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nyheder2019april25

Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm

Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in 'good people,' psychologists report.

18min

Drik ikke vandet: Giftigt pesticid fundet i vandboringer vest for København

Fundet i Egedal har fået Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed til at opstille tanke med rent drikkevand.

2h

New insights into quantum measurements

Researchers from the University of Bristol have shed new light on the process of quantum measurement, one of the defining, and most quantum features of quantum mechanics.

2h

'Resulting': Don’t mistake a bad outcome for a bad decision

Bad outcomes get criticized as evidence of bad decisions, but that's not necessarily so. Here, poker pro Annie Duke desribes a simple thought experiment that separates decisions from outcomes. It is quite possible to make a very good decision that, due to external factors, results in a bad outcome. Thinking in Bets: Making Smarter Decisions When You Don't Have All the Facts List Price: $26.00 New

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Wild bee males and females like different flowers

The females and males of many wild bee species visit very different flowers for food, say researchers. In fact, the diets of female and male bees of the same species could be as different as the diets of different bee species, according to a study in PLOS ONE . “As we get a better sense of what makes flowers attractive to different kinds of bees, maybe we can get smarter about bee conservation,”

3min

Deep-ocean creatures living a 'feast-or-famine' existence because of energy fluxes

Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits.

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Store mængder NOx fra krydstogtskibe plager havnenære etagebyggerier

Hvert sekund udleder et krydstogtskib i Københavns eller Aarhus’ havn den samme mængde NOx som 3.500 biler. Det går hårdt ud over nærliggende lejligheder i over 25 meters højde, viser en ny kortlægning.

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Human Composting May Soon Be Legal in Washington State

When a loved one dies, you typically get two choices for the human remains: Put the body in a coffin or cremate it into ashes. But now, another option may soon be possible — "natural organic reduction," known as human composting — at least in Washington.

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Informella strukturer hindrar pappaledighet

Informella strukturer på arbetsplatsen kan vara en orsak till att svenska pappor bara tar ut en tredjedel av de dagar som mammorna tar ut. Det menar forskare som låtit 56 anställda på olika nivåer i fem stora privata företag svara på frågor om pappors föräldraledighet.

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Barfing neutron stars reveal their inner guts

We don't really understand neutron stars. Oh, we know that they are – they're the leftover remnants of some of the most massive stars in the universe – but revealing their inner workings is a little bit tricky, because the physics keeping them alive is only poorly understood.

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Filling in the gaps of connected car data helps transportation planners

An engineer has created a method to fill in the gaps of available connected vehicle data, which will give transportation planners a more accurate picture of traffic in their cities. It is also a more cost-effective data gathering system than what is currently available.

18min

Surprising quantum effect in hard disk drive material

Scientists have further explored a new effect that enhances their ability to control the direction of electron spin in certain materials. Their discovery may lead to more powerful and energy-efficient materials for information storage.

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Snowmelt causes seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera

A spring surge of meltwater, seeping through vertically tilted layers of rock, caused a seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera in 2017, according to new research.

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Creativity is not just for the young, study finds

If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story. A new study of winners of the Nobel Prize in economics finds that there are two different life cycles of creativity, one that hits some people early in their career and another that more often strikes later in life.

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Lung cancer under-recognized in people who have never smoked

Lung cancer in people who have never smoked is more common than most people think, and on the rise. Historically strong, and correct, messaging on smoking and lung cancer has inadvertently contributed to lung cancer receiving much less attention than breast, prostate and ovarian cancers. Increasing awareness could help lead to earlier diagnosis, reduce the blame culture around lung cancer and re-b

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Peanut Allergy Immunotherapy Increases Anaphylaxis Risk: Study

Although the oral treatment seems to work, an analysis of the results from 12 clinical trials finds kids who got an immunotherapy have a greater rate of serious reactions.

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How did the ancient Egyptians catch and mummify millions of ibises?

Egyptians mummified millions of sacred ibises thousands of years ago. Analysing their DNA seems to show they were sourced from the wild rather than large farms

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What happens with the Arctic and subarctic lakes in the offseason?

Scientists at TSU, Umeå University (Sweden), and Midi-Pyrenees Observatory (France), under the SIWA (Siberian Inner Waters) international project, have studied for the first time the emission of greenhouse gases from thermokarst lakes in the cryolithozone of Western Siberia on a latitudinal gradient. The scientists have found that bodies of water formed as a result of melting permafrost emit large

31min

Coffee machine helps physicists to make more efficient ion traps

Scientists from ITMO University have developed and applied a new method for analyzing the electromagnetic field inside ion traps. For the first time, they explained the field deviations inside nonlinear radio-frequency traps. This leads us to reconsider the prospects for nonlinear traps applications, including ion cooling and studies of quantum phenomena. The results are published in the Journal o

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Google Has A Pretty Cool ‘Thanos’ Easter Egg That You Should Definitely Check Out

At the moment, Marvel’s Avengers: Endgame is the hottest topic being discussed, and it looks like Google is getting in on the fun as well. The company has introduced a fun little Easter …

39min

Here's Why a Woman Had a 'Bull's-Eye' Pattern in Her Eye

The distinct appearance was a sign of damage to the eye's retina.

42min

The Mysterious Halos That Surround Coral Reefs

The last decade of Elizabeth Madin’s work began with one day of terrible weather. In 2010 she and her husband, Joshua, both ecologists, flew to Heron Island in Australia to study how fishing influences the creatures of the Great Barrier Reef. But they arrived to find strong winds and rough seas that constrained them to the beach. While trying to work out how to spend her time while the elements c

49min

‘You do think: why me?’ The shocking rise of lung cancer in non-smokers

The ‘smoker’s disease’ is affecting more and more people who have never lit up in their lives – and it is a particular problem among women. What do experts think is going on? ‘Don’t go home. Order a taxi, go to A&E and have a chest x-ray. I don’t think this is asthma-related. Something’s not right here.” Her GP’s words struck fear into Jenny Abbott. It hadn’t started out that way. A few weeks ear

49min

The Plan to Grab the World's Carbon With Supercharged Plants

Joanne Chory is tackling climate change as a biologist: by engineering plants to grab much more carbon from the air than they already do.

52min

The Rise and Fall of Facebook’s Memory Economy

The social network monetizes your nostalgia today, but that digital oil reservoir won’t last forever.

52min

5 Comics to Read After Seeing 'Avengers: Endgame'

Can't get enough Avengers? Luckily, their canon is nearly endless.

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Image of the Day: Color Grid

Researchers genetically engineered E. coli to produce colorful and fluorescent proteins originally from Cnidaria.

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Uber aiming for stock market debut value of up to $90 bn: report

Uber is aiming to make its stock market debut at a share price that would value the leading ride-share startup between $80 billion and $90 billion, Bloomberg reported on Thursday.

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London Marathon: How do you reduce the environmental impact?

The London race aims to reduce waste with paper cups, fewer drinks and even edible seaweed capsules.

1h

Fitting a right hand in a left-handed mitten

Many biomolecules come in two versions that are each other's mirror image, like a left and a right hand. Cells generally use the left-hand version of amino acids to produce proteins, and uptake mechanisms were thought to share this preference. University of Groningen scientists have now shown that a prokaryotic transport protein can transport both versions of the amino acid aspartate with equal ef

1h

When the biggest numbers don't add up

The different methods scientists use to measure cosmic expansion fundamentally disagree with each other.

1h

Tracking charge carriers in the molecular crystal at organic pn junction

In conventional organic solar cells, the electrons exhibit their particle-nature and need to jump between organic molecules in the cell. The conductivity is, therefore, lower than that of crystalline silicon solar cells. Researchers have succeeded in arranging the organic molecules in a highly ordered manner like in crystals, and to invoke the wave-nature. "Conductive bands" are formed by energy d

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Battery research: new breakthroughs in research on super-batteries

Since 2012, Stefan Freunberger of the Institute for Chemistry and Technology of Materials at TU Graz has been working on development of a new generation of batteries with enhanced performance and longer useful lives, and which are also cheaper to produce than current models. He believes that lithium-oxygen batteries have significant potential. In 2017, in the course of his work, Freunberger uncove

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Researchers trace 3,000 years of monsoons through shell fossils

The tiny shells at the bottom of Lake Nakaumi in southwest Japan may contain the secrets of the East Asia Summer Monsoon. This rainy season is fairly predictable, ushering in air and precipitation conducive to growing crops, but—sometimes without any hint—the pattern fails. Some areas of East Asia are left without rainfall, and their crops die. Other areas are inundated with rain, and their crops

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Microscopic life in the saline soil of the Marismas del Odiel Natural Park

A University of Seville research group, led by the professor Antonio Ventosa, has, for the first time, studied and described the microbiome of saline soil in the Marismas del Odiel Natural Park. This research opens new perspectives in microbiome study of this type of environment, which can produce data on, among other aspects, possible climate alterations and other environmental factors in microbi

1h

Turtle Power: near extinct terrapins make Cambodian comeback

Twenty critically endangered 'Royal Turtles' were released into a remote stretch of a Cambodian river Friday—a species once feared extinct because of hunting, trafficking and illegal sand mining.

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Fitting a right hand in a left-handed mitten

Many biomolecules come in two versions that are each other's mirror image, like a left and a right hand. Cells generally use the left-hand version of amino acids to produce proteins, and uptake mechanisms were thought to share this preference. University of Groningen scientists have now shown that a prokaryotic transport protein can transport both versions of the amino acid aspartate with equal ef

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Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors

For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. They used diamond quantum sensors to determine the strength of the magnetization of individual atomic layers of the material chromium triiodide. In addition, they found a long-sought explanation for the unusual magnetic propertie

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Stimulating the differentiation of bone precursors with organically modified hydroxyapatite (ormoHAP) nanospheres

Bioinspired materials mimic their natural counterparts for characteristic functionality in multidisciplinary applications forming a popular theme in biomaterials development. In bone tissue engineering, for instance, researchers focus on the natural composite architecture of bone, organically designed from complex structures of mineralized collagen. The resulting bioengineered constructs include i

1h

Turtle Power: near extinct terrapins make Cambodian comeback

Twenty critically endangered 'Royal Turtles' were released into a remote stretch of a Cambodian river Friday—a species once feared extinct because of hunting, trafficking and illegal sand mining.

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Ocean acidification 'could have consequences for millions'

Ocean acidification could have serious consequences for the millions of people globally whose lives depend on coastal protection, fisheries and aquaculture, a new publication suggests.

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Ocean acidification 'could have consequences for millions'

Ocean acidification could have serious consequences for the millions of people globally whose lives depend on coastal protection, fisheries and aquaculture, a new publication suggests.

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Sony logs record profits, warns of headwinds to come

Japan's Sony said Friday that robust games and entertainment divisions had pushed annual profits to a second consecutive record high but warned of a looming downturn in its bottom line.

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Helping others makes us happier — but it matters how we do it | Elizabeth Dunn

Research shows that helping others makes us happier. But in her groundbreaking work on generosity and joy, social psychologist Elizabeth Dunn found that there's a catch: it matters how we help. Learn how we can make a greater impact — and boost our own happiness along the way — if we make one key shift in how we help others. "Let's stop thinking about giving as just this moral obligation and sta

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To Understand Political Behavior, Look at How Kids Think

Developmental psychology can uncover the intuitive bedrock on which (motivated) political attitudes form — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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To Understand Political Behavior, Look at How Kids Think

Developmental psychology can uncover the intuitive bedrock on which (motivated) political attitudes form — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Nobody Knows What ‘Troll’ Means Anymore—Least of All Mueller

I have spent much of my career writing about trolls. I still find the word impossible to define.

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The SIM Swap Fix That the US Isn't Using

While foreign phone carriers are sharing data to stop SIM swap fraud, US carriers are dragging feet.

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Bizarre New Materials Could Make Bendy Phones That Work

Flexible phones are only now possible because of fancy materials, ones that likely don’t have all the kinks worked out yet. Enter the "metamaterial."

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How the Blockchain Could Protect California's Aquifer

State law requires farmers to use groundwater at sustainable levels, and lets them trade water with neighbors. The blockchain could make sure the system is fair.

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A Gripping History of the Nuclear Disaster at Chernobyl

Drawing on more than a decade of research and interviews, including recently declassified material, a British journalist recounts the horrific 1986 accident in rural Ukraine, as well as the often-mismanaged response and political fallout, bringing both villains and victims to life in painstaking detail.

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Skoleelev fik beslaglagt computerudstyr efter afsløring af sikkerhedshul – men så slog han til igen

En norsk elev brugte midlertidig skole-pc til at sprede et script til 8.000 maskiner med henblik på at kortlægge netværk.

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Microsoft: Stop med at tvinge brugerne til at skifte password i tide og utide

I en opdatering til deres baseline-sikkerhedsindstillinger til Windows 10 og Windows Server fjerner Microsoft nu kravet om, at brugere skal ændre deres kode hver 60. dag

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Half of cannabis users think they can drive safely while high – are they right?

It’s been several years since recreational cannabis was made legal in some US states. What effect has it had on road safety? People who are stoned often think they’re being funnier than they actually are, now we know they overestimate their driving ability too. Almost half of cannabis users believe it’s safe to drive when you’re high , according to a new study by PSB Research and Buzzfeed News. P

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Endangered green sea turtles may be making a comeback in the U.S. Pacific

The numbers of green sea turtles spotted around Hawaii, American Samoa and the Mariana Islands have increased in the last decade.

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FT Health: Taking the fight to malaria

Abdourahmane Diallo interview, drugs by drone, antibiotic alert

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Facebook announces plans to combat misinformation during EU elections

Facebook is expanding its use of independent fact-checkers in an effort to stop the spread of misinformation as Europe goes to the polls next month

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Nurture Alone Can’t Explain Male Aggression – Facts So Romantic

A young bank teller is shot dead during a robbery. The robber flees in a stolen van and is chased down the motorway by a convoy of police cars. Careening through traffic, the robber runs several cars off the road and clips several more. Eventually, the robber pulls off the motorway and attempts to escape into the hills on foot, the police in hot pursuit. After several tense minutes, the robber pu

1h

Jakob Ellemann-Jensen: Der er allerede taget væsentlige skridt mod PFAS

Men arbejdet er ikke gjort ved at forbyde mindre dele af den enorme stofgruppe, lyder det i kor fra danske eksperter.

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To Understand Political Behavior, Look at How Kids Think

Developmental psychology can uncover the intuitive bedrock on which (motivated) political attitudes form — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Is the EPA Stifling Science on Chemical Toxicity Reports?

Critics say changes to the agency’s review process will harm public health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Sony says the PlayStation 5 won't launch within the next 12 months

Last week saw Sony release a slew of information regarding the PS5, which might not go by that name. Lead system architect Mark Cerny confirmed that the heart of the console would be an 8-core, …

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20 Examples Of Machine Learning Used In Customer Experience

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The world is sadder and angrier than ever, major study finds

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Is the EPA Stifling Science on Chemical Toxicity Reports?

Critics say changes to the agency’s review process will harm public health — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A fat-tissue sensor couples growth to oxygen availability by remotely controlling insulin secretion

A fat-tissue sensor couples growth to oxygen availability by remotely controlling insulin secretion A fat-tissue sensor couples growth to oxygen availability by remotely controlling insulin secretion, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09943-y The mechanisms by which organisms adapt their growth according to the availability of oxygen are incompletely understood. Here the aut

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Water quality improvements offset the climatic debt for stream macroinvertebrates over twenty years

Water quality improvements offset the climatic debt for stream macroinvertebrates over twenty years Water quality improvements offset the climatic debt for stream macroinvertebrates over twenty years, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09736-3 Both climate change and environmental degradation pose harm to freshwaters. Here the authors find that macroinvertebrate communities i

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Publisher Correction: Phosphoric acid-catalyzed atroposelective construction of axially chiral arylpyrroles

Publisher Correction: Phosphoric acid-catalyzed atroposelective construction of axially chiral arylpyrroles Publisher Correction: Phosphoric acid-catalyzed atroposelective construction of axially chiral arylpyrroles, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10071-w Publisher Correction: Phosphoric acid-catalyzed atroposelective construction of axially chiral arylpyrroles

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Room temperature electrofreezing of water yields a missing dense ice phase in the phase diagram

Room temperature electrofreezing of water yields a missing dense ice phase in the phase diagram Room temperature electrofreezing of water yields a missing dense ice phase in the phase diagram, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09950-z Water can crystallize in different ice polymorphs according to temperature and pressure conditions. Here the authors predict by molecular dyna

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Mendelian randomization analysis using mixture models for robust and efficient estimation of causal effects

Mendelian randomization analysis using mixture models for robust and efficient estimation of causal effects Mendelian randomization analysis using mixture models for robust and efficient estimation of causal effects, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09432-2 Mendelian randomization (MR) is a powerful and widely used method for causal inference leveraging genetic information.

