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nyheder2019april26

Ecuador Amazon tribe win first victory against oil companies

Ecuador's Waorani indigenous tribe won their first victory Friday against big oil companies in a ruling that blocks the companies' entry onto ancestral Amazonian lands for oil exploration activities.

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City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, Concordia researcher says

Concordia University associate professor of biology Carly Ziter writes that dense neighborhood tree canopy coverage can lower local temperatures significantly even compared to uncovered neighborhoods nearby.

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Bach and Adele: Knock yourselves out on MuseNet

OpenAI is introducing a musical MuseNet, the music-generating AI that was in the news earlier this week. Some AI watchers were calling the music OpenAI just unveiled as amazing.

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Readitfor.me condenses great business books into bite-sized summaries

Catch up with Steve Jobs, Made to Stick, Rework, and more. Catch up with Steve Jobs, Made to Stick, Rework, and more with Readitfor.me that condenses great business books into bite-sized summaries.

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Science News Briefs From All Over

A few brief reports about international science and technology from Liberia to Hawaii, including one on the discovery in Northern Ireland of soil bacteria that stop the growth of some superbugs, including MRSA.

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The Finnish Blood Testing Company Reinventing Chronic Disease Diagnostics

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Machine learning in a data-limited regime: Augmenting experiments with synthetic data uncovers order in crumpled sheets

Machine learning has gained widespread attention as a powerful tool to identify structure in complex, high-dimensional data. However, these techniques are ostensibly inapplicable for experimental systems where data are scarce or expensive to obtain. Here, we introduce a strategy to resolve this impasse by augmenting the experimental dataset with synthetically generated data of a much simpler sist

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A brain-plausible neuromorphic on-the-fly learning system implemented with magnetic domain wall analog memristors

Neuromorphic computing is an approach to efficiently solve complicated learning and cognition problems like the human brain using electronics. To efficiently implement the functionality of biological neurons, nanodevices and their implementations in circuits are exploited. Here, we describe a general-purpose spiking neuromorphic system that can solve on-the-fly learning problems, based on magneti

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Optical fiber bundles: Ultra-slim light field imaging probes

Optical fiber bundle microendoscopes are widely used for visualizing hard-to-reach areas of the human body. These ultrathin devices often forgo tunable focusing optics because of size constraints and are therefore limited to two-dimensional (2D) imaging modalities. Ideally, microendoscopes would record 3D information for accurate clinical and biological interpretation, without bulky optomechanica

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Room temperature nanocavity laser with interlayer excitons in 2D heterostructures

Atomically thin layered two-dimensional (2D) materials have provided a rich library for both fundamental research and device applications. Bandgap engineering and controlled material response can be achieved from artificial heterostructures. Recently, excitonic lasers have been reported using transition metal dichalcogenides; however, the emission is still the intrinsic energy bandgap of the mono

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Synthetic and living micropropellers for convection-enhanced nanoparticle transport

Nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as an advantageous drug delivery platform for the treatment of various ailments including cancer and cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. However, their efficacy in shuttling materials to diseased tissue is hampered by a number of physiological barriers. One hurdle is transport out of the blood vessels, compounded by difficulties in subsequent penetration int

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3D strain-induced superconductivity in La2CuO4+{delta} using a simple vertically aligned nanocomposite approach

A long-term goal for superconductors is to increase the superconducting transition temperature, T C . In cuprates, T C depends strongly on the out-of-plane Cu-apical oxygen distance and the in-plane Cu-O distance, but there has been little attention paid to tuning them independently. Here, in simply grown, self-assembled, vertically aligned nanocomposite thin films of La 2 CuO 4+ + LaCuO 3 , by s

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All-optical detection of interfacial spin transparency from spin pumping in {beta}-Ta/CoFeB thin films

Generation and utilization of pure spin current have revolutionized energy-efficient spintronic devices. Spin pumping effect generates pure spin current, and for its increased efficiency, spin-mixing conductance and interfacial spin transparency are imperative. The plethora of reports available on generation of spin current with giant magnitude overlook the interfacial spin transparency. Here, we

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Elon Musk Announces a Leaf Blower, Controversy Ensues

Tesla will do quiet, battery-power leaf blowers. Rainn Wilson (The Office) wants credit for his suggestion to Musk. Chill: Battery leaf blowers exist now. But Tesla could make them better. The post Elon Musk Announces a Leaf Blower, Controversy Ensues appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Biological machinery of cell's 'executioner' yields secrets of its control

Researchers by structural biologists have discovered how the cell switches on an executioner mechanism called necroptosis that induces damaged or infected cells to commit suicide to protect the body.

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US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years

New research shows 75% of the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats.

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You Can Buy a Piece of NASA’s Apollo 11 Spacecraft for Less Than a Pair of Sneakers

Reading about NASA rockets, lunar modules, and space shuttles is cool, but there’s nothing like seeing all that stuff with your own eyes in a museum. But what if you didn’t have to go to a museum to see incredible specimens from the space program? What if you could actually own a tiny piece of it, all for yourself? Well, thanks to the folks at Mini Museum , you don’t have to be rich to have your

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Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the Central and Eastern US

Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers.

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It's hard to know how much oil we have left, but this is our best guess

Environment When will we run out? Estimating the world's oil reserves is hard, but we wanted to illustrate the best estimate with (what else?) the world's biggest, oiliest milkshake.

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New Nanotechnology Imaging Technique Sheds Light on DNA Structure

The new technology could help pinpoint how errors occur in DNA replication, which can cause cancer and other diseases

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Common oral infections in childhood may increase the risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood

A Finnish 27-year follow-up study suggests that common oral infections in childhood, caries and periodontal diseases, are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood.

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Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the Central and Eastern US

Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers.

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Hubble snaps a crowded cluster

This sparkling burst of stars is Messier 75. It is a globular cluster: a spherical collection of stars bound together by gravity. Clusters like this orbit around galaxies and typically reside in their outer and less-crowded areas, gathering to form dense communities in the galactic suburbs.

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Flexible circuits for 3D printing

A research cooperation has developed a process suitable for 3D printing that can be used to produce transparent and mechanically flexible electronic circuits. The technique can enable new applications such as printable light-emitting diodes, solar cells or tools with integrated circuits, as the scientists report in the journal Scientific Reports. The researchers are demonstrating the potential of

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Screening for genes to improve protein production in yeast

By silencing genes, researchers have managed to increase protein production in yeast significantly. This method can lay the grounds for engineering better yeast production hosts for industries producing biopharmaceutical proteins and industrial enzymes.

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AI-generated profiles? Airbnb users prefer a human touch

With so much at stake, should Airbnb hosts rely on an algorithm to write their profiles for them? That depends, according to new research. If everyone uses algorithmically generated profiles, users trust them. However, if only some hosts choose to delegate writing responsibilities to artificial intelligence, they are likely to be distrusted.

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How to combine 'leg day' with running

Scientists say they have the solution for a problem gym-goers have when they combine endurance and weight training.

