. The study showed that mice who were housed in a system of three interconnected cages used separate cages for nesting and eliminating waste. Typically, laboratories house mice in close proximity with their excrement. The study suggests this compromises their welfare and may also negatively affect research data.

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Study unravels mystery of antimicrobial frog secretions

Japanese scientists have identified the molecular mechanism that gives the skin secretions of a species of frog effective antimicrobial properties. Unraveling the molecular mechanism that facilitates antimicrobial activity of these peptides can help us better understand how the defense system of the frog has evolved, and how this can be used to fight microbial infections of medical importance.

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30 percent off a stand mixer and other sweet deals happening today

Gadgets All the great discounts in one place. PopSci is always on the lookout for today's best deals. Our lists will be updated throughout the day, so check back to see if stumbled upon any awesome new discounts.

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Researchers Discover How a Brainless Slime Can Remember Things

Brain Not Included In 2016, a team of French researchers discovered that a slime mold could not only learn about substances it encountered, but also share its knowledge with other molds despite not having a brain. Now, they think they’ve figured out what gives the organism this unexpected ability — providing us with remarkable new insights into the cognition of brainless organisms. Slimy Study In

4h

European Eels Strew Their Eggs Across 2,000 Km of Ocean

The fish continue to spawn over a large area despite a drop in their numbers, a study finds.

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Greenland's Ice Sheet Was Growing. Now It's in a Terrifying Decline

Greenland's ice sheet has undergone a stunning reversal in the last 46 years, as a meticulous new study documents.

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Information technology can support antimicrobial stewardship programs

The incorporation of information technology (IT) into an antimicrobial stewardship program can help improve efficiency of the interventions and facilitate tracking and reporting of key metrics.

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New way to 'see' objects accelerates the future of self-driving cars

Researchers have discovered a simple, cost-effective, and accurate new method for equipping self-driving cars with the tools needed to perceive 3D objects in their path.

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Experiences of 'ultimate reality' or 'God' confer lasting benefits to mental health

In a survey of thousands of people who reported having experienced personal encounters with God, Johns Hopkins researchers report that more than two-thirds of self-identified atheists shed that label after their encounter, regardless of whether it was spontaneous or while taking a psychedelic.

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New sensor detects rare metals used in smartphones

A more efficient and cost-effective way to detect lanthanides, the rare earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies, could be possible with a new protein-based sensor that changes its fluorescence when it binds to these metals.

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After firings, MD Anderson officials try to calm fears of racial profiling

Investigations “not based on ethnicity,” administrator says at town hall meeting

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Scratching the skin primes the gut for allergic reactions to food, mouse study suggests

Scratching the skin triggers a series of immune responses culminating in an increased number of activated mast cells — immune cells involved in allergic reactions — in the small intestine, according to research conducted in mice. This newly identified skin-gut communication helps illuminate the relationship between food allergy and atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema), a disease characterized by

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Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia

Children may be at a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia when their parents were in sexual contact for less than three years before conceiving them, according to new research.

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Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms

Compounds from elderberries can directly inhibit the virus's entry and replication in human cells, and can help strengthen a person's immune response to the virus.

4h

Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers report on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. In the dysprosium gas these properties are unprecedentedly long-lived. This sets the stage for future investigations into the nature of this exotic phase of matter.

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Distribution of World's First Malaria Vaccine Begins

The World Health Organization and its partners will test the public health effect of immunization in parts of Malawi, Ghana, and Kenya.

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Watch a Tesla Model S Burst Into Flames in a Parking Garage

Fire in Shanghai A CCTV video has been making its rounds on Chinese media since the weekend that shows a Tesla Model S catching fire in a Shanghai parking lot. The car in question first starts to heavily smoke from below, before catching fire in a big ball of light and flame. The exact cause of the fire is still unknown — but the incident illustrates the perils that ubiquitous cameras pose for pr

5h

Scenes From Coachella 2019

Over the past two weekends, the 2019 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival took place in Indio, California. Thousands of music fans gathered to hear performances by artists on multiple stages, including sets by Ariana Grande, Janelle Monáe, Weezer, Billie Eilish, Blackpink, Kid Cudi, Gesaffelstein, Bad Bunny, and many more. Gathered here are scenes from the performances and of the colorful Coa

5h

Girls and boys on autism spectrum tell stories differently, could explain 'missed diagnosis' in girls

A new study from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) examined differences in the way girls and boys on the autism spectrum used certain types of words during storytelling. This study found that autistic girls used significantly more "cognitive process" words such as "think" and "know" than autistic boys, despite comparable autism symptom severity.

5h

Carbon dioxide from Silicon Valley affects the chemistry of Monterey Bay

Elevated concentrations of carbon dioxide in air flowing out to sea from Silicon Valley and the Salinas Valley could increase the amount of carbon dioxide dissolving in Monterey Bay waters by about 20 percent.

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CU School of Medicine scientist helps create international database of women scientists

A database of women scientists that was created a year ago by a team led by a CU School of Medicine postdoctoral fellow has grown to list more than 7,500 women and is featured in an article published today in PLOS Biology. The 'Request a Woman Scientist' database was created to address concerns that women's scientific expertise is often excluded at professional gatherings.

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Calcium deficiency in cells due to ORAI1 gene mutation leads to damaged tooth enamel

A mutation in the ORAI1 gene — studied in a human patient and mice — leads to a loss of calcium in enamel cells and results in defective dental enamel mineralization, finds a study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry.

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Shining light on rare nerve tumors illuminates a fresh path for fighting cancer

A discovery about the rare nerve disease NF2 suggests that targeting mechanical signaling between cells could become another weapon against many forms of cancer. Findings published online in Science Signaling were led by experts at Cincinnati Children's.

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Texting to improve health outcomes for people with schizophrenia

Texting patients with schizophrenia and their lay health supporters in a resource-poor community setting is more effective than a free-medicine program alone in improving medication adherence and reducing relapses and re-hospitalizations, according to a study published April 23 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Wenjie Gong of Central South University in Hunan, China, Dong (Roman) Xu of S

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Low socioeconomic position associated with worse care at the end of life

In high-income countries, people with low socioeconomic position are more likely to receive poor quality end of life care and die in hospital, according to a large meta-analysis by Joanna Davies of King's College London, UK, and colleagues, published this week in PLOS Medicine.

5h

Don't Praise the Sri Lankan Government for Blocking Facebook

Social media can provide vital information in a crisis, and there's evidence that blocking it does more harm than good.

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US Airports Will Scan 97% of Outbound Flyers’ Faces Within 4 Years

Airport Screening If you board a flight out of the United States four years from now, chances are the government is going to scan your face — an ambitious timeline that has privacy experts reeling. That’s according to a recent Department of Homeland Security report , which says that U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) plans to dramatically expand its Biometric Exit program to cover 97 percen

5h

Researchers see health effects across generations from popular weed killer

Researchers have found a variety of diseases and other health problems in the second- and third-generation offspring of rats exposed to glyphosate, the world's most popular weed killer. In the first study of its kind, the researchers saw descendants of exposed rats developing prostate, kidney and ovarian diseases, obesity and birth abnormalities.

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How light triggers brain activity

Optogenetics uses light to control brain processes. It is based on light-controlled proteins such as channelrhodopsin-2, an ion channel that opens when it's exposed to light, thus activating cellular processes. The researchers have now shed light on its mode of action.

5h

How lifestyle affects our genes

In the past decade, knowledge of how lifestyle affects our genes, a research field called epigenetics, has grown exponentially. Researchers have summarized the state of scientific knowledge within epigenetics linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes.

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Devil rays may have unknown birthing zone

The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays tangled in fishing nets in a village along Mexico's Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters, a study suggests. If more research confirms the possibility, the zone should be protected and placed off limits to fishing during times each spring when pregnant rays migrate there.

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People with happy spouses may live longer

Research suggests that having a happy spouse leads to a longer marriage, and now study results show that it's associated with a longer life, too.

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Playing video games generally not harmful to boys' social development

A new longitudinal study conducted in Norway looked at how playing video games affects the social skills of 6- to 12-year-olds. It found that playing the games affected youth differently by age and gender, but that generally speaking, gaming was not associated with social development.

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Scientists create international database of women scientists

A database of women scientists that was created a year ago by a team led by a CU School of Medicine postdoctoral fellow has grown to list more than 7,500 women and is featured in an article published today in PLOS Biology.

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A Revised CAR T for Lymphoma Has Fewer Side Effects

An early-stage clinical study finds that none of the 25 patients treated developed neurotoxicity or cytokine release syndrome, common hazards of the cancer immunotherapy.

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Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation

submitted by /u/-Hastis- [link] [comments]

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Kræftpatienter skjuler alternativ medicin for lægen: Det kan få konsekvenser for behandlingen

Naturmedicin kan for eksempel nedsætte virkningen af strålebehandling og kemoterapi.

5h

SpaceX Won’t Admit That Its Crew Capsule Exploded

Explosive Situation Sometimes, when you fill a small metal capsule with rocket fuel, it will explode . That’s what appears to have happened this past weekend when SpaceX attempted a static test of its Dragon 2 capsule. “Crew Dragon capsule explodes,” wrote Scientific American . Business Insider called it a “large explosion.” Quartz said that it “blew up.” There’s even a grainy video of the test t

5h

Three in four female physics undergrads report sexual harassment

Mistreatment may help explain low number of women obtaining physics degrees

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Bumble bees see huge population decline

An estimate of bumble bee population and distribution shows that half of the species studied have seen a more than 50 percent decline. For the study, which appears in Ecology , researchers compared current distributions of bumble bee species across Michigan to information they gleaned from museum specimens collected as far back as the 1880s. While the findings are specific to the state of Michiga

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‘Recycling truck’ delivers gene to get bacteria through hard times

Scientists have captured the first “snapshot” of two proteins involved in delivering a bacterial stress-response master regulator to the cell’s recycling machinery. The team found that RssB—a protein that specifically recognizes the master regulator and delivers it to the recycling machinery somewhat like a recycling truck—forms a compact structure with a factor that inhibits RssB activity. DNA d

5h

Trump’s London Visit Will Bring More of the Same

Donald Trump is coming back to Britain—this time, at the invitation of Queen Elizabeth II. On Tuesday, Buckingham Palace announced that the American president would be returning to the United Kingdom in June for a three-day state visit, which will include a commemoration of the 75th anniversary of D-Day. The long-anticipated visit comes less than a year after Trump’s first to the U.K. as presiden

5h

Study finds that quitting smoking during pregnancy lowers risk of preterm births

A new study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth.

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When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts

Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments. How best to design clinical trials in which HD patients are willing to participate and comply is a question faced by researchers.

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Starting in July, any Kohl’s store will handle your Amazon returns

Amazon and Kohl’s are expanding their partnership that allows customers of the former to return their items to the latter’s retail stores. Beginning in July, Kohl’s will take back …

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Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home

Researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of Bacteroides fragilis, one of the most prevalent bacteria found in humans' large intestines. In a new paper, the authors describe how the common gut microbe adapts and evolves within individuals as well as across Western versus Eastern cultures.

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Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

A new method renders the gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 'immunosilent,' potentially allowing the editing and repair of genes to be accomplished reliably and stealthily.

6h

Reducing Climate Change by Making it Less Abstract

Psychology offers a strategy to meet the threat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Researchers devise a progression risk-based classification for patients with AWM

Researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have devised a risk model for determining whether patients with AWM have a low, intermediate, or high risk of developing symptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

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Advances in cryo-EM materials may aid cancer and biomedical research

Cryogenic-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has been a game changer in the field of medical research, but the substrate, used to freeze and view samples under a microscope, has not advanced much in decades. Now, thanks to a collaboration between Penn State researchers and the applied science company Protochips, Inc., this is no longer the case.

6h

The Fun and Frustration of Rooting for Lizzo

The Minneapolis-bred rapper, singer, and flutist Lizzo is proud to do things “Like a Girl.” The breezy empowerment anthem appears on her new album, Cuz I Love You , with a pre-chorus that sounds as though it were written solely to soundtrack the plush pink changing rooms of the Wing: “ Sugar, spice, and I’m nice / Show me what you’re made of / Crazy, sexy, cool, baby / With or without makeup .” “

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Reducing Climate Change by Making it Less Abstract

Psychology offers a strategy to meet the threat — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Engineered virus to be tested as treatment for incurable cancers

People with incurable melanomas and brain or breast cancers are to receive injections of genetically modified viruses that may shrink their tumours

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Arctic warming will accelerate climate change and impact global economy

Carbon released into the atmosphere by the increasing loss of Arctic permafrost, combined with higher solar absorption by the Earth's surface due to the melting of sea ice and land snow, will accelerate climate change — and have a multi-trillion dollar impact on the world economy.

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Feces transplantation: Effective treatment with economic benefits

From an average of 37 days in hospital to just 20 days per year. So pronounced is the decrease in hospitalizations for patients who are treated with feces transplantation instead of antibiotics to fight the deadly intestinal disease Clostridium difficile. This is shown by the first study using what is known as 'real world data.'

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Study: Drugs reprogram genes in breast tumors to prevent endocrine resistance

Treating breast tumors with two cancer drugs simultaneously may prevent endocrine resistance by attacking the disease along two separate gene pathways, scientists at the University of Illinois found in a new study. The two drugs used in the study, selinexor and 4-OHT, caused the cancer cells to die and tumors to regress for prolonged periods.

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FAA paves way for Alphabet unit to make first U.S. drone deliveries

Alphabet Inc's Wing Aviation unit on Tuesday got the okay to start delivering goods by drone in Virginia later this year, making the sister unit of search engine Google the first company to …

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Google Drone Delivery Gets First FAA Clearance

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Strongly agree: The number of response options matter when using a Likert Scale

Researchers often tweak the number of response options in the traditional five-point Likert Scale with little empirical justification for doing so. Now a psychologist has tested the test. Leonard Simms says 'six appears to be the magic number' of responses.

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Auroral 'speed bumps' are more complicated, scientists find

Researchers find that 'speed bumps' in space, which can slow down satellites orbiting closer to Earth, are more complex than originally thought.

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'Marsquake': first tremor detected on Red Planet

Scientists said Tuesday they might have detected the first known seismic tremor on Mars in a discovery that could shed light on the ancient origins of Earth's neighbour.

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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Snapshot of asteroid-induced mass extinction in North Dakota Left: Thin-section photomicrograph of shocked mineral from the Tanis Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary. Right: Micro-computed tomography of ejecta spherule, digitally dissected to reveal core of unaltered impact-melt glass. The Chicxulub crater in Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula bears witness to a cataclysmic asteroid impact in the…

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Speaking of gender bias [Editorials]

A lot can be learned about the history of science in America from browsing through the front matter of PNAS across its 104-year history. You’d have to look through 73 volumes, for example, before coming across the name of the first distaff editor-in-chief. In 1985, molecular biologist Maxine Singer became…

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Rainfall recycling needs to be considered in defining limits to the world’s green water resources [Physical Sciences]

In PNAS, Schyns et al.’s (1) analysis of the limits to the world’s green water resources starts from the commonly made assumption that rainfall is an independent, exogenously determined variable, not influenced by anthropogenic land cover change. An increasing body of research now suggests that this is incorrect (2). It…

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Reply to van Noordwijk and Ellison: Moisture recycling: Key to assess hydrological impacts of land cover changes, but not to quantify water allocation to competing demands [Physical Sciences]

Moisture recycling—the contribution of evapotranspiration (ET) in a certain area to precipitation in the same area—can be substantial (1), particularly in forests (2). Land cover changes can affect local ET and, consequentially, local precipitation (3, 4). We agree with van Noordwijk and Ellison (5) that moisture recycling on land is…

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Demography and destiny: The syngameon in hyperdiverse systems [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Levi et al. (1) argue that near-neighbor exclusion zones of conspecifics suffice to maintain tropical biodiversity. Their argument, while supported by computer simulations, does not consider (i) the influence that demographic processes may have on species survival or (ii) the phylogenetic distribution of diversity found in tropical systems….