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A defined mechanistic correlate of protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in non-human primates

A defined mechanistic correlate of protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in non-human primates A defined mechanistic correlate of protection against Plasmodium falciparum malaria in non-human primates, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09894-4 Proof of protection against blood-stage P. falciparum malaria by a single immunological mechanism has been elusive. Here,

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DNA-enabled rational design of fluorescence-Raman bimodal nanoprobes for cancer imaging and therapy

DNA-enabled rational design of fluorescence-Raman bimodal nanoprobes for cancer imaging and therapy DNA-enabled rational design of fluorescence-Raman bimodal nanoprobes for cancer imaging and therapy, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09173-2 Currently available Raman scanners are limited in speed to acquire images of clinically relevant sizes in cancer imaging. Here, the au

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Exposure to violence affects the development of moral impressions and trust behavior in incarcerated males

Exposure to violence affects the development of moral impressions and trust behavior in incarcerated males Exposure to violence affects the development of moral impressions and trust behavior in incarcerated males, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09962-9 In a sample of prisoners, the authors show how learning contributes to the link between exposure to violence (ETV) and m

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Chemical probes pave the way for a better understanding of disease development

Proteins produced in cells often undergo modifications by enzymes after they are formed. One type of modification, called prenylation, adds 'tags' to proteins that tells them where to go in the cell and how to interact with other proteins.

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Suffolk Broads gateway restoration work begins

Sir David Attenborough says the restoration of the wetlands is a "unique opportunity" for wildlife.

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Climate change: Is Greta Thunberg right about UK carbon emissions?

Teenager Greta Thunberg said the UK's carbon emissions reduction relied on "creative accounting".

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Is China losing the battle against an incurable pig virus?

Global pork prices could rise sharply as African swine fever decimates China's pig population.

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The giant galaxy around the giant black hole

On April 10, 2019, the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) unveiled the first-ever image of a black hole's event horizon, the area beyond which light cannot escape the immense gravity of the black hole. That giant black hole, with a mass of 6.5 billion Suns, is located in the elliptical galaxy Messier 87 (M87). EHT is an international collaboration whose support in the U.S. includes the National Science

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Chemical probes pave the way for a better understanding of disease development

Proteins produced in cells often undergo modifications by enzymes after they are formed. One type of modification, called prenylation, adds 'tags' to proteins that tells them where to go in the cell and how to interact with other proteins.

2h

Hayabusa-2: Spacecraft's 'bomb' crater found

The Hayabusa-2 spacecraft sends back images of the crater made when it detonated an explosive charge on the asteroid it is exploring.

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New report explores barriers to employment for refugees and 'asylum migrants'

Efforts to help refugees who have settled in the UK to integrate into British society have been constrained by the lack of information on the short- and long-term outcomes of refugees, a new report by The Centre on Migration, Policy and Society (COMPAS) at the University of Oxford, reveals today. The report identifies information on jobs and the labour market as particular gaps.

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Designing ocean ecological systems in the lab

Researchers from MIT have discovered simple rules of assembly of ocean microbiomes that degrade complex polysaccharides in coastal environments. Microbiomes, or microbial communities, are composed of hundreds or thousands of diverse species, making it a challenge to identify the principles that govern their structure and function.

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Designing ocean ecological systems in the lab

Researchers from MIT have discovered simple rules of assembly of ocean microbiomes that degrade complex polysaccharides in coastal environments. Microbiomes, or microbial communities, are composed of hundreds or thousands of diverse species, making it a challenge to identify the principles that govern their structure and function.

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Nyupptäckt reglermekanism kan bidra till bättre blodsockerkoll

Hormonet glukagon, som frisätts från bukspottkörtelns alfaceller, spelar en livsviktig roll för kroppens blodsockerreglering. Normalt hämmas frisättningen av glukagon när blodsockerkoncentrationen stiger efter en måltid. När koncentrationen så småningom sjunker så frisätter alfacellerna åter glukagon som i sin tur stimulerar levern att frigöra socker till blodbanan. På så sätt förhindras att blod

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The Green New Deal doesn't just help climate. It's also a public health new deal | Abdul Sunshine

As a doctor, I realize the forces that cause climate change are the same forces that poisoned the lungs of babies in Detroit I used to be a reluctant environmentalist. Of course, as a scientist, I’ve always believed in the science of climate change – even a casual examination of the evidence shows that humans burning fossil fuels into the Earth’s atmosphere is causing it. But my reluctance wasn’t

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School choice does not achieve social mix across schools

A new study has found that school choice is associated with higher levels of segregation among school children from different socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds.

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The day the asteroid might hit

For the first time, ESA will cover a major international asteroid impact exercise live via social media, highlighting the the actions that might be taken by scientists, space agencies and civil protection organisations.

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Image: Queensland floods

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over Australia's northeast state of Queensland, where a large amount of sediment is visible gushing into the Coral Sea, close to the Great Barrier Reef lagoon.

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Democrats Are Answering the Wrong Questions

In a week during which, among other things, the White House defied multiple congressional subpoenas, the commander in chief threatened armed conflict with Mexico, and we learned that the number of Americans breathing unsafe air is at an all-time high, presidential politics was largely consumed by the following question: Should the Boston Marathon bomber be allowed to vote from jail? The odds of D

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When Making Things Better Only Makes Them Worse

Accidents are part of life. So are catastrophes. Two of Boeing’s new 737 Max 8 jetliners, arguably the most modern of modern aircraft, crashed in the space of less than five months. A cathedral whose construction started in the 12th century burned before our eyes, despite explicit fire-safety procedures and the presence of an on-site firefighter and a security agent . If Notre-Dame stood for so m

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The Three-Letter Word That Triggered a Revolution

Because of sex. Over the past 55 years, that single three-letter word has had momentous legal and social consequences for American life that the man who inserted it into the 1964 Civil Rights Act on a wintry Saturday morning could never have imagined. And now that the Supreme Court has agreed to decide whether that landmark law forbids employment discrimination based on sexual orientation and gen

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Flammer i Notre Dame: Efterforskere jagter nu to forklaringer

En kortslutning i renoveringsarbejdernes udstyr eller en cigaret er de to hovedmistænkte årsager til branden i den 850 år gamle katedral, som efterforskere nu er ved at kortlægge hændelsesforløbet bag.

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SAS pilot strike strands 72,000 passengers

Pilots at Scandinavian carrier SAS walked off the job in Sweden, Denmark and Norway on Friday, stranding more than 72,000 travellers as 673 flights were cancelled, the airline said.

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Do wind turbines cause plagiarism? Energy researcher up to 20 retractions

The editors of PLoS ONE have done something that we’re betting Donald Trump will never do: Retract a statement about noisy wind turbines. The journal is pulling a 2014 article, titled “Adaptive neuro-fuzzy methodology for noise assessment of wind turbine,” after concluding that the researchers plagiarized. The corresponding author of the article is Shahaboddin Shamshirban, … Continue reading Do wi

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The science behind Extinction Rebellion’s three climate change demands

Ministers are expected to meet with climate protestors next week, but what do they want? Rupert Read, of Extinction Rebellion, explains the group’s demands

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Message to the EU: you have the chance to stop fuelling devastation in the Amazon

The effects of European consumption are being felt in Brazil, driving disastrous deforestation and violence.

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Geoscientists find new fallout from 'the collision that changed the world'

When the landmass that is now the Indian subcontinent slammed into Asia about 50 million years ago, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more. Now a team of Princeton University scientists has identified one more effect: the oxygen in the world's oceans increased, altering the conditions for life.

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Study: Deep-ocean creatures living a 'feast-or-famine' existence because of energy fluxes

Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits.

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Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm

Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in 'good people,' psychologists at Yale and University of Oxford report April 26 in the journal Nature Communications

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Study: Deep-ocean creatures living a 'feast-or-famine' existence because of energy fluxes

Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits.

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Positive ecological effects of wind farms on vegetation in China’s Gobi desert

Positive ecological effects of wind farms on vegetation in China’s Gobi desert Positive ecological effects of wind farms on vegetation in China’s Gobi desert, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42569-0 Positive ecological effects of wind farms on vegetation in China’s Gobi desert

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Solar Power Doubles In Most American Cities In Last 6 Years

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Elsevier strikes its first national deal with large open-access element

Elsevier strikes its first national deal with large open-access element Elsevier strikes its first national deal with large open-access element, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01349-6 Agreement with Norwegian consortium allows researchers to make the vast majority of their work free to read on publication in Elsevier journals.

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Explosiv elitfotboll kräver individuellt inriktad träning

1958 gjorde Kurre Hamrin ett klassiskt VM-mål mot Västtyskland. Alla som sett klippet vet att han långsamt kommer gående på sin högerkant, innan han sätter lite fart och petar in bollen. Anfallet har lite gemensamt med hur det ser ut när dagens stjärnor gör mål, och den moderna spelstilen med betydligt fler ruscher och tempoväxlingar kräver ett nytt sätt att träna. – De korta och mycket intensiva

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Antarctica's effect on sea level rise in coming centuries

There are two primary causes of global mean sea level rise – added water from melting ice sheets and glaciers, and the expansion of sea water as it warms. The melting of Antarctica's ice sheet is currently responsible for 20-25% of global sea level rise.

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Podcast: Teknologi skal hjælpe politiet med at opklare flere forbrydelser

Politiet får stadigt flere og bedre tekniske værktøjer som massespektrometri, 3D-visualiseringer og dna-analyse i jagten på forbrydere.

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Så er den gal med togsignalerne igen: Premiere på Sjælland må udskydes

Banedanmark har fundet en sikkerhedsfejl i det system, som skal styre togene på Sjælland, når de går over til nye signaler. Derfor kommer systemet tidligst i brug på første strækning i slutningen af året.

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Rear seats of cars need better safety equipment, study says

The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety says in a new report that safer restraint systems are needed for the back seats of cars. The study finds that rear-seat safety has not kept pace with front-seat safety and it has been to the detriment of belted passengers in the back seat.

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Musk still working on pact with SEC to avoid contempt ruling

Elon Musk and U.S. securities regulators say they are still trying to work out an agreement that would avoid the Tesla CEO being held in contempt of court over his tweets.

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Stora skillnader i smittorisk vid mässlingsutbrott

En studie av det uppmärksammade mässlingsutbrottet i Göteborg härom året visar på stora skillnader i smittorisk mellan olika patienter. Majoriteten av mässlingsfallen under utbrottet 2017-2018 i Göteborg, 16 av 28 konstaterade fall, var så kallade genombrottsinfektioner. Det var alltså vaccinerade personer som insjuknande, många av dem anställda inom sjukvården. Lägre virusnivåer hos vaccinerade

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Yemen proves it: in western eyes, not all ‘Notre Dames’ are created equal | Lamya Khalidi

As an archaeologist, I’ve seen Yemen’s rich heritage. But for too many world leaders, only arms sales really matter Like everyone else the world over, I watched in horror last week as Notre Dame burned and its spire fell. I saw the stunned reactions of onlookers on the news, on social media and in front of television sets and phone screens on the streets of Nice, where I live. A part of France’s n

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Ecuador's Waorani tribe vows to protect life in Amazon

Spears and poisoned blowguns at hand, the Waorani people say they are ready to strike down invaders of their Amazon homelands, just like their forefathers did.

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Nintendo says working with Tencent to release Switch in China

Japanese games giant Nintendo said Friday it was working with Chinese internet firm Tencent to roll out its popular Switch console in China, confirming rumours that have dramatically pushed up its share price.

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California governor signs internet sales tax law

California's Democratic governor has signed a law requiring companies like Amazon and eBay to collect sales taxes on behalf of some out-of-state sellers.

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Uber aiming for stock market debut value of up to $90 bn: report

Uber is aiming to make its stock market debut at a share price that would value the leading ride-share startup between $80 billion and $90 billion, Bloomberg reported on Thursday.

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Be wary of robot emotions; 'simulated love is never love'

When a robot "dies," does it make you sad? For lots of people, the answer is "yes"—and that tells us something important, and potentially worrisome, about our emotional responses to the social machines that are starting to move into our lives.

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Sony logs record profits, warns of headwinds to come

Japan's Sony said Friday that robust games and entertainment divisions had pushed annual profits to a second consecutive record high but warned of a looming downturn in its bottom line.

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Blodprov ger svar om nervcellsskador vid Alzheimers sjukdom

En ny studie bekräftar att ett enkelt blodprov kan ge svar på accelererande nervcellsskador i hjärnan. Ett protein, kallat NFL, har analyserats i blodprover, insamlade från patienter med Alzheimers sjukdom. Studien visar att NFL-koncentrationen i blodet skulle kunna tala om ifall ett läkemedel faktiskt påverkar förlusten av nervceller.

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Ny rapport: Krydstogtskibe forurener som tusindvis af biler

Farlige partikler vælter ud af krydstogtskibenes skorstene, mens de ligger stille.

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Fortfarande farligt höga farter i tätorterna

2009 fattades ett riksdagsbeslut om målet att antalet dödade i vägtrafiken ska halveras 2007–2020. För att följa upp detta studeras utvecklingen av bland annat hastighetsefterlevnad på det kommunala vägnätet i tätort. Mätningar av trafikanternas hastighetsval i tätort har gjorts årligen sedan 2012. Delmålet är att minst 80 procent av trafiken ska köra inom gällande hastighetsgränser. Mätningarna

4h

Creativity is not just for the young, study finds

If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story.

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Betablokkere kan reducere indlæggelse og død på grund af KOL

Stort dansk registerstudie peger på sammenhæng mellem brug af blodtrykssænkende betablokkere og fremtidig risiko for indlæggelse eller død på grund af KOL.

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Forsker, iværksætter og businesstalent

Forsker i økonomi Christina Gravert er udvalgt til Berlingskes Talent100-liste.

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The Legal and Ethical Implications of Using AI in Hiring

submitted by /u/stormforce7916 [link] [comments]

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Magnets can help AI get closer to the efficiency of the human brain

submitted by /u/CocknLoad [link] [comments]

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An Entirely Different Kind of Quantum Computer

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Mysterious Bone Discarded by Evolution Is Making a Comeback in Modern Humans

Many humans are walking around with an extra bone in their bodies.

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The government's plans to cut student fees threaten life-changing research | Stephanie Smith

The cuts expected to be announced by the government to tuition fees next month will take a vital subsidy for science Everywhere you go, your life is improved by breakthroughs developed in the labs and classrooms of UK universities. Treatments for diabetes and Parkinson’s, methods used by the police to cut violent crime, the sugar tax – even digital theology that can tackle online trolling. All of

6h

Ying and Yang nanoquackery at Royal Society of Chemistry

Royal Society of Chemistry published a research paper which unashamedly peddled TCM, under the title: "Probing the Qi of traditional Chinese herbal medicines by the biological synthesis of nano-Au". Both Editor-in-Chief and publisher executive saw no problem there because the paper passed peer review.

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How Technology Could Revolutionize Refugee Resettlement

PITTSBURGH—Half a world away from the refugee camp in Uganda where he lived for a dozen years, Baudjo Njabu tells me about his first winter in the United States. “The biggest challenge is the cold,” he said in Swahili, speaking through an interpreter. We’re sitting on dining chairs in his sparsely furnished living room. Outside, snow covers the grass on the other side of the glass patio doors tha

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Black holes: seeing 'the unseeable' – Science Weekly podcast

Using a global network of telescopes, scientists have managed to capture an image of a black hole for the first time. Hannah Devlin investigates why it’s more than just a pretty picture Black holes have long featured in science fiction movies as dark swirling objects that swallow anything that dares to cross its threshold, so it’s easy to forget that we’ve never actually seen one before. That was

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Black holes: seeing 'the unseeable' – Science Weekly podcast

Using a global network of telescopes, scientists have managed to capture an image of a black hole for the first time. Hannah Devlin investigates why it’s more than just a pretty picture. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod

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På sporet af den ­rette ­behandling af svært syge KOL-patienter

Undersøgelse på danske lungeafdelinger skal klarlægge bakterien Pseudomonas aeruginosas betydning for KOL-patienter, og om det gængse valg af 14 dages indlæggelse og intensiv antibiotikabehandling overhovedet er det rette for disse patienter

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Vis mig dit ­vente­værelse

Stereotypen om lægens venteværelse eksisterer af en grund. Det er dog alle pengene værd at prioritere venteværelset, siger læger, der har gjort en ekstra indsats for, at patienten skal føle sig hjemme i flotte omgivelser.