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Ford says US opened criminal probe over vehicle emissions

US authorities have opened a criminal probe into Ford's emissions certification process, the automaker said Friday.

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Scientist: “Alien Life Now Seems Inevitable and Possibly Imminent”

Playing The Odds The cosmos are filled with roughly Earth-sized exoplanets. Various moons , comets, and planets have stores of water, organic molecules, and amino acids like those that make up life on Earth. Cathal O’Donnell, a 3D bioprinting researcher at St. Vincent’s Hospital in Melbourne, likes those odds — he argues in The Conversation that the abundance of potentially habitable worlds out t

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The Family Weekly: When Families Are Divided On Vaccinating Their Kids

This Week in Family (9dream Studio / Shutterstock) As measles outbreaks multiply across the country, some families are divided on the need to vaccinate their children. That can lead to difficult or awkward conversations with family members who doubt the science behind vaccines—particularly when it comes to the health and safety of young children and newborns in the family. One sociologist advises

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Princeton geoscientists find new fallout from 'the collision that changed the world'

When India slammed into Asia, the collision changed the configuration of the continents, the landscape, global climate and more. Now a team of Princeton University scientists has identified one more effect: the oxygen in the world's oceans increased, altering the conditions for life. They created an unprecedented nitrogen record destined to become one of the fundamental datasets for biogeochemical

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Smart cities aim to make urban life more efficient—but for citizens' sake they need to slow down

All over the world, governments, institutions and businesses are combining technologies for gathering data, enhancing communications and sharing information, with urban infrastructure, to create smart cities. One of the main goals of these efforts is to make city living more efficient and productive – in other words, to speed things up.

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The Guardian view of UK’s climate responsibility: zero emission target needed | Editorial

Activists are changing the discourse on climate change. Politicians must respond with policies that meet the Paris agreement’s goal of limiting global warming to 1.5C Climate change is becoming hard to ignore. Extreme weather has grown more frequent. Scientists are loudly and urgently sounding the alarm – and people have noticed. The 10-day Extinction Rebellion protests were the biggest act of mas

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How UK journalists compare with their German counterparts—new research

The British press is regarded by the rest of the world as notoriously raucous. If you need an example of how raucous, the way British newspapers have reported Brexit is only one recent, if much-discussed, example. Headlines such as "Who will speak for England?", "Enemies of the people" or "Draw a red line on immigration or else" stirred up controversy and put the media's role in political and demo

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Let's get real with college athletes about their chances of going pro

When the NFL draft takes place, it will represent a professional dream come true for the 224 college football players who get picked.

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Chemists manipulate the quantum states of gold nanoclusters

Researchers have found a way to control the lifetime of the quantum states of gold nanoclusters by three orders of magnitude, which could lead to improvements in solar cell and photocatalysis technologies.

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How Countries Use Passports as a Geopolitical Tool

Russia’s announcement this week that it intends to issue passports to residents of the breakaway Ukrainian regions of Donetsk and Luhansk is provocative—Kiev has called it “ aggression ” and Washington has labeled it “ provocative ”—but it is hardly novel. Granting passports is, in effect, the equivalent of handing out citizenship, and conferring passports to citizens of another country is not il

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Gene-editing technology may produce resistant virus in cassava plant

The use of gene-editing technology to create virus-resistant cassava plants could have serious negative ramifications, according to new research by plant biologists.

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A spoonful of peppermint helps the meal go down

When treated with peppermint oil, 63 percent of patients with disorders of the esophagus that cause difficulty swallowing and non-cardiac chest pain reported feeling much or slightly better, report Medical University of South Carolina researchers in Digestive Diseases & Sciences. Eighty-three percent of patients with spastic disorders of the esophagus reported feeling better. Peppermint is an attr

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American expects $350 million hit from grounded Boeing plane

American Airlines expects to take a $1 billion hit from two things it didn't expect when 2019 started: That its newest Boeing jet would be grounded for months after two deadly crashes, and that oil prices would rise.

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NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth over northern Mozambique

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the remnant clouds and storms still lingering over northern Mozambique on April 26. Tropical Cyclone Kenneth made landfall in the less-populated northern reaches of Mozambique on April 25.

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Scientists take a 'metamaterials' approach to earthquake damage

In the past decade scientists have been experimenting with metamaterials, artificial materials designed with periodic internal structures to give them properties not found in natural materials. Depending on their internal geometry and composition, researchers have found that they can control waves propagating through some of these materials, filtering sound or deflecting light so that an object ap

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US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years

New research shows 75 percent of the Atlantic Coast from North Carolina to Central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats.

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Neanderthals may have trapped golden eagles 130,000 years ago

New research suggests they may have passed the lesson on to us

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Ung forsker knækker koden: Nu ved vi, hvordan parasitter manipulerer med vores kroppe

Parasitterne kan lamme vores cellers evne til at kalde på hjælp fra immunforsvaret.

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Quick reconnaissance after 2018 Anchorage quake reveals signs of ground failure

A day after the 30 November 2018 magnitude 7 earthquake in Anchorage, Alaska, U.S. Geological Survey scientists Robert Witter and Adrian Bender had taken to the skies. The researchers were surveying the region from a helicopter, looking for signs of ground failure from landslides to liquefaction.

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World’s First Center for Psychedelics Research Opens in UK

Fringe No More On Friday, Imperial College London launched the Imperial Centre for Psychedelic Research — the world’s first formal center for research into mind-altering substances, like LSD and mescaline, that have been relegated to the realm of fringe science for nearly 80 years . “This new Centre represents a watershed moment for psychedelic science; symbolic of its now mainstream recognition,

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Biological machinery of cell's 'executioner' yields secrets of its control

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital structural biologists have discovered how the cell switches on an executioner mechanism called necroptosis that induces damaged or infected cells to commit suicide to protect the body.

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Biological machinery of cell's 'executioner' yields secrets of its control

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital structural biologists have discovered how the cell switches on an executioner mechanism called necroptosis that induces damaged or infected cells to commit suicide to protect the body.

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Mapping industrial 'hum' in the US

Using a dense sensor network that scanned the United States between 2003 and 2014, researchers have identified areas within the country marked by a persistent seismic signal caused by industrial processes.

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Chemists manipulate the quantum states of gold nanoclusters

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Chemistry have found a way to control the lifetime of the quantum states of gold nanoclusters by three orders of magnitude, which could lead to improvements in solar cell and photocatalysis technologies. Their study is published in the April 18 issue of Science.

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NASA sees remnants of Tropical Cyclone Kenneth over northern Mozambique

NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the remnant clouds and storms still lingering over northern Mozambique on April 26. Tropical Cyclone Kenneth made landfall in the less-populated northern reaches of Mozambique on April 25.

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NASA's Aqua satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Lorna

As Tropical Storm Lorna continued moving in a southerly direction in the Southeastern Indian Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and provided forecasters with a look at the storm.