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Reply to Cannon and Lerdau: Maintenance of tropical forest tree diversity [Biological Sciences]

We thank Cannon and Lerdau (1) for their interest in our article (2) and for raising several related issues. At the outset, they express doubt that the Janzen–Connell mechanism is “sufficient for the long-term maintenance of diversity.” The statement is made without reference to any feature of our model and…

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Advances in understanding the long-term population decline of monarch butterflies [Population Biology]

Monarch butterflies are an icon of nature: spectacular in form, known for their unfathomable annual migration, and frequent visitors in our backyards (Fig. 1). It is no wonder they are a darling among invertebrates. And what has now captured our attention is the striking and precipitous decline of monarch populations…

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Radiocarbon dating the end of urban services in a late Roman town [Anthropology]

The fall of the Roman Empire was a much bigger deal than a generalissimo’s deposition in 476 CE of Romulus Augustus (a child puppet ruling the empire’s impoverished western half), an event memorized by generations of high schoolers. Recent research has uncovered a big, complex story that still features barbarian…

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Shedding light into memories under circadian rhythm system control [Neuroscience]

The biological clock is the complex mechanism that regulates the cyclical repetition of many biological functions alternating between day and night. These functions are regulated by the clock genes and through the interaction with synchronizing stimuli that align the endogenous rhythm (determined biologically and genetically) with day/night alternation. In this…

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A seismically induced onshore surge deposit at the KPg boundary, North Dakota [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The most immediate effects of the terminal-Cretaceous Chicxulub impact, essential to understanding the global-scale environmental and biotic collapses that mark the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction, are poorly resolved despite extensive previous work. Here, we help to resolve this by describing a rapidly emplaced, high-energy onshore surge deposit from the terrestrial Hell Creek…

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Gasification of coal and biomass as a net carbon-negative power source for environment-friendly electricity generation in China [Environmental Sciences]

Realizing the goal of the Paris Agreement to limit global warming to 2 °C by the end of this century will most likely require deployment of carbon-negative technologies. It is particularly important that China, as the world’s top carbon emitter, avoids being locked into carbon-intensive, coal-fired power-generation technologies and undertakes…

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Molecular design of self-coacervation phenomena in block polyampholytes [Physics]

Coacervation is a common phenomenon in natural polymers and has been applied to synthetic materials systems for coatings, adhesives, and encapsulants. Single-component coacervates are formed when block polyampholytes exhibit self-coacervation, phase separating into a dense liquid coacervate phase rich in the polyampholyte coexisting with a dilute supernatant phase, a process…

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Ancient trash mounds unravel urban collapse a century before the end of Byzantine hegemony in the southern Levant [Anthropology]

The historic event of the Late Antique Little Ice Age (LALIA) was recently identified in dozens of natural and geological climate proxies of the northern hemisphere. Although this climatic downturn was proposed as a major cause for pandemic and extensive societal upheavals in the sixth–seventh centuries CE, archaeological evidence for…

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The criminogenic and psychological effects of police stops on adolescent black and Latino boys [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Proactive policing, the strategic targeting of people or places to prevent crimes, is a well-studied tactic that is ubiquitous in modern law enforcement. A 2017 National Academies of Sciences report reviewed existing literature, entrenched in deterrence theory, and found evidence that proactive policing strategies can reduce crime. The existing literature,…

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Daisy-chain gene drives for the alteration of local populations [Applied Biological Sciences]

If they are able to spread in wild populations, CRISPR-based gene-drive elements would provide new ways to address ecological problems by altering the traits of wild organisms, but the potential for uncontrolled spread tremendously complicates ethical development and use. Here, we detail a self-exhausting form of CRISPR-based drive system comprising…

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Rational conversion of chromophore selectivity of cyanobacteriochromes to accept mammalian intrinsic biliverdin [Biochemistry]

Because cyanobacteriochrome photoreceptors need only a single compact domain for chromophore incorporation and for absorption of visible spectra including the long-wavelength far-red region, these molecules have been paid much attention for application to bioimaging and optogenetics. Most cyanobacteriochromes, however, have a drawback to incorporate phycocyanobilin that is not available in…

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Genome-wide effects on Escherichia coli transcription from ppGpp binding to its two sites on RNA polymerase [Biochemistry]

The second messenger nucleotide ppGpp dramatically alters gene expression in bacteria to adjust cellular metabolism to nutrient availability. ppGpp binds to two sites on RNA polymerase (RNAP) in Escherichia coli, but it has also been reported to bind to many other proteins. To determine the role of the RNAP binding…

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Myosin Va transport of liposomes in three-dimensional actin networks is modulated by actin filament density, position, and polarity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The cell’s dense 3D actin filament network presents numerous challenges to vesicular transport by teams of myosin Va (MyoVa) molecular motors. These teams must navigate their cargo through diverse actin structures ranging from Arp2/3-branched lamellipodial networks to the dense, unbranched cortical networks. To define how actin filament network organization affects…

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Photocycle-dependent conformational changes in the proteorhodopsin cross-protomer Asp-His-Trp triad revealed by DNP-enhanced MAS-NMR [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Proteorhodopsin (PR) is a highly abundant, pentameric, light-driven proton pump. Proton transfer is linked to a canonical photocycle typical for microbial ion pumps. Although the PR monomer is able to undergo a full photocycle, the question arises whether the pentameric complex formed in the membrane via specific cross-protomer interactions plays…

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Extreme mechanical diversity of human telomeric DNA revealed by fluorescence-force spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

G-quadruplexes (GQs) can adopt diverse structures and are functionally implicated in transcription, replication, translation, and maintenance of telomere. Their conformational diversity under physiological levels of mechanical stress, however, is poorly understood. We used single-molecule fluorescence-force spectroscopy that combines fluorescence resonance energy transfer with optical tweezers to

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Stabilization of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains by small molecules [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

In Ig light-chain (LC) amyloidosis (AL), the unique antibody LC protein that is secreted by monoclonal plasma cells in each patient misfolds and/or aggregates, a process leading to organ degeneration. As a step toward developing treatments for AL patients with substantial cardiac involvement who have difficulty tolerating existing chemotherapy regimens,…

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Structural basis for auxiliary subunit KCTD16 regulation of the GABAB receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Metabotropic GABAB receptors mediate a significant fraction of inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Native GABAB receptor complexes contain the principal subunits GABAB1 and GABAB2, which form an obligate heterodimer, and auxiliary subunits, known as potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing proteins (KCTDs). KCTDs interact with GABAB receptors and modify the kinetics of…

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Oncogenic PIK3CA promotes cellular stemness in an allele dose-dependent manner [Cell Biology]

The PIK3CA gene, which encodes the p110α catalytic subunit of PI3 kinase (PI3K), is mutationally activated in cancer and in overgrowth disorders known as PIK3CA-related overgrowth spectrum (PROS). To determine the consequences of genetic PIK3CA activation in a developmental context of relevance to both PROS and cancer, we engineered isogenic…

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Mechanistic basis for impaired ferroptosis in cells expressing the African-centric S47 variant of p53 [Cell Biology]

A population-restricted single-nucleotide coding region polymorphism (SNP) at codon 47 exists in the human TP53 gene (P47S, hereafter P47 and S47). In studies aimed at identifying functional differences between these variants, we found that the African-specific S47 variant associates with an impaired response to agents that induce the oxidative stress-dependent,…

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Prostaglandin signaling regulates renal multiciliated cell specification and maturation [Developmental Biology]

Multiciliated cells (MCCs) are specialized epithelia with apical bundles of motile cilia that direct fluid flow. MCC dysfunction is associated with human diseases of the respiratory, reproductive, and central nervous systems. Further, the appearance of renal MCCs has been cataloged in several kidney conditions, where their function is unknown. Despite…

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Sexual conflict drives male manipulation of female postmating responses in Drosophila melanogaster [Evolution]

In many animals, females respond to mating with changes in physiology and behavior that are triggered by molecules transferred by males during mating. In Drosophila melanogaster, proteins in the seminal fluid are responsible for important female postmating responses, including temporal changes in egg production, elevated feeding rates and activity levels,…

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Immune tolerance in multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica with peptide-loaded tolerogenic dendritic cells in a phase 1b trial [Medical Sciences]

There are adaptive T-cell and antibody autoimmune responses to myelin-derived peptides in multiple sclerosis (MS) and to aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSDs). Strategies aimed at antigen-specific tolerance to these autoantigens are thus indicated for these diseases. One approach involves induction of tolerance with engineered dendritic cells (tolDCs)…

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Conserved serum protein biomarkers associated with growing early colorectal adenomas [Medical Sciences]

A major challenge for the reduction of colon cancer is to detect patients carrying high-risk premalignant adenomas with minimally invasive testing. As one step, we have addressed the feasibility of detecting protein signals in the serum of patients carrying an adenoma as small as 6–9 mm in maximum linear dimension….

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Chemosynthetic symbiont with a drastically reduced genome serves as primary energy storage in the marine flatworm Paracatenula [Microbiology]

Hosts of chemoautotrophic bacteria typically have much higher biomass than their symbionts and consume symbiont cells for nutrition. In contrast to this, chemoautotrophic Candidatus Riegeria symbionts in mouthless Paracatenula flatworms comprise up to half of the biomass of the consortium. Each species of Paracatenula harbors a specific Ca. Riegeria, and…

7h

Widespread soil bacterium that oxidizes atmospheric methane [Microbiology]

The global atmospheric level of methane (CH4), the second most important greenhouse gas, is currently increasing by ∼10 million tons per year. Microbial oxidation in unsaturated soils is the only known biological process that removes CH4 from the atmosphere, but so far, bacteria that can grow on atmospheric CH4 have…

7h

Biosynthesis and secretion of the microbial sulfated peptide RaxX and binding to the rice XA21 immune receptor [Microbiology]

The rice immune receptor XA21 is activated by the sulfated microbial peptide required for activation of XA21-mediated immunity X (RaxX) produced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo). Mutational studies and targeted proteomics revealed that the RaxX precursor peptide (proRaxX) is processed and secreted by the protease/transporter RaxB, the function of…

7h

Ebolavirus polymerase uses an unconventional genome replication mechanism [Microbiology]

Most nonsegmented negative strand (NNS) RNA virus genomes have complementary 3′ and 5′ terminal nucleotides because the promoters at the 3′ ends of the genomes and antigenomes are almost identical to each other. However, according to published sequences, both ends of ebolavirus genomes show a high degree of variability, and…

7h

Streptococcus gordonii programs epithelial cells to resist ZEB2 induction by Porphyromonas gingivalis [Microbiology]

The polymicrobial microbiome of the oral cavity is a direct precursor of periodontal diseases, and changes in microhabitat or shifts in microbial composition may also be linked to oral squamous cell carcinoma. Dysbiotic oral epithelial responses provoked by individual organisms, and which underlie these diseases, are widely studied. However, organisms…

7h

Fast and robust active neuron segmentation in two-photon calcium imaging using spatiotemporal deep learning [Neuroscience]

Calcium imaging records large-scale neuronal activity with cellular resolution in vivo. Automated, fast, and reliable active neuron segmentation is a critical step in the analysis workflow of utilizing neuronal signals in real-time behavioral studies for discovery of neuronal coding properties. Here, to exploit the full spatiotemporal information in two-photon calcium…

7h

Childhood trauma history is linked to abnormal brain connectivity in major depression [Neuroscience]

Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) present with heterogeneous symptom profiles, while neurobiological mechanisms are still largely unknown. Brain network studies consistently report disruptions of resting-state networks (RSNs) in patients with MDD, including hypoconnectivity in the frontoparietal network (FPN), hyperconnectivity in the default mode network (DMN), and increased connectio

7h

Chronic psychosocial stress compromises the immune response and endochondral ossification during bone fracture healing via {beta}-AR signaling [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Chronic psychosocial stress/trauma represents an increasing burden in our modern society and a risk factor for the development of mental disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD, in turn, is highly comorbid with a plethora of inflammatory disorders and has been associated with increased bone fracture risk. Since a balanced…

7h

Underwater ritual offerings in the Island of the Sun and the formation of the Tiwanaku state [Anthropology]

Considerable debate surrounds the economic, political, and ideological systems that constitute primary state formation. Theoretical and empirical research emphasize the role of religion as a significant institution for promoting the consolidation and reproduction of archaic states. The Tiwanaku state developed in the Lake Titicaca Basin between the 5th and 12th…

7h

Complete biosynthetic pathways of ascofuranone and ascochlorin in Acremonium egyptiacum [Applied Biological Sciences]

Ascofuranone (AF) and ascochlorin (AC) are meroterpenoids produced by various filamentous fungi, including Acremonium egyptiacum (synonym: Acremonium sclerotigenum), and exhibit diverse physiological activities. In particular, AF is a promising drug candidate against African trypanosomiasis and a potential anticancer lead compound. These compounds are supposedly biosynthesized through farnesylatio

7h

Rigidity percolation and geometric information in floppy origami [Applied Physical Sciences]

Origami structures with a large number of excess folds are capable of storing distinguishable geometric states that are energetically equivalent. As the number of excess folds is reduced, the system has fewer equivalent states and can eventually become rigid. We quantify this transition from a floppy to a rigid state…

7h

TePhe, a tellurium-containing phenylalanine mimic, allows monitoring of protein synthesis in vivo with mass cytometry [Biochemistry]

Protein synthesis is central to maintaining cellular homeostasis and its study is critical to understanding the function and dysfunction of eukaryotic systems. Here we report L-2-tellurienylalanine (TePhe) as a noncanonical amino acid for direct measurement of protein synthesis. TePhe is synthetically accessible, nontoxic, stable under biological conditions, and the tellurium…

7h

Mechanism mediated by a noncoding RNA, nc886, in the cytotoxicity of a DNA-reactive compound [Biochemistry]

DNA-reactive compounds are harnessed for cancer chemotherapy. Their genotoxic effects are considered to be the main mechanism for the cytotoxicity to date. Because this mechanism preferentially affects actively proliferating cells, it is postulated that the cytotoxicity is specific to cancer cells. Nonetheless, they do harm normal quiescent cells, suggesting that…

7h

Histone H3 tail binds a unique sensing pocket in EZH2 to activate the PRC2 methyltransferase [Biochemistry]

Enhancer of Zeste Homolog 2 (EZH2) is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2), the enzyme that catalyzes monomethylation, dimethylation, and trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27). Trimethylation at H3K27 (H3K27me3) is associated with transcriptional silencing of developmentally important genes. Intriguingly, H3K27me3 is mutually exclusive with…

7h

Measuring the average shape of transition paths during the folding of a single biological molecule [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Transition paths represent the parts of a reaction where the energy barrier separating products and reactants is crossed. They are essential to understanding reaction mechanisms, yet many of their properties remain unstudied. Here, we report measurements of the average shape of transition paths, studying the folding of DNA hairpins as…

7h

Structural basis for ligand modulation of the CCR2 conformational landscape [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) is a part of the chemokine receptor family, an important class of therapeutic targets. These class A G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in mammalian signaling pathways and control cell migration toward endogenous CC chemokine ligands, named for the adjacent cysteine motif on their N…

7h

Ultrafast folding kinetics of WW domains reveal how the amino acid sequence determines the speed limit to protein folding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Protein (un)folding rates depend on the free-energy barrier separating the native and unfolded states and a prefactor term, which sets the timescale for crossing such barrier or folding speed limit. Because extricating these two factors is usually unfeasible, it has been common to assume a constant prefactor and assign all…

7h

Relative interfacial cleavage energetics of protein complexes revealed by surface collisions [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

To fulfill their biological functions, proteins must interact with their specific binding partners and often function as large assemblies composed of multiple proteins or proteins plus other biomolecules. Structural characterization of these complexes, including identification of all binding partners, their relative binding affinities, and complex topology, is integral for understanding…

7h

Synergy of topoisomerase and structural-maintenance-of-chromosomes proteins creates a universal pathway to simplify genome topology [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Topological entanglements severely interfere with important biological processes. For this reason, genomes must be kept unknotted and unlinked during most of a cell cycle. Type II topoisomerase (TopoII) enzymes play an important role in this process but the precise mechanisms yielding systematic disentanglement of DNA in vivo are not clear….