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KOL-patienter driver ­stigning i medicin­forbrug

Med registerstudier forsøger Mette Reilev og hendes kolleger på SDU at blive klogere på, hvordan inhalationsmedicin til kroniske obstruktive lungesygdomme, såsom KOL og astma, rent faktisk bliver brugt. Et af de seneste studier lægger op til at undersøge, hvorfor man ser en stor stigning i det totale forbrug af inhalationssteroid og bronkodilatorer og en lav persistens til behandling hos patiente

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Forlod en presset almen praksis: Nu er jeg lykkelig som 1813-læge

Akuttelefonen 1813 har nu langt nemmere ved at tiltrække praktiserende læger end tidligere. Vi er inde i en god udvikling, siger ledelsen. Men 1813 er stadig en forkert konstruktion, og der er stadig problemer, siger læger.

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Ledende overlæger: Øget travlhed skyldes ikke 1813

Region Hovedstadens fire børneafdelinger fik for nylig 16 mio. kr. for at kunne opfylde udredningsretten efter stor patienttilgang. Travlheden kan dog ikke knyttes til akuttelefonen 1813, siger to ledende overlæger.

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Novel therapies slow CKD progression in patients with diabetes

The recently published CREDENCE study showed that SGLT2 inhibitors can slow progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in diabetes patients in addition to the effects seen with RAAS blockade. Canagliflozin was associated with a 34% risk reduction of the renal end point. The SONAR study had shown that the selective endothelin A receptor antagonist, atrasentan, reduced the risk of renal events in a

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Changes from head injuries associated with increases in youth offending

A new longitudinal study looked at the impact on criminal persistence of head injuries, which have been linked to increased levels of offending, among adolescents and early adults. It found that changes in individuals with head injuries were associated with increases in self-reported offending, and with violent offending in particular.

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Creativity is not just for the young, study finds

If you believe that great scientists are most creative when they're young, you are missing part of the story. A new study of winners of the Nobel Prize in economics finds that there are two different life cycles of creativity, one that hits some people early in their career and another that more often strikes later in life.

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A Solution for Cemeteries?

Does anyone have any ideas how to start eliminating cemeteries? I know it may be problematic due to people's emotional attachment to their loved ones. But having graves take up space with empty boxes doesn't just force our brains to focus on an old idea of Death and Decay which is not healthy anymore as the future for humanity is Cell regeneration and immortality. But it also takes up a lot of be

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PLO: »Svært at forestille sig, at vi får lægevagten tilbage«

De praktiserende læger i Region Hovedstaden kommer ikke til at køre lægevagt igen uden større ændringer. Sådan lyder vurderingen fra hovedstadens PLO-formand Karin Zimmer, som tvivler på viljen – både i egne rækker og blandt politikerne i regionen.

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PLO ønsker en centralisering af fremtidens lægevagt

Gamle lægevagtsaftaler volder problemer flere steder i landet. Vagthyppigheden og antallet af læger hænger ikke sammen, og derfor ønsker de regionale PLO-formænd sig færre konsultationssteder.

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Datatilsynet med alvorlig kritik af TDC: Midlertidig database blev ikke tømt

TDC har behandlet oplysninger om tidligere og nuværende kunder i strid med databeskyttelsesforordningen, lyder det i afgørelse fra Datatilsynet, der udtaler 'alvorlig kritik' af televirksomheden.

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Retsgenetikere vil give fuldt signalement af forbrydere alene ud fra dna-spor

PLUS. Fantomtegninger baseret på bittesmå dna-spor ville være et stærkt værktøj i efterforskningen, som retsgenetikerne arbejder sig stadigt tættere på. Men det er værktøjer, der skal bruges med varsomhed.

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Kriminalteknik: Politiet satser på højteknologi i jagten på forbrydere

Forskere over hele verden arbejder intenst på at omdanne selv det mindste spor til et væld af informationer, som kan hjælpe politiet i jagten på forbrydere.

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Judge Temporarily Blocks Trump Rule on Abortion Referrals

An administration measure would bar groups that provide abortion referrals from receiving federal family planning money.

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Amazon Prime two-day shipping will go down to one day

submitted by /u/l30 [link] [comments]

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Harder-Working Snakes Pack Stronger Venom

Snake venom toxicity depends on snake size, energy requirements and environmental dimensionality more than on prey size.

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Galaxy containing first black hole pic revealed

NASA orbiter captures particle jets spewing from the most famous black hole in the universe. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Breaking: LIGO Detects Gravitational Waves From Another Neutron Star Merger

For just the second time, physicists working on the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) have caught the gravitational waves of two neutron stars colliding to form a black hole. The ripples in space time traveled some 500 million light-years and reached the detectors at LIGO, as well as its Italian sister observatory, Virgo, at around 4 a.m. E.T. on Thursday, April 25. Team m

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Stepwise activation of a class C GPCR begins with millisecond dimer rearrangement [Pharmacology]

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key biological switches that transmit both internal and external stimuli into the cell interior. Among the GPCRs, the “light receptor” rhodopsin has been shown to activate with a rearrangement of the transmembrane (TM) helix bundle within ∼1 ms, while all other receptors are thought to…

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Role for the shoot apical meristem in the specification of juvenile leaf identity in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]

The extent to which the shoot apical meristem (SAM) controls developmental decisions, rather than interpreting them, is a longstanding issue in plant development. Previous work suggests that vegetative phase change is regulated by signals intrinsic and extrinsic to the SAM, but the relative importance of these signals for this process…

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Family quarrels in seeds and rapid adaptive evolution in Arabidopsis [Evolution]

Evolutionary conflict can drive rapid adaptive evolution, sometimes called an arms race, because each party needs to respond continually to the adaptations of the other. Evidence for such arms races can sometimes be seen in morphology, in behavior, or in the genes underlying sexual interactions of host−pathogen interactions, but is…

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A pair of native fungal pathogens drives decline of a new invasive herbivore [Applied Biological Sciences]

Two North American fungal pathogens caused a coepizootic leading to localized collapse of an outbreak population of the newly invasive planthopper pest, the spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula), in the eastern United States. The pathogens partitioned the habitat, with the majority of L. delicatula on tree trunks killed by Batkoa major,…

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Retinal microglia initiate neuroinflammation in ocular autoimmunity [Immunology and Inflammation]

Autoimmune uveitis is a sight-threatening ocular inflammatory condition in which the retina and uveal tissues become a target of autoreactive immune cells. While microglia have been studied extensively in autoimmune uveitis, their exact function remains uncertain. The objective of the current study was to determine whether resident microglia are necessary…

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A Dark Matter Detector Just Recorded One of The Rarest Events Known to Science

It's "a rare thing multiplied by another rare thing, making it ultra-rare".

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Harder-Working Snakes Pack Stronger Venom

Snake venom toxicity depends on snake size, energy requirements and environmental dimensionality more than on prey size. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Harder-Working Snakes Pack Stronger Venom

Snake venom toxicity depends on snake size, energy requirements and environmental dimensionality more than on prey size. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Insect wings inspire drone that can handle serious wind

A new design for drones works in windy conditions, is more energy-efficient, and can handle a bigger payload. A drone delivery is great—on a perfect, sunny day. But what about when it’s windy? Most drones are not able to withstand wind because of their fixed-arm design. “Our drone design was inspired by the wings and flight patterns of insects,” says Xiumin Diao, an assistant professor in the Sch

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How to See the Grand Canyon Without Dying

Death and serious injury stalk one of the most spectacular geological sites in the world. Learn how you can protect yourself while enjoying the views. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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An ancient person ate a whole rattlesnake. Why?

Researchers have discovered evidence in fossilized feces that an ancient Native American ate an entire rattlesnake about 1,500 years ago. The team examined coprolites—the scientific name for fossilized human fecal material—which an earlier researcher discovered in the 1960s during the construction of the Amistad Dam in far west Texas. Researchers believe the coprolites originated in the Conejo Sh

12h

Ashes of cat named Pikachu to be launched into space

Steve Munt, Pikachu's owner, created a GoFundMe page to raise money for the mission. If all goes according to plan, Pikachu will be the second cat to enter space, the first being a French feline named Felicette. It might seem frivolous, but the cat-lovers commenting on Munt's GoFundMe page would likely disagree. None A recently deceased cat named Pikachu is about to boldly go where only one other

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Bagsiden: CO2-neutralt danskvand – næsten, i hvert fald

Under påskeferiens oprydning dukkede flere stadig aktuelle sager op fra dybet. Som f.eks. det viste billede af en flaske fra vores miljøbevidste læser, der glæder sig over, at vi i det mindste ikke behøver at skamme os over at drikke danskvand:

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Bagsiden: Ny journalistenhed – Badekar

Firmaet Liebherr har fået omsat nogle af deres meget store maskiner til Lego-klodser. Vor opmærksomme læser har nærlæst firmaets tekst herom:

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Microbes near volcanoes help store a whole bunch of CO2

Up to about 19 percent more carbon dioxide than previously believed is removed naturally and stored underground between coastal trenches and inland chains of volcanoes, keeping the greenhouse gas from entering the atmosphere, according to a new study. Surprisingly, subsurface microbes play a role in storing vast amounts of carbon by incorporating it in their biomass and possibly by helping to for

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MIT finally gives a name to the sum of all AI fears

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Amazon plans to make Prime shipping one-day by default

On Thursday, Amazon reported its Q1 2019 earnings with an $800 million investment in making free one-day delivery shipping the default for Prime members. The transition from free two-day to …

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The Atlantic Daily: Biden's in for 2020. But in 2016, Obama Talked Him Out of It.

What We’re Following (Henry Nicholls / Reuters) Joe Biden is (officially) running. The former vice president announced his 2020 campaign after months of pondering … but what stopped him from running in 2016? Biden is running now as an heir to Obama, but four years ago, Obama talked him out of a presidential run, instead favoring Hillary Clinton for the office. In the summer of 2015, Obama sent a

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Veterans suffer from 'culture shock' when returning to university

War veterans experience such extreme 'culture shock' at university, that they struggle to communicate their feelings and begin a destructive cycle of silence, according to a new study.

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Lung cancer under-recognized in people who have never smoked

Lung cancer in people who have never smoked is more common than most people think, and on the rise. Historically strong, and correct, messaging on smoking and lung cancer has inadvertently contributed to lung cancer receiving much less attention than breast, prostate and ovarian cancers. Increasing awareness could help lead to earlier diagnosis, reduce the blame culture around lung cancer and re-b

13h

Nils Nilsson, 86, Dies; Scientist Helped Robots Find Their Way

He was part of a Stanford team whose work in artificial intelligence has found its way into smartphones, Siri and other hallmarks of the algorithmic age.

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Instagram's Newest Star Is … a Tree?

Tentree's Instagram post about planting trees has gone viral. But as with any celebrity’s carefully orchestrated photo, the reality is much more complicated.

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You probably shouldn’t buy a 5G phone this year

Technology Samsung's new 5G Galaxy phone is now up for pre-sale, but don't rush to purchase it. Don't rush out and buy a 5G phone just yet.

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UN climate chief warns current path leads to 'catastrophe'

The U.N. climate chief says world leaders must recognize there is no option except to speed-up and scale-up action to tackle global warming, warning that continuing on the current path will lead to "a catastrophe.

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Quality improvement in emergency surgery shows no difference in patient survival

Researchers from Queen Mary University of London studied the effectiveness of one of the largest ever national quality improvement programmes in the National Health Service (NHS) and found no improvement in patient survival.

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Individual nutrition shows benefits in hospital patients

Individualized nutrition not only causes hospital patients to consume more protein and calories, but also improves clinical treatment outcomes. This has been demonstrated in a study by researchers from the University of Basel and Aarau Cantonal Hospital in the journal The Lancet.

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Global malaria spending $2 billion short of WHO target, stifling progress

A first-of-its-kind study reveals malaria spending in 2016 totaled $4.3 billion globally, far short of the annual funding target of $6.6 billion set by the World Health Organization.'A persistent challenge remains as funds are stagnating,' said Dr. Joseph Dieleman, senior author on the study, health economist, and assistant professor at IHME. 'More resources are needed. This is particularly eviden

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The Lancet: Peanut allergy oral immunotherapy increases allergic reactions, compared with avoidance or placebo

A systematic review including 12 studies with more than 1,000 patients who were followed for a year finds that, compared with allergen avoidance or placebo, current oral immunotherapy treatments result in a large increase in anaphylaxis and other allergic reactions, rather than preventing them as intended. The findings, published in The Lancet, highlight the gap between outcomes measured in the cl

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Peanut allergy immunotherapy may actually do more harm than good

Treatments intended to desensitise people to peanuts had shown promise in tests, but an analysis suggests they may make dangerous allergic reactions more likely

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To boost your self-esteem, write about chapters of your life

In truth, so much of what happens to us in life is random – we are pawns at the mercy of Lady Luck. To take ownership of our experiences and exert a feeling of control over our future, we tell stories about ourselves that weave meaning and continuity into our personal identity. Writing in the 1950s, the psychologist Erik Erikson put it this way: To be adult means among other things to see one's o

14h

Trump Evicts Tech Workers, Avengers Return, and More News

Catch up on the most important news today in 2 minutes or less.

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Amazon aims to bring one-day delivery to Prime members around the globe

Amazon.com Inc plans to deliver packages to members of its loyalty club Prime in just one day, instead of two days, part of a spending ramp-up that might curb future profits after a blockbuster …

14h

Google updates misconduct reporting amid employee discontent

Google says it has updated the way it investigates misconduct claims, changes it pledged to make after thousands of employees walked out in protest last November.

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Early, hormone-driven breast cancer is less likely to recur if treated with radiotherapy

Women with early, low-risk, hormone-driven breast cancer are less likely to have a recurrence of their disease if they have radiotherapy after surgery, as well as anti-hormone treatment, according to results from a trial that has followed 869 women for 10 years. The research will be presented at ESTRO 38 — Europe's largest radiation oncology conference.

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Football on turf is hard on the knees

Health The artificial grass may slightly increase your risk of common sports injuries. Playing on turf might pose a slightly greater injury risk than playing on grass. A new analysis published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine, found that playing…

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Feature: Australia Is Deadly Serious About Killing Millions of Cats

Feral felines are driving the country’s native species to extinction. Now a massive culling is underway to preserve what’s left of the wild.

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Google updates misconduct reporting amid employee discontent

Google said Thursday it has updated the way it investigates misconduct claims—changes the company pledged to make after employees called for action last year.

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Ford shares surge as US pickup sales stay strong

Ford reported a drop in first-quarter profits Thursday due in part to restructuring costs, but the company's share price rallied following a strong performance in North America and improved results in Europe.

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Video game effort could help regulate future drone traffic

Drones ferrying medical supplies, packages and even pizza could one day be crisscrossing the skies above U.S. cities, and a team at the University of Utah is working with regulators to keep that future traffic in check using a video game.

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Immune to pain: new insights into chronic pain treatment

Jo Cameron, a Scottish woman in her mid-60s, was seemingly happy and healthy other than a problem with her hip. Now and then, it would give way and prevent her from walking straight. She had brought it up to her doctor, but because she wasn’t in pain, the issue was dismissed. It wasn’t until a […]

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Scientists unlock new role for nervous system in regeneration

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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US Pentagon to accelerate the development of Hypersonic Weapons

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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SPECIAL REPORT: The Pentagon Could Put Directed Energy Weapons in Space

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Chinese Hypersonic Vehicle Could Be Model for a Future Weapon System

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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NASA finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Lorna

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Lorna.

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Snowmelt causes seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera

A spring surge of meltwater, seeping through vertically tilted layers of rock, caused a seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera in 2017, according to research presented at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting.

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Filling in the gaps of connected car data helps transportation planners

If you have a new or late model car, most likely it's connected: GPS navigation, that infotainment panel, the wireless network your car creates—they're all ways for your car to provide information, whether it's to give you directions, ping other vehicles, or to check in with infrastructure like traffic signals, signs or bridges.