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Quick reconnaissance after 2018 Anchorage quake reveals signs of ground failure

A day after the Nov. 30, 2018, magnitude 7 earthquake in Anchorage, Alaska, US Geological Survey scientists Robert Witter and Adrian Bender had taken to the skies. The researchers were surveying the region from a helicopter, looking for signs of ground failure from landslides to liquefaction.

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Mapping industrial 'hum' in the US

Using a dense sensor network that scanned the United States between 2003 and 2014, researchers have identified areas within the country marked by a persistent seismic signal caused by industrial processes.

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Scientists take a 'metamaterials' approach to earthquake damage

At the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting, seismologists from around the world will discuss how metamaterial theory might be applied to everything from developing deflective barriers to manipulating the layout of buildings within a city as a way to minimize the impact of damaging surface seismic waves.

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NASA's Aqua satellite tracks Tropical Cyclone Lorna

As Tropical Storm Lorna continued moving in a southerly direction in the Southeastern Indian Ocean, NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and provided forecasters with a look at the storm.

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Lessons from the Winnipeg general strike of 1919 have much to teach us about our future

A century ago, the Winnipeg General Strike shut down what was then Canada's third-largest city. Today, the strike is usually remembered as a moment when workers demanded the collective bargaining rights and living wages that are defended by today's unions.

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Mushroom leather could be the key to sustainable fashion

Businesses around the world are starting to offer a new type of environmentally friendly vegan leather. It's made from mushrooms, and some of it is being produced right here in Western Australia.

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First Proven Malaria Vaccine Rolled Out in Africa—But Doubts Linger

The vaccine is up to 40 percent effective at preventing malaria in young children — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Variety is the spice of life, but mostly later in the day

How much variety we want varies by the time of day, according to new research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business.

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What Will Happen If an Asteroid Hits Earth? A Practice Drill On Social Media May Find Out.

What would happen if a giant asteroid slammed into Earth? The European Space Agency (ESA) anticipates a coming crash would send alarmed humans to social media.

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MoviePass competitor Sinemia is shutting down just as Avangers: Endgame hits theaters

While MoviePass continues to experiment with ways to prevent going out of business, competing movie theater subscription service Sinemia is calling it quits ahead of what is shaping …

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Biological machinery of cell's 'executioner' yields secrets of its control

Researchers led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital structural biologists have discovered how the cell switches on an executioner mechanism called necroptosis that induces damaged or infected cells to commit suicide to protect the body.

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US Southeast Atlantic coast facing high threat of sea-level rise in the next 10 years

New research shows 75% of the Atlantic coast from North Carolina to central Florida will be highly vulnerable to erosion and inundation from rising tides by 2030, negatively impacting many coastal species' nesting habitats.

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Carnegie Mellon chemists manipulate the quantum states of gold nanoclusters

Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Department of Chemistry have found a way to control the lifetime of the quantum states of gold nanoclusters by three orders of magnitude, which could lead to improvements in solar cell and photocatalysis technologies. Their study is published in the April 18 issue of Science.

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Children's NICU slashes unintended extubation rates by 60% over 10 years

A quality-improvement project at the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Children's National that included standardized taping methods, bedside review of events within 72 hours and reducing how often newborns received chest X-rays reduced unintended extubations by 60% over 10 years and saved an estimated $1.5 million per year, according to research published online April 26, 2019, in Pediatrics

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New research, April 15-21, 2019

A selection of new climate related research articles is shown below. This post has separate sections for: Climate Change, Climate Change Impacts, Climate Change Mitigation, and Other Papers. Climate change Time of steady climate change Temperature, precipitation, wind Recent global warming as confirmed by AIRS (open access) A Global Analysis of Land Surface Temperature Diurnal Cycle Using MODIS O

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The week in wildlife – in pictures

Hungry bears, busy bees and disappearing penguins Continue reading…

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How we reported on the challenges of using ancestry tests to solve crimes

Here’s how we found out what happened when an arrest was made in the Golden State Killer case that was tied to genetic testing.

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How we reported a controversial story about the day the dinosaurs died

Here’s how we covered the story of new fossils found in the Tanis site in North Dakota, including the story’s more controversial elements.

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Amazon to bring 1-day delivery to Prime members

Two-day delivery is going out of style.

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Two Los Angeles Universities Establish Measles Quarantine

Health officials have asked students and staff potentially exposed to the virus and who either have not been vaccinated or cannot verify immunity to stay home.

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To Cut Emissions, China's Global Infrastructure Plan May Need a Greener Path

Nations participating in the Belt and Road Initiative could do much to push low-carbon investments — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Rebroadcast: Nature PastCast, April 1953

Rebroadcast: Nature PastCast, April 1953 Rebroadcast: Nature PastCast, April 1953, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01347-8 We delve into the archives to tell the stories behind some of Nature’s biggest papers.

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Daily briefing: How to protect the paradoxical platypus

Daily briefing: How to protect the paradoxical platypus Daily briefing: How to protect the paradoxical platypus, Published online: 26 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01379-0 Face-to-face with the weirdest mammal, malaria vaccine rolled out in Africa and the art of deep time.

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Lionfish genes studied for clues to invasive prowess

What makes the red lionfish (Pterois volitans) such a successful and powerful invader in Atlantic Ocean waters compared to its rather lamblike existence in its native Pacific Ocean?

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City trees can offset neighborhood heat islands, researcher says

The idea of the heat island—that densely built-up urban areas are considerably hotter than the rural and semi-rural landscapes that surround them—has been extensively studied and is widely accepted by academics and the public.

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Introducing the Transparency Project

The Transparency Project aims to be more open and accountable to readers by explaining key coverage decisions and showing how science journalism happens.

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Lionfish genes studied for clues to invasive prowess

What makes the red lionfish (Pterois volitans) such a successful and powerful invader in Atlantic Ocean waters compared to its rather lamblike existence in its native Pacific Ocean?

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Expert: Justice Dept. has changed view on emoluments

The United States Justice Department’s new, narrower interpretation of the foreign emoluments clause allows foreign countries to court President Donald Trump through patronizing his hotels, condos, and golf courses and through granting him trademarks, a new article suggests. The foreign emoluments clause is a provision of the US Constitution that generally prohibits high-level federal officials f

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Pictures confirm Hayabusa2 made a crater in asteroid Ryugu

Hayabusa2’s crater-blasting success, confirmed by an image beamed back from the spacecraft, paves the way to grab subsurface asteroid dust.

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The Best Speed Climbers Dash up Walls With a Time-Saving Move

Champion speed climbers chalk their hands, grab their holds, and do the Reza, a move that demands explosive power and tight coordination.