7h

Structural insights into unique features of the human mitochondrial ribosome recycling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Mammalian mitochondrial ribosomes (mitoribosomes) are responsible for synthesizing proteins that are essential for oxidative phosphorylation (ATP generation). Despite their common ancestry with bacteria, the composition and structure of the human mitoribosome and its translational factors are significantly different from those of their bacterial counterparts. The mammalian mitoribosome recycling f

7h

pH dependence, kinetics and light-harvesting regulation of nonphotochemical quenching in Chlamydomonas [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Sunlight drives photosynthesis but can also cause photodamage. To protect themselves, photosynthetic organisms dissipate the excess absorbed energy as heat, in a process known as nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). In green algae, diatoms, and mosses, NPQ depends on the light-harvesting complex stress-related (LHCSR) proteins. Here we investigated NPQ in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii…

7h

Blind tests of RNA-protein binding affinity prediction [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Interactions between RNA and proteins are pervasive in biology, driving fundamental processes such as protein translation and participating in the regulation of gene expression. Modeling the energies of RNA–protein interactions is therefore critical for understanding and repurposing living systems but has been hindered by complexities unique to RNA–protein binding. Here,…

7h

Light-heat conversion dynamics in highly diversified water-dispersed hydrophobic nanocrystal assemblies [Chemistry]

We investigate, with a combination of ultrafast optical spectroscopy and semiclassical modeling, the photothermal properties of various water-soluble nanocrystal assemblies. Broadband pump–probe experiments with ∼100-fs time resolution in the visible and near infrared reveal a complex scenario for their transient optical response that is dictated by their hybrid composition at…

7h

Rational design of an argon-binding superelectrophilic anion [Chemistry]

Chemically binding to argon (Ar) at room temperature has remained the privilege of the most reactive electrophiles, all of which are cationic (or even dicationic) in nature. Herein, we report a concept for the rational design of anionic superelectrophiles that are composed of a strong electrophilic center firmly embedded in…

7h

Imaging the Renner-Teller effect using laser-induced electron diffraction [Chemistry]

Structural information on electronically excited neutral molecules can be indirectly retrieved, largely through pump–probe and rotational spectroscopy measurements with the aid of calculations. Here, we demonstrate the direct structural retrieval of neutral carbonyl disulfide (CS2) in the B∼1B2 excited electronic state using laser-induced electron diffraction (LIED). We unambiguously identify the.

7h

Quintet-triplet mixing determines the fate of the multiexciton state produced by singlet fission in a terrylenediimide dimer at room temperature [Chemistry]

Singlet fission (SF) is a photophysical process in which one of two adjacent organic molecules absorbs a single photon, resulting in rapid formation of a correlated triplet pair (T1T1) state whose spin dynamics influence the successful generation of uncorrelated triplets (T1). Femtosecond transient visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of a…

7h

CAP2 deficiency delays myofibril actin cytoskeleton differentiation and disturbs skeletal muscle architecture and function [Developmental Biology]

Actin filaments (F-actin) are key components of sarcomeres, the basic contractile units of skeletal muscle myofibrils. A crucial step during myofibril differentiation is the sequential exchange of α-actin isoforms from smooth muscle (α-SMA) and cardiac (α-CAA) to skeletal muscle α-actin (α-SKA) that, in mice, occurs during early postnatal life. This…

7h

Untangling posterior growth and segmentation by analyzing mechanisms of axis elongation in hemichordates [Developmental Biology]

The trunk is a key feature of the bilaterian body plan. Despite spectacular morphological diversity in bilaterian trunk anatomies, most insights into trunk development are from segmented taxa, namely arthropods and chordates. Mechanisms of posterior axis elongation (PAE) and segmentation are tightly coupled in arthropods and vertebrates, making it challenging…

7h

Pore condensation and freezing is responsible for ice formation below water saturation for porous particles [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Ice nucleation in the atmosphere influences cloud properties, altering precipitation and the radiative balance, ultimately regulating Earth’s climate. An accepted ice nucleation pathway, known as deposition nucleation, assumes a direct transition of water from the vapor to the ice phase, without an intermediate liquid phase. However, studies have shown that…

7h

Phylogenetic, functional, and taxonomic richness have both positive and negative effects on ecosystem multifunctionality [Ecology]

Biodiversity encompasses multiple attributes such as the richness and abundance of species (taxonomic diversity), the presence of different evolutionary lineages (phylogenetic diversity), and the variety of growth forms and resource use strategies (functional diversity). These biodiversity attributes do not necessarily relate to each other and may have contrasting effects on…

7h

Propagation of pop ups in kirigami shells [Engineering]

Kirigami-inspired metamaterials are attracting increasing interest because of their ability to achieve extremely large strains and shape changes via out-of-plane buckling. While in flat kirigami sheets, the ligaments buckle simultaneously as Euler columns, leading to a continuous phase transition; here, we demonstrate that kirigami shells can also support discontinuous phase…

7h

Systems thinking as a pathway to global warming beliefs and attitudes through an ecological worldview [Environmental Sciences]

Prior research has found that systems thinking, the tendency to perceive phenomena as interconnected and dynamic, is associated with a general proenvironmental orientation. However, less is known about its relationship with public understanding of climate change and/or whether this relationship varies across people with different political views. Because climate change…

7h

Genomic evidence of survival near ice sheet margins for some, but not all, North American trees [Evolution]

Temperate species experienced dramatic range reductions during the Last Glacial Maximum, yet refugial populations from which modern populations are descended have never been precisely located. Climate-based models identify only broad areas of potential habitat, traditional phylogeographic studies provide poor spatial resolution, and pollen records for temperate forest communities are difficult…

7h

Prediction and identification of recurrent genomic rearrangements that generate chimeric chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Genetics]

Genomes are dynamic structures. Different mechanisms participate in the generation of genomic rearrangements. One of them is nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR). This rearrangement is generated by recombination between pairs of repeated sequences with high identity. We analyzed rearrangements mediated by repeated sequences located in different chromosomes. Such rearrangements generate chime

7h

Differential expression of human tRNA genes drives the abundance of tRNA-derived fragments [Genetics]

The human genome encodes hundreds of transfer RNA (tRNA) genes but their individual contribution to the tRNA pool is not fully understood. Deep sequencing of tRNA transcripts (tRNA-Seq) can estimate tRNA abundance at single gene resolution, but tRNA structures and posttranscriptional modifications impair these analyses. Here we present a bioinformatics…

7h

Bootstrapping variables in algebraic circuits [Mathematics]

We show that for the blackbox polynomial identity testing (PIT) problem it suffices to study circuits that depend only on the first extremely few variables. One needs only to consider size-s degree-s circuits that depend on the first log○c s variables (where c is a constant and composes a logarithm…

7h

VSMC-specific EP4 deletion exacerbates angiotensin II-induced aortic dissection by increasing vascular inflammation and blood pressure [Medical Sciences]

Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) plays an important role in vascular homeostasis. Its receptor, E-prostanoid receptor 4 (EP4) is essential for physiological remodeling of the ductus arteriosus (DA). However, the role of EP4 in pathological vascular remodeling remains largely unknown. We found that chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion of mice with vascular…

7h

Inhibitors of the Neisseria meningitidis PilF ATPase provoke type IV pilus disassembly [Microbiology]

Despite the availability of antibiotics and vaccines, Neisseria meningitidis remains a major cause of meningitis and sepsis in humans. Due to its extracellular lifestyle, bacterial adhesion to host cells constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. Here, we present a high-throughput microscopy-based approach that allowed the identification of compounds able to decrease…

7h

Epidermal growth factor receptor is a host-entry cofactor triggering hepatitis B virus internalization [Microbiology]

Sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) is a host cell receptor required for hepatitis B virus (HBV) entry. However, the susceptibility of NTCP-expressing cells to HBV is diverse depending on the culture condition. Stimulation with epidermal growth factor (EGF) was found to potentiate cell susceptibility to HBV infection. Here, we show…

7h

Regenerative therapy based on miRNA-302 mimics for enhancing host recovery from pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae [Microbiology]

Bacterial pneumonia remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A defining feature of pneumonia is lung injury, leading to protracted suffering and vulnerability long after bacterial clearance. Little is known about which cells are damaged during bacterial pneumonia and if the regenerative process can be harnessed to promote…

7h

Klebsiella and Providencia emerge as lone survivors following long-term starvation of oral microbiota [Microbiology]

It is well-understood that many bacteria have evolved to survive catastrophic events using a variety of mechanisms, which include expression of stress-response genes, quiescence, necrotrophy, and metabolic advantages obtained through mutation. However, the dynamics of individuals leveraging these abilities to gain a competitive advantage in an ecologically complex setting remain…

7h

Optogenetic reactivation of memory ensembles in the retrosplenial cortex induces systems consolidation [Neuroscience]

The neural circuits underlying memory change over prolonged periods after learning, in a process known as systems consolidation. Postlearning spontaneous reactivation of memory-related neural ensembles is thought to mediate this process, although a causal link has not been established. Here we test this hypothesis in mice by using optogenetics to…

7h

Superhydrophobic frictions [Physics]

Contrasting with its sluggish behavior on standard solids, water is extremely mobile on superhydrophobic materials, as shown, for instance, by the continuous acceleration of drops on tilted water-repellent leaves. For much longer substrates, however, drops reach a terminal velocity that results from a balance between weight and friction, allowing us…

7h

Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-gated K+ channels form and break interactions with membrane lipids during each gating cycle [Physiology]

Membrane depolarization and intracellular Ca2+ promote activation of the large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-gated (Slo1) big potassium (BK) channel. We examined the physical interactions that stabilize the closed and open conformations of the ion conduction gate of the human Slo1 channel using electrophysiological and computational approaches. The results show that the…

7h

EXPANSIN A1-mediated radial swelling of pericycle cells positions anticlinal cell divisions during lateral root initiation [Plant Biology]

In plants, postembryonic formation of new organs helps shape the adult organism. This requires the tight regulation of when and where a new organ is formed and a coordination of the underlying cell divisions. To build a root system, new lateral roots are continuously developing, and this process requires the…

7h

PCH1 regulates light, temperature, and circadian signaling as a structural component of phytochrome B-photobodies in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The members of the phytochrome (phy) family of bilin-containing photoreceptors are major regulators of plant photomorphogenesis through their unique ability to photointerconvert between a biologically inactive red light-absorbing Pr state and an active far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. While the initial steps in Pfr signaling are unclear, an early event for…

7h

Multiscale seasonal factors drive the size of winter monarch colonies [Population Biology]

Monarch butterflies in eastern North America have declined by 84% on Mexican wintering grounds since the observed peak in 1996. However, coarse-scale population indices from northern US breeding grounds do not show a consistent downward trend. This discrepancy has led to speculation that autumn migration may be a critical limiting…

7h

Racial disparities in school-based disciplinary actions are associated with county-level rates of racial bias [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

There are substantial gaps in educational outcomes between black and white students in the United States. Recently, increased attention has focused on differences in the rates at which black and white students are disciplined, finding that black students are more likely to be seen as problematic and more likely to…

7h

Biased competition in the absence of input bias revealed through corticostriatal computation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Classical accounts of biased competition require an input bias to resolve the competition between neuronal ensembles driving downstream processing. However, flexible and reliable selection of behaviorally relevant ensembles can occur with unbiased stimulation: striatal D1 and D2 spiny projection neurons (SPNs) receive balanced cortical input, yet their activity determines the…

7h

Locus coeruleus toggles reciprocal prefrontal firing to reinstate fear [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays an essential role in regulating emotion, including inhibiting fear when danger has passed. The extinction of fear, however, is labile and a number of factors, including stress, cause extinguished fear to relapse. Here we show that fear relapse in rats limits single-unit activity among…

7h

Opinion: Toward an international definition of citizen science [Social Sciences]

Public participation in scientific projects is flourishing globally as part of projects labeled “citizen science” (CS). Already, a number of professional networks for CS stakeholders have been founded, for example, the US-based Citizen Science Association, the European Citizen Science Association, and the Australian Citizen Science Association. As citizen science (CS)…

7h

Effect of deforestation on access to clean drinking water [Sustainability Science]

Using satellite data on deforestation and weather in Malawi and linking those datasets with household survey datasets, we estimate the causal effect of deforestation on access to clean drinking water. In the existing literature on forest science and hydrology, the consensus is that deforestation increases water yield. In this study,…

7h

Realizing the values of natural capital for inclusive, sustainable development: Informing China’s new ecological development strategy [Sustainability Science]

A major challenge in transforming development to inclusive, sustainable pathways is the pervasive and persistent trade-off between provisioning services (e.g., agricultural production) on the one hand and regulating services (e.g., water purification, flood control) and biodiversity conservation on the other. We report on an application of China’s new Ecological Development…

7h

Multicentury perspective assessing the sustainability of the historical harvest of seaducks [Sustainability Science]

Where available, census data on seabirds often do not extend beyond a few years or decades, challenging our ability to identify drivers of population change and to develop conservation policies. Here, we reconstruct long-term population dynamics of northern common eiders (Somateria mollissima borealis). We analyzed sterols together with stable nitrogen…

7h

Correction for Shin et al., Light-triggered thermal conductivity switching in azobenzene polymers [Correction]

ENGINEERING Correction for “Light-triggered thermal conductivity switching in azobenzene polymers,” by Jungwoo Shin, Jaeuk Sung, Minjee Kang, Xu Xie, Byeongdu Lee, Kyung Min Lee, Timothy J. White, Cecilia Leal, Nancy R. Sottos, Paul V. Braun, and David G. Cahill, which was first published March 8, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1817082116 (Proc Natl Acad…

7h

Correction for Anreiter et al., Epigenetic mechanisms modulate differences in Drosophila foraging behavior [Correction]

GENETICS Correction for “Epigenetic mechanisms modulate differences in Drosophila foraging behavior,” by Ina Anreiter, Jamie M. Kramer, and Marla B. Sokolowski, which was first published October 16, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1710770114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114: 12518–12523). The authors wish to note the following: “We have found an error in Fig….

7h

Correction for Kaufman, A model of human phenylalanine metabolism in normal subjects and in phenylketonuric patients [Correction]

MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “A model of human phenylalanine metabolism in normal subjects and in phenylketonuric patients,” by Seymour Kaufman, which was first published March 16, 1999; 10.1073/pnas.96.6.3160 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 96:3160–3164). The editors were contacted by a reader who noted two errors in Eq. 3, on page…

7h

Correction for Kirkbride et al., Maternal small RNAs mediate spatial-temporal regulation of gene expression, imprinting, and seed development in Arabidopsis [Correction]

PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “Maternal small RNAs mediate spatial-temporal regulation of gene expression, imprinting, and seed development in Arabidopsis,” by Ryan C. Kirkbride, Jie Lu, Changqing Zhang, Rebecca A. Mosher, David C. Baulcombe, and Z. Jeffrey Chen, which was first published February 12, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1807621116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA…

7h

Tech Offers a Virtual Window into Future Climate Change Risk

AI and supercomputing are rapidly shifting the way disaster planners, regulators and insurers gauge climate hazards — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

The buzz about bumble bees isn't good

While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees. The good news is that a new study provides an estimate on bumble bee population and distributions across Michigan in the past century. The bad news is that these results are dramatically low, and they mirror what's happening across the Americas, Europe and Asia, too.

7h

When is sexting associated with psychological distress among young adults?