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NY, Canada Gunning for Facebook Over Data Protection

Facebook’s luck may be running out. New York Attorney General Letitia James has opened an investigation into the social network’s unauthorized collection of 1.5 million users’ …

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A Federal Court Makes an Aggressive Move Against Partisan Gerrymandering

A panel of federal judges in Michigan on Thursday unanimously struck down nearly 30 of the state’s U.S. House and state legislative districts as unconstitutional. Furthermore, the court ordered special early elections for several state-Senate seats—an unusual and aggressive remedy. It’s the latest in a string of rulings that show federal courts are more open to claims that partisan gerrymandering

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The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Joe for Broke

What We’re Following Today It’s Thursday, April 25. ‣ North Korea reportedly sent the U.S. a $2 million bill to cover medical care for Otto Warmbier, the American student detained by the country for one year, who died shortly after he was returned to the U.S. in 2017. ‣ Facebook said it expects to be fined up to a record $5 billion by the Federal Trade Commission over its mishandling of users’ pe

15h

Trilobites: An Emperor Penguin Colony in Antarctica Vanishes

A colony in Halley Bay lost more than 10,000 chicks in 2016 and hasn’t recovered. Some adults have relocated.

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The spin doctors: Researchers discover surprising quantum effect in hard disk drive material

Scientists find surprising way to affect information storage properties in metal alloy.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth make landfall in northern Mozambique

Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country. As NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth making landfall in northern Mozambique.

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After Pentagon Ends Contract, Top-Secret Scientists Group Vows To Carry On

The 60 or so members of the Jasons are normal academics by day. But each summer, they come together to study tough problems for the military, intelligence agencies and other parts of the government. (Image credit: R. Fugate/Air Force Research Laboratory)

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Snowmelt causes seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera

A spring surge of meltwater, seeping through vertically tilted layers of rock, caused a seismic swarm near California's Long Valley Caldera in 2017, according to research presented at the 2019 SSA Annual Meeting.

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NASA-NOAA satellite catches intense Tropical Cyclone Kenneth make landfall in northern Mozambique

Mozambique is still recovering from deadly Tropical Cyclone Idai, and a second powerful tropical cyclone has now made landfall in the country. As NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean, it captured an infrared image of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth making landfall in northern Mozambique.

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How a droplet in a tube leaps upward again and again

How a droplet in a tube leaps upward again and again How a droplet in a tube leaps upward again and again, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01302-7 Surface tension between an oil droplet and surrounding liquid helps droplet to defy gravity.

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Give your videos a professional edge with Viddyoze animation templates

Get lifetime access now for $89. Give your videos a professional edge with Viddyoze animation templates. You can now get lifetime access for $89.

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Tesla May Offer Its Own (Nosy) Car Insurance

Tesla insurance today runs about $2,500 a year from third parties. Tesla sees an opportunity to charge less to drivers who voluntarily agree to monitoring of some parts of their driving. The post Tesla May Offer Its Own (Nosy) Car Insurance appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Japan's Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Shoots Asteroid, Returns to Crime Scene

Japan’s Hayabusa2 spacecraft dropped an explosive onto its asteroid home, Ryugu, back on April 5, blasting a new crater into its rocky surface so it could investigate what lies beneath. Since then, the spacecraft has been in hiding around the asteroid’s far side, waiting for the dust to settle. Yesterday, it ventured out to survey the damage. The pictures Hayabusa2 returned reveal a crater roughly

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Hubble Hints Today's Universe Expands Faster Than it Did in the Past

For a while now, astronomers have been confronting a conundrum. Studies of the early universe, looking at the era just after the Big Bang, tell us that the cosmos should be expanding at one speed. But when astronomers actually measure today's universe, they find a faster rate of expansion. Scientists have known that the universe is expanding for around a century. Astronomers like Edwin Hubble firs

16h

A New AI Can Spot Art Forgeries

Rembrandt Rip-Off A couple from Massachusetts has trained a neural network to spot the difference between real oil paintings by 17th century Dutch painter Rembrandt and clever imitations. As IEEE Spectrum reports , many of the 611 paintings attributed to Rembrandt are thought to be imitations, copies and forgeries . The idea is that this new AI could potentially help separate the authentic ones f

16h

Researchers discover surprising quantum effect in hard disk drive material

Argonne scientists have further explored a new effect that enhances their ability to control the direction of electron spin in certain materials. Their discovery may lead to more powerful and energy-efficient materials for information storage.

16h

Filling in the gaps of connected car data helps transportation planners

A Michigan Tech engineer has created a method to fill in the gaps of available connected vehicle data, which will give transportation planners a more accurate picture of traffic in their cities. It is also a more cost-effective data gathering system than what is currently available.

16h

NASA finds a more circular Tropical Cyclone Lorna

NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of what appeared to be a more organized Tropical Cyclone Lorna.

16h

Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots

A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition.

16h

Preventing collapse after catastrophe

As the impacts of climate change escalate, ecosystems will likely undergo events that will disrupt entire populations. In marine ecosystems, anthropogenic warming has subjected organisms to elevated temperatures, oxygen loss, and acidification. The increased frequency and severity of catastrophic events may inhibit a population's ability to recover and, in turn, may spur collapse.

16h

Maximizing conservation benefits

Overexploitation and population collapse pose significant threats to marine fish stocks across the globe. While certain fish populations have already collapsed, research indicates that nearly one third of fisheries worldwide are currently impacted by overharvesting.

16h

Comfort food leads to more weight gain during stress

Australian researchers have discovered a new molecular pathway in the brain that triggers more weight gain in times of stress.

16h

How eating feeds into the body clock

A new study identifies insulin as a primary signal that helps communicate the timing of meals to the cellular clocks located across our body, commonly known as the body clock.

16h

Microscopic life in the saline soil of the Marismas del Odiel Natural Park

This research opens new perspectives in microbiome study of this type of environment, which can produce data on, among other aspects, possible climate alterations and other environmental factors in microbial populations.

16h

Lawyer: Make a Rule Saying We Can Nuke Apocalyptic Asteroids

Launch Protocol International agreements including the Outer Space Treaty prohibit countries from militarizing outer space — especially putting nukes into orbit. But maybe we should reconsider that, argues public international law professor James Green in The Conversation . Rather, humanity ought to rewatch the 1998 movie “Armageddon,” and start thinking hard about whether we’d want to nuke an in

16h

Amazon delivers record profits on gains in cloud, advertising

Amazon on Thursday delivered record profits for the first quarter, fueled by gains in cloud computing and new business segments for the US technology colossus.

16h

Maximizing conservation benefits

Overexploitation and population collapse pose significant threats to marine fish stocks across the globe. While certain fish populations have already collapsed, research indicates that nearly one third of fisheries worldwide are currently impacted by overharvesting.

16h

Preventing collapse after catastrophe

As the impacts of climate change escalate, ecosystems will likely undergo events that will disrupt entire populations. In marine ecosystems, anthropogenic warming has subjected organisms to elevated temperatures, oxygen loss, and acidification. The increased frequency and severity of catastrophic events may inhibit a population's ability to recover and, in turn, may spur collapse.

16h

New view of how ocean 'pumps' impact climate change

Earth's oceans have a remarkable natural ability to pull carbon from the atmosphere and store it deep within the ocean waters, exerting an important control on the global climate.

16h

Maximizing conservation benefits

Overexploitation and population collapse pose significant threats to marine fish stocks across the globe. While certain fish populations have already collapsed, research indicates that nearly one third of fisheries worldwide are currently impacted by overharvesting.

16h

Preventing collapse after catastrophe

As the impacts of climate change escalate, ecosystems will likely undergo events that will disrupt entire populations. In marine ecosystems, anthropogenic warming has subjected organisms to elevated temperatures, oxygen loss, and acidification. The increased frequency and severity of catastrophic events may inhibit a population's ability to recover and, in turn, may spur collapse.

16h

High school students publish paper with RIT scientists analyzing rare bacterium

Three high school students working in a science lab for the first time made a surprising discovery with a Rochester Institute of Technology professor. Now, the young women are co-authors on a scientific paper announcing a rare bacterium that kills e-coli.

16h

Hundreds of dead dolphins wash up on French coast

A record number of dead dolphins have washed up on France's Atlantic coast in recent months after being caught in fishing nets, the Pelagis observatory said Thursday.

16h

New method proposed for studying hydrodynamic behavior of electrons in graphene

By studying how electrons in two-dimensional graphene can literally act like a liquid, researchers have paved the way for further research into a material that has the potential to enable future electronic computing devices that outpace silicon transistors.

16h

What makes mosquitoes avoid DEET? An answer in their legs

Many of us slather ourselves in DEET each summer in hopes of avoiding mosquito bites, and it generally works rather well. Now, researchers have made the surprising discovery that part of the reason for DEET's success can be found in the mosquito's legs, not their biting mouthparts.

16h

How to avoid the mid-movie bathroom break

DIY Need tips on controlling your bladder? Urine luck. Long movies and the urge to pee have been inextricably linked since the early days of cinema.

16h

High school students publish paper with RIT scientists analyzing rare bacterium

Three high school students working in a science lab for the first time made a surprising discovery with a Rochester Institute of Technology professor. Now, the young women are co-authors on a scientific paper announcing a rare bacterium that kills e-coli.

16h

Hundreds of dead dolphins wash up on French coast

A record number of dead dolphins have washed up on France's Atlantic coast in recent months after being caught in fishing nets, the Pelagis observatory said Thursday.

16h

Lyft Expands Program to Help Families Get Healthy Groceries

Grocery Run In December, rideshare company Lyft announced a pilot program to offer some Washington D.C. residents $2.50 flat-rate rides to their local grocery stores. And now it’s expanding the program to more than a dozen additional cities — with the promise to add even more in the future. “Access to healthy food is a significant issue for millions of people in the U.S.,” Lyft’s head of social i

16h

Maximizing conservation benefits

Overexploitation and population collapse pose significant threats to marine fish stocks across the globe. While certain fish populations have already collapsed, research indicates that nearly one third of fisheries worldwide are currently impacted by overharvesting.

16h

Preventing collapse after catastrophe

As the impacts of climate change escalate, ecosystems will likely undergo events that will disrupt entire populations. In marine ecosystems, anthropogenic warming has subjected organisms to elevated temperatures, oxygen loss, and acidification. The increased frequency and severity of catastrophic events may inhibit a population's ability to recover and, in turn, may spur collapse.

16h

Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots

A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition.

16h

High school students publish paper with RIT scientists analyzing rare bacterium

Three high school students from an urban charter school in Rochester, N.Y., found a rare e-coli-killing bacterium on a door handle at Rochester Institute of Technology while gaining college experience through a senior capstone program. They genetically sequenced and analyzed the bacterium in the RIT Genomics Lab and are now co-authors with their RIT faculty mentor on a paper published in The Ameri

16h

New view of how ocean 'pumps' impact climate change

A new Rochester study has found that factors such as wind, currents, and even small fish play a larger role in transferring and storing carbon from the surface of the ocean to the deep oceans than was previously thought.

16h

Researchers reveal key to targeting dormant cancer cells

Researchers have identified what keeps some cancer cells dormant — a finding which could uncover new approaches to preventing the spread of cancer.

16h

What Are Bacteria?

Friend or foe? These tiny microbes can cure or kill.

16h

Trump’s Chief of Staff Says He’s Having a Ball

Steve Snowden / Shutterstock / The Atlantic Here’s the thing, Mick Mulvaney says, sitting in his West Wing office on Wednesday afternoon: He knows that Donald Trump’s administration doesn’t always make good on conservative ideals. He knows that they’re “spending a bunch of money on stuff we’re not supposed to,” and that all the excess doesn’t comport well with his own reputation as a fiscal hawk

16h

Ny studie: Stress påverkar vikten

Långvarig stress kan göra att vikten ökar. Det visar en ny djurstudie från Australien. – Det är ju inte så enkelt som att bara räkna kalorier utan det är ganska komplicerad biokemi, säger svenska överviktsforskaren Erik Hemmingsson

16h

The WHO’s ‘zero screen time for babies’ rule is more complicated than it seems

Health It's not necessarily because screens are bad. Your baby is probably sitting too much, and the World Health Organization wants to change that.

17h

New Image Shows Aftermath of Japan’s Asteroid Bomb

Big Blast On April 4, a Japanese spacecraft launched a plastic explosive at an asteroid, then headed for the other side of the rock to avoid flying debris from the impact. This week, the craft returned to the scene of the crime to check out the aftermath of the mission . As it turns out, the projectile packed more of a punch than expected — a development scientists believe could lead to a better

17h

Bridge over coupled waters: Scientists 3D-print all-liquid 'lab on a chip'

Researchers have 3D-printed an all-liquid "lab on a chip" that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications – from making battery materials to screening drug candidates.

17h

Injections, exercise promote muscle regrowth after atrophy in mice

By injecting cells that support blood vessel growth into muscles depleted by inactivity, researchers say they are able to help restore muscle mass lost as a result of immobility.

17h

Beyoncé, Donald Glover, Adidas, Nike, and the Fight for Cool

Adidas' collaboration with Donald Glover is just its latest attempt to define culture. Also on deck? Beyoncé.

17h

The Lowest Bid Universe

If reality is manufactured it's time to lodge some complaints — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

17h

Ice-proof coating for big structures relies on a 'beautiful demonstration of mechanics'

A new class of coatings that sheds ice effortlessly from even large surfaces has moved researchers closer to their decades-long goal of ice-proofing cargo ships, airplanes, power lines and other large structures.

17h

Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors

For the first time, physicists have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. They used diamond quantum sensors to determine the strength of the magnetization of individual atomic layers of the material chromium triiodide. In addition, they found a long-sought explanation for the unusual magnetic properties of the material.

17h

Diamonds reveal how continents are stabilized, key to Earth's habitability

The longevity of Earth's continents in the face of destructive tectonic activity is an essential geologic backdrop for the emergence of life on our planet. This stability depends on the underlying mantle attached to the landmasses. New research demonstrates that diamonds can be used to reveal how a buoyant section of mantle beneath some of the continents became thick enough to provide long-term st

17h

A cancer therapy’s grave dangers subside after a little fine-tuning

A cancer therapy’s grave dangers subside after a little fine-tuning A cancer therapy’s grave dangers subside after a little fine-tuning, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01298-0 Modifying a T-cell receptor eliminates the serious side effects of an immunotherapy.

17h

The Pentagon Wants to Build Satellite-Repairing Droids

Astromech Droids The Pentagon’s research division, DARPA, wants to develop space robots that can visit high-altitude satellites and conduct repairs when something breaks down. The repair-bots are expected to service the satellites and spacecraft orbiting Earth at around 22,000 miles, according to Nextgov . The fleet would not only provide support for a U.S. Space Force but could also potentially

17h

Rehabilitation psychologists: #SayTheWord disability

A group of female rehabilitation psychologists with disabilities highlight the need for clinicians, educators and disability allies to normalize the word 'disability.'

17h

Researchers verify new method of HIV transmission among injection drug users and effective prevention technique

New studies from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University have found for the first time that HIV can be transmitted through the sharing of equipment used to prepare drugs before injection and that a simple intervention – heating the equipment with a cigarette lighter for 10 seconds – can destroy the HIV virus, preventing that transmission. The findings, used to inform a public healt

17h

New method proposed for studying hydrodynamic behavior of electrons in graphene

By studying how electrons in two-dimensional graphene can literally act like a liquid, researchers have paved the way for further research into a material that has the potential to enable future electronic computing devices that outpace silicon transistors.

17h

Working to advance radiation therapy for children with cancer

Doctors use novel software to increase quality assurance in radiation therapy. This allows radiation oncologists to assess targeting and dosing of radiation in real time as treatment progresses.

17h

Bringing information into the cell

Researchers have elucidated an important part of a signal pathway that transmits information through the cell membrane into the interior of a cell. This signal pathway is of great significance for all mammals, since it is involved in various important vital processes such as the regulation of the heartbeat.

17h

It's 2019 – where's my supersuit?

I loved the "Thundercats" cartoon as a child, watching cat-like humanoids fighting the forces of evil. Whenever their leader was in trouble, he'd unleash the Sword of Omens to gain "sight beyond sight," the ability to see events happening at faraway places, or bellow "Thunder, Thunder, Thunder, Thundercats, Hooo!" to instantaneously summon his allies to his location to join the fight. What kid did

17h

16 things you’ll definitely want in your office locker

Gadgets Storage accessories for school, for the gym, and for your new open-plan office. Items to always have on hand that you’ll definitely want in your office locker.

17h

Plan to drill in Alaskan wildlife refuge downplays climate impact, U.S. agency argues

Bureau of Land Management analysis flawed, wildlife officials say

17h

US invites world's aviation regulators to meeting on Boeing's 737 MAX

Facing criticism that it is too close to Boeing, the Federal Aviation Administration has invited global regulators to a meeting on the Boeing 737 MAX next month as it works to restore confidence following two deadly crashes.