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Walmart stocks store with robots as concern grows over retail job losses

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Lettuce-Farming Robots Might Grow Your Next Salad

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Why Tech Billionaires Are Spending To Restrain Artificial Intelligence

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Autonomous Scooter Uses AI to Learn Your Favorite Routes

A Smarter Last Mile UK-based design agency Layer has teamed up with Chinese electric car maker Nio to create a smart scooter that can learn where you want to go. Once “Pal” learns your preferred routes, the smart scooter can autonomously take you to your destination. On its website, Layer calls the scooter a “near-future prototype” that “embraces AI and machine learning to offer flexible and conv

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This AI-generated musak shows us the limit of artificial creativity

A powerful AI algorithm can dream up music that echoes Bach or the Beatles, but it isn’t real creativity.

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What does the future of Kilauea hold?

Ever since Hawaii's Kilauea stopped erupting in August 2018, ceasing activity for the first time in 35 years, scientists have been wondering about the volcano's future. Its similarities to the Hawaiian seamount Lo`ihi might provide some answers.

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Want to Come Study or Work in America? Not So Fast

We say we welcome skilled immigrants like doctors and engineers, but we don’t act that way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Want to Come Study or Work in America? Not So Fast

We say we welcome skilled immigrants like doctors and engineers, but we don’t act that way — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Research opens way to ending malaria

The malaria parasite kills nearly half a million every year – most of them children …

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U.S. universities reassess collaborations with foreign scientists in wake of NIH letters

Dual faculty appointments could receive increased scrutiny

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Fort Wayne Makes Its Own Luck

Today’s theme: what happens to buildings, after they die. Today’s locale: a major manufacturing center along Indiana’s I-69 corridor, the industrial stronghold of Fort Wayne. The second lives of buildings—or third, or fourth or tenth—after they’ve outlived their original economic or civic purpose, is a topic that has commanded Deb’s and my attention more and more, with each new American venue we

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Kommentar: Test for pesticidrester bør foretages ved boringerne

Efter fundet af chlorothalonil-amidsulfonsyre i drikkevand fra Ledøje Vandværk, foreslår Rambøll, at der testes for stoffet ved alle boringer – ikke blot ved det vand, der sendes ud til forbrugerne.

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The European Space Agency Will Live-Tweet a Mock Asteroid Impact

Apocalyptic LARPing On Monday, the Twitter account for the European Space Agency (ESA), is going to pivot hard to science fiction: The agency will spend the week acting out a catastrophic asteroid impact. The ESA carries out a similar preparedness exercise — in which volunteers play the roles of government officials, scientists, and others — every two years . But this is the first time it will br

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Watch how well this ice-proof coating works

New spray-on coatings cause ice to fall away from structures—regardless of their size—with just the force of a light breeze, or often the weight of the ice itself, report researchers. The new class of coatings get researchers closer to their decades-long goal of ice-proofing cargo ships, airplanes, power lines, and other large structures. In a test on a mock power line, the coating shed ice immed

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On the Dunning-Kruger Effect, And On Fakers

Here’s a fascinating paper (PDF) that’s not exactly chemistry-related (well, not directly) but definitely has some relevance to a person’s everyday work life in the sciences. The authors are using data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) questionnaire, administered every three years in OECD countries to teenage students. And they are able to provide us with some rare data

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Remote connections? Detangling entanglement in quantum physics

Quantum computers, quantum cryptography and quantum (insert name here) are often in the news these days. Articles about them inevitably refer to entanglement, a property of quantum physics that makes all these magical devices possible.

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Scientific journal snubs academic over Sleeping Beauty metaphor

Professor Ton van Raan told use of phrase for ignored work is culturally insensitive A leading American academic journal has refused to publish an article by a respected professor on the grounds that his use of the fairytale Sleeping Beauty as a metaphor for ignored scientific work is culturally insensitive and in danger of being “sexualised”. Ton van Raan, a professor emeritus of quantitative sc

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Lionfish genes studied for clues to invasive prowess

What makes the red lionfish (Pterois volitans) such a successful and powerful invader in Atlantic Ocean waters compared to its rather lamb-like existence in its native Pacific Ocean? A new NC State study sorts it out.

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Bactericidal action of violacein revealed

Violet pigment is produced by microorganisms found in the environment, such as Chromobacterium violaceum and its various biological activities include the capacity to kill even bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics.

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Mount Sinai researchers find significant delays in West Nile virus reporting

Mount Sinai researchers found significant delays in reporting human cases of West Nile virus, hampering real-time forecasting of the potentially deadly mosquito-borne disease, according to a study in the JAMA Network Open in April.

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Common oral infections in childhood may increase the risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood

A Finnish 27-year follow-up study suggests that common oral infections in childhood, caries and periodontal diseases, are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis in adulthood.

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Association between high blood PCB levels and premature death

High levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the blood are associated with premature death. This is shown by a cross-disciplinary study, based on 1,000 randomly selected 70-year-olds in Uppsala, that is published in the JAMA Network Open journal today.

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Cyclone Kenneth is one of the strongest storms to hit mainland Africa

Cyclone Kenneth made landfall in Mozambique on 25 April and may have been intensified by climate change. The storm could dump nearly a metre of rain in the next few days

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New “Nanofiber Yarn” Keeps Cells Alive While Injured Tissues Heal

Muscle Repair Researchers have created a “nanofiber yarn” that they say could help repair damaged muscles and tendons , while also allowing a patient to retain use of the injured area. “When you repair muscle or tendon, you really have to fix their movement for a period of time, by wearing a boot, for example,” MIT research Ming Guo told MIT News . “With this nanofiber yarn, the hope is, you won’

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The AI Group Elon Musk Quit Just Released An Amazing Music AI

MuseNet Artificial intelligence non-profit OpenAI just unveiled an extraordinary AI music tool called Musenet. The tool generates musical compositions, with multiple instruments and in wide-ranging styles from classical music to country music, according to OpenAI’s website , where you can experiment with the tool yourself. The deep neural network doesn’t necessarily understand music theory or com

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Why the southern resident killer whales should have the same rights as people

Each year, the number of southern resident killer whales in the Salish Sea on the Pacific coast declines—yet another species on the road to extinction. Last summer, many grieved as they watched an orca named J35, also known as Tahlequah, carried her dead calf for more than two weeks.

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Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods

Flinders University archaeologists are using cutting edge subsurface imaging technology to help assist community groups map unmarked graves and manage their cultural heritage.

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Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the central and eastern US

Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting.

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Why the southern resident killer whales should have the same rights as people

Each year, the number of southern resident killer whales in the Salish Sea on the Pacific coast declines—yet another species on the road to extinction. Last summer, many grieved as they watched an orca named J35, also known as Tahlequah, carried her dead calf for more than two weeks.

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NASA may have detected a ‘Marsquake’ for the first time

Space It’s the dawn of Martian seismology. NASA’s Mars InSight mission has only been in full swing for about a little over four months now, but it’s already poised to reveal some of the biggest mysteries inside…

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What does the future of Kilauea hold?