While sending or receiving nude electronic images may not always be associated with poorer mental health, being coerced to do so and receiving unwanted sexts was linked to a higher likelihood of depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms, according to a new study published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

7h

New Cochrane Review investigates the effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy

New evidence published in the Cochrane Library provides high quality evidence that people who use a combination of nicotine replacement therapies (a patch plus a short acting form, such as gum or lozenge) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of the medicine.

7h

New diagnostic tool developed for global menace Xylella fastidiosa increases specificity

In a research article in Plant Disease, Bonants et al. record their efforts to improve the reliability of existing X. fastidiosa diagnostic tools. The team combined two existing tools with an internal control to develop a triplex TaqMan assay, which they then used to analyze DNA extracts in naturally infected plant material, artificially infected plant material, and uninfected plant material.

7h

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at risk of giving birth prematurely

Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of delivering their baby prematurely. The risk increases as blood sugar levels rise, however women who maintain the recommended levels also risk giving birth prematurely. These are the findings from researchers at Karolinska Institutet and the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden, published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

7h

Rare disease gives new insight into regulatory T cell function

An international study led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden provides new insights into the regulatory T cells' role in protecting against autoimmune disease. By mapping the targets of the immune system in patients with the rare disease IPEX, they were able to show that regulatory T cells control immunotolerance in the gut. The results are published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immuno

7h

The buzz about bumble bees isn't good

While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees. The good news is that a new study provides an estimate on bumble bee population and distributions across Michigan in the past century. The bad news is that these results are dramatically low, and they mirror what's happening across the Americas, Europe and Asia, too.

7h

WSU researchers see health effects across generations from popular weed killer

Washington State University researchers have found a variety of diseases and other health problems in the second- and third-generation offspring of rats exposed to glyphosate, the world's most popular weed killer. In the first study of its kind, the researchers saw descendants of exposed rats developing prostate, kidney and ovarian diseases, obesity and birth abnormalities.

7h

The buzz about bumble bees isn't good

While many scientists are focused on the decline of honey bees, relatively few study bumble bees. The good news is that a new study provides an estimate on bumble bee population and distributions across Michigan in the past century. The bad news is that these results are dramatically low, and they mirror what's happening across the Americas, Europe and Asia, too.

7h

New diagnostic tool developed for global menace Xylella fastidiosa increases specificity

The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is notable for having a wide host range, with the ability to infect more than 300 plants. X. fastidiosa has a long history of causing serious harm to crops and trees in the Americas, with especially damaging repercussions on grapevine and citrus.

7h

Experts: Tesla’s Plans to Launch a Robotaxi Network Are Nonsense

Elon Being Elon During Monday’s “ Autonomy Investor Day ,” Elon Musk said he expects Tesla to have more than 1 million autonomous robotaxis on the road in 2020. Wall Street’s response: Yeah, right. “The Tesla Network robotaxi plans seemed half baked,” Cowen’s analyst Jeffrey Osborne wrote in a note to investors, according to a CNBC report , “with the company appearing to either not have answers t

7h

What Republicans Really Want From Investigating the Russia Investigators

The arc of the modern American life is long and bends toward a never-ending relitigation of 2016. Any assumptions that talk of collusion and spying—and the need to remember how to spell Papadopoulos —would end following the release of Robert Mueller’s 400-page report have been rendered quaint in the past week. Republicans and Democrats alike have latched on to Mueller’s findings not as the final

7h

The Other Segregation

The segregation of America’s public schools is a perpetual newsmaker. The fact that not even 1 percent of the incoming freshman class identifies as black at New York City’s elite Stuyvesant High School made national headlines last month. And New York isn’t unusual. The minority gap in enrollment at elite academic public schools is a problem across America. But more troubling, and often less discu

7h

The Instagram Aesthetic Is Over

As Instagram has grown to more than 1 billion monthly users , it has ushered in a very particular aesthetic: bright walls , artfully arranged lattes and avocado toast , and Millennial-pink everything , all with that carefully staged , color-corrected , glossy-looking aesthetic. Photos that play into these trends perform so well on Instagram that the look became synonymous with the platform itself

7h

New diagnostic tool developed for global menace Xylella fastidiosa increases specificity

The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is notable for having a wide host range, with the ability to infect more than 300 plants. X. fastidiosa has a long history of causing serious harm to crops and trees in the Americas, with especially damaging repercussions on grapevine and citrus.

7h

RIP Laundroid: Company behind $1000 laundry-folding bot has filed for bankruptcy

Dreams of dishing laundry duty to an in-house robot just got a little less hopeful with the company behind the automated laundry assistant, Laundroid, filing for bankruptcy, effectively putting …

7h

Nvidia's Turing architecture trickles down to the entry level with $149 GeForce GTX 1650

Nvidia’s Turing architecture has finally trickled down to the entry level with the launch of the GeForce GTX 1650.

7h

Stuff Elon Musk Said About Tesla Autonomous Cars on Monday, Ranked

submitted by /u/wewewawa [link] [comments]

7h

Oil and Gas tech infographic

submitted by /u/thestartupgeek [link] [comments]

7h

New Research: The Moon Is Covered With Miles-Deep Cracks

Cracked A new study revealed that the Moon has much deeper scars, from billions of years of asteroid impacts, than previously believed. “We found that impacts break the lunar crust into roughly meter‐sized blocks,” the abstract of the study’s paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets last month reads. “Impacts can break up the lunar crust down to approximately 20 km, and obj

7h

New study compiles Gulf of Maine seasonal wildlife timing shifts

Many researchers and amateur naturalists keep track of dates for the first robin of spring, the first peepers or ice-out on ponds, and such records can offer decades of data on the timing of plant and animal life cycle events known as phenology.

7h

New study compiles Gulf of Maine seasonal wildlife timing shifts

Many researchers and amateur naturalists keep track of dates for the first robin of spring, the first peepers or ice-out on ponds, and such records can offer decades of data on the timing of plant and animal life cycle events known as phenology.

7h

Daily briefing: What it will take to maintain a liveable planet

Daily briefing: What it will take to maintain a liveable planet Daily briefing: What it will take to maintain a liveable planet, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01326-z Fully protect 30% of Earth’s surface and sustainably manage another 20%. Plus: an ancient mega-carnivore and networking for introverted scientists.

7h

NASA catches formation of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth near Aldabra

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the formation of Tropical Storm Kenneth in the Southern Indian Ocean. Kenneth formed north of Madagascar and east of the Aldabra Atoll.

7h

Can sensor data save California’s aquifers?

New research suggests a way to map precisely where and how to use groundwater recharge to refill Californian aquifers and stop the land from sinking. In California, the amount of water exiting aquifers under the state’s most productive farming region far surpasses the amount of water trickling back in. That rampant overdraft has caused land across much of the region to sink like a squeezed out sp

7h

To test the munchies, researchers offer a choice: chips or an orange?

Results underscore an important issue as more states legalize marijuana: the increased need for tailored nutrition education as the population of pot-smokers grows.

7h

New study compiles gulf of maine seasonal wildlife timing shifts

Many researchers and amateur naturalists track dates for the first robin or pond ice-out; such records offer data on timing of plant and animal life cycle events known as phenology. While such observations are common in terrestrial systems, a new report led by UMass Amherst shows limited understanding of similar marine events. The authors urge researchers to increase observations and use more phen

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Scratching the skin primes the gut for allergic reactions to food, mouse study suggests

Scratching the skin triggers a series of immune responses culminating in an increased number of activated mast cells — immune cells involved in allergic reactions — in the small intestine, according to research conducted in mice. This newly identified skin-gut communication helps illuminate the relationship between food allergy and atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema), a disease characterized by

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Women underreport prevalence and intensity of their own snoring

A new study of adults who were referred for evaluation of a suspected sleep disorder suggests that women tend to underreport snoring and underestimate its loudness.

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NASA catches formation of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth near Aldabra

Visible satellite imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed the formation of Tropical Storm Kenneth in the Southern Indian Ocean. Kenneth formed north of Madagascar and east of the Aldabra Atoll.

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Scientists develop low-cost energy-efficient materials

An international team of scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' (NUST MISIS), Tianjin University (China), as well as from Japan and the United States has developed new energy-efficient iron-based alloys which combine high mechanical and magnetic properties with low cost and open up new opportunities for industry. The research results are published in the Journal

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People with happy spouses may live longer

Research suggests that having a happy spouse leads to a longer marriage, and now study results show that it's associated with a longer life, too. The study was published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Where Are the Black Women in STEM Leadership?

By training diverse women in science and tech to become leaders, the whole ecosystem benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Jake's Deck Boss Takes a Knife to the Ribs | Deadliest Catch

Although Jake's hellbent on fishing, all bets are off when his deck boss inadvertently stabs himself in the ribs. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.c

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Where Are the Black Women in STEM Leadership?

By training diverse women in science and tech to become leaders, the whole ecosystem benefits — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Stressede insekter og grønnere planter: Smeltet indlandsis forandrer Nordøstgrønland dramatisk

Livet i fjorde, søer og tundra er truet af menneskeskabte klimaforandringer.

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Kids who don’t drink water drink lots more sugary stuff

Kids and young adults who drink no water during the day consume twice the amount of calories from sugary drinks than those who do, according to a new study. The findings underscore the importance of children having free access to clean water, researchers say. “Kids should consume water every single day, and the first beverage option for kids should be water,” says Asher Rosinger, assistant profes

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Thirst regulates motivated behavior through modulation of brainwide neural population dynamics

Physiological needs produce motivational drives, such as thirst and hunger, that regulate behaviors essential to survival. Hypothalamic neurons sense these needs and must coordinate relevant brainwide neuronal activity to produce the appropriate behavior. We studied dynamics from ~24,000 neurons in 34 brain regions during thirst-motivated choice behavior in 21 mice as they consumed water and beca

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Spontaneous behaviors drive multidimensional, brainwide activity

Neuronal populations in sensory cortex produce variable responses to sensory stimuli and exhibit intricate spontaneous activity even without external sensory input. Cortical variability and spontaneous activity have been variously proposed to represent random noise, recall of prior experience, or encoding of ongoing behavioral and cognitive variables. Recording more than 10,000 neurons in mouse v

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Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home

MIT researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of Bacteroides fragilis, one of the most prevalent bacteria found in humans' large intestines. In a paper published April 23 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, the authors describe how the common gut microbe adapts and evolves within individuals as well as across Western versus Eastern cultu

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From Garbage to Chocolate: A New Possible Source

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Alipay’s sustainability commitment has seen 100m trees planted

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Google Maps Will Now Show If An EV Station Is In Use

It has already been possible to search for the location of electric vehicle chargers in Google Maps but there was no way to telling if the station would be free or in use when you eventually …

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Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home

MIT researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of Bacteroides fragilis, one of the most prevalent bacteria found in humans' large intestines. In a paper published April 23 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, the authors describe how the common gut microbe adapts and evolves within individuals as well as across Western versus Eastern cultu

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Amazon Is Forcing Its Delivery Drivers to Take Selfies

Service With a Smile Amazon’s delivery drivers now have to prove they aren’t package thieves by stopping to take a selfie every now and then. The idea is to verify deliveries with Amazon’s facial recognition, according to Business Insider . It also means that the contractors who deliver Amazon boxes are now forced to pose for a camera to periodically “confirm their identity” if they want to get p

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Därför spelar din röst roll i EU-valet

Det finns en omfattande kunskapsbrist om hur EU fungerar. Det framgick i den statliga utredningen ” EU på hemmaplan ”, som Maria Strömvik, forskare i statsvetenskap, lämnade över till dåvarande demokratiminister Alice Bah Kuhnke i början av 2016. I rapporten beskrev Maria Strömvik, som är biträdande föreståndare för Centrum för Europaforskning vid Lunds universitet, kunskapsnivån som pinsamt låg.

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Genetic study homes in on height’s heritability mystery

Genetic study homes in on height’s heritability mystery Genetic study homes in on height’s heritability mystery, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01157-y Analysis of 20,000 genomes reveals that rare gene variants can help to explain how the trait is inherited.

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Scientists find auroral 'speed bumps' are more complicated

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire Space Science Center find that "speed bumps" in space, which can slow down satellites orbiting closer to Earth, are more complex than originally thought.

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Three-antibiotic cocktail clears 'persister' Lyme bacteria in mouse study

A new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that a slow-growing variant form of Lyme bacteria caused severe symptoms in a mouse model. The slow-growing variant form of Lyme bacteria, according to the researchers, may account for the persistent symptoms seen in ten to twenty percent of Lyme patients that are not cured by the current Lyme antibiotic trea

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What Ramy Gets Wrong About Muslim Women

This article contains spoilers throughout Season 1 of Ramy. Hulu’s new series Ramy depicts a fictionalized version of the life of its star and co-creator, Ramy Youssef (named Ramy Hassan on the show), a Millennial Egyptian American from a robust North Jersey Muslim community. Along with the co-creators Ari Katcher and Ryan Welch, Youssef explores the complexities of being a religious man from an

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New Turmoil Over Predicting the Effects of Genes

Various innovations in the field of genomics over the past few decades have given researchers hope that resolutions to long-lasting debates might finally be on the horizon. In particular, many have become optimistic about the prospects for disentangling the threads of “nature” and “nurture” — that is, about determining the extent to which genes alone can explain differences within and between pop

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Rigspolitiet: Kan man overhovedet lave en digital beredskabsradio i Grønland?

Rigspolitiet vil købe nyt radiobaseret kommunikationssystem til Grønland, men er i tvivl om det teknisk er muligt.

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Who Created Maslow's Iconic Pyramid?

A new paper investigates the real origins of Maslow's pyramid. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Endangered rays may have unknown birthing zone in Mexican waters

The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays accidentally caught in fishing nets in a village along Mexico's northern Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters, a new Duke University study suggests.

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Vine spiritual successor Byte enters closed beta testing

Twitter’s decision to end short-form video service Vine was spurred by rival platforms’ adoption of similar (and some would say better) offerings. As marketers increasingly jumped ship, Twitter …

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Fishes Were Julie Packard’s Wishes for Her New Smithsonian Portrait

National Portrait Gallery unveils a painting honoring the renowned ocean conservationist and director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium

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UNH scientists find auroral 'speed bumps' are more complicated

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire Space Science Center find that 'speed bumps' in space, which can slow down satellites orbiting closer to Earth, are more complex than originally thought.

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Strongly agree: It's time to test the Likert scale

Researchers often tweak the number of response options in the traditional five-point Likert Scale with little empirical justification for doing so. Now a UB psychologist has tested the test. Leonard Simms says 'six appears to be the magic number' of responses.

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Acupuncture equals disease prevention say new studies

Well-recognized for its therapeutic effects, acupuncture is increasingly being appreciated for its ability to promote wellness and contribute to the prevention of a broad range of conditions.

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Electronic health records decision support reduces inappropriate use of GI test

Programming a hospital's electronic health record system (EHR) to provide information on appropriate use of a costly gastrointestinal panel and to block unnecessary orders reduced inappropriate testing by 46% and saved up to $168,000 over 15 months, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

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Despite health warnings, Americans still sit too much

Most Americans continue to sit for prolonged periods despite public health messages that such inactivity increases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and certain cancers, according to a major new study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

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Majority of US states restrict decision-making for incapacitated pregnant women

Half of all US states have laws on the books that invalidate a pregnant woman's advance directive if she becomes incapacitated, and a majority of states don't disclose these restrictions in advance directive forms, according to a study by physicians and bioethicists at Mayo Clinic and other institutions.

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How the body protects itself from type 2 diabetes

A specific group of white blood cells, termed 'regulatory T cells', keeps the immune system in balance and suppresses its activity to protect the body against autoimmune diseases. Scientists at the DZNE and the University of Bonn have now discovered a new mechanism by which regulatory T cells inhibit inflammation specifically in adipose tissue. This mechanism plays an important role in protecting

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Is state Medicaid expansion associated with changes in low birth weight, preterm births?