17h

A Voting-Rights Debate Reveals Why Democrats Keep Losing

Two separate stories this week about criminal justice and the right to vote offer a sharp microcosm of the difference between the major U.S. political parties. The Democratic presidential field has spent most of the week tying itself in knots over whether prisoners should be able to vote—an important but largely abstract debate. Meanwhile, Florida Republicans are close to passing a law that allow

17h

The Genre-Defying Rage of Rico Nasty

The rapper Rico Nasty begins her latest project, Anger Management , with a scream. For fans of the eclectic Maryland-raised artist, that yell conjures a feeling akin to the pleasant stomach churn of a roller-coaster climb: When Rico shouts “KENNY!,” the name of her longtime producer, you know electrifying chaos is about to ensue. Rico metabolizes life’s frustrations by raging about them—and invit

17h

US Measles Cases Break Record Since Returning to Country

There are now more cases of measles in America than in any year since the disease was eradicated nearly 20 years ago.

17h

Sooner or Later Your Cousin’s DNA Is Going to Solve a Murder

The Golden State Killer case was just the start. Hundreds of cold cases are hot again thanks to a new genealogy technique. The price may be everyone’s genetic privacy.

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Editorial: The march of the robots has begun

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

17h

New type of plastic is a recycling dream

submitted by /u/pipsdontsqueak [link] [comments]

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Canada privacy watchdog taking Facebook to court

Canada's privacy czar said Thursday that he is taking Facebook to court after finding that lax practices at the social media giant allowed personal information to be used for political purposes.

17h

Mutation ‘middle ground’ made corn good to domesticate

Researchers have identified the genomic features that might have made domestication possible for corn and soybeans, two of the world’s most critical crop species. The research has implications for how scientists understand domestication, the process by which humans have been able to breed plants for desirable traits through centuries of cultivation. The researchers drew on vast amounts of data on

17h

In degrading Nature humanity harms itself, UN report warns

Diplomats and scientists from 130 nations gather in Paris next week to vet and validate the first UN global assessment of the state of Nature in more than a decade, and the news is not good.

18h

SpaceX, NASA tight-lipped on cause of crew capsule incident

NASA and SpaceX remained tight-lipped Thursday about what caused a mysterious but apparently serious incident last weekend during engine tests on the Crew Dragon capsule designed to carry US astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) later this year.

18h

Bridge over coupled waters: Scientists 3-D-print all-liquid 'lab on a chip'

Researchers at DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have 3-D-printed an all-liquid device that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications—from making battery materials to screening drug candidates.

18h

The New President of Ukraine Only Campaigned Online

Political Outsider Ukraine’s current president is a former Parliament member who once served as the nation’s head of foreign policy, economic development, and trade. The man the Eastern European nation just elected by a landslide to succeed him once played a president on a TV show. And actor/comedian Volodymyr Zelenskiy’s qualifications — or lack thereof — aren’t even the strangest part of Sunday

18h

Persona 5 for Switch is not your father's RPG

This week Atlus confirmed two Persona 5 titles.

18h

Bridge over coupled waters: Scientists 3D-print all-liquid 'lab on a chip'

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have 3D-printed an all-liquid "lab on a chip" that, with the click of a button, can be repeatedly reconfigured on demand to serve a wide range of applications – from making battery materials to screening drug candidates.

18h

Working to advance radiation therapy for children with cancer

Doctors at Children's Hospital Los Angeles use novel software to increase quality assurance in radiation therapy. This allows radiation oncologists to assess targeting and dosing of radiation in real time as treatment progresses.

18h

WINTHER trial results

Published in Nature Medicine, results of WINTHER, the first study pioneered by the WIN Consortium — Genomic and transcriptomic profiling expands precision cancer medicine: the WINTHER trial — shows that RNA profiling together with DNA testing matches more patients with advanced cancer to personalized therapies than DNA profiling for tumor mutations alone.

18h

The glass half-full: How optimism can bias prognosis in serious illness

A new study in the journal Psycho-Oncology, details how a seriously ill patient's optimism can impact a clinician's survival prognosis in palliative care conversations, impacting end-of-life decision-making and potentially, quality of life in the end-of-life setting.

18h

Scientists Need to Talk More About Failure

The most radical talk at TED 2019 wasn't about a miracle cure or a moonshot. It was about a balloon that popped.

18h

Rami Malek Is Your New Villain … Bond Villain

Malek's next gig, the Avengers are coming for all the money, Captain America does VR, and more.

18h

Photos: Climate-Change Protests Around the World

Since the beginning of the year, large numbers of protests against government inaction on issues of climate change have been taking place in cities worldwide. Most of the movement has taken place in Europe, is largely student-led, and was inspired by the Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg, who has been speaking out and demanding action from leaders since last year. On March 15, thousands of env

18h

A Monk’s Son Struggles to Find Meaning

Finding a path in life is a tall order for anyone. But when you’re the son of a Buddhist monk, discovering your purpose can seem even more daunting. In her short documentary Sit , Yoko Okumura tells the story of her father, the Japanese Sōtō Zen priest Shohaku Okumura, and her brother, Masaki, who lives at home and struggles to find the motivation to go out in the world and seek a place for himse

18h

It's OK to indulge once in a while, study suggests: The body adapts to occasional short-term overeating

Overeating has been found to impair blood sugar (glucose) control and insulin levels. A new study suggests that the duration of a bout of overeating can affect how the body adapts glucose and insulin processing when calorie intake increases.

18h

Study in mice uncovers an unknown pathway for breast cancer tumors to recur

Experimenting in mice, the researchers tracked a series of events that enable a small reservoir of treatment-resistant cancer cells to awake from dormancy, grow and spread.

18h

Vascular surgery after firearm injury associated with increased morbidity and mortality

Researchers have found that among all hospitalizations that were due to firearm injury, patients who underwent surgical repair of their major blood vessels had the highest injury severity score (predictor of in-hospital death).

18h

Tech fixes can't protect us from disinformation campaigns

More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts. Policymakers and diplomats need to focus more on the psychology behind why citizens are so vulnerable to disinformation campaigns.

18h

'Make EU trade with Brazil sustainable'

600 scientists call on the EU to make trade with Brazil more sustainable to protect the planet.

18h

Campi Flegrei in Italy Adopts an Orphan Massive Eruption

Most people would think that it would be hard to hide the evidence of a massive volcanic eruption. It shouldn't be hard to track down the source of tens of cubic kilometers of ash and debris because it should just get thicker and thicker until you reach the volcano that disgorged the mess. Yet, somehow, it isn't that easy. We live on a geologically active planet where all the processes of weather,

18h

Winds and Waves on the Oceans Are Getting (Slightly) Stronger Every Year

In the world of climate science — and science in general — data is king. The more of it you have, and the higher its quality, the better. And while such trends as the rise in temperatures and sea levels have impeccable data behind them, not every measure of a changing climate has been so lucky. Take the global wind and wave climate, for example, which measures trends in wind speed and wave height

18h

'It's a Haunting Thing': Space Artists on the First Black Hole Image

When researchers with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) unveiled the first true picture of a black hole on April 10, they finally succeeded in imaging the invisible. The bright ring of the accretion disk and the dark shadow of the event horizon stood out clearly, validating scientists’ theories as to what a singularity looked like. The event was a momentous one for the space artists who have spent

18h

Self-Driving Catheter Robot Navigates the Heart for Surgery

When navigating through dark environments, rats swish their whiskers against nearby objects to figure out where they are. As the animals explore, they use this sense of touch to build maps of unfamiliar places. Cockroaches and blind crayfish use their antennae in a similar approach. Now, the go-by-feel strategy has inspired the creation of a robotic catheter capable of finding its way through the

18h

New App Tells You When Your Smart Speaker Is Spying On You

Double Agent Your internet-connected devices share a lot of the information that they collect about you, even when you’re not actively using them. To help inform people about just how much personal information gets sent out, a team of Princeton University scientists built a tool that tracks every transmission that a smart home device, whether it’s an Amazon Echo or a smart TV, sends out into the

18h

Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria

Bacterial cells use both a virus—traditionally thought to be an enemy—and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment.

18h

Scientists unlock new role for nervous system in regeneration

Biologists at Tufts University have developed a computational model of planarian (flatworm) regeneration that explains how fragments of planaria determine which end should form a tail and which should form a head. The development begins to answer an important question in regeneration research—what are the signals that determine the rebuilding of specific anatomical structures? Combining modeling a

18h

Human encroachment alters air quality over Amazon rainforest

Plumes of air pollution generated from a rapidly expanding city within the Amazon rainforest are wafting hundreds of miles and degrading air quality in the pristine rainforest, according to a team of scientists.

18h

Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria

Bacterial cells use both a virus—traditionally thought to be an enemy—and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment.

18h

Scientists unlock new role for nervous system in regeneration

Biologists at Tufts University have developed a computational model of planarian (flatworm) regeneration that explains how fragments of planaria determine which end should form a tail and which should form a head. The development begins to answer an important question in regeneration research—what are the signals that determine the rebuilding of specific anatomical structures? Combining modeling a

18h

NASA winner demos red berries on the red planet

A team from Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering that designed a greenhouse for Mars was announced the winner of the 2019 NASA BIG Idea Challenge Wednesday at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

18h

Climate change is way worse on ocean animals

Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, researchers report. The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to the new study. It’s the first to compare cold-blooded marine and land species’ sensitivity to

18h

Scientists discover what powers celestial phenomenon STEVE

The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research. In a new study, scientists found STEVE's source region in space and identified two mechanisms that cause it.

18h

In Diamonds' Flaws, Finding the Secret History of Continents

Minerals more than 2 billion years old lurk inside the sparkly gems.

18h

Diamonds reveal how continents are stabilized, key to Earth's habitability

The longevity of Earth's continents in the face of destructive tectonic activity is an essential geologic backdrop for the emergence of life on our planet. This stability depends on the underlying mantle attached to the landmasses. New research demonstrates that diamonds can be used to reveal how a buoyant section of mantle beneath some of the continents became thick enough to provide long-term st

18h

Unprecedented insight into two-dimensional magnets using diamond quantum sensors

For the first time, physicists at the University of Basel have succeeded in measuring the magnetic properties of atomically thin van der Waals materials on the nanoscale. They used diamond quantum sensors to determine the strength of the magnetization of individual atomic layers of the material chromium triiodide. In addition, they found a long-sought explanation for the unusual magnetic propertie

18h

Ice-proof coating for big structures relies on a 'beautiful demonstration of mechanics'

A new class of coatings that sheds ice effortlessly from even large surfaces has moved researchers closer to their decades-long goal of ice-proofing cargo ships, airplanes, power lines and other large structures.

18h

33-year study shows increasing ocean winds and wave heights

Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, University of Melbourne research shows.

18h

Bringing information into the cell

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have elucidated an important part of a signal pathway that transmits information through the cell membrane into the interior of a cell. This signal pathway is of great significance for all mammals, since it is involved in various important vital processes such as the regulation of the heartbeat.

18h

How to take the 'petro' out of the petrochemicals industry

University of Toronto Engineering researchers chart a course for how an alternative technology — renewable electrosynthesis — could usher in a more sustainable chemical industry, and ultimately enable us to leave much more oil and gas in the ground.

18h

Injections, exercise promote muscle regrowth after atrophy in mice, study finds

By injecting cells that support blood vessel growth into muscles depleted by inactivity, researchers say they are able to help restore muscle mass lost as a result of immobility.

18h

Ocean winds and waves have slightly strengthened over last three decades

Over the last three decades, wind speeds and wave heights have increased, even if just a little, in most places around the world, with the greatest increases occurring in the Southern Ocean.

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Accounting for ice-earth feedbacks at finer scale suggests slower glacier retreat

Accounting for the way the Antarctic ice sheet interacts with the solid earth below — an important but previously poorly captured phenomena — reveals that ice sheet collapse events may be delayed for several decades, at this major ice structure.

18h

The cellular source of fat tissue formation

Researchers working in mice and human tissue have identified several classes of adipocyte progenitor cells, which give rise to fat tissue, some of which reside in a recently discovered anatomical niche.

18h

New approach to easier ice removal

Reducing the toughness, rather than the strength, between ice and the surface it covers is key to developing highly icephobic materials, a new study reports.

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UMBC program to support diverse students in STEM successfully replicated at PSU, UNC

Five years ago, Pennsylvania State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill launched replications of UMBC's Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which over the last 30 years has earned national recognition for its strength in supporting diverse students in STEM. The positive results at PSU and UNC demonstrate that any institution committed to Meyerhoff principles can reproduce the program

18h

Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects

Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area. In the latest issue of Science, a international team of researchers reveals it is more a matter of helping the damaged ecosystem to regenerate and sustain itself.

18h

Dengue research in the Philippines evolving over time

Communicable diseases including dengue continue to be major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Philippines. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have reviewed 60 years of published literature on dengue in the country to identify trends in previous studies and areas where more research is needed.

18h

The FASEB Journal: Pericytes may improve muscle recovery

Extended periods of limb immobilization — whether from long-term bed rest, casting, spaceflight, or other circumstances — can reduce skeletal muscle mass and strength to the extent that recovery is delayed or never achieved. The biological basis for this lack of recovery, however, remains unclear. An animal study published in The FASEB Journal provides the first evidence that pericytes (cells in

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Study: Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing

Abundant and healthy wildlife populations are a cultural and ecological treasure in the United States. Over time, however, the decisions about how agencies manage wildlife have become highly contested: How should managers handle human-wildlife conflict, endangered species restoration and predator control?

18h

People Love Living in Pods So Much They’re Getting Neck Tattoos About It

Choosing the Pod Life The rent is too damn high! A recent quality of life survey by the University of California in Los Angeles found that the residents of the sprawling metropolis are becoming increasingly dissatisfied with housing affordability. In response, thousands of young people are giving up traditional housing in favor of living in a “pod” — a hostel-like living experience that confines

18h

Study: Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing

Abundant and healthy wildlife populations are a cultural and ecological treasure in the United States. Over time, however, the decisions about how agencies manage wildlife have become highly contested: How should managers handle human-wildlife conflict, endangered species restoration and predator control?

18h

The Galaxy Fold's Breaking Display Won't Be Easy to Fix

The ambitious device gets an iFixit teardown, revealing what might turn out to be systematic problems.

18h

Password1, Password2, Password3 no more: Microsoft drops password expiration rec

For years, Microsoft's baseline security policy has expired passwords after 60 days.

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The ocean’s tallest waves are getting taller

Wind-driven waves are growing fastest in the Southern Ocean, new study says

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Dentists can be the first line of defense against domestic violence

New findings indicate that oral biomarkers may help health providers identify victims of domestic violence.

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Two birds, one stone: Drug combo may prove effective against second type of leukemia

Researchers tested to see if arsenic trioxide (ATO) was effective in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in in both the mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in human AML cells in the lab, and determined that the combination proved 'powerfully and exquisitely effective' against a subset of AML. The combo could serve as the foothold researchers need to overcome resistance to t

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Mysterious eruption came from Campi Flegrei caldera

The caldera-forming eruption of Campi Flegrei (Italy) 40,000 years ago is the largest known eruption in Europe during the last 200,000 years, but little is known about other large eruptions at the volcano prior to a more recent caldera-forming event 15,000 years ago.

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Evidence of 6 new binary black hole mergers within LVC data

Scholars recently submitted an article announcing the discovery of six new binary black hole mergers, which exceed the detection thresholds defined by the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration. Applying a unique set of signal processing techniques the team, nearly doubled the total number of binary black hole mergers found within the data of LVC's second observing run (O2) from 7 to 13.

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Human activity can influence the gut microbiota of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos

In the Galapagos Islands, Darwin's finches drawn to junk food are experiencing changes in their gut microbiota and their body mass as compared to finches that don't encounter human food, according to a new study.

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World's oceans are becoming stormier, researchers discover

Data matches predictions that weather will get more extreme as planet warms, scientists say The world’s oceans have become more stormy during the past three decades, according to the largest and most detailed study of its kind. The findings add to concerns that as the world gets hotter, extreme events such as storms and floods could become more frequent and more devastating in their impact. Conti

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Radio Atlantic: To Impeach or Not to Impeach?