Ever since Hawaii's Kilauea stopped erupting in August 2018, ceasing activity for the first time in 35 years, scientists have been wondering about the volcano's future. Its similarities to the Hawaiian seamount Lo`ihi might provide some answers, according to Jacqueline Caplan-Auerbach at Western Washington University.

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Image: Hubble snaps a crowded cluster

This sparkling burst of stars is Messier 75. It is a globular cluster: a spherical collection of stars bound together by gravity. Clusters like this orbit around galaxies and typically reside in their outer and less-crowded areas, gathering to form dense communities in the galactic suburbs.

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Bizarrely distributed and verging on extinction, this 'mystic' tree went unidentified for 17 years

Almost 30 years ago, the specimen of a weird tree collected in the southern part of Kakadu National Park was packed in my luggage. It was on its way to the mecca of botanical knowledge in London, the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.

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Bizarrely distributed and verging on extinction, this 'mystic' tree went unidentified for 17 years

Almost 30 years ago, the specimen of a weird tree collected in the southern part of Kakadu National Park was packed in my luggage. It was on its way to the mecca of botanical knowledge in London, the Royal Botanic Gardens Kew.

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How does chronic edema impact health-related quality of life?

Final results of the large, international LIMPRINT study have provided new data on the prevalence of chronic swelling and the devastating impact it can have on health-related quality of life.

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Studies link earthquakes to fracking in the central and eastern US

Small earthquakes in Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas can be linked to hydraulic fracturing wells in those regions, according to researchers speaking at the SSA 2019 Annual Meeting.

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What does the future of Kilauea hold?

Ever since Hawaii's Kilauea stopped erupting in August 2018, ceasing activity for the first time in 35 years, scientists have been wondering about the volcano's future. Its similarities to the Hawaiian seamount Lo`ihi might provide some answers, according to Jacqueline Caplan-Auerbach at Western Washington University.

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Flexible circuits for 3D printing

A research cooperation between the University of Hamburg and DESY has developed a process suitable for 3D printing that can be used to produce transparent and mechanically flexible electronic circuits. The technique can enable new applications such as printable light-emitting diodes, solar cells or tools with integrated circuits, as the scientists report in the journal Scientific Reports. The rese

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Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods

Dr. Moffat leads a group which recently published the results of using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and GPS surveys to non-invasively map the location of unmarked graves within the Lake Condah Mission Cemetery in Eastern Australia.

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Insights from Uganda on why solar street lights make sense

Street-lighting is important. It allows informal vendors and traders to operate for longer hours and improves road and public safety. It also makes streets feel safer and more secure, especially for women.

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Race Replay: Ryan vs. Big Chief for the #2 Spot | Street Outlaws

Ryan calls out Big Chief for a chance at the #2 spot on The List. Don't miss new episodes of Street Outlaws at Mondays 9p! Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.co

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Game of Thrones: for HBO, piracy is 'better than an Emmy' as it battles Netflix

Eight years after the first season premiered, the long-awaited winter has finally come – Game of Thrones' final season is here. The television series created by David Benioff and Daniel Brett Weiss from the books by George RR Martin has built a rich and complex multi-thread plot-knot of epic battles, of the living and the undead, of long owed-debts to be paid, and of the culmination of clan strata

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Improving the lifetime of bioelectrodes for solar energy conversion

The use of proteins involved in the photosynthetic process enables the development of affordable and efficient devices for energy conversion. However, although proteins such as photosystem I are robust in nature, the use of isolated protein complexes incorporated in semi-artificial electrodes is associated with a considerably short long-term stability. Thus, technological application is still limi

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The Books Briefing: The Fault With Our Stars

Fame! To paraphrase David Bowie, it takes over culture and conversations in a way that can be hard to swallow. Back in 1962, the historian Daniel Boorstin worried that Americans’ obsession with celebrities and their manufactured personas was deteriorating the nation’s understanding of reality. His book about that phenomenon, The Image , now feels more prescient than ever. That’s not to say celebr

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Cancer treatment could become more effective thanks to new algorithms which can predict millions of gene interactions

While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes.

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Cancer treatment could become more effective thanks to new algorithms which can predict millions of gene interactions

While network algorithms are usually associated with finding friends on social media, researchers at the University of Sussex have shown how they could also be used improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment, by predicting the interactions between genes.

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Clearing an icy windshield is about to get easier, says UBC engineer

Scraping an icy windshield can be a seasonal struggle for those that live in colder climates. But engineers from UBC's Okanagan campus are aiming to ease that winter frustration with a new surface coating that can shed ice from large areas using little effort.

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Latitudinal gradient of plant phylogenetic diversity explained

The most discussed global pattern of species diversity along the latitudinal gradient has now an evolutionary explanation: museum vs cradle hypothesis broken into pieces.

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Screening for genes to improve protein production in yeast

By silencing genes, researchers have managed to increase protein production in yeast significantly. This method can lay the grounds for engineering better yeast production hosts for industries producing biopharmaceutical proteins and industrial enzymes.

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Mysterious volcanic ash layer from 29,000 years ago traced to volcano in Naples

Mysterious volcanic ash layer blanketing the Mediterranean 29,000 years ago traced to volcano in Naples, Italy.

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Hubble snaps a crowded cluster

This sparkling burst of stars is Messier 75. It is a globular cluster: a spherical collection of stars bound together by gravity. Clusters like this orbit around galaxies and typically reside in their outer and less-crowded areas, gathering to form dense communities in the galactic suburbs.

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How to combine 'leg day' with running

James Cook University scientists in Australia say they have the solution for a problem gym-goers have when they combine endurance and weight training.

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Her kan vi lægge havvindmøller til 12.400 megawatt

Vi har 35.000 kvadratkilometer hav, hvor der kan bygges havvindmøller. Energistyrelsen har kortlagt de mest oplagte placeringer til tre vindmølleparker i horisonten.

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Gestational diabetes in India and Sweden

Indian women are younger and leaner than Swedish women when they develop gestational diabetes, a new study shows. The researchers also found a gene that increases the risk of gestational diabetes in Swedish women, but which, on the contrary, turned out to have a protective effect in Indian women.

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Veterans suffer from 'culture shock' when returning to university

War veterans experience such extreme 'culture shock' at university, that they struggle to communicate their feelings and begin a destructive cycle of silence, according to a new study.

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Humanization of antibodies targeting human herpesvirus 6B

A research group have succeeded in humanization of mouse antibodies that can neutralize the infection caused by human herpesvirus 6B. The team created "humanized" antibodies based on mouse antibodies.

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Red-neck phalarope: A migratory divide towards the Pacific Ocean and Arabian Sea

When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations — the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea — following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area.

