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nyheder2019april29

Giant planets and big data: What deep learning reveals about Saturn's storms

A deep learning approach to detecting storms on Saturn shows the vast regions affected by storms and that dark storm clouds contain material swept up from the lower atmosphere.

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15h

Etisk Råd: Uansvarligt at være imod genredigerede planter

Det Etiske Råd vil gerne have en ny debat om GMO-modstanden, efter at EU-Domstolen har besluttet at regulere Crispr-redigerede planter hårdt. Etisk problematisk fra EU’s side, lyder det fra rådet.

13h

What a never-before-seen radioactive decay could tell us about neutrinos

In a new set of results, chemists have laid the foundation for a single-atom illumination strategy called barium tagging. Their achievement is the first known imaging of single atoms in a solid noble gas.

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How the olfactory brain affects memory

How sensory perception in the brain affects learning and memory processes is far from fully understood. Two neuroscientists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum have discovered a new aspect of how the processing of odours impacts memory centres. They showed that the piriform cortex — a part of the olfactory brain — has a direct influence on information storage in our most important memory structure, the h

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Astronomers discover 2,000-year-old remnant of a nova

For the first time, a European research team involving the University of Göttingen has discovered the remains of a nova in a galactic globular cluster. A nova is an explosion of hydrogen on the surface of a star which makes it much brighter. The remains have formed a glowing nebula. The remnant is located near the centre of the globular cluster Messier 22 and has recently been observed using moder

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GRACE mission data contributes to our understanding of climate change

Intended to last just five years in orbit on an experimental mission to measure changes in the Earth's gravitational fields, GRACE lasted over 15 years, providing unique insight into our global water resources, more accurate measurements of polar ice loss, ocean currents and the rise in global sea levels.

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What We Saw in Muncie

Here is why I think this report from central Indiana matters, for people who don’t happen to live there themselves. What Deb Fallows and I saw in Muncie, Indiana is as stark an illustration as we’ve recently come across, of a gap with huge implications for America’s civic and political prospects. On one side of this gap (whose existence has been a running theme in this space) is the growing reali

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Filaments and fibers three times finer than a human hair

Experts have discovered that there is a moment at which a polymer in liquid state — specifically one that has been worked from polyethylene glycol, which is widely used in industry — shows greater elasticity that, instead of breaking up and forming drops, the liquid experiences a stretching which causes filaments to be formed.

6min

Record solar hydrogen production with concentrated sunlight

Researchers have created a smart device capable of producing large amounts of clean hydrogen. By concentrating sunlight, their device uses a smaller amount of the rare, costly materials that are required to produce hydrogen, yet it still maintains a high solar-to-fuel efficiency. Their research has been taken to the next scale with a pilot facility installed on the EPFL campus.

6min

Distant Black Hole Gobbles Star, Belches Plasma Plumes in All Directions

This odd behavior was previously unknown in black holes.

9min

The Battle of Winterfell: A Tactical Analysis

If you're going up against an army of the undead, maybe plan a little better.

10min

Is it better to 'contain' rather than destroy cancer?

New research in mice suggests that we could stop some cancers from making a comeback by maintaining metastatic cells in a 'dormant' state.

10min

'Perplexing' New Crab Species Sheds Light on Crustacean Evolution

(Inside Science) — A newfound fossil that scientists described as perplexing, beautiful and the platypus of the crab family is now shedding light on how its crustacean relatives evolved, a new study finds. Paleontologists examined more than 70 exceptionally well-preserved specimens of the entirely new branch of the crab evolutionary tree, along with hundreds of fossils of shrimp and other kinds o

11min

Search For The 'Dark World': Scientists Use LHC to Hunt Dark Matter Siblings

Dark matter has long frustrated researchers. It seems to make up most of our universe, yet it barely interacts with that universe. And despite a plethora of active experiments hunting for dark matter, so far they’ve all turned up empty. That has some researchers turning to the next best thing: other dark particles. Our world of normal matter has lots of different particles, so perhaps there’s a wh

11min

Filaments and fibers three times finer than a human hair

Experts have discovered that there is a moment at which a polymer in liquid state — specifically one that has been worked from polyethylene glycol, which is widely used in industry — shows greater elasticity that, instead of breaking up and forming drops, the liquid experiences a stretching which causes filaments to be formed.