This observational study examined whether state Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act was associated with changes in low birth weight and preterm birth both overall and by race/ethnicity.

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How much time do Americans spend sitting?

Americans spend more time sitting. Total time spent sitting increased about an hour per day to 8.2 hours for adolescents and 6.4 hours for adults in 2007-2016 in this analysis of nationally representative survey data. Data from nearly 52,000 children, adolescents and adults from 2001-2016 were used to examine trends over time in sedentary behaviors among the US population.

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Meet B. fragilis, a bacterium that moves into your gut and evolves to make itself at home

MIT researchers have analyzed population genomics and metagenomics to investigate the microbiome evolution of Bacteroides fragilis, one of the most prevalent bacteria found in humans' large intestines. In a paper published April 23 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe, the authors describe how the common gut microbe adapts and evolves within individuals as well as across Western versus Eastern cultu

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How fish brain cells react to Alzheimer's disease

Researchers in Dresden, Germany, have studied the regenerative capacity of zebrafish brain in single cell resolution with the aim of developing novel strategies against Alzheimer's. Their findings are published in Cell Reports.

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Endangered rays may have unknown birthing zone in Mexican waters

The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays accidentally caught in fishing nets in a village along Mexico's northern Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters, a new Duke University study suggests.

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New studies highlight challenge of meeting Paris Agreement climate goals

New research highlights the "incredible challenge" of reaching the Paris Agreement without intense action and details the extreme temperatures parts of the planet will suffer if countries fail to reduce emissions.

8h

Simple sea anemones not so simple after all

The tube-dwelling anemone is an ancient sea creature that resembles a prehistoric flower. The animals live slow, long and predictable lifestyles and look fairly similar from species to species.

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Google self-driving unit Waymo picks Detroit factory site

Google's self-driving car spinoff Waymo says it will reopen an axle plant in Detroit to convert conventional vehicles so they can drive autonomously.

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Simple sea anemones not so simple after all

The tube-dwelling anemone is an ancient sea creature that resembles a prehistoric flower. The animals live slow, long and predictable lifestyles and look fairly similar from species to species.

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Study: Why unique finches keep their heads of many colors

There appears to be an underlying selection mechanism at work among Gouldian Finches—a mechanism that allows this species to produce and maintain individuals with red heads, black heads, and yellow heads. Research by scientists from the the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and other institutions, reveals what this additional evolutionary process might

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Battery-free pacemaker harvests energy from pig hearts in first tests

A battery-free pacemaker that turns heartbeats into electricity has been successfully tested in pigs for the first time

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The Moon's Surface Is Totally Cracked

Is the moon all it's cracked up to be?

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France, Japan back Renault-Nissan alliance despite Ghosn case

French President Emmanuel Macron and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday pledged their backing for the alliance of car giants Renault and Nissan, despite the strains caused by the arrest of the alliance's former boss Carlos Ghosn.

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Study: Why unique finches keep their heads of many colors

There appears to be an underlying selection mechanism at work among Gouldian Finches—a mechanism that allows this species to produce and maintain individuals with red heads, black heads, and yellow heads. Research by scientists from the the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, and other institutions, reveals what this additional evolutionary process might

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Researchers create artificial mother-of-pearl using bacteria

The strongest synthetic materials are often those that intentionally mimic nature.

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Calling out Cersei Lannister: Elizabeth Warren reviews Game of Thrones

Sen. Elizabeth Warren argues that Game of Thrones is primarily about women in her review of the wildly popular HBO show. Warren also touches on other parallels between the show and our modern world, such as inequality, political favoritism of the elite, and the dire impact of different leadership styles on the lives of the people. Her review serves as another example of using Game of Thrones as a

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Medicaid expansion may help shrink health gaps between black and white babies

States that expanded Medicaid as part of the Affordable Care Act shrunk racial disparities between black and white infants, a new study shows.

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An Incredibly Powerful White-Light Superflare Erupted from a Small, Faint Star

This tiny, cool star produced a powerful superflare.

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A new window into macaque brain connections

Researchers can now see how the two sides of the living brain mirror each other thanks to a new combination-imaging technique. The method dubbed 'opto-OISI' takes advantage of rapidly developing high-resolution optical technologies to help make sense of the trillions of connections in the brain. Published on April 23, 2019 in the open-access journal Scientific Reports, the study allows us to see h

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Devil rays may have unknown birthing zone

The discovery of dozens of pregnant giant devil rays tangled in fishing nets in a village along Mexico's Gulf of California could mean the endangered species has a previously unknown birthing zone in nearby waters, a Duke University study suggests. If more research confirms the possibility, the zone should be protected and placed off limits to fishing during times each spring when pregnant rays mi

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Biologists design new molecules to help stall lung cancer

University of Texas at Dallas scientists have demonstrated that the growth rate of the majority of lung cancer cells relates directly to the availability of a crucial oxygen-metabolizing molecule called heme. In a preclinical study recently published in Cancer Research, they showed that the expansion of lung tumors in mice slowed when access to heme was restricted. They also engineered new molecul

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Simple sea anemones not so simple after all

New research on tube anemones is challenging everything that evolutionary biologists thought they knew about sea animal genetics. The mitochondrial DNA of the tube anemone, or Ceriantharia, is a real head scratcher, from its unexpected arrangement to its previously unimagined magnitude.

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Some women could be more susceptible to PTSD than others, according to new study

Childhood trauma is known to increase the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder in adulthood, especially for women, but the biological reasons for this correlation remain largely unknown. In a new study from the University of Missouri, researchers have proposed a solution to this mystery in the form of a model that could help psychiatrists better understand the far-reaching impacts of early traum

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How lifestyle affects our genes

In the past decade, knowledge of how lifestyle affects our genes, a research field called epigenetics, has grown exponentially. Researchers at Lund University have summarised the state of scientific knowledge within epigenetics linked to obesity and type 2 diabetes in a review article published in the scientific journal Cell Metabolism.

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New studies highlight challenge of meeting Paris Agreement climate goals

New research highlights the 'incredible challenge' of reaching the Paris Agreement without intense action and details the extreme temperatures parts of the planet will suffer if countries fail to reduce emissions.

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'Longevity gene' responsible for more efficient DNA repair

University of Rochester researchers found that the gene sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) is responsible for more efficient DNA repair in species with longer lifespans. The research illuminates new targets for anti-aging interventions and could help prevent age-related diseases.

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Researchers create artificial mother-of-pearl using bacteria

A University of Rochester biologist invented an inexpensive and environmentally friendly method for making artificial nacre using an innovative component: bacteria. The artificial nacre is made of biologically produced materials and has the toughness of natural nacre, while also being stiff and, surprisingly, bendable. The method used to create the novel material could lead to new applications in

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Future mmWave networks set to deliver the best features of high and low frequencies

Future high-speed communication networks based on millimeter-wave (30-300GHz) technology will be more robust and efficient in delivering extremely high speed, high quality video, and multimedia content and services thanks to the results of a ground-breaking research project. The recently concluded project was a collaboration between Huawei Technologies and IMDEA Networks Institute, the Madrid-base

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Forsker: Sod-angreb kan købe os 10 år i klimakampen

Afsmeltningen af indlandsisen kan bremses med indsats rettet mod sod, metan og ozon.

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Coming to store shelves: cameras that guess your age and sex

Eyeing that can of soda in the supermarket cooler? Or maybe you're craving a pint of ice cream? A camera could be watching you.

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Can we cure genetic diseases by rewriting DNA? | David R. Liu

In a story of scientific discovery, chemical biologist David R. Liu shares a breakthrough: his lab's development of base editors that can rewrite DNA. This crucial step in genome editing takes the promise of CRISPR to the next level: if CRISPR proteins are molecular scissors, programmed to cut specific DNA sequences, then base editors are pencils, capable of directly rewriting one DNA letter into

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From Sketch Comedy to BDSM, Netflix Burrows Into Every Niche It Can Find

The company is no longer in the business of Prestige TV—at least, not single-mindedly. What happens when a platform becomes an industry?

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Scientists create largest collection of coral reef maps ever made

A study from scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation and the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science offers a new way to accurately map coral reefs using a combination of Earth-orbiting satellites and field observations. This first-ever global coral reef atlas contains maps of over 65,000 square kilometers (25,097 square miles) of coral ree

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New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care.

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New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care.

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Army publishes new findings to support soldier training

Researchers recently demonstrated that people's attitudes about avoiding negative outcomes versus achieving positive outcomes is related to how their performance changes in response to gamified feedback during simulation-based training exercises.The research took place at the US Army Combat Capabilities Development Command's Army Research Laboratory, the Army's corporate research laboratory known

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Study: Why unique finches keep their heads of many colors

There appears to be an underlying selection mechanism at work among Gouldian finches — a mechanism that allows this species to produce and maintain individuals with red heads, black heads, and yellow heads.

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Bacteria reveal strong individuality when navigating a maze

Researchers from ETH Zurich demonstrate that genetically identical cells exhibit differing responses in their motility towards chemical attractants. Average values hide the full picture when it comes to describing the behavior of bacteria.

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Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!

Our actions are driven by 'internal states' such as anxiety, stress or thirst — which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. Little is known about how such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, including sub-cortical structures such as the amygdala. In a study recently published in Science, the group of Andreas Lüthi at the FMI used a deep brain imaging technique to mon

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Researchers reveal how bacteria can adapt to resist treatment by antibiotics

In a joint collaboration, researchers from Denmark and Switzerland have shown that bacteria produce a specific stress molecule, divide more slowly, and thus save energy when they are exposed to antibiotics. The new knowledge is expected to form the basis for development of a new type of antibiotics.

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Revealed: The secret superpower that makes C. difficile so deadly

A new discovery about dangerous C. difficile diarrhea has identified a new way that the bacteria — and possibly others like it — cause severe disease. C. diff is the most common hospital-acquired infection and estimated to result in 453,000 cases per year, with 29,300 associated deaths.

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Selvkørende busser kan være på vej til københavnsk bydel

Autonomous Mobility ansøger om at få to selvkørende busser i Nordhavn, hvor de førerløse busser skal være en del af den almindelige trafik. Firmaets selvkørende busser er allerede blevet sikkerhedsgodkendt af flere myndigheder.

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Intel Unleashes 9th Generation 8-Core Mobile CPUs

Intel is launching its new 9th generation mobile CPUs today, including new eight-core CPUs clocked up to 5GHz. The post Intel Unleashes 9th Generation 8-Core Mobile CPUs appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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AI Company Successfully Predicted Biogen's Clinical Trial Failure

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Can you run a city with blockchain?

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COPD and type 2 diabetes

COPD and type 2 diabetes are two highly prevalent global health conditions associated with high mortality and morbidity. In this review article, a team of researchers from USA discuss the studies demonstrating the associations between COPD and type 2 diabetes, underlying pathophysiology and recommended therapeutic approach in the management of patients with coexisting COPD and diabetes.

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Simple and fast method for radiolabelling antibodies against breast cancer

Radioactive antibodies that target cancer cells are used for medical diagnostics with PET imaging or for targeted radioimmunotherapy. Researchers from the University of Zurich have created a new method for radiolabelling antibodies using UV light. In less than 15 minutes, the proteins are ready-to-use for cancer imaging or therapy.

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More evidence that blood tests can detect the risk of Alzheimer's

A new study confirms that a simple blood test can reveal whether there is accelerating nerve cell damage in the brain. The researchers analyzed neurofilament light protein (NFL) in blood samples from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Recently published in JAMA Neurology, the study suggests that the NFL concentration in the blood could be able to indicate if a drug actually affects the loss of ner

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BU, Johnson & Johnson Innovation alliance: Immune system boost could prevent lung cancer

BU, Johnson & Johnson Innovation alliance: why an immune system boost could prevent lung cancer

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How light triggers brain activity

Optogenetics uses light to control brain processes. It is based on light-controlled proteins such as channelrhodopsin-2, an ion channel that opens when it's exposed to light, thus activating cellular processes. In collaboration with colleagues from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, the researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have now shed light on its mode of action. The team headed by Profes

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Field trial with neonicotinoids: Honeybees are much more robust than bumblebees

The insecticide clothianidin affects different species of bees in different ways. While it has no demonstrably negative effect on honeybees, it disrupts the growth of bumblebees and threatens the survival of entire colonies. However, the insecticide does not make either species more susceptible to diseases and pathogens, as a massive field study in Sweden shows. The latest findings were published

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Pre-op daily life disability may predict poor outcome after hip replacement

A new Johns Hopkins Medicine study looking at medical records of more than 43,000 US adults with hip-joint damaging osteoarthritis suggests that those who cannot perform daily activities independently before total hip replacement surgery are more likely to have poorer outcomes after surgery.

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Obesity linked with differences in form and structure of the brain

Researchers using sophisticated MRI technology have found that higher levels of body fat are associated with differences in the brain's form and structure, including smaller volumes of gray matter, according to a new study. The findings add important information to our understanding of the connection between obesity and negative health consequences such as dementia.

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Soft tissue makes coral tougher in the face of climate change

Climate change and ocean warming threaten coral reefs and disrupt the harmonious relationship between corals and their symbiotic algae, a process known as "coral bleaching." However, a new study conducted by scientists at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and the California Academy of Sciences revealed soft tissues that cover the rocky coral skeleton promote the recovery of corals following

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These gaming laptops pack the latest Intel and NVIDIA hardware

If you prefer your PC gaming in portable form, you're enjoying an embarrassment of riches right now. Intel has unveiled gaming-friendly 9th-generation Core laptop processors, while …

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Amazon Wants to Let Strangers into Your Garage Now

Convenience isn’t easy. In the old days, you’d have to sign for packages, and then, as rules relaxed, you could count on packages getting stolen off your porch. Now Amazon has a whole host of …

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Så ger regulatoriska T-celler skydd mot autoimmun sjukdom

Patienter med den sällsynta sjukdomen IPEX saknar regulatoriska T-celler och utvecklar svåra autoimmuna sjukdomar där immunsystemet angriper kroppens egna vävnader, som typ 1-diabetes och inflammation i tarm och hud. En forskargrupp vid Karolinska Institutet har genomfört en kartläggande undersökning för att identifiera vilka målmolekyler som immunförsvaret angriper när kroppen saknar regulatoris

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Dansk startup vil bringe pakker ud med fortovsrobotter

Tidligere på måneden var der inviteret til dialogmøde hos Færdselsstyrelsen i Ribe med fokus på de selvkørende pakkerobotter. Meldingen er, at de skal gøres lovlige i 2020.

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High Body Fat Linked to Possible 'Brain Shrinkage'

A new study suggests that high levels of body fat may affect the brain's structure.

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Future millimeter wave networks set to deliver the best features of high and low frequencies

Future high-speed communication networks based on millimeter-wave (30-300GHz) technology will be more robust and efficient in delivering extremely high speed, high quality video, and multimedia content and services thanks to the results of a ground-breaking research project. The recently-concluded project was a collaboration between Huawei Technologies and IMDEA Networks Institute, the Madrid-base

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A step toward determining which car crashes cause traumatic brain injury—and which don't

Motor vehicle crashes are the most common cause of emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths related to traumatic brain injury among people aged 15 to 34, according to a 2013 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Measles outbreak is a reminder of the power of viral information

Rise in cases shows it is time for systematic scrutiny of algorithms that determine behaviour

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Tiny component may be able to reach ‘quantum supremacy’

Researchers have developed a nanocomponent that emits light particles carrying quantum information. Less than one-tenth the width of a human hair, the miniscule component makes it possible to scale up and could ultimately reach the capabilities required for a quantum computer or quantum internet. The authors of the new study and their colleagues have focused on developing quantum communication te

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Atomic beams shoot straighter via cascading silicon peashooters

To a non-physicist, an "atomic beam collimator" may sound like a phaser firing mystical particles. That might not be the worst metaphor to introduce a technology that researchers have now miniaturized, making it more likely to someday land in handheld devices.