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Improving the lifetime of bioelectrodes for solar energy conversion

The use of proteins involved in the photosynthetic process enables the development of affordable and efficient devices for energy conversion. However, although proteins such as photosystem I are robust in nature, the use of isolated protein complexes incorporated in semi-artificial electrodes is associated with a considerably short long-term stability. Thus, technological application is still limi

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Taylor Swift’s ‘ME!’ Is Everything Wrong With Pop

One of the most impressive things about Taylor Swift is that she keeps finding a way to offend people simply with sound alone. The story’s been the same every album rollout since 2012’s Red : Swift, the onetime mascot for speaking your own truth over humble country strums, “goes pop,” garishly and greatly. The bungee-jump yodels of “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together,” the Jazzercise drum li

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Workers Love AirPods Because Employers Stole Their Walls

Once upon a time, offices had walls inside them. They weren’t glass, like the conference rooms of 2019, but were made of drywall, and were usually painted a neutral color, like many of the walls you know and love. Over time, office walls gave way to cubicles. Now, for many office workers, the cubicles are also gone. There are only desks. If you’re under 40, you might have never experienced the jo

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Amazon Used An AI to Automatically Fire Low-Productivity Workers

Automation Station This time, artificial intelligence is literally taking jobs. Documents obtained by The Verge show how Amazon used a computer system to automatically track and fire hundreds of fulfillment center employees between for failing to meet productivity quotas — a grim glimpse of a future in which AI is your boss. While not every decision was made by a computer system, the documents —

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Sensors made from gummy bears could monitor how children chew

A sensor made with a gummy bear could help researchers study how children chew. It's cheap to make and offers a tasty treat for the child being tested

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NeurExo Sciences and Henry Ford present preclinical data on exosomes at ISEV2019

NeurExo Sciences, LLC and Henry Ford Health System today announced the presentation of new data on exosomes at the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) 2019 Annual Meeting being held April 24-28, 2019 in Kyoto, Japan. Among their key findings, Henry Ford researchers demonstrated the ability of exosomes to suppress chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and enhance the anti-t

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AI-generated profiles? Airbnb users prefer a human touch

With so much at stake, should Airbnb hosts rely on an algorithm to write their profiles for them? That depends, according to new research from Cornell and Stanford University. If everyone uses algorithmically generated profiles, users trust them. However, if only some hosts choose to delegate writing responsibilities to artificial intelligence, they are likely to be distrusted.

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Higher weight increases risk of psoriasis

The higher a person's BMI, the greater the chance of getting psoriasis. But researchers are still uncertain as to why.

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Gestational diabetes in India and Sweden

Indian women are younger and leaner than Swedish women when they develop gestational diabetes, a new study from Lund University shows. The researchers also found a gene that increases the risk of gestational diabetes in Swedish women, but which, on the contrary, turned out to have a protective effect in Indian women.

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Coffee machine helped physicists to make ion traps more efficient

Scientists from ITMO University have developed and applied a new method for analyzing the electromagnetic field inside ion traps. For the first time, they explained the field deviations inside nonlinear radio-frequency traps. This allows to reconsider the prospects nonlinear traps applications, including ion cooling and studies of quantum phenomena. The results are published in the Journal of Phys

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Improving the lifetime of bioelectrodes for solar energy conversion

The use of proteins involved in the photosynthetic process enables the development of affordable and efficient devices for energy conversion. However, although proteins such as photosystem I are robust in nature, the use of isolated protein complexes incorporated in semi-artificial electrodes is associated with a considerably short long-term stability. Thus, technological application is still limi

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Gene-editing technology to create virus-resistant cassava plant has opposite effect, researchers find

Using gene-editing technology to create virus-resistant cassava plants could have serious negative ramifications, according to new research by plant biologists at the University of Alberta, the University of Liège in Belgium and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

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Gene-editing technology to create virus-resistant cassava plant has opposite effect, researchers find

Using gene-editing technology to create virus-resistant cassava plants could have serious negative ramifications, according to new research by plant biologists at the University of Alberta, the University of Liège in Belgium and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

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Blogs must adapt or die

Blogs, or as they were originally known, weblogs, first hit the World Wide Web back in 1997. The term "weblog" was coined in December that year and almost immediately abbreviated to "blog". The subsequent two decades saw the rise and rise of millions of blogs, they rode the wave of Web 2.0, became multi-author publication tools, and many matured into fully-fledged information and news services.

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Workplace messaging startup Slack to list on Wall Street

The workplace messaging startup Slack filed documents Friday to list its shares on the New York Stock Exchange, the latest of a group of richly valued tech enterprises to look to Wall Street.

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Renault wants joint holding with Nissan: media

French car maker Renault wants to create a common holding company with its Japanese partner Nissan that will own 100 percent of both auto manufacturers, the business daily Nikkei reported Friday.

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Ford says US opened criminal probe over vehicle emissions

US authorities have opened a criminal probe into Ford's emissions certification process, the automaker said Friday.

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Red-neck phalarope: a migratory divide towards the Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea

When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations -the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea- following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area.

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Work messaging app Slack takes next step for IPO

Work messaging platform Slack is taking the next step in filing to go public, the latest in several highly anticipated tech IPOs.

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Red-neck phalarope: a migratory divide towards the Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea

When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations -the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea- following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area.

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How intelligent workstations will use AI to improve health and happiness

Statistics show that if you're reading this at work, you're likely indoors at a table or a desk. If so, pause for a moment: How's your posture? Is the room temperature comfortable? Lighting OK? In the U.S., 81 million office workers spend at least 75% of the day at a desk, and logging long hours in front of screens has been linked to significant health conditions, including heart disease and diabe

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U.S. Measles Outbreak Becomes the Largest in Two Decades

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday afternoon that growing measles outbreaks have helped the United States break a troubling record. The agency now reports there are 695 cases of measles in 22 states, making 2019 the year with the greatest number of cases since 2000.

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Ocean wind speeds and wave heights are growing

Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, research shows. Researchers from the University of Melbourne’s infrastructure engineering department, analyzed wind speed and wave height measurements taken from 31 different satellites between 1985-2018, consisting of approximately 4 billion observations. They compared the

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Biochemists untangle mysteries of cellular form, function

The complex inner workings of cells, from their architecture to their signaling, underlie much of multicellular organic life. How are they built? How do their proteins interact? And most crucially, how can understanding these functions improve our knowledge of biological outcomes such as disease?

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Stumbling Into Adulthood, Alongside a Friend

Every week, The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic ’s Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two women who went from high-school acquaintances to long-distance pen pals to roommates, learning the skills that make friendships last along the way. One says she had a hard time making friends

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How did the moon end up where it is?

Nearly 50 years since man first walked on the moon, the human race is once more pushing forward with attempts to land on the Earth's satellite. This year alone, China has landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon, while India is close to landing a lunar vehicle, and Israel continues its mission to touch down on the surface, despite the crash of its recent venture. NASA meanwhile has

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Red-neck phalarope: a migratory divide towards the Pacific Ocean and the Arabian Sea

When winter comes, populations of red-neck phalarope from the Western Palearctic migrate to two different destinations -the Pacific Ocean or the Arabian Sea- following an exceptional migratory divide strategy which has never been described in this geographical area.