Subscribe to Radio Atlantic : Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Play Atlantic Ideas Editor Yoni Appelbaum and Vox Editor at Large Ezra Klein have both deeply researched the question of impeachment—and both have come to a different conclusion. Appelbaum argued in The Atlantic ’s March cover story that the House of Representatives “must immediately open a formal impeachment inquiry into

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China’s ambitious telescopes rise in the thin air of the Tibetan Plateau

Observatories to study gamma rays, gravitational waves, stars, and the sun take shape on the roof of the world

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Into the overworld: Ex–spy plane to see whether towering storms pose new threat to ozone layer

New NASA mission will probe the stratosphere over central United States

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Facebook fact checker has ties to news outlet that promotes climate doubt

CheckYourFact.com, an affiliate of The Daily Caller, accused of selective reporting

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Easy ice removal

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Building better bone

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Extremely fast winds and high waves are now happening more often

Over the past three decades, extreme winds and waves have increased globally, worsening the risk of flooding in coastal communities during storms

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Health for all

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News at a glance

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The overworld

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Easy ice removal

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Building better bone

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Architecture and subunit arrangement of native AMPA receptors elucidated by cryo-EM

Glutamate-gated AMPA receptors mediate the fast component of excitatory signal transduction at chemical synapses throughout all regions of the mammalian brain. AMPA receptors are tetrameric assemblies composed of four subunits, GluA1–GluA4. Despite decades of study, the subunit composition, subunit arrangement, and molecular structure of native AMPA receptors remain unknown. Here we elucidate the

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Mechanism of 5' splice site transfer for human spliceosome activation

The prespliceosome, comprising U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) bound to the precursor messenger RNA 5' splice site (5'SS) and branch point sequence, associates with the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP to form the fully assembled precatalytic pre–B spliceosome. Here, we report cryo–electron microscopy structures of the human pre–B complex captured before U1 snRNP dissociation at 3.3-angstro

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Phonon-mediated quantum state transfer and remote qubit entanglement

Phonons, and in particular surface acoustic wave phonons, have been proposed as a means to coherently couple distant solid-state quantum systems. Individual phonons in a resonant structure can be controlled and detected by superconducting qubits, enabling the coherent generation and measurement of complex stationary phonon states. We report the deterministic emission and capture of itinerant surf

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Low-interfacial toughness materials for effective large-scale deicing

Ice accretion has adverse effects on a range of commercial and residential activities. The force required to remove ice from a surface is typically considered to scale with the iced area. This imparts a scalability limit to the use of icephobic coatings for structures with large surface areas, such as power lines or ship hulls. We describe a class of materials that exhibit a low interfacial tough

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Observation of second sound in graphite at temperatures above 100 K

Wavelike thermal transport in solids, referred to as second sound, is an exotic phenomenon previously limited to a handful of materials at low temperatures. The rare occurrence of this effect restricted its scientific and practical importance. We directly observed second sound in graphite at temperatures above 100 kelvins by using time-resolved optical measurements of thermal transport on the mic

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Imaging covalent bond formation by H atom scattering from graphene

Viewing the atomic-scale motion and energy dissipation pathways involved in forming a covalent bond is a longstanding challenge for chemistry. We performed scattering experiments of H atoms from graphene and observed a bimodal translational energy loss distribution. Using accurate first-principles dynamics simulations, we show that the quasi-elastic channel involves scattering through the physiso

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Sulfur isotopes in diamonds reveal differences in continent construction

Neoproterozoic West African diamonds contain sulfide inclusions with mass-independently fractionated (MIF) sulfur isotopes that trace Archean surficial signatures into the mantle. Two episodes of subduction are recorded in these West African sulfide inclusions: thickening of the continental lithosphere through horizontal processes around 3 billion years ago and reworking and diamond growth around

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Nitrogen isotope evidence for expanded ocean suboxia in the early Cenozoic

The million-year variability of the marine nitrogen cycle is poorly understood. Before 57 million years (Ma) ago, the 15 N/ 14 N ratio ( 15 N) of foraminifera shell-bound organic matter from three sediment cores was high, indicating expanded water column suboxia and denitrification. Between 57 and 50 Ma ago, 15 N declined by 13 to 16 per mil in the North Pacific and by 3 to 8 per mil in the Atlan

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The structure of a membrane adenylyl cyclase bound to an activated stimulatory G protein

Membrane-integral adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are key enzymes in mammalian heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G protein)–dependent signal transduction, which is important in many cellular processes. Signals received by the G protein–coupled receptors are conveyed to ACs through G proteins to modulate the levels of cellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Here, we describe the cryo–electron mi

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PAC, an evolutionarily conserved membrane protein, is a proton-activated chloride channel

Severe local acidosis causes tissue damage and pain, and is one of the hallmarks of many diseases including ischemia, cancer, and inflammation. However, the molecular mechanisms of the cellular response to acid are not fully understood. We performed an unbiased RNA interference screen and identified PAC (TMEM206) as being essential for the widely observed proton-activated Cl – (PAC) currents ( I

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Long-term functional maintenance of primary human hepatocytes in vitro

The maintenance of terminally differentiated cells, especially hepatocytes, in vitro has proven challenging. Here we demonstrated the long-term in vitro maintenance of primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) by modulating cell signaling pathways with a combination of five chemicals (5C). 5C-cultured PHHs showed global gene expression profiles and hepatocyte-specific functions resembling those of freshly

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New Products

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A cure for burnout

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Cell competition during reprogramming gives rise to dominant clones

The ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells from differentiated cell types has enabled researchers to engineer cell states. Although studies have identified molecular networks that reprogram cells to pluripotency, the cellular dynamics of these processes remain poorly understood. Here, by combining cellular barcoding, mathematical modeling, and lineage tracing approaches, we demonstrat

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Identification of a mesenchymal progenitor cell hierarchy in adipose tissue

Metabolic health depends on the capacity of adipose tissue progenitor cells to undergo de novo adipogenesis. The cellular hierarchy and mechanisms governing adipocyte progenitor differentiation are incompletely understood. Through single-cell RNA sequence analyses, we show that the lineage hierarchy of adipocyte progenitors consists of distinct mesenchymal cell types that are present in both mous

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What would it take for renewably powered electrosynthesis to displace petrochemical processes?

Electrocatalytic transformation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and water into chemical feedstocks offers the potential to reduce carbon emissions by shifting the chemical industry away from fossil fuel dependence. We provide a technoeconomic and carbon emission analysis of possible products, offering targets that would need to be met for economically compelling industrial implementation to be achieved

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Rewilding complex ecosystems

The practice of rewilding has been both promoted and criticized in recent years. Benefits include flexibility to react to environmental change and the promotion of opportunities for society to reconnect with nature. Criticisms include the lack of a clear conceptualization of rewilding, insufficient knowledge about possible outcomes, and the perception that rewilding excludes people from landscape

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Architecture of the heteromeric GluA1/2 AMPA receptor in complex with the auxiliary subunit TARP {gamma}8

AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs) mediate excitatory neurotransmission and are central regulators of synaptic plasticity, a molecular mechanism underlying learning and memory. Although AMPARs act predominantly as heteromers, structural studies have focused on homomeric assemblies. Here, we present a cryo–electron microscopy structure of the heteromeric GluA1/2 receptor associated with two tr

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Ung forsker: Vi kan takke udvandrerne for vores velfærdssamfund

Vi blev mere fællesskabs-orienterede i Danmark, fordi individualisterne rejste til USA.

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This Video Game Detects Alzheimer’s Earlier Than Lab Tests

Memory Loss Although memory problems are the strongest indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, they’re a late-stage symptom. A much earlier sign of dementia is poor spatial orientation — which researchers are now leveraging to determine who’s at risk by asking them to play a video game. “Research shows us that the brain changes associated with diseases like Alzheimer’s begin decades before symptoms li

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Diamonds reveal how continents are stabilized, key to Earth's habitability

The longevity of Earth's continents in the face of destructive tectonic activity is an essential geologic backdrop for the emergence of life on our planet. This stability depends on the underlying mantle attached to the landmasses. New research by a group of geoscientists from Carnegie, the Gemological Institute of America, and the University of Alberta demonstrates that diamonds can be used to re

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UMBC program to support diverse students in STEM successfully replicated at PSU, UNC

UMBC's Meyerhoff Scholars Program has been lauded as a national model for supporting diverse students in STEM fields. Other institutions across the United States have begun to ask if UMBC's approach could work for them. A new paper published in Science on April 26 answers that question with a resounding "yes."

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Ice-proof coating for big structures relies on a 'beautiful demonstration of mechanics'

A new class of coatings that sheds ice effortlessly from even large surfaces has moved researchers closer to their decades-long goal of ice-proofing cargo ships, airplanes, power lines and other large structures.

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33-year study shows increasing ocean winds and wave heights

Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, University of Melbourne research shows.

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Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects

Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area. An international team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Lei

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How to take the 'petro' out of the petrochemicals industry

Fossil fuels are the backbone of the global petrochemicals industry, which provides the world's growing population with fuels, plastics, clothing, fertilizers and more. A new research paper, published today in Science, charts a course for how an alternative technology—renewable electrosynthesis—could usher in a more sustainable chemical industry, and ultimately enable us to leave much more oil and

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Scientists unlock new role for nervous system in regeneration

Biologists have developed a computational model of flatworm regeneration to answer an important question in regeneration research – what are the signals that determine the rebuilding of specific anatomical structures? The model confirms experiments showing how numerous factors determine body pattern formation, and the critical role nerve fibers play in determining polarity in regeneration. The mod

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Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing

A new 50-state study on America's Wildlife Values led by researchers at Colorado State University and The Ohio State University describes individuals' values toward wildlife.

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Would you let tiny robots clean your teeth?

Researchers have created a microscopic robotic cleaning crew that could one day remove plaque from your teeth. A visit to the dentist typically involves time-consuming and sometimes unpleasant scraping with mechanical tools to remove plaque from teeth. What if, instead, a dentist could deploy a small army of tiny robots to precisely and non-invasively remove that buildup? With two types of roboti

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Bringing information into the cell

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have elucidated an important part of a signal pathway that transmits information through the cell membrane into the interior of a cell.

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5 Years After Flint's Crisis Began, Is The Water Safe?

"In some ways we're better," says activist Melissa Mays. "In other ways, we're forever poisoned, damaged, traumatized … that's not gonna ever be better." (Image credit: Paul Sancya/AP)

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AT&T CEO: We’re Going to Double Dip, Charge 5G Customers for Both Data and Performance

This would be a substantial change from how wireless performance is typically billed. The post AT&T CEO: We’re Going to Double Dip, Charge 5G Customers for Both Data and Performance appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects

Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area. An international team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Lei

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Bringing information into the cell

Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) have elucidated an important part of a signal pathway that transmits information through the cell membrane into the interior of a cell.

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Could invigorating the immune system prevent lung cancer?

Early immune-related molecular changes in airway tissue could potentially predict invasive lung cancer and serve as prevention targets, new study suggests.

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Developing a model critical in creating better devices

Chemical engineers have developed a new computational model to better understand the relationship between water and a type of two-dimensional material.

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Caffeine gives solar cells an energy boost

Scientists have discovered that caffeine can help make a promising alternative to traditional solar cells more efficient at converting light to electricity. Their research may enable this cost-effective renewable energy technology to compete on the market with silicon solar cells.

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When Obama Talked Biden Out of Running for President

Barack Obama stood in the Rose Garden, watching Joe Biden announce that he wasn’t going to run for president—exactly what he wanted and had helped make happen. Four years later, the president has come a long way on his views of a Biden run. For many Democrats, Biden’s 2020 announcement today is the bookend to the anxiety and regret they’ve been filled with since Election Night 2016, when they wat

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Songbird-body changes that allow migration may have human health implications

Songbirds that pack on as much as 50 percent of their body weight before migrating and that sleep very little, exhibit altered immune system and tissue-repair function during the journey, which may hold implications for human health.

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Developing a model critical in creating better devices

Chemical engineers have developed a new computational model to better understand the relationship between water and a type of two-dimensional material.

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Caffeine gives solar cells an energy boost

Scientists have discovered that caffeine can help make a promising alternative to traditional solar cells more efficient at converting light to electricity. Their research may enable this cost-effective renewable energy technology to compete on the market with silicon solar cells.

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Fishing for cures: New zebrafish model identifies drugs that kill pediatric cancer cells

A new immunodeficient zebrafish model investigators promises to be less expensive, easier to use and to improve personalized therapies for cancers and potentially other diseases. The ability of the model to visualize drug responses at single-cell resolution in live animals allowed the team to identify a promising new treatment for rhabdomyosarcoma.

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How to shape research to advance global health

How to shape research to advance global health How to shape research to advance global health, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01235-1 Soumya Swaminathan explains how the World Health Organization’s new science division can promote universal health coverage in all countries.

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Federal Agencies Disagree on Environmental Impacts of Drilling in Alaska

Aspects of climate change were minimized in an analysis of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Human encroachment alters air quality over Amazon rainforest

Plumes of air pollution generated from a rapidly expanding city within the Amazon rainforest are wafting hundreds of miles and degrading air quality in the pristine rainforest, according to a team of scientists.

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Mystery of the universe's expansion rate widens with new Hubble data

The universe is getting bigger every second — but how fast? Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope say they have crossed an important threshold in revealing a discrepancy between the two key techniques for measuring the universe's expansion rate.

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Bacteria uses viral weapon against other bacteria

Bacterial cells use both a virus — traditionally thought to be an enemy — and a prehistoric viral protein to kill other bacteria that competes with it for food according to an international team of researchers who believe this has potential implications for future infectious disease treatment.

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How to stop climate change? Nationalise the oil companies | Owen Jones

Extinction Rebellion got the ball rolling, but more radical action is now necessary if humanity is to survive If only the Daily Express was right. That is not a sentence I ever expected to type. “Extinction Rebellion protests have WORKED as MPs succumb to calls for change”, bellowed the rightwing rag. Alas, the government has not capitulated to demands to declare a climate emergency, let alone to

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How to buy a smartphone case

Gadgets You may not even need a case, but if you're going to buy one, make it the right one. Don't buy the wrong smartphone case.

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Not Even the Avengers Know Who All the Avengers Are

It's a lot of heroes to keep track of, y'know?

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Addendum: A FRET biosensor for necroptosis uncovers two different modes of the release of DAMPs

Addendum: A FRET biosensor for necroptosis uncovers two different modes of the release of DAMPs Addendum: A FRET biosensor for necroptosis uncovers two different modes of the release of DAMPs, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09536-9 Addendum: A FRET biosensor for necroptosis uncovers two different modes of the release of DAMPs

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Publisher Correction: Dispersal homogenizes communities via immigration even at low rates in a simplified synthetic bacterial metacommunity

Publisher Correction: Dispersal homogenizes communities via immigration even at low rates in a simplified synthetic bacterial metacommunity Publisher Correction: Dispersal homogenizes communities via immigration even at low rates in a simplified synthetic bacterial metacommunity, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09885-5 Publisher Correction: Dispersal homogenizes communitie

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Publisher Correction: Breaking the speed limit with multimode fast scanning of DNA by Endonuclease V

Publisher Correction: Breaking the speed limit with multimode fast scanning of DNA by Endonuclease V Publisher Correction: Breaking the speed limit with multimode fast scanning of DNA by Endonuclease V, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10070-x Publisher Correction: Breaking the speed limit with multimode fast scanning of DNA by Endonuclease V

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How Game of Thrones’ New Song ‘Jenny of Oldstones’ Was Made

It might be Westeros’s heroes’ last night alive: Time for wine, time for conversation, and time for a song. When Tyrion Lannister called for music amid a fireside chat with comrades in the latest Game of Thrones episode, “A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms ,” it was the shy squire Podrick Payne who answered his call. “High in the halls of the kings who are gone,” he sang in an unexpectedly delicate,

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Discovery could be game-changer for pharmaceuticals

Manufacturing drugs may one day become more efficient, courtesy of a recent discovery by researchers at Florida International University.

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Does your tongue have a sense of smell?

New research in mice and human cell cultures has revealed that the taste cells of humans and other mammals can also contain smell receptors.

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Caffeine Cranks Up Solar Cells

Caffeine makes perovskite photovoltaics more stable, enhancing their commercial potential

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At Walmart, using AI to watch the store

Inside one of Walmart's busiest Neighborhood Market grocery stores, high resolution cameras suspended from the ceiling point to a table of bananas. They can tell how ripe the bananas are from …

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Two birds, one stone: Drug combo may prove effective against second type of leukemia

Researchers tested to see if arsenic trioxide (ATO) was effective in combination with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in in both the mouse model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and in human AML cells in the lab, and determined that the combination proved 'powerfully and exquisitely effective' against a subset of AML. The combo could serve as the foothold researchers need to overcome resistance to t

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Have people in the UK really been banned from shooting wood pigeons?