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Uganda Airlines gets first planes in revival bid

The first two planes purchased in a bid to relaunch Uganda Airlines were delivered on Tuesday, nearly two decades after the East African country's national carrier collapsed.

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How to tell if an asteroid if going to kill you

With 20,000 space rocks whizzing around Earth’s neighbourhood, picking the one that’s going to smack into the planet is a tricky task. Lauren Fuge explains.

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Health apps send data to tech giants without disclosure

Study finds many smoking-cessation and depression apps operate under dodgy privacy regimes. Nick Carne reports.

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Anthropogenic global warming kicked off in 1865

New modelling and old records combine to show greenhouse gases and aerosols started to warm things up in the late nineteenth century. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Sand, bubbling through sand

Fluid-like motion observed in granular material for the first time.

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Dark web weapons trade 'could grow, travel and change very quickly'

Research reveals clandestine sales favour handguns rather than exotic firearms. Nick Carne reports.

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Silent no more: river dolphins turn out to be talkative

Elusive cetaceans have a much greater vocal range than previously thought. Tanya Loos reports.

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Solving a Math Problem Just Brought Holograms Closer to Reality

Holograms are a staple in science fiction , but creating ones detailed enough to have serious applications in the real world has proved difficult . While scientists have been slowly pushing the field of holographic projection forward, they haven’t been able to overcome a problem called cross-talk. However, in a recent paper published in Nature, they have been able to manipulate the shape of light

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One million species risk extinction due to humans: Draft UN report

Up to one million species face extinction due to human influence, according to a draft UN report obtained by AFP that painstakingly catalogues how humanity has undermined the natural resources upon which its very survival depends.

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New chemical tool to block endocytosis in plants identified

Plant cells absorb many important substances through a process called endocytosis. In plants, endocytosis is essential for nutrient uptake, passing on cellular signals and plant-microbe interactions. However, the vital nature of endocytosis makes it challenging to study using methods from classical genetics. Small molecules targeting this process are a good alternative for such studies but in plan

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KAIST unveils the hidden control architecture of brain networks

A KAIST research team identified the intrinsic control architecture of brain networks. The control properties will contribute to providing a fundamental basis for the exogenous control of brain networks and, therefore, has broad implications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience.

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Plant signals trigger remarkable bacterial transformation

Cycad plant roots release signals into the soil that triggers the transformation of bacteria into its motile form, helping them move to the plant roots and establish a symbiotic partnership.

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The scientists developed a new method for improving the efficiency of air purifiers

Clean air is something that we are continuously proud of in our little Estonia, and it has been called, partly in jest, one of the most important export articles of Estonia. Unfortunately, the environment, including the air, around us is becoming increasingly polluted.

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NUS researchers identified new biomarkers associated with 'chemobrain'

Researchers from the National University of Singapore have identified new biomarkers related to the cognitive impairment associated with cancer known as chemobrain.

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Nanocomponent is a quantum leap for Danish physicists

University of Copenhagen researchers have developed a nanocomponent that emits light particles carrying quantum information. Less than one-tenth the width of a human hair, the minuscule component makes it possible to scale up and could ultimately reach the capabilities required for a quantum computer or quantum internet. The research result puts Denmark at the head of the pack in the quantum race.

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Quantum gas turns supersolid

Researchers led by Francesca Ferlaino from the University of Innsbruck and the Austrian Academy of Sciences report in Physical Review X on the observation of supersolid behavior in dipolar quantum gases of erbium and dysprosium. In the dysprosium gas these properties are unprecedentedly long-lived. This sets the stage for future investigations into the nature of this exotic phase of matter.

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Eating elderberries can help minimize influenza symptoms

Conducted by Professor Fariba Deghani, Dr. Golnoosh Torabian and Dr. Peter Valtchev as part of the ARC Training Centre for the Australian Food Processing Industry that was established within the university's Faculty of Engineering and IT, the study showed that compounds from elderberries can directly inhibit the virus's entry and replication in human cells, and can help strengthen a person's immun

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Study unravels mystery of antimicrobial frog secretions

Japanese scientists including researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology and Yokohama National University have identified the molecular mechanism that gives the skin secretions of a species of frog effective antimicrobial properties. Unravelling the molecular mechanism that facilitates antimicrobial activity of these peptides can help us better understand how the defense system

9h

Thiazide diuretics reduced the risk of fractures in people with Alzheimer's disease

The use of thiazide diuretics was associated with a decreased risk of low energy fractures in people with Alzheimer's disease, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The association was found in long-term use exceeding three years; however, shorter term use did not reduce the risk of fractures. Thiazides are typically prescribed to treat hypertension.

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One million species risk extinction due to humans: Draft UN report

Up to one million species face extinction due to human influence, according to a draft UN report obtained by AFP that painstakingly catalogues how humanity has undermined the natural resources upon which its very survival depends.

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Logged native forests mostly end up in landfill, not in buildings and furniture

Victoria has some of the most carbon-dense native forests in the world. Advocates for logging these forests often argue that wood products in buildings and furniture become long-term storage for carbon.

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Science history: the battle to end the Great Stink

Early efforts to defeat cholera in London backfired badly. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Try this illusion on the treadmill and running will never be the same

Head Trip The treadmill works out your brain, too. Run on the machine for at least 10 minutes, step off, then have a friend blindfold you. Try to walk in place and you’ll run forward instead. Why?

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Could Machine Learning Be the Key to Earthquake Prediction?

Predicting earthquakes might be impossible, but some experts wonder if tools that can analyze enormous amounts of data could crack the seismic code

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Asus ROG goes all out with 2019 gaming laptop updates – CNET

When confronted by so many, the one with the prettiest lighting wins.

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Want to keep CEO pay down? Perhaps don't use a compensation consultant

Companies that use compensation consultants end up paying more for their CEOs, according to a new study that peers into the 'black box' of CEO pay at a time when boards are under pressure to justify high payments.

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Lægeboom ikke nok: Det skal gøres mere attraktivt at være praktiserende læge

Ifølge ny prognose vil der være godt 50 pct. flere speciallæger i almen medicin i 2040 end i dag. Hvis rekrutteringsudfordringen skal løses, skal det dog stadig være mere attraktivt at være praktiserende læge, siger PLO.

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An ecological tale of two scavengers

Two species of vulture—the turkey vulture and the black vulture—are able to coexist because their respective traits reduce the need for them to compete for nutritional resources, according to a study by University of Georgia researchers.

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Climate change has already worsened economic inequality

Global warming has increased economic inequality since the 1960s, research shows. Temperature changes as a result of growing concentrations of greenhouse gases in Earth’s atmosphere enriched cool countries like Norway and Sweden, while dragging down economic growth in warm countries such as India and Nigeria. “Our results show that most of the poorest countries on Earth are considerably poorer th

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Hormone duo may protect some women against PTSD

New research could clarify why not all women with traumatic childhoods develop PTSD. Childhood trauma is known to increase the risk of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) in adulthood, especially for women, but the biological reasons for this correlation remain largely unknown. Researchers now propose a solution to this mystery in the form of a model that could help psychiatrists better underst

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Scientists create largest collection of coral reef maps ever made

A study from scientists at the Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation and the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science offers a new way to accurately map coral reefs using a combination of Earth-orbiting satellites and field observations. This first-ever global coral reef atlas contains maps of over 65,000 square kilometers (25,097 square miles) of coral ree

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Soft tissue makes coral tougher in the face of climate change

A new study conducted by scientists at the University of Hawai'i (UH) at Mānoa and the California Academy of Sciences revealed soft tissues that cover the rocky coral skeleton promote the recovery of corals following a bleaching event.

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An ecological tale of two scavengers

Two species of vulture—the turkey vulture and the black vulture—are able to coexist because their respective traits reduce the need for them to compete for nutritional resources, according to a study by University of Georgia researchers.

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Washington Is One Signature Away From Legalizing Human Composting

Human Remains On Friday, Washington’s state senators and congresspeople finalized their approval of bill 5001 — an item of legislation that would legalize human composting. The bill will now head to the desk of the state’s governor, Jay Inslee. If he signs it, the legislation will go into effect in 2020, making Washington residents the first in the nation to have this economical, environmentally-

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Electron-phonon instability in graphene revealed by global and local noise probes

Understanding nonequilibrium phenomena to effectively control it is an outstanding challenge in science and engineering. In a recent study, Trond. I. Andersen and colleagues at the departments of physics, chemistry, materials science and engineering in the USA, Japan and Canada used electricity to drive ultraclean graphene devices out-of-equilibrium and observe the manifested instability as enhanc

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What washing machines can teach us about the cost of tariffs

Recent trade wars between the United States and other countries have raised the question: Who pays the price when countries raise tariffs or impose other import duties?

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Shakespeare: research blows away stereotypes and reveals teenagers actually love the Bard

When you think of inner-city teenagers, what springs to mind? For many, it's hoodies, video games – and probably hating Shakespeare. But my research proves that this stereotype is far from the truth.

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Which car crashes cause traumatic brain injury?

Motor vehicle crashes are one of the most common causes of TBI-related emergency room visits, hospitalizations and deaths. Yet, much of TBI research is focused on military or sports-related injuries. University of Arizona aerospace and mechanical engineering professor Samy Missoum is working to identify the threshold separating car crashes that cause TBIs from those that don't.

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TOS president-elect co-authors study on genetic test for obesity

President-elect of The Obesity Society (TOS) Lee M. Kaplan, MD, PhD, FTOS, has co-authored a new study that describes a newly developed genetic test that can identify newborns at the highest risk of developing severe obesity, the Society announced today.

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Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia

Mount Sinai study may help explain some of the excess risks for inflammatory diseases in first born children.

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Number of women who aren't physically active enough is high and growing

Using data from a national survey representing more than 19 million US women with established cardiovascular disease, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that more than half of women with the condition do not do enough physical activity and those numbers have grown over the last decade. These results imply that targeted counseling to exercise more could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease as

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New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care.

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Atomic beams shoot straighter via cascading silicon peashooters

Atomic beams conjure fantasies of gigantic Space Force canons. But there are real tiny atomic beams that shoot out of newly engineered collimators, a kind of tiny silicon peashooter, that could land in handheld devices. The beams streaming out of them create precise inertia much better than a gyroscope's that could help spacecraft navigate the solar system. The atomic beams from the new collimator

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Protecting small farms in Mozambique from drought

During the months that Jonathan Malacarne spent traveling from village to village in rural Mozambique, the weather could be dry and dusty or soaking wet from heavy rain. Either way, people from the community would walk and ride bikes from miles away to meet under the shade of a tree or in a classroom to learn about insured maize seeds.

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Sundhedsminister kaldes i samråd om lægemangel i almen praksis

I dag skal sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) svare på, hvilke tiltag regeringen vil tage for at bekæmpe lægemanglen i almen praksis de kommende år.

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Fortune favours the bold: Can behaviour explain why some animal species become invasive?

A new study has found that adaptability is the key to invasive species succeeding in non-native environments.

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Biochemists discover an enzyme to stop cell death

RUDN biochemists found out that apoptosis (programmed cell death) can be regulated using the EndoG enzyme. The discovery will lead to a better understanding of cell and tissue protection mechanisms. The results of the study were published in the Biochimie journal.

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Fortune favours the bold: Can behaviour explain why some animal species become invasive?

A new study has found that adaptability is the key to invasive species succeeding in non-native environments.

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Strongly agree: The number of response options matter when using a Likert Scale

You've probably seen a Likert Scale even if you don't know the ubiquitous measurement tool by name. In its traditional form, a researcher presents a statement followed by five response options of varying intensity and attitude. For instance, "I'm pleased with the reliability of my internet service provider (ISP)." Do you strongly disagree, disagree, neither agree nor disagree, agree or strongly ag

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New rules for lung transplants lead to unintended consequences

A recent policy change in allocating donor lungs has had several unintended consequences, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The new policy has imposed a significant logistical burden on organ procurement organizations and surgical teams involved in retrieving the donated organs.

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Minor sleep loss can put your job at risk

Just 16 minutes shaved off your regular sleep routine can dramatically impact job performance the next day. A new study shows that slight dip of sleep causes workers to have poor judgement and fall off-task.

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CRISPR gene-editing creates wave of exotic model organisms

CRISPR gene-editing creates wave of exotic model organisms CRISPR gene-editing creates wave of exotic model organisms, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01300-9 But the practical challenges of breeding and maintaining unconventional lab animals persist.

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A simple approach to dating bones

A simple approach to dating bones A simple approach to dating bones, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01247-x Forensic anthropologist Ann Ross describes the techniques she uses to determine the age of human skeletons.

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Nature celebrates the one-page wonders too pithy to last

Nature celebrates the one-page wonders too pithy to last Nature celebrates the one-page wonders too pithy to last , Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01233-3 Our 150th anniversary offers an opportunity to revel in the short, quirky and fun formats of our past.

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When a conflict of interest is not a conflict

When a conflict of interest is not a conflict When a conflict of interest is not a conflict, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01285-5 When a conflict of interest is not a conflict

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Protect our right to light

Protect our right to light Protect our right to light, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01238-y Skyscrapers in cities rob people of sunlight and put human health, well-being and sustainability at risk, warn Karolina M. Zielinska-Dabkowska and Kyra Xavia.

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Artist of deep time

Artist of deep time Artist of deep time, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01240-4 Philip Ball talks to Katie Paterson, whose artworks take on climate change, Moon dust and the death of stars.

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Germline-editing moratorium — why we should resist it

Germline-editing moratorium — why we should resist it Germline-editing moratorium — why we should resist it, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01292-6 Germline-editing moratorium — why we should resist it

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01245-z How Nature reported hopes for the first trans-Atlantic flight in 1919, and plans to connect land-based gas wells to the UK national grid in 1969.

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Sexual harassment is pervasive in US physics programmes

Sexual harassment is pervasive in US physics programmes Sexual harassment is pervasive in US physics programmes, Published online: 22 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01303-6 Survey of undergraduate women finds that most experienced some type of unwanted sexual attention during their physics studies.

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The Physics of a Bolt Smashing a Watermelon (or Your Brain)

It's easier to follow rules when you know why they exist. In this case, you can calculate the force of an object hitting a melon to see why hard hats matter.

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Women's Homicidal Rage Is All Over TV—and It's Funny

'Killing Eve' and 'Santa Clarita Diet' aren't the first to center female criminals, but their tone and confidence are a post-#MeToo internet-y revelation.

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What the Press Is Missing About Pete Buttigieg

After nearly every election, journalists and pundits bloviate during postmortems at Harvard’s Kennedy School and the Aspen Institute about how there were too many “process” stories in their campaign coverage—too many articles and segments about the horse race, how big the crowds were, and how much money the candidates raised. Reporters promise to do more in-depth reporting during the next cycle,

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X-ray observations reveal insights into the nature of the pulsar wind nebula 3C 58

Analysis of the new data from X-ray observations using NASA's NuSTAR spacecraft and archival data from the agency's Chandra X-ray space observatory, has yielded more insights into the nature of a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) named 3C 58. Results of the analysis, presented in a paper published April 12 on arXiv.org, could also shed more light on particle distribution in the population of known PWNe.

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Students develop acoustic device to detect whales near offshore wind farm

A group of six ocean engineering students at the University of Rhode Island has developed an acoustic device that successfully detects the sounds made by whales and other marine mammals in the vicinity of the Block Island Wind Farm. The invention was created for the students' senior capstone design class, a yearlong project that requires students to call upon all of the skills and knowledge they l

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17-årige Nanna taler alvorsord om klima med EU-kommissær

Seks unge klimaaktivister er inviteret til Bruxelles af EU-kommissionens næstformand.