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How online stores trick you into impulse buying

A new study analyzes the tricks of the trade that may contribute to impulse buying. Researchers studied 200 of the top major online retailers and asked consumers what tools would be helpful to curb impulse buying. They found that retail websites contained an average of 19 features that can encourage impulse buying, including discounts and sales, product ratings, and interactive displays that allo

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Exquisite Underwater Photos to Make You Love the Ocean

Christian Vizl gets up close with sharks, sea lions and more.

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Key to targeting dormant cancer cells

Researchers have identified what keeps some cancer cells dormant — a finding which could uncover new approaches to preventing the spread of cancer.

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New method proposed for studying hydrodynamic behavior of electrons in graphene

By studying how electrons in two-dimensional graphene can literally act like a liquid, researchers have paved the way for further research into a material that has the potential to enable future electronic computing devices that outpace silicon transistors.

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Blood cancer's Achilles' heel opens door for new treatments

New findings about an aggressive form of leukemia could aid the development of novel drugs to treat the condition.

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Americans' beliefs about wildlife management are changing

A new 50-state study on America's Wildlife Values describes individuals' values toward wildlife.

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Pericytes may improve muscle recovery

Extended periods of limb immobilization — whether from long-term bed rest, casting, spaceflight, or other circumstances — can reduce skeletal muscle mass and strength to the extent that recovery is delayed or never achieved. The biological basis for this lack of recovery, however, remains unclear. An animal study provides the first evidence that pericytes (cells integral to blood vessel formatio

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Hubble Data: The Universe Is Expanding Faster and Faster

Expanding Universe We have bad news for any cosmologists out there: you have a lot of work ahead of you. There’s long been a discrepancy between the calculated, theoretical rate at which the universe ought to be expanding, based on our knowledge of the big bang, and the rate at which scientific data says it’s actually expanding. Measurements of the light emitted by distant stars suggest that the

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Hundreds of thousands of viruses in oceans

The oceans contain almost 200,000 different viral populations, according to the latest count.

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5 AI Breakthroughs We’ll Likely See in the Next 5 Years

Convergence is accelerating disruption… everywhere! Exponential technologies are colliding into each other, reinventing products, services, and industries. As AI algorithms such as Siri and Alexa can process your voice and output helpful responses, other AIs like Face++ can recognize faces . And yet others create art from scribbles, or even diagnose medical conditions . Let’s dive into AI and con

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DNA as you've never seen it before, thanks to a new nanotechnology imaging method

For biologists everywhere, April 25 is auspicious. It is DNA Day and commemorates the date in 1953 when scientists Francis Crick, Rosalind Franklin, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins published seminal scientific papers describing the helical structure of the DNA molecule. In 2003, April 25 was used to announce the completion of the Human Genome Project. Now annual festivities on this day celebrate

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Unravelling the complexity of air pollution in the world's coldest capital city

A joint Mongol-Japanese research team from the National University of Mongolia and Kanazawa University conducted the first detailed study of organic air pollutants in Ulaanbaatar city. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contents of airborne particulates were determined, and indicated that the degree of air pollution varies markedly by district and season.

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DNA as you've never seen it before, thanks to a new nanotechnology imaging method

For biologists everywhere, April 25 is auspicious. It is DNA Day and commemorates the date in 1953 when scientists Francis Crick, Rosalind Franklin, James Watson and Maurice Wilkins published seminal scientific papers describing the helical structure of the DNA molecule. In 2003, April 25 was used to announce the completion of the Human Genome Project. Now annual festivities on this day celebrate

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Research finds some bacteria travel an alternate path to antibiotic resistance

In a study with implications for efforts to halt the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, researchers at Princeton have identified a new, troubling path that some bacteria take toward resistance.

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Biochemists untangle mysteries of cellular form, function

The complex inner workings of cells, from their architecture to their signaling, underlie much of multicellular organic life. How are they built? How do their proteins interact? And most crucially, how can understanding these functions improve our knowledge of biological outcomes such as disease?

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Intel warns of continuing 14nm shortage but says 10nm sales will be strong

Intel’s CEO Bob Swan delivered the bad news at a recent earnings call, dropping Intel’s shares by 10% — their worst fall in over a year although the stock had been trading at record levels …

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This Is Your Brain On Ads: How Mass Marketing Affects Our Minds

How many ads have you encountered today? On this week's radio show, we discuss the insidiousness of advertising in American media. (Image credit: Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF)

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Machines won’t take all the jobs, but they’ll likely change them

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Robots Replacing Humans Leading to Big Job Losses: Report

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Sean Hannity Plays T-ball With President Trump

Two times during Barack Obama’s tenure, I criticized the 60 Minutes correspondent Steve Kroft for asking softball questions when interviewing the president . Last night, I expected Sean Hannity would fail the American public similarly in his interview with President Donald Trump. But it wouldn’t be fair to beer-guzzling amateurs playing recreational slow-pitch to compare what I saw to softball. T

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Research finds some bacteria travel an alternate path to antibiotic resistance

In a study with implications for efforts to halt the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, researchers at Princeton have identified a new, troubling path that some bacteria take toward resistance.

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Humanization of antibodies targeting human herpesvirus 6B

A Japanese research group have succeeded in humanization of mouse antibodies that can neutralize the infection caused by human herpesvirus 6B. Professor Mori's research team created "humanized" antibodies based on mouse antibodies. The findings were published on March 6 in the online edition of the Journal of Virology, and have also been introduced in the HHV-6 Foundation Newsletter.

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Pattern of Mozambique storms 'unprecedented': UN

The back-to-back cyclones that have ravaged Mozambique are unprecedented in recorded history, the UN said Friday, as it planned to examine the country's defences against extreme weather in the light of climate change.

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Uber pulls back on valuation with IPO pricing

Uber pulled back on its ambitious valuation target Friday, while still pricing its share offering in a range that would make it one of the largest tech market debuts in recent years.

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African populations crossbred with other extinct humans

A new international study led by David Comas, principal investigator at UPFand at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE: CSIC-UPF), demonstrates for the first time using artificial intelligence that African populations hybridized with other extinct humans. The study is published today, 26 April, in the journal Genome Biology.

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New restrictions to protect rare whale expected from group

A group organized by the federal government is expected to release recommendations about how to better protect a vanishing species of whale in the Atlantic Ocean.

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Crack propagation is asymmetric in polar materials

The ICN2 Oxide Nanophysics Group, led by ICREA Prof. Gustau Catalán, has published in Physical Review Letters how, due to flexoelectricity, cracks in ferroelectrics (switchable polar materials) propagate more easily in the polar direction than in the opposite.

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Forest and sea residues strengthen the stomach

With the help of forest residues such as sawdust, branches and tops (GROT), and cellulose from sea squirts, researchers in Biochemical Process Engineering at Luleå University of Technology want to make our stomach to feel better. The researchers are the first to develop prebiotics from non-edible forest and sea resources, into a type of fiber that helps beneficial bacteria in the large intestine t

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Wristbands do a health check while you work out

Next-generation fitness sensors could give deeper insights into human health through noninvasive testing of bodily fluids. A stretchy patch developed at KAUST could help this approach by making it easier to analyze sweat for critical biomarkers.