A legal victory means 16 species of bird, including wood pigeons and crows, can no longer be killed with impunity in the UK

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Exponential Growth: Reimagining the Future of Finance

The forces of digitization which led to exponential growth in the gaming industry are about to do the same for the world of finance. Futurists are gathering to envision what this world of tomorrow may look like. Join them in reimagining the future of finance at the 2019 Fluidity Summit. Tickets available now at: https://fut.sm/FSW The post Exponential Growth: Reimagining the Future of Finance app

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Human-caused climate change played limited role in Beijing's 2013 'airpocalypse'

Although the particulate matter that filled the winter skies resulted from both human and natural emissions, a new study concludes that human-caused climate change played only a minor role in the air's stagnation.

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Drones are delivering life-saving medicines in Ghana. We went to see it happen.

For nurses like Gladys Dede Tetteh and her team, Zipline’s new drone delivery service is helping them get their community the vaccines and medicines they vitally need.

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Here we go again: Earth's major 'mass extinctions'

Most scientists agree that a "mass extinction" event is underway on Earth, with species disappearing hundreds of time quicker under the influence of human activity.

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Here we go again: Earth's major 'mass extinctions'

Most scientists agree that a "mass extinction" event is underway on Earth, with species disappearing hundreds of time quicker under the influence of human activity.

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Human-caused climate change played limited role in Beijing's 2013 'airpocalypse'

In January 2013, a suffocating, poisonous haze hung over Beijing for four days. The record high levels of fine particulate matter in the air caused airports to close and thousands of coughing, choking citizens to seek hospital care.

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Next-generation NASA instrument advanced to study the atmospheres of Uranus and Neptune

Much has changed technologically since NASA's Galileo mission dropped a probe into Jupiter's atmosphere to investigate, among other things, the heat engine driving the gas giant's atmospheric circulation.

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Daily briefing: Scientists in China are under pressure to stop a deadly pig virus

Daily briefing: Scientists in China are under pressure to stop a deadly pig virus Daily briefing: Scientists in China are under pressure to stop a deadly pig virus, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01353-w African swine fever spurs vaccine research, brain signals translated into speech and transgender health is finally getting researchers’ attention.

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Dentists can be the first line of defense against domestic violence

New findings indicate that oral biomarkers may help health providers identify victims of domestic violence.

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It's OK to indulge once in a while: The body adapts to occasional short-term overeating

Overeating has been found to impair blood sugar (glucose) control and insulin levels. A new study suggests that the duration of a bout of overeating can affect how the body adapts glucose and insulin processing when calorie intake increases. The article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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Healthy aging entails reorganization of function in prefrontal brain areas

Researchers from HSE University and York University have become the first to analyze the results of 82 functional neuroimaging studies on working memory mechanisms in different adult age groups. The meta-analyses showed that across studies the agreement of various areas of the prefrontal cortex decreases with aging, suggesting reorganization of brain function during healthy aging. The results have

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Norwich Cathedral peregrine falcons' chicks hatch

Three noisy falcon chicks hungry for food reveal themselves in a cathedral spire nest.

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Urging party supporters to sign up for postal votes is ineffective

Research carried out by the University of Kent and Kings College London (KCL) into a common postal vote recruitment tactic found it to be ineffective in persuading people to change from visiting polling stations to vote.

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Mysterious eruption came from Campi Flegrei caldera

The caldera-forming eruption of Campi Flegrei (Italy) 40,000 years ago is the largest known eruption in Europe during the last 200,000 years, but little is known about other large eruptions at the volcano prior to a more recent caldera-forming event 15,000 years ago. A new Geology article by Paul Albert and colleagues discusses a 29,000-year-old eruption, here verified as coming from Campi Flegrei

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Researchers detect evidence of six new binary black hole mergers within LVC data

Scholars at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) recently submitted a paper announcing the discovery of six new binary black hole mergers that exceed the detection thresholds defined by the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration (LVC), the group responsible for the first direct observation of gravitational waves on February 11, 2016.

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Multiplikation på den hurtige måde

PLUS. At gange store tal sammen er besværligt selv for computere – med mindre man tager den tungere matematik i brug.

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Inequality gap grew before the Great Recession and after, study finds

The Great Recession hit Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum, with some still working to recover economically. Yet, the drivers behind these socioeconomic divides were mounting before the decline even hit, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE.

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Unlike His Rivals, Biden Sees Trump as an Aberration

The key word in Joe Biden’s announcement video is aberrant . If Donald Trump serves only one term, Biden declares, “I believe history will look back on four years of this president and all he embraces as an aberrant moment in time.” Before Trump, the former vice president implies, a moral consensus reigned. America, he declares, “is an idea”—an idea that “everyone is treated with dignity,” and th

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Over 20 Million Children a Year Miss Out on First Dose of Measles Vaccine

Over eight years to 2017, a Unicef report found, nearly 170 million children worldwide failed to receive the first of two doses.

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Human activity can influence the gut microbiota of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos

In the Galapagos Islands, Darwin's finches drawn to junk food are experiencing changes in their gut microbiota and their body mass as compared to finches that don't encounter human food, according to a new University of Connecticut study.

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The Decades-Long Effort to Protect the World's Largest Sheep

In the Gobi Desert, where argali roam, a group of Mongolian researchers work to conserve the wild sheep populations

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Surgeons Just Sent a Tiny, Autonomous Bot Into a Heart Valve

Self-Guiding In a world first, surgeons just used a self-navigating surgery robot in an experimental surgery — training a robotic catheter to find its way to a leaky valve in a pig’s heart. The new robot, described in research published in the journal Science Robotics on Wednesday, marks the beginning of the transition from robotic surgical tools to true robot-assisted surgeries, where autonomous

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Tech fixes can't protect us from disinformation campaigns

More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts.

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Human activity can influence the gut microbiota of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos

In the Galapagos Islands, Darwin's finches drawn to junk food are experiencing changes in their gut microbiota and their body mass as compared to finches that don't encounter human food, according to a new University of Connecticut study.

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IAS researchers detect evidence of 6 new binary black hole mergers within LVC data

Scholars at the Institute for Advanced Study recently submitted a paper announcing the discovery of six new binary black hole mergers, which exceed the detection thresholds defined by the LIGO-Virgo Collaboration. Applying a unique set of signal processing techniques the team, nearly doubled the total number of binary black hole mergers found within the data of LVC's second observing run (O2) from

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Research calls for analysis of corporate ethics in the global sports industry

A new book co-written by a University of Kent sports scientist recommends corporations and organisations engage more effectively with communities—rather than taking a 'top down' approach—to improve relationships and outcomes in the sport sector.

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What's on the far side of the Moon?

Looking up at the silvery orb of the Moon, you might recognize familiar shadows and shapes on its face from one night to the next. You see the same view of the Moon our early ancestors did as it lighted their way after sundown.

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Scientists discover what powers celestial phenomenon STEVE

The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research. In a new study, scientists found STEVE's source region in space and identified two mechanisms that cause it.

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Nuclear weapons might save the world from an asteroid strike – but we need to change the law first

The schlocky 1998 Bruce Willis movie Armageddon was the highest grossing film of that year. The blockbuster saw a master oil driller (Willis) and an unlikely crew of misfits place a nuclear bomb inside a giant asteroid heading for Earth, blow it up – and save humanity. Armageddon isn't exactly a documentary: it's packed full of sci-fi nonsense. But, 20 years on, its basic plot – of using a nuclear

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Sex and diet affect protein machineries

Scientists have discovered that the collection of proteins in an animal cell — called the proteome — is substantially affected by both the animal's sex and its diet. Understanding these individual proteomes might provide a basis for personalised treatments for humans in the future.

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Pole-to-pole study of ocean life identifies nearly 200,000 marine viruses

An international team has conducted the first-ever global survey of the ecological diversity of viruses in the oceans during expeditions aboard a single sailboat. They identified nearly 200,000 marine viral species, which vastly exceeds the 15,000 known from prior ocean surveys of these waters and the approximately 2,000 genomes available from cultured viruses of microbes. Their findings have impl

20h

New technique uses power anomalies to ID malware in embedded systems

Researchers have developed a technique for detecting types of malware that use a system's architecture to thwart traditional security measures. The new detection approach works by tracking power fluctuations in embedded systems.

20h

The first laser radio transmitter

For the first time, researchers have used a laser as a radio transmitter and receiver, paving the way for towards ultra-high-speed Wi-Fi and new types of hybrid electronic-photonic devices.

20h

Gonorrhoea cases on the rise across Europe

Following a decline in notification rates in 2016, the number of gonorrhoea cases has gone up by 17% across the reporting EU/EEA countries with more than 89,000 confirmed diagnoses in 2017 — equivalent to 240 cases a day.

20h

Dermcidin may play role in the pathogenesis of skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa

A team have identified the protein dermcidin as having a potential role in the pathogenesis of the chronic skin disease hidradenitis suppurativa.

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Meet Callichimaera perplexa, the platypus of crabs

The crab family just got a bunch of new cousins — including a 95-million-year-old chimera species that will force scientists to rethink the definition of a crab.

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57% See Artificial Intelligence As Threat to Human Race

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Watch this pro table-tennis player get beaten by a robot.

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Mind-reading device uses AI to turn brainwaves into audible speech

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Automation creates risk of low-quality jobs, OECD report warns

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Mysterious eruption came from Campi Flegrei caldera

The caldera-forming eruption of Campi Flegrei (Italy) 40,000 years ago is the largest known eruption in Europe during the last 200,000 years, but little is known about other large eruptions at the volcano prior to a more recent caldera-forming event 15,000 years ago.

20h

Hubble measurements suggest disparity in Hubble constant calculations is not a fluke

Hubble's measurements of today's expansion rate do not match the rate that was expected based on how the Universe appeared shortly after the Big Bang over 13 billion years ago. Using new data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers have significantly lowered the possibility that this discrepancy is a fluke.

20h

Human-caused climate change played limited role in Beijing's 2013 'airpocalypse'

Although the particulate matter that filled the winter skies resulted from both human and natural emissions, a new Northwestern University study concludes that human-caused climate change played only a minor role in the air's stagnation.

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Inequality gap grew before the Great Recession and after, study finds

The Great Recession hit Americans across the socioeconomic spectrum, but the drivers behind these socioeconomic divides were mounting before the decline even hit, according to a paper published in PLOS ONE.

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Study in mice uncovers an unknown pathway for breast cancer tumors to recur

Experimenting in mice, the researchers tracked a series of events that enable a small reservoir of treatment-resistant cancer cells to awake from dormancy, grow and spread.

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Haunted by the past

Good sleepers literally can settle cringe-worthy mistakes and embarrassing blunders in their head as neutralized memories, whereas people with insomnia were not able to do so. This breakthrough finding by the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, suggests that insomnia could primarily be caused by a failing neutralization of emotional distress. Which makes it understandable that insomnia is the

20h

First proven malaria vaccine rolled out in Africa — but doubts linger

First proven malaria vaccine rolled out in Africa — but doubts linger First proven malaria vaccine rolled out in Africa — but doubts linger, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01342-z The RTS,S vaccine is up to 40% effective at preventing malaria in young children.

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Assistive robot learns to feed

About a million Americans with injury or age-related disabilities need someone to help them eat. Now NIBIB funded engineers have taught a robot the strategies needed to pick up food with a fork and gingerly deliver it to a person's mouth.

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Magnets can help AI get closer to the efficiency of the human brain

Researchers have developed a process to use magnetics with brain-like networks to program and teach devices such as personal robots, self-driving cars and drones to better generalize about different objects.

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Sticky proteins could protect crops more safely than chemical pesticides

Designer peptides kill soybean rust, a major threat that requires heavy fungicide use

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New Hubble measurements confirm universe is expanding faster than expected

New measurements from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope confirm that the Universe is expanding about 9% faster than expected based on its trajectory seen shortly after the big bang, astronomers say.

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How cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders

Psychologists have studied how the application of the stress hormone cortisol affects exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. The researchers knew from earlier studies that extinction learning, which constitutes the foundation of exposure therapy, can be reinforced by administering cortisol. However, the team has demonstrated with a group of arachnophobics that an application of cortisol after exp

20h

Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning

Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content 'on the fly' — even if it is not linguistic in nature.

20h

Magnets can help AI get closer to the efficiency of the human brain

Researchers have developed a process to use magnetics with brain-like networks to program and teach devices such as personal robots, self-driving cars and drones to better generalize about different objects.

20h

New key stages discovered in how plants prepare to make sex cells for reproduction

Scientists have built a detailed timeline of the gene activity leading up to meiosis in corn, a finding with potential implications for plant breeding as well as sexually reproductive organisms more broadly.

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AI learns to paint in the styles of Van Gogh, Turner and Vermeer

Artificial intelligence has learned to to paint in the style of artists including Van Gogh and Turner from just a few examples

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How a Key Energy Technology Can Help Developing Countries

The World Bank has a new program for financing the advanced battery storage systems essential for making wind and solar power work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Hver tiende oplever uforklarlige smerter: Ung forsker kan have svaret

En kædereaktion i immunforsvaret kan være årsag til kroniske nervesmerter.

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China Wants to Make Deepfakes Illegal

Major Threat China plans to ban deepfakes — a move that shows at least one world power is taking the threat of AI-manipulated video very seriously. On Saturday, China’s top legislative body proposed making it illegal to “distort another person’s picture or mimic voices using technology,” according to a story by the state-run newspaper China Daily . The paper quoted senior legislator Shen Chunyao

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High-Altitude Auroras Create 'Speed Bumps' for Satellites

They help move pockets of air up where some spacecraft roam.

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Low awareness of hypertension and diabetes in China elderly causing public health concerns

Awareness and diagnoses of hypertension and diabetes in China has been limited, resulting in compromised treatment, and increased screening did not lead to significant improvements, according to a new study. Until now, there was little information on how individuals with hypertension or diabetes in China first became aware of their conditions and what factors may have contributed to changes in awa

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New in the Hastings Center Report: Federal right-to-try, the gamification of science, & more

The federal right-to-try law's effect on the FDA, the gamification of science, how the Conscience and Religious Freedom Division is changing health care, and more in the latest issue.

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Human activity can influence the gut microbiota of Darwin's finches in the Galapagos

In the Galapagos Islands, Darwin's finches drawn to junk food are experiencing changes in their gut microbiota and their body mass as compared to finches that don't encounter human food, according to a new University of Connecticut study.

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New technique uses power anomalies to ID malware in embedded systems

Researchers have developed a technique for detecting types of malware that use a system's architecture to thwart traditional security measures. The new detection approach works by tracking power fluctuations in embedded systems.

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Huawei Still Has Friends in Europe, Despite US Warnings

The UK appears ready to allow Huawei gear in "non-core" parts of its 5G network. Many European countries rely heavily on Chinese equipment.

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'The Big Bang Theory' takes math notes from Carl Pomerance

A prime number theory equation by mathematics professor emeritus Carl Pomerance turned up on The Big Bang Theory, where it was scrawled on a white board in the background of the hit sitcom about a group of friends and roommates who are scientists, many of them physicists at the California Institute of Technology.

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How a Key Energy Technology Can Help Developing Countries

The World Bank has a new program for financing the advanced battery storage systems essential for making wind and solar power work — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Wild Bill Faces Rough Waters at the King Crab Finish Line | Deadliest Catch

With the king crab season coming to a close, Captain Wild Bill and the Summer Bay crew face rough waters ahead. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com

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Canada privacy watchdog rebukes Facebook

Canada's privacy commissioner said Thursday Facebook broke the law when it harvested data from 600,000 citizens—and vowed to go to court to force reforms at the social networking giant.

21h

Svensk välvilja riskerar skada unga flickor

Svenska myndigheters strävan att skydda flickor och unga kvinnor från att bli könsstympade riskerar att ha motsatt effekt. Flickornas hälsa och välmående äventyras samtidigt som uppmärksamheten kring påstådda mörkertal riskerar fördröja att traditionen upphör, menar Sara Johnsdotter, professor vid Malmö universitet.

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How to destroy an asteroid without nuking each other first

In the event of an asteroid heading to Earth and likely to cause catastrophic damage, an Armageddon-style nuclear explosion may well be our best line of defence. But would doing so lead the way to potential space-based nuclear apocalypse instead?

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Left or right handed biomolecules

Many biomolecules come in two versions that are each other's mirror image, like a left and a right hand. Cells generally use the left-hand version of amino acids to produce proteins, and uptake mechanisms were thought to share this preference. Scientists have now shown that a prokaryotic transport protein can transport both versions of the amino acid aspartate with equal efficiency.