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US expands probe into air bag failures to 12.3M vehicles

U.S. auto safety regulators have expanded an investigation into malfunctioning air bag controls to include 12.3 million vehicles because the bags may not inflate in a crash. The problem could be responsible for as many as eight deaths.

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Students develop acoustic device to detect whales near offshore wind farm

A group of six ocean engineering students at the University of Rhode Island has developed an acoustic device that successfully detects the sounds made by whales and other marine mammals in the vicinity of the Block Island Wind Farm. The invention was created for the students' senior capstone design class, a yearlong project that requires students to call upon all of the skills and knowledge they l

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Heterogeneous catalyst goes enzymatic

What if there were no tunnels in the Swiss Alps? Anyone trying to travel through them would have to go up and down hills and zigzag around the ranges. A lot more energy and time is saved by passing through a tunnel than climbing a mountain. This is similar to how catalysts work: they speed up chemical reactions by lowering the energy required to reach the desired physical state.

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Researchers describe the mechanism of a protein upon infection of the 'Fasciola hepatica'

Fasciola hepatica is a parasite that causes on average 3.2 million in losses in the agricultural sector every year worldwide. It is a two-centimeter-long worm at adult size that mainly affects ruminants by means of water or raw vegetables that act as vehicles of infection. Moveover, in developing countries with deficient sanitary control systems, more than five million people have been infected. T

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CLASP-2: Investigating the magnetic solar chromosphere

Four years ago, an international team (USA, Japan and Europe) carried out an unprecedented suborbital space experiment called CLASP-1, motivated by theoretical investigations carried out at the IAC by Javier Trujillo Bueno and his research group. After the outstanding success of that mission, NASA launched CLASP-2 from a launch center near Las Cruces (USA). CLASP-2 has made it possible to detect f

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Semiconductor scientists discover effect that was thought impossible

A physical effect known as superinjection underlies modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and lasers. For decades this effect was believed to occur only in semiconductor heterostructures—that is, structures composed of two or more semiconductor materials. Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have found superinjection to be possible in homostructures, which are made of a si

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Biochemists discover an enzyme to stop cell death

RUDN biochemists found out that apoptosis (programmed cell death) can be regulated using the EndoG enzyme. The discovery will lead to a better understanding of cell and tissue protection mechanisms. The results of the study were published in the Biochimie journal.

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Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite pathways in forest recovery

The composition of regrowing wet and dry tropical forests follow opposite pathways while these forests age. This fact has significant consequences for forest restoration initiatives. The findings of a new study published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution provide insights to select the best tree species for a forest area, thus enhancing and accelerating tropical forest restoration success.

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Scientists explore the unknown behaviour of gold nanoparticles with neutrons

Nanoparticles of less than 100 nanometres in size are used to engineer new materials and nanotechnologies across a variety of sectors. Their small size means these particles have a very high surface area to volume ratio and their properties depend strongly on their size, shape and bound molecules. This offers engineers greater flexibility when designing materials that can be used in our everyday l

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Researchers find naturally occurring photocurrents in inorganic mineral systems

A team of researchers with members affiliated with several institutions in China, one in Canada and one in the U.S. has found evidence of naturally occurring photocurrents in inorganic mineral systems. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of naturally occurring varnishes and other rock surface coatings in different parts of Ch

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From Industry to Academia

Academic research and industrial drug discovery have always been on separate paths, but my impression is that the two understand each other better now than they have at any time during my career. That’s in no small part due to the number of industrial scientists who have moved into academia (itself in no small part due to the employment turmoil in the industry). Here’s a perspective from James Ba

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Researchers describe the mechanism of a protein upon infection of the 'Fasciola hepatica'

Fasciola hepatica is a parasite that causes on average 3.2 million in losses in the agricultural sector every year worldwide. It is a two-centimeter-long worm at adult size that mainly affects ruminants by means of water or raw vegetables that act as vehicles of infection. Moveover, in developing countries with deficient sanitary control systems, more than five million people have been infected. T

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Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite pathways in forest recovery

The composition of regrowing wet and dry tropical forests follow opposite pathways while these forests age. This fact has significant consequences for forest restoration initiatives. The findings of a new study published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution provide insights to select the best tree species for a forest area, thus enhancing and accelerating tropical forest restoration success.

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Verizon's profits surge as it waits for 5G – CNET

Verizon is still adding wireless subscribers, but traditional phone customers are declining, as the company prepares for what's next in wireless.

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Team identifies 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia

Scientists have identified 104 high-risk genes for schizophrenia, a discovery that suggests it may be possible to detect and treat the disease before the onset of symptoms. The finding also supports the view that schizophrenia is a developmental disease, researchers say. “This framework opens the door for several research directions,” says Bingshan Li, associate professor of molecular physiology

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Study opens a new route to achieving invisibility without using metamaterials

A pair of researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating. Their findings could enable invisibility of natural materials at optical frequency and eventually lead to a simpler way of enhancing optoelectronic devices, including sensing and communication technologies.

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Advances in cryo-EM materials may aid cancer and biomedical research

Cryogenic-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) has been a game changer in the field of medical research, but the substrate, used to freeze and view samples under a microscope, has not advanced much in decades. Now, thanks to a collaboration between Penn State researchers and the applied science company Protochips, Inc., this is no longer the case.

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The Mueller Report Was My Tipping Point

Let’s start at the end of this story. This weekend, I read Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report twice, and realized that enough was enough—I needed to do something. I’ve worked on every Republican presidential transition team for the past 10 years and recently served as counsel to the Republican-led House Financial Services Committee. My permanent job is as a law professor at the George Mason

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First-ever open public alerts now available from LIGO

Two new probable gravitational waves—ripples in the fabric of spacetime caused by cataclysmic cosmic events and first predicted by Albert Einstein over 100 years ago—have been detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo observatory in Italy in the first weeks after the detectors were updated. The source of both waves is believed to be the merging of a p

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Stopping climate change will pump trillions into the economy

Climate change is no longer a financial problem, just a political one. Mitigating climate change by decarbonizing our economy would add trillions of dollars in new investments. Public attitudes toward climate change have shifted steadily in favor of action. Now it's up to elected leaders. The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming List Price: $27.00 New From: $16.18 in Stock Used From: $16.91 in

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Archaeologists unearth more evidence that when a civilization drinks together, it stays together

Science The Wari people used their corn-based beer to spread their culture across Peru. The Wari empire, an ancient Peruvian civilization that predated the Inca, made advances in agriculture, art, architecture, and warfare. They also drank a ton of beer.

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Will ocean seafood farming sink or swim? Study evaluates its potential

Seafood farming in the ocean—or marine aquaculture—is the fastest growing sector of the global food system, and it shows no sign of slowing. Open-ocean farms have vast space for expansion, and consumer demand continues to rise.

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Experts discuss challenges and opportunities in disposing of waste

Waste ain't what it used to be. Since China largely closed the door to imported garbage last year, recycling costs have increased considerably and programs have disappeared or scaled back in communities across the United States. The shift creates an opportunity for reassessing how we create and dispose of waste.

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Researchers work to genetically modify flatworms and unlock their regenerative powers

Slice it into a hundred pieces if you want, and the millimeters-long flatworm called a planarian won't particularly care. Each piece can grow back into a new worm. But how they do that, and what scientists could learn about how to regenerate our own bodies, has remained mysterious because one of the most valuable investigative tools – gene editing – has so far not worked in these animals.

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Will ocean seafood farming sink or swim? Study evaluates its potential

Seafood farming in the ocean—or marine aquaculture—is the fastest growing sector of the global food system, and it shows no sign of slowing. Open-ocean farms have vast space for expansion, and consumer demand continues to rise.

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Researchers work to genetically modify flatworms and unlock their regenerative powers

Slice it into a hundred pieces if you want, and the millimeters-long flatworm called a planarian won't particularly care. Each piece can grow back into a new worm. But how they do that, and what scientists could learn about how to regenerate our own bodies, has remained mysterious because one of the most valuable investigative tools – gene editing – has so far not worked in these animals.

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Research on disk galaxies sheds light on movement of stars

University of Arkansas astrophysicists have taken an important step toward solving the mystery of how disk galaxies maintain the shape of their spiral arms. Their findings support the theory that these arms are created by a wave of denser matter that creates the spiral pattern as it travels across the galaxy.

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High-fidelity simulations point the way to optimizing heat transfer in current and next-generation reactors

Engineers must manage a maelstrom in the core of operating nuclear reactors. Nuclear reactions deposit an extraordinary amount of heat in the fuel rods, setting off a frenzy of boiling, bubbling, and evaporation in surrounding fluid. From this churning flow, operators harness the removal of heat.

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Designing water infrastructure for climate uncertainty

In Kenya's second largest city, Mombasa, the demand for water is expected to double by 2035 to an estimated 300,000 cubic meters per day. In Mombasa's current warm and humid climate, that water comes from a substantial volume of precipitation that may also change significantly as the region warms in the coming decades in line with global climate model projections.

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Greenland’s ice sheet is melting faster than we thought and shows no signs of stopping

Environment The thawing will likely continue for decades. More grim news from the Arctic: Greenland’s ice sheet has shrunk six times faster than normal since the 1980s, and it could keep melting for decades even if humans…

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Watching molecules split in real time

Using a new X-ray technique, a team of researchers was able to watch in real time as a molecule split apart into two new molecules. The method could be used to look at chemical reactions that other techniques can't catch, for instance in catalysis, photovoltaics, peptide and combustion research. The team, led by researchers from Brown University in collaboration with the Department of Energy's SLA

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People who use marijuana tend to weigh a bit less

People who use marijuana weigh less compared to those who don’t, according to a new study. The finding runs contrary to the belief that marijuana users who get “the munchies” will ultimately gain more weight. “Over a three-year period, all participants showed a weight increase, but interestingly, those who used marijuana had less of an increase compared to those that never used,” says Omayma Alsh

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Hvordan håndterer man en hel befolknings arvemasse?

PLUS. Mød Peter Løngreen, der har ansvaret for, at danskernes dna-oplysninger bliver opbevaret på betryggende vis i Nationalt Genom Center.

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In Automation, the 'Last Motion' Will Come Before the Last Mile

Opinion: Robots seem to be the solution to the last-mile problem. But mechanization will likely come for a different part of the process first.

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‘An Elegant Defense’ explores the immune system’s softer side

The lives of four people helped or harmed by their body’s natural defenses illustrate why immunology has become one of the hottest fields in science.

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Professor Zhao’s paper mill of fraud

A cancer research professor in China runs a paper mill, sources claim he sells first authorships for a bribe. Problem for his customers: the peer-reviewed papers they pay for, contain fake data.

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Image of the Day: Microbes At War

Scientists identify microbes in mice that help defend against Salmonella.

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Behind the Curve – Flat Earth Exposed

I finally watched Behind The Curve , a documentary about the Flat Earth movement. It is a powerful documentary which provides important insights into this fascinating phenomenon. If you haven’t seen it yet, I highly recommend it. For me the most interesting moments were those when the Flat Earth believers the film focuses on show a flash of insight. They never quite get there, but they have all t

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Samsung facing crucial test over Galaxy Fold delay, analysts warn

South Korean tech giant Samsung Electronics is "facing its biggest test ever", analysts said Tuesday after it delayed the release of its $2,000 foldable phone over screen problems.

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Twitter triples profits, global user base steadies

Twitter said Tuesday profits soared in the past quarter, and President Donald Trump immediately claimed credit for the success of the short messaging platform even as he renewed his allegations of bias.

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Twitter shares lift off as profits soar; Trump weighs in

Twitter shares flew higher Tuesday after a surprisingly robust quarterly report, which sparked a fresh tirade from President Donald Trump over his claims of unfair treatment by social media.

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Teen sues Apple for $1 billion, blames facial recognition at stores for his arrest

The 18-year-old New Yorker claims he “was forced to respond to multiple false allegations" in several states, which caused severe stress and damaged his reputation.

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Meal kits beat groceries in emissions head-to-head

Meal kits have a much lower overall carbon footprint than the same meals purchased at a grocery store, despite having more packaging, according to new research. Meal kit services, which deliver a box of pre-portioned ingredients and a chef-selected recipe to your door, are hugely popular but get a bad environmental rap due to perceived packaging waste. Average greenhouse gas emissions were one-th

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SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule lost after 'anomaly' during ground test

The Crew Dragon capsule is intended to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station, but a possible explosion during a ground test may set launches back

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Coal-free spells are good, but the UK is falling short of carbon goals

Despite growth in renewable energy, the UK still uses plenty of gas – and other sectors are failing to cut emissions

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What's the Controversy Over the Baby T. Rex Listed on eBay?

The partial skeleton of a baby Tyrannosaurus rex is for sale on eBay for nearly $3 million. Paleontologists are furious about it.

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Ringtail Cats: Photos of the 'Cutest Animal in North America'

This cutie pie may be wild but the ringtail cat sometimes acts like Fluffy. It will lick its forepaw, then use that forepaw to wipe and clean its ears, face and snout.

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What Makes the Strong Force So Special?

The Force is (super) strong with these quarks.

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The Worst Romantic Couple on Game of Thrones

This story contains major spoilers through the most recent episode of Game of Thrones. Sunday’s episode of Game of Thrones announced its theme early. “The things we do for love,” Bran Stark said, echoing the words Jaime Lannister had spoken to him in the series premiere all those years ago. “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms,” set on the eve of the Battle of Winterfell, did the emotional work that m

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Parenting Like an Economist Is a Lot Less Stressful

As a genre, parenting books generally don’t give their readers much room to think through what’s best for them and their children—they offer plenty in the way of “how to,” but little in the way of “whether to” or “why to.” “By not explaining why,” writes Emily Oster in her new book, Cribsheet: A Data-Driven Guide to Better, More Relaxed Parenting, From Birth to Preschool , “we remove people’s abi

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Letter: The Census Citizenship Question Is a ‘Nonissue’

A Supreme Court Case That Will Affect Every Aspect of National Life Today the Supreme Court will hear Department of Commerce v. New York. The case concerns whether next year’s federal census can include a question asking whether each member of a household is a U.S. citizen—something it hasn’t done since 1950. The outcome, Garrett Epps wrote recently, “will affect virtually every aspect of our nat

12h

Greenland Is Falling Apart

The Greenland Ice Sheet is the world’s second-largest reservoir of fresh water sitting on the world’s largest island. It is almost mind-bogglingly huge. If Greenland were suddenly transported to the central United States, it would be a very bad day for about 65 million people, who would be crushed instantly. But for the sake of science journalism, imagine that Greenland’s southernmost tip displac

12h

You look but do not find: why the absence of evidence can be a useful thing

Imagine you're looking for your keys and you think you might have left them on the bookshelf. But when you look, you see nothing but books. A natural conclusion to draw is that the keys are not there.

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A new eye on the cosmos

How do galaxies form and evolve? And how do central supermassive black holes form in galaxies and influence their hosts? Those are two of the big questions that Tufts astronomers hope to answer when they start using a new, highly sensitive instrument that's set to come online in a few years on a landmark telescope in Hawaii.

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Scientists find an underground bacterium that could live on Mars

Tomsk State University microbiologists were the first in the world to isolate Desulforudis audaxviator from deep underground waters. Translated from Latin, its name means "a brave traveler". Scientists from different countries have hunted for this bacterium for over 10 years. The increased interest by researchers is because the microorganism receives energy in the absence of light and oxygen. Theo

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Junior AI researchers are in demand by universities and industry

Junior AI researchers are in demand by universities and industry Junior AI researchers are in demand by universities and industry, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01248-w Opportunities for moving between academia and business are expanding for scientists as companies step up recruitment.