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Dansk forsker vil redde fremtidens landbrug

Håndholdt scanner kan spotte fosformangel i planter – og måske hjælpe med at forhindre en global landbrugskrise.

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Sju frågor om förstamajfirandet

Hur blev 1 maj arbetarnas dag? – Om man frågar folk var firandet av 1 maj startade dyker bilder av Ryssland, Röda torget och parader upp för många. Men det började inte alls där utan i USA. Kravet på en kortare arbetsdag var gammalt. Redan före bildandet av de första bestående fackföreningarna vid 1790-talets slut fanns en rörelse i USA för tio timmars arbetsdag. 1791 hade ”Philadelphia carpenter

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African populations crossbred with other extinct humans

A new international study led by David Comas, principal investigator at UPFand at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE: CSIC-UPF), demonstrates for the first time using artificial intelligence that African populations hybridized with other extinct humans. The study is published today, 26 April, in the journal Genome Biology.

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Lobstering gear could be reduced, changed to save whales

A group organized by the federal government is recommending reductions and changes for lobster gear off the East Coast to try to protect a rare species of whale.

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Forest and sea residues strengthen the stomach

With the help of forest residues such as sawdust, branches and tops (GROT), and cellulose from sea squirts, researchers in Biochemical Process Engineering at Luleå University of Technology want to make our stomach to feel better. The researchers are the first to develop prebiotics from non-edible forest and sea resources, into a type of fiber that helps beneficial bacteria in the large intestine t

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How hydroponic gardening can help you

DIY No dirt necessary. Fresh produce contains more nutrients, tastes better, and is often cheaper than the fruits and veggies at your local farmers’ market. But gardening also requires more…

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How music listening affects the climate

CD listening has been replaced by music streaming. Has the change in music consumption been good for the climate? The answer might surprise you.

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Alaskan seashells reveal a changing Arctic

Climate change results in warmer ocean temperatures, melting glaciers and more extreme weather patterns. Scientists have also observed its effects on the clams, snails, worms, crabs, urchins, starfish and more living on and in the deep seafloor off Alaska, as the ecosystem shifted from arctic to sub-arctic within the last few decades.

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Scientists Think They've Finally Figured Out Why DEET Is So Effective

The researchers put their own bodies on the line for DEET-mosquito science.

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Dengue research in the Philippines evolving over time

Communicable diseases including dengue continue to be major causes of morbidity and mortality in the Philippines. Now, researchers have reviewed 60 years of published literature on dengue in the country to identify trends in previous studies and areas where more research is needed.

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Scientists unlock new role for nervous system in regeneration

Biologists have developed a computational model of flatworm regeneration to answer an important question in regeneration research – what are the signals that determine the rebuilding of specific anatomical structures? The model confirms experiments showing how numerous factors determine body pattern formation, and the critical role nerve fibers play in determining polarity in regeneration. The mod

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Natural landscapes? Scientists call for a paradigm shift in restoration projects

Regardless of whether we are dealing with a floodplain landscape or an entire national park, the success of a restoration project depends on more than just the reintroduction of individual plant or animal species into an area. An international team of researchers reveals it is more a matter of helping the damaged ecosystem to regenerate and sustain itself.

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UMBC program to support diverse students in STEM successfully replicated at PSU, UNC

Five years ago, Pennsylvania State University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill launched replications of UMBC's Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which over the last 30 years has earned national recognition for its strength in supporting diverse students in STEM. The positive results at PSU and UNC demonstrate that likely any institution committed to Meyerhoff principles can reproduce the

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33-year study shows increasing ocean winds and wave heights

Extreme ocean winds and wave heights are increasing around the globe, with the largest rise occurring in the Southern Ocean, University of Melbourne research shows.

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This Martian Greenhouse Concept Just Won a NASA Award

Red Planet, Green Thumb A team from Dartmouth University has won NASA’s 2019 BIG Idea Challenge for a futuristic design for a dome-shaped Martian greenhouse. The hydroponic structure could allow astronauts to grow their own food on the desolate Martian surface. It’d cultivate up to eight food crops could be grown inside a rotating system that could serve up 3100 calories per day for four astronau

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Tre afrikanske lande skal teste verdens første malaria-vaccine

Omkring 360.000 børn i Malawi, Ghana og Kenya bliver nu vaccineret med RTS,S-vaccinen, der er den første af sin art i verden. Det store pilotprojekt skal vise, om det er muligt at implementere vaccinen i det afrikanske sundhedsvæsen.

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Facebook cracks down on personality quizzes to protect your personal info

Facebook has been cracking down on on Pages and Groups that spread false information and banned content also.

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Researchers find H-C bonds form when hydrogen atoms collide at high speed with graphene

A team of researchers from Germany, the U.S. and the U.K. has found that a significant number of H-C bonds formed when hydrogen atoms were forced at high speed to collide with graphene. In their paper published in the journal Science, the researchers describe their efforts to view the atomic-scale motion that occurs and the energy dissipation pathways that are involved when covalent bonds form—in

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Giant Bird That Killed Its Owner Heads to Auction

The giant bird that killed its owner is now up for auction

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Ad-Blocking Web Browser Will Now Pay You Crypto to Watch Ads

Brave New World The Brave web browser’s primary selling point has been that it wouldn’t let websites try to sell users anything — it automatically blocks ads. Now, the company has launched a version of Brave that lets users opt into a program that will pay them in cryptocurrency to — wait for it — watch ads. The user can then choose to keep the crypto or give it to their favorite content creators

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JBL's Google Speaker Deal: The Link 20 Is Half Off Now

JBL's Link 20 Google Home and portable Bluetooth speaker is $100 cheaper this week.

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Why a Geocode Is Not an Address

Opinion: Geocodes have been suggested as a solution for Puerto Rico’s address problem. But there’s more to an address than determining location.

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The 'Avengers: Endgame' Tie-In on 'Fortnite' Lets You Be a Hero

Plus: 'Overwatch' (kind of) introduces modding, why you must check out 'Final Fantasy X-2,' and more.

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Omdiskuterede regionsklinikker lukker ned til oktober

De to regionsklinikker i hovedstaden lukker. I stedet har regionen planer om at lade praktiserende læger flytte ind i lokalerne eller overgå til licensklinik.

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Lad os tale om funktionelle neurologiske lidelser

At fjerne ME/CFS fra kategorien functional neurological disorder (FND), med bl.a. det argument at mindske stigmatiseringen, vil desværre medføre yderligere stigmatisering af de sygdomme, som stadig betegnes som FND.

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A mathematician traces his journey from poverty to prominence

In 'The Shape of Life,' Shing-Tung Yau describes his groundbreaking work in geometry, which provided insights into string theory.

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BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.

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