21h

New lens system for brighter, sharper diffraction images

Researchers have developed a new and improved version of electron diffraction that offers advanced and unique experimental instrumentation for studying particle acceleration to researchers from all around the world.

21h

Engineers make injectable tissues a reality

A simple injection that can help regrow damaged tissue has long been the dream of physicians and patients alike. A new study moves that dream closer to reality with a device that makes encapsulating cells much faster, cheaper and more effective.

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Tracking charge carriers in the molecular crystal at organic pn junction

In conventional organic solar cells, the electrons exhibit their particle-nature and need to jump between organic molecules in the cell. The conductivity is, therefore, lower than that of crystalline silicon solar cells. Researchers have succeeded to arrange the organic molecules in highly ordered manner like in crystals and to invoke the wave-nature. 'Conductive bands' are formed by energy disper

21h

Battery research: New breakthroughs in research on super-batteries

Researchers have discovered a means of suppressing singlet oxygen formation in lithium-oxygen batteries in order to extend their useful lives.

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Chemical engineers replicate feed, fight and flight responses in catalytic chemical reactions

Chemical engineers have recreated collaboration and competition responses within a microchamber environment of microscopic particles, sheets, and catalysts, effectively mimicking responses of feeding, fighting, and fleeing.

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Battery research: New breakthroughs in research on super-batteries

Researchers have discovered a means of suppressing singlet oxygen formation in lithium-oxygen batteries in order to extend their useful lives.

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Massive ecological and economic impacts of woody weed invasion in Ethiopia

Scientists have revealed the massive ecological and economic impacts that the invasive alien tree Prosopis juliflora has had across the Afar Region of north eastern Ethiopia.

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Extracting something from nothing: A bright glow from empty space

Particles traveling through empty space can emit bright flashes of gamma rays by interacting with the quantum vacuum, according to a new study.

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Chemical engineers replicate feed, fight and flight responses in catalytic chemical reactions

Chemical engineers have recreated collaboration and competition responses within a microchamber environment of microscopic particles, sheets, and catalysts, effectively mimicking responses of feeding, fighting, and fleeing.

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Unravelling the complexity of air pollution in the world's coldest capital city

A joint Mongol-Japanese research team conducted the first detailed study of organic air pollutants in Ulaanbaartar city. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contents of airborne particulates were determined, and indicated that the degree of air pollution varies markedly by district and season.

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Researchers trace 3,000 years of monsoons through shell fossils

The tiny shells at the bottom of Lake Nakaumi in southwest Japan may contain the secrets of the East Asia summer monsoon. This rainy season is fairly predictable, ushering in air and precipitation conducive to growing crops, but — sometimes without any hint — the pattern fails. Some areas of East Asia are left without rainfall, and their crops die. Other areas are inundated with rain, and their

21h

Avengers: Endgame exploits time travel and quantum mechanics as it tries to restore the universe

At the end of Avengers: Infinity War half the people (including heroes and villains) in the universe were gone in the snap of a finger from Thanos (Josh Brolin).

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Scientists discover what powers celestial phenomenon STEVE

The celestial phenomenon known as STEVE is likely caused by a combination of heating of charged particles in the atmosphere and energetic electrons like those that power the aurora, according to new research. In a new study, scientists found STEVE's source region in space and identified two mechanisms that cause it.

21h

A Dead Cat Named Pikachu Is Getting Launched Into Space

Nyan Cat Pikachu, a well-loved housecat who died in January from complications following a battle with diabetes, is going to blast off. Owner Steve Munt plans to send some of Pikachu’s ashes into space, according to Space.com — a strange tribute that will make Pikachu the first cremated cat to enter orbit. All Aboard Shuttling Pikachu into the cosmos will be pet memorial service Celestis Pets, an

21h

Liam Fox forced to clarify climate change comments

International trade secretary appeared to suggest scientific consensus could be questioned The international trade secretary, Liam Fox, has been forced to clarify comments suggesting individuals could question the scientific consensus on climate change. Speaking in the Commons after protesters from Extinction Rebellion held protests across the City of London , Fox suggested even those who did not

21h

New lens system for brighter, sharper diffraction images

Researchers have developed a new and improved version of electron diffraction that offers advanced and unique experimental instrumentation for studying particle acceleration to researchers from all around the world.

21h

Using DNA templates to harness the sun's energy

As the world struggles to meet the increasing demand for energy, coupled with the rising levels of CO2 in the atmosphere from deforestation and the use of fossil fuels, photosynthesis in nature simply cannot keep up with the carbon cycle. But what if we could help the natural carbon cycle by learning from photosynthesis to generate our own sources of energy that didn't generate CO2?

21h

Engineers make injectable tissues a reality

A simple injection that can help regrow damaged tissue has long been the dream of physicians and patients alike. A new study moves that dream closer to reality with a device that makes encapsulating cells much faster, cheaper and more effective.

21h

Exercise activates memory neural networks in older adults

A new study of healthy older adults shows that just one session of exercise increased activation in the brain circuits associated with memory — including the hippocampus — which shrinks with age and is the brain region attacked first in Alzheimer's disease.

21h

Place-based management can protect coral reefs in a changing climate

Scientists have applied new computer models to identify where cesspool conversion and marine conservation efforts will minimize human impacts on coral reefs.

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Tracking charge carriers in the molecular crystal at organic pn junction

In conventional organic solar cells, the electrons exhibit their particle-nature and need to jump between organic molecules in the cell. The conductivity is, therefore, lower than that of crystalline silicon solar cells. Researchers have succeeded to arrange the organic molecules in highly ordered manner like in crystals and to invoke the wave-nature. 'Conductive bands' are formed by energy disper

21h

Being too harsh on yourself could lead to OCD and anxiety

A new study has found that people who reported intense feelings of responsibility were susceptible to developing Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) or Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD).

21h

Study uncovers new materials interactions that could improve data storage

A new study provides insight into multiferroic materials, which could have substantive implications in fields such as data storage.

21h

IDT lowers genomic barriers with powerful rhAmpSeq™ targeted sequencing system

Increasing accuracy and reducing cost barriers, IDT’s innovative system delivers simple and cost-effective amplicon sequencing

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Scientists on a Sailboat Just Found Nearly 200,000 Viruses Hiding in Earth's Oceans

The boat, named the Tara, has given scientists an unprecedented, detailed map of viruses in the marine ecosystem.

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Tesla Loses $702 Million as Sales Fall to Earth

Things will only get better, Elon Musk says, after losing $702 million in Q1 and seeing sales fall 31 percent. Tesla still expects to sell 360,000 to 400,000 cars in 2019. The post Tesla Loses $702 Million as Sales Fall to Earth appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Avengers Endgame Fortnite Crossover Battle Royale Starts Today: Heroes Versus Thanos

Thanos is a bad, bad man. Or maybe he is just misunderstood. By now we all know how Avengers: Infinity War ended, and I expect this topic to be fully explored in Avengers: Endgame, which is …

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Google has created a maths AI that has already proved 1200 theorems

An AI made by Google has written mathematical proofs for more than 1200 theorems and may one day go on to tackle problems mathematicians don't know how to solve

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Tech fixes can't protect us from disinformation campaigns

More than technological fixes are needed to stop countries from spreading disinformation on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, according to two experts. Policymakers and diplomats need to focus more on the psychology behind why citizens are so vulnerable to disinformation campaigns.

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Conflicting laws may keep contaminated needles in circulation, add to hep-C cases

A recent study led by Steve Davis, a researcher in the WVU School of Public Health, suggests fear of arrest is a formidable barrier to getting clean needles and disposing of used ones safely. That can make needle exchange programs less effective — and hepatitis C infections more likely.

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Urging party supporters to sign up for postal votes is ineffective

Research carried out by the University of Kent and Kings College London (KCL) into a common postal vote recruitment tactic found it to be ineffective in persuading people to change from visiting polling stations to vote.Traditionally the tactic involves writing to party supporters to suggest that using a postal vote would be more convenient and aid their participation and to urge them to apply eit

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Québec siblings with rare orphan disease lead to discovery of rare genetic diseases

Mutations in a gene involved in brain development have led to the discovery of two new neurodevelopmental diseases by an international team led by researchers at McGill University and CHU Sainte-Justine Research Center.

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Structure and degradation of circular RNAs regulate PKR activation in innate immunity

In a study published in Cell, a team led by Dr. CHEN Lingling at the Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Dr. YANG Li at the CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology discovered that most examined circRNAs tend to form 16-26 bp intramolecularly imperfect RNA duplexes. In addition, circRNAs preferentially bind to dsRNA-activated

21h

Blood cancer's Achilles' heel opens door for new treatments

New findings about an aggressive form of leukemia could aid the development of novel drugs to treat the condition.

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Fishing for cures: New zebrafish model identifies drugs that kill pediatric cancer cells

A new immunodeficient zebrafish model developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators promises to be less expensive, easier to use and to improve personalized therapies for cancers and potentially other diseases. The ability of the model to visualize drug responses at single-cell resolution in live animals allowed the team to identify a promising new treatment for rhabdomyosarcoma.

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Sex and diet affect protein machineries

Scientists from EMBL Heidelberg have discovered that the collection of proteins in an animal cell — called the proteome — is substantially affected by both the animal's sex and its diet. Understanding these individual proteomes might provide a basis for personalised treatments for humans in the future.

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Researchers detail marine viruses from pole to pole

New research provides the most complete account to date of the viruses that impact the world's oceans, increasing the number of known virus populations tenfold. Researchers analyzed marine samples far and deep in an effort to understand the complexities of viruses, which are increasingly being recognized as important players in the oceans' role in tempering the effects of climate change.

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Analyzing colon cancer proteins and genes uncovers new potential treatments

Analyzing both the entire set of genes and all the proteins produced by colon cancer tissues from patient samples has revealed a more comprehensive view of the tumor that points at novel cancer biological mechanisms and possible new therapeutic strategies.

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Pole-to-pole study of ocean life identifies nearly 200,000 marine viruses

An international team has conducted the first-ever global survey of the ecological diversity of viruses in the oceans during expeditions aboard a single sailboat. They identified nearly 200,000 marine viral species, which vastly exceeds the 15,000 known from prior ocean surveys of these waters and the approximately 2,000 genomes available from cultured viruses of microbes. Their findings, appearin

21h

Caffeine gives solar cells an energy boost

Scientists from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Solargiga Energy in China have discovered that caffeine can help make a promising alternative to traditional solar cells more efficient at converting light to electricity. Their research, published April 25 in the journal Joule, may enable this cost-effective renewable energy technology to compete on the market with silicon solar

21h

What makes mosquitoes avoid DEET? An answer in their legs

Many of us slather ourselves in DEET each summer in hopes of avoiding mosquito bites, and it generally works rather well. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on April 25 have made the surprising discovery that part of the reason for DEET's success can be found in the mosquito's legs, not their biting mouthparts.

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MRC researchers discover how eating feeds into the body clock

The Medical Research Council (MRC)-funded study, published today in the journal Cell, is the first to identify insulin as a primary signal that helps communicate the timing of meals to the cellular clocks located across our body, commonly known as the body clock.

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Comfort food leads to more weight gain during stress

Australian researchers have discovered a new molecular pathway in the brain that triggers more weight gain in times of stress.

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Who Cares About Making Ammonia? You Do.

This paper comes under the heading of “early days, but possibly of great interest”. It demonstrates room-temperature synthesis of ammonia from nitrogen gas using a samarium/molybdenum system, and chemists of all sorts will sit up and that news and say “Hold it. Ammonia is the Haber-Bosch process, isn’t it?” That it is. And that’s a reaction that keeps over half the human race alive, through its u

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Copepods: The unsung heroes of the ocean

We all know the amazing job that bees and birds, as pollinators, do for the planet. But have you heard about the humble copepod?

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This common survey format needs some testing

The Likert Scale—the measurement tool that asks, “Do you strongly disagree, disagree, neither agree nor disagree, agree, or strongly agree?”—warrants some testing of its own. You’ve probably seen Likert Scales even if you don’t know them by name. They show up in psychological contexts and other social science research, business, employment interviews, political polling, education, and often at th

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Fearing no-deal Brexit, European funder orders U.K. researchers to transfer grants

U.K. COST grant holders face bureaucratic headaches to shift grant administration out of the country by 1 May

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Left or right handed biomolecules

Many biomolecules come in two versions that are each other's mirror image, like a left and a right hand. Cells generally use the left-hand version of amino acids to produce proteins, and uptake mechanisms were thought to share this preference. Scientists have now shown that a prokaryotic transport protein can transport both versions of the amino acid aspartate with equal efficiency.

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An army of micro-robots can wipe out dental plaque

A swarm of micro-robots, directed by magnets, can break apart and remove dental biofilm, or plaque, from a tooth. The innovation arose from a cross-disciplinary partnership among dentists, biologists, and engineers.

21h

Trigger region found for absence epileptic seizures

Scientists have discovered a neurological origin for absence seizures — a type of seizure characterized by very short periods of lost consciousness in which people appear to stare blankly at nothing. Using a mouse model of childhood epilepsy, a team showed that absence epilepsy can be triggered by impaired communication between two brain regions: the cortex and the striatum.

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Songbird-body changes that allow migration may have human health implications

Songbirds that pack on as much as 50 percent of their body weight before migrating and that sleep very little, exhibit altered immune system and tissue-repair function during the journey, which may hold implications for human health, according to Penn State researchers.

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The Fundamentals Behind Hacking: MIT Technology Review’s Martin Giles

What business leaders and consumers need to know about the latest trends in cyber attacks and how to handle that next inevitable data breach.

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Ancient Tomb of Mysterious Man Named Tjt Discovered in Egypt

Inside were many mummies and a statue of a ba-bird.

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Songbird-body changes that allow migration may have human health implications

Songbirds that pack on as much as 50 percent of their body weight before migrating and that sleep very little, exhibit altered immune system and tissue-repair function during the journey, which may hold implications for human health, according to Penn State researchers.

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‘Unusual and cute’ new species could redefine the crab

A newly discovered, 95-million-year-old species will force scientists to rethink the definition of a crab—and perhaps the disparate ways animals evolve over time. The researchers announced the discovery of hundreds of exceptionally well-preserved specimens from rock formations in Colombia and the United States that date back to the mid-Cretaceous period of 90-95 million years ago. The cache inclu

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Fake Meat Startup Beyond Meat Says It’s Worth More Than $1 Billion

Public Sale Plant-based fake meat startup Beyond Meat has announced plans to go public sometime in early May, according to CNN . And based on the company’s plans, the public offering will likely value Beyond Meats at an impressive $1.2 billion. That’s an extraordinary upswing — in addition to selling its increasingly-trendy meat alternative on grocery store shelves, the company recently partnered

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Antarctic Emperor Penguin Colony Faces Collapse

After three years with very few new chicks, the birds are abandoning one of the biggest breeding sites on the continent, satellite images show.

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Quaternary-centre-guided synthesis of complex polycyclic terpenes

Quaternary-centre-guided synthesis of complex polycyclic terpenes Quaternary-centre-guided synthesis of complex polycyclic terpenes, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1179-2 Quaternary-centre-guided synthesis of complex polycyclic terpenes

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Hundreds of thousands of marine viruses discovered in world's oceans

Hundreds of thousands of marine viruses discovered in world's oceans Hundreds of thousands of marine viruses discovered in world's oceans, Published online: 25 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01329-w Survey reveals virus diversity hotspots in the Arctic Ocean, as well as the surface waters of temperate and tropical seas.

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Developing a model critical in creating better devices

Water is everywhere. Understanding how it behaves at an intersection with another material and how it affects the performance of that material is helpful when trying to develop better products and devices. An undergraduate researcher at Virginia Tech is leading the way.

21h

Video: How to get rid of that skunk smell?

Skunks are nocturnal animals that prefer to keep to themselves.

21h

Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning

Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content "on the fly"—even if it is not linguistic in nature.

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Pole-to-pole study of ocean life identifies nearly 200,000 marine viruses

An international team has conducted the first-ever global survey of the ecological diversity of viruses in the oceans during expeditions aboard a single sailboat, the Tara. They identified nearly 200,000 marine viral species, which vastly exceeds the 15,000 known from prior ocean surveys of these waters and the approximately 2,000 genomes available from cultured viruses of microbes. Their findings

21h

Over 20 Million Children a Year Miss Out on First Dose of Measles Vaccine

Over eight years to 2017, a Unicef report found, nearly 170 million children worldwide failed to receive the first of two doses.

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Caffeine Peps Up Solar Energy

The human energizer can also improve the efficiency and stability of perovskite solar cells — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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