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Droplet trains reveal how nature navigates blood traffic

Nearing a decision point, online traffic maps recommend a less-crowded route over the other ways with several slow spots. For most of us, the choice seems clear. Still, have you ever wondered whether this collectively preferring one path may result in a new traffic jam along the chosen road? Indeed, traffic congestions constantly change as the accumulation of drivers' preferences for the "faster p

12h

Scientists find an underground bacterium that could live on Mars

Tomsk State University microbiologists were the first in the world to isolate Desulforudis audaxviator from deep underground waters. Translated from Latin, its name means "a brave traveler". Scientists from different countries have hunted for this bacterium for over 10 years. The increased interest by researchers is because the microorganism receives energy in the absence of light and oxygen. Theo

12h

Census Citizenship Question Riles Tech and Privacy Groups

The Trump administration wants to add a citizenship question to the 2020 Census. Tech companies and privacy advocates think that’s a bad idea.

12h

Inside the Quietly Lucrative Business of Donating Human Eggs

Across the US, women are being paid to donate their eggs to aspiring parents. The business is well-paid, under-regulated, and little-studied.

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A 'Blockchain Bandit' Is Guessing Private Keys and Scoring Millions

The larger lesson of an ongoing Ethereum crime spree: Be careful about who's generating your cryptocurrency keys.

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The desperate race to cool the ocean before it’s too late

Holly Jean Buck is a fellow at UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability. This is an adapted excerpt from her upcoming book After Geoengineering: Climate Tragedy, Repair, and Restoration (September 2019, Verso Books).

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Dansk forsker om voldsomt tab af indlandsis: Det begyndte allerede at gå galt i 80'erne

Anders Anker Bjørk har været med til afdække, at indlandsisen smelter seks gange hurtigere end i startfirserne.

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Did a Meteor from Another Star Strike Earth in 2014?

Questionable data clouds the potential discovery of the first known interstellar fireball — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Did a Meteor from Another Star Strike Earth in 2014?

Questionable data clouds the potential discovery of the first known interstellar fireball — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model and will help researchers to better understand and develop cures for diseases like cancer.

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Scientists create first billion-atom biomolecular simulation

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have created the largest simulation to date of an entire gene of DNA, a feat that required one billion atoms to model and will help researchers to better understand and develop cures for diseases like cancer.

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Can a Wi-Fi network ever be completely secure?

There are many ways in which hackers and crackers can break into a Wi-Fi network. It is trivial if the network uses out of date security protocols or weak passwords. But even if the system is setup with the latest security measures, strong passwords, and firewall and malware protection, there are still ways and means that a malicious third party might access such a network. Writing in the Internat

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Research team discovers perfectly imperfect twist on nanowire growth

For years, researchers have been trying to find ways to grow an optimal nanowire, using crystals with perfectly aligned layers all along the wire.

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“A new form of plagiarism:” When researchers fake co-authors’ names

There’s a new publishing trend in town, says Mario Biagioli: Faking co-authors’ names. Biagioli, distinguished professor of law and science and technology studies and director of the Center for Innovation Studies at the University of California, Davis, writes in an article in Trends in Chemistry that it’s “the emergence of a new form of plagiarism … Continue reading “A new form of plagiarism:” Whe

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Teknologien rykker: Snart sætter flere anlæg sol og vind på flaske

Overskudsstrøm fra vindmøller og solcelleanlæg kan lagres som brint, og teknologien vinder frem, viser ny rapport.

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Study shines light on safety of deworming programs

A new study has identified no major differences between the microbiomes of people infected with roundworm or hookworm and uninfected peers. The investigators found no evidence that curing either of these infections with albendazole treatment has a harmful effect on the microbiome, but they identified specific changes that result from curing hookworm infections and from albendazole.

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Scientists discover how 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut

A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists led by the University of Birmingham have discovered.

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How drug-resistant E. coli succeeds as a public health menace

In a study published this week, an international team of researchers conducted high-resolution analyses of more than 850 drug-resistant genomes to identify survival strategies employed by drug-resistant Escherichia coli clones. The research is published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

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The Lost Art of Deadline Writing

Patrick Leger B ap . That’s how Damon Runyon, reporting on Game 1 of the 1923 World Series, Giants versus Yankees, for the New York American , records the sound of Casey Stengel connecting with a pitch from “Bullet Joe” Bush. Bat meets ball, the essential atomic encounter—and Runyon puts the sound of it, the briefest, most prodigious syllable, right in the center of his column. Everything leads t

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Australia WWII ship sunk by Japanese submarine found

An Australian freighter sunk by a Japanese submarine during World War II has been located "relatively intact" in waters off the country's southeast coast, archeologists said Tuesday.

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Amazon and Casino to roll out grocery delivery in France

US online retailer Amazon and French food giant Casino said Tuesday they would roll out their partnership in rapid delivery of groceries to further French cities in the coming months.

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Scientists discover how 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut

A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists led by the University of Birmingham have discovered.

13h

Scientists discover how 'superbug' E. coli clones take over human gut

A 'superbug' clone of E. coli has evolved to prevent itself from becoming so dominant that it could potentially wipe out the bacteria from existence, scientists led by the University of Birmingham have discovered.

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How an obscure sexually transmitted parasite tangos with the immune system

Scientists are working out how Trichomonas vaginalis, one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted infections, causes problems in women and men.

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A Growing Gap in Consumers’ Awareness of Algorithmic Influence

A new digital divide is forming not around technological access, but in people's understanding of the factors influencing their online experiences. As savvier users choose to opt out of data sharing and algorithmic curation, many consumers are relying even more on algorithms to guide their decisions.

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The three challenges keeping cars from being fully autonomous

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Förtroende för medier ökar – men klyftorna växer

Svenska folket har fortsatt högt förtroende för medier. Det gäller framför allt radio och tv, där fler än hälften (56 procent) har ett högt eller ganska högt förtroende. En tredjedel (33 procent) anser sig ha ett lika högt förtroende för dagspress. Däremot har det blivit allt mer tydligt att förtroendet för medier varierar beroende på var på den politiska skalan en person anser sig höra hemma.

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Tjejlopp gör skillnad för kvinnor

Kvinnorna siktar in sig på att prestera så bra som möjligt och det är det fysiska utförandet som är det viktigaste. Det är en av slutsatserna i Karin S. Lindelöfs och Annie Woubes forskning kring tjejlopp, som pågått under åren 2011–2018 vid Centrum för genusvetenskap vid Uppsala universitet, och som nu är avslutad. – Deltagarna fokuserar på och blir stärkta av den fysiska prestationen. De uppska

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Australia’s dingoes may keep feral cats in check and protect wildlife

Feral cats have contributed to the extinction of 20 of Australia’s native mammals, but another predator – the dingo – might stop them causing more damage

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Rise in electric community car schemes in Wales

Supporters say they can make it easier for people in rural areas to get around.

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Multiple myeloma: DNA rearrangement may predict poor outcomes

In multiple myeloma, Ig lambda translocations may indicate poor outcomes and resistance to immunomodulatory drugs such as lenalidomide.

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Study finds improved WIC food packages reduced obesity risk for children

A decade ago, the federal government overhauled nutrition standards for food packages in its primary food assistance program for young mothers and their children. The change reduced obesity risks for 4-year-olds, according to a new study lead by a Tulane University researcher and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

In research appearing in the advanced online edition of the journal Nature Communications, Karen Andersen, Samira Kiani and their colleagues at Arizona State University describe a method of rendering the gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 'immunosilent,' potentially allowing the editing and repair of genes to be accomplished reliably and stealthily.

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Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues

Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr. Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively 'weld' the cells together.

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Unblocking arteries after heart attack may be lifesaver for older patients

Among heart attack patients 75 years and older, the oldest of those patients were less likely to receive a procedure to open blocked arteries than younger patients.Older patients were more likely to survive heart attacks if they had the procedure, called percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI.

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Mobility may predict elderly heart attack survivors' repeat hospital stays

Standing up from a seated position and walking across a room may help predict which heart attack survivors over age 75 will require repeat hospital stays within a month.

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Arctic warming will accelerate climate change and impact global economy

Carbon released into the atmosphere by the increasing loss of Arctic permafrost, combined with higher solar absorption by the Earth's surface due to the melting of sea ice and land snow, will accelerate climate change — and have a multi-trillion dollar impact on the world economy.

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New approach to repair fetal membranes may prevent birth complications

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London and University College London have developed a new approach to repair defects in fetal membranes which could prevent life-long medical conditions and disabilities associated with preterm birth.

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Sony’s new 4K OLED TVs start at $2,499.99

Following their announcement at CES in January, Sony has announced pricing for its OLED and LCD TVs for 2019. The lineup includes Sony’s first ever 8K LCD TV, the Z9G, which will …

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Fine root lignin content is well predictable with near-infrared spectroscopy

Fine root lignin content is well predictable with near-infrared spectroscopy Fine root lignin content is well predictable with near-infrared spectroscopy, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42837-z Fine root lignin content is well predictable with near-infrared spectroscopy

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Fertilizer management and soil type influence grain zinc and iron concentration under contrasting smallholder cropping systems in Zimbabwe

Fertilizer management and soil type influence grain zinc and iron concentration under contrasting smallholder cropping systems in Zimbabwe Fertilizer management and soil type influence grain zinc and iron concentration under contrasting smallholder cropping systems in Zimbabwe, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42828-0 Fertilizer management and soil type influence grain zinc

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Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Evocalcet in Japanese Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Receiving Hemodialysis

Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Evocalcet in Japanese Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Receiving Hemodialysis Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Evocalcet in Japanese Patients with Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Receiving Hemodialysis, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42017-z Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Evocalcet in Japanese Patients with Secondary Hyperparath

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Novel DNA Biosensor for Direct Determination of Carrageenan

Novel DNA Biosensor for Direct Determination of Carrageenan Novel DNA Biosensor for Direct Determination of Carrageenan, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42757-y Novel DNA Biosensor for Direct Determination of Carrageenan

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Low-temperature microstructural studies on superconducting CaFe2As2

Low-temperature microstructural studies on superconducting CaFe 2 As 2 Low-temperature microstructural studies on superconducting CaFe 2 As 2 , Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42660-6 Low-temperature microstructural studies on superconducting CaFe 2 As 2

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Mistletoe extract Fraxini inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer by down-regulating c-Myc expression

Mistletoe extract Fraxini inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer by down-regulating c-Myc expression Mistletoe extract Fraxini inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer by down-regulating c-Myc expression, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-41444-2 Mistletoe extract Fraxini inhibits the proliferation of liver cancer by down-regulating c-Myc expression

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Iroquois transcription factor irx2a is required for multiciliated and transporter cell fate decisions during zebrafish pronephros development

Iroquois transcription factor irx2a is required for multiciliated and transporter cell fate decisions during zebrafish pronephros development Iroquois transcription factor irx2a is required for multiciliated and transporter cell fate decisions during zebrafish pronephros development, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42943-y Iroquois transcription factor irx2a is required fo

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Spiking Neural Network Modelling Approach Reveals How Mindfulness Training Rewires the Brain

Spiking Neural Network Modelling Approach Reveals How Mindfulness Training Rewires the Brain Spiking Neural Network Modelling Approach Reveals How Mindfulness Training Rewires the Brain, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42863-x Spiking Neural Network Modelling Approach Reveals How Mindfulness Training Rewires the Brain

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Ny professor på Sjællands Universitetshospital skal arbejde for større social lighed på kræftområdet

Susanne Dalton er ny professor på Sjællands Universitetshospital, hvor hun skal lede nyt forskningscenter.

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It-system har lavet fejl i 228.000 danske pas

Det skal nu afklares, om alle berørte borgere skal have nyt pas.

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Organopolymer with dual chromophores and fast charge-transfer properties for sustainable photocatalysis

Organopolymer with dual chromophores and fast charge-transfer properties for sustainable photocatalysis Organopolymer with dual chromophores and fast charge-transfer properties for sustainable photocatalysis, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09316-5 While photoredox catalysis offers a new dimension to chemical synthesis, there are few heterogeneous organocatalysts for metal

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K27-linked ubiquitination of BRAF by ITCH engages cytokine response to maintain MEK-ERK signaling

K27-linked ubiquitination of BRAF by ITCH engages cytokine response to maintain MEK-ERK signaling K27-linked ubiquitination of BRAF by ITCH engages cytokine response to maintain MEK-ERK signaling, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09844-0 BRAF drives MEK/ERK activation to facilitate tumorigenesis. Here, the authors show that in response to pro-inflammatory cytokines, ITCH me

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Binary tree-inspired digital dendrimer

Binary tree-inspired digital dendrimer Binary tree-inspired digital dendrimer, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09957-6 Digital polymers with precisely ordered units for next-generation data storage media are continually investigated for higher storage capacity. Here the authors show the synthesis of information-coded 2D digital dendrimers and the generated data matrix barc

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Ultrafast charge transfer coupled with lattice phonons in two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks

Ultrafast charge transfer coupled with lattice phonons in two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks Ultrafast charge transfer coupled with lattice phonons in two-dimensional covalent organic frameworks, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09872-w The donor–acceptor (D-A) conjugation has been adopted for two-dimensional (2D) covalent organic frameworks (COFs) for efficient ge

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The future of Southeast Asia’s forests

The future of Southeast Asia’s forests The future of Southeast Asia’s forests, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09646-4 Southeast Asia’s forests play important roles in the society, but the region is a deforestation hotspot. Here, the authors examined the future changes in the region’s forests under different scenarios and found that by 2050 under a regional rivalry/rocky r

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A unified strategy toward total syntheses of lindenane sesquiterpenoid [4 + 2] dimers

A unified strategy toward total syntheses of lindenane sesquiterpenoid [4 + 2] dimers A unified strategy toward total syntheses of lindenane sesquiterpenoid [4 + 2] dimers, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09858-8 Of the 3 classes of dimeric lindenane sesquiterpenoids, only type I And II have been targeted in total synthesis. Here, the authors report a unified strategy to s

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Nanoprinting organic molecules at the quantum level

Nanoprinting organic molecules at the quantum level Nanoprinting organic molecules at the quantum level, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09877-5 Integration of emitters for nanophotonic applications requires precise control over their position and orientation. Here, Hail et al. demonstrate the positioning of a single and a small number of oriented molecules with subwavelen

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An inner activation gate controls TMEM16F phospholipid scrambling

An inner activation gate controls TMEM16F phospholipid scrambling An inner activation gate controls TMEM16F phospholipid scrambling, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09778-7 TMEM16F is an enigmatic Ca2 + -activated phospholipid scramblase (CaPLSase) that passively transports phospholipids. Here authors identify an inner activation gate and its disruption profoundly alters T

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Melting permafrost in Arctic will have $70tn climate impact – study

Study shows how destabilised natural systems will worsen man-made problem The release of methane and carbon dioxide from thawing permafrost will accelerate global warming and add up to $70tn (£54tn) to the world’s climate bill, according to the most advanced study yet of the economic consequences of a melting Arctic . If countries fail to improve on their Paris a greement commitments , this feedb

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Proofreading the book of life: Gene editing made safer

The advance of science is something like the wandering of an explorer through an uncharted jungle. Often, the dense undergrowth can seem impenetrable, but at certain privileged moments, a clearing opens, and an entirely new landscape emerges.

14h

Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues

Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr. Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively 'weld' the cells together.

14h

Arctic warming will accelerate climate change and impact global economy

Carbon released into the atmosphere by the increasing loss of Arctic permafrost, combined with higher solar absorption by the Earth's surface due to the melting of sea ice and land snow, will accelerate climate change—and have a multi-trillion dollar impact on the world economy.

14h

A European initiative to unclog pipeline for new medicines

A European initiative to unclog pipeline for new medicines A European initiative to unclog pipeline for new medicines, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01293-5 A European initiative to unclog pipeline for new medicines

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Automation: Chemistry shoots for the Moon

Automation: Chemistry shoots for the Moon Automation: Chemistry shoots for the Moon, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01246-y A new class of chemical instrumentation seeks to alleviate the tedium and complexity of organic syntheses.

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Manage risk of accidental gene editing of germline

Manage risk of accidental gene editing of germline Manage risk of accidental gene editing of germline, Published online: 23 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-