14min

Record solar hydrogen production with concentrated sunlight

Researchers have created a smart device capable of producing large amounts of clean hydrogen. By concentrating sunlight, their device uses a smaller amount of the rare, costly materials that are required to produce hydrogen, yet it still maintains a high solar-to-fuel efficiency. Their research has been taken to the next scale with a pilot facility installed on the EPFL campus.

14min

Mycobateria: Simple Solution to Complex Problem

A team has for the first time identified a transport protein in mycobacteria which is responsible for the uptake of the nutrient L-arabinofuranose. The scientists used a novel approach which could simplify the identification of transport proteins in mycobacteria in the future. This class of proteins could play a key role in the development of new types of medications to tackle mycobacteria and tre

14min

New 3D printed microscope promising for medical diagnostics in developing countries

Researchers have used 3D printing to make an inexpensive and portable high-resolution microscope that is small and robust enough to use in the field or at the bedside. The high-resolution 3D images provided by the instrument could potentially be used to detect diabetes, sickle cell disease, malaria and other diseases.

15min

Are buyers willing to forgo quality in locally grown produce?

Phillip Coles, professor of practice in management at Lehigh University, is among researchers who found that East Coast buyers aren't willing to forgo quality when it comes to local broccoli varieties.

15min

Magma is the key to the moon's makeup

For more than a century, scientists have squabbled over how the Earth's moon formed. But researchers at Yale and in Japan say they may have the answer.

15min

How Tactical Drivers Learn Crazy-Ass Maneuvers

And you thought you could maneuver out of dangerous situations.

16min

In the World of Supplements, Should We Really Follow Elite Athletes?

Your idols are undoubtedly the best of the best, but they could be steering you in the wrong direction — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

21min

The Universe Might Be a Billion Years Younger Than We Thought

New Answers New data from the Hubble Space Telescope confirms that the universe is expanding nine percent more rapidly than theoretical calculations predicted. Those original calculations were based on data from the early universe, so many scientists suspected that something sped up the works . But the new Hubble data suggests that the universe could be substantially younger than previously belie

25min

Facebook to fund research on social media impact on elections

Facebook announced Monday its first research grants to academics studying the impact of social media on elections, part of an effort to prevent manipulation of social platforms.

29min

Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

The discovery, published today in Nature Communications by researchers from La Trobe University and the University of Queensland, provides details on how proteins in the outer membrane of bacteria—the …

29min

'Hippie Chimps' Had Sex with Mysterious 'Ghost Ape' Hundreds of Thousands of Years Ago

Mysterious "ghost apes" may have interbred with the great apes known as bonobos just as modern humans repeatedly had sex with now-extinct human lineages.

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The Hundred-Tonne Robots That Help Keep New Zealand Running

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Countries need to 'step up' their efforts against superbugs

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The future of work is here. Indonesia is optimistic but still clueless

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32min

Mayo Clinic doctors: Fecal transplants may be best answer to antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Unlike antibiotics, which are destructive by definition, fecal transplants or microbial replacement therapies, repopulate the gut with a diverse group of microbes that may block the C. diff's spore from germinating and propagating disease via its toxins. Transplants have several delivery methods, including enemas, capsules and direct instillation, to replace the diverse flora that maintain health

36min

Study: Loan-replacement grants boost low-income students' graduation rates

Receiving Illinois Promise loan-replacement grants influenced low-income students' decision to attend the University of Illinois and boosted their graduation rates, according to a new study led by the program's founding director, Susan Gershenfeld.

36min

Cosmic dust reveals new insights on the formation of solar system

The study of a tiny grain of stardust — older than our solar system — is shining new light on how planetary systems are formed. Alongside planetary scientists at the University of Arizona, the grain was studied at the atomic-level by University of Toronto Engineering professor Jane Howe.

36min

Consumption of caffeinated energy drinks rises in the United States

According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, energy drink consumption in the United States has increased substantially over the past decade among adolescents, young adults, and middle-aged adults. Energy drink consumers had significantly higher total caffeine intake compared with non-consumers and the beverages represented a majority of

36min

Urine test could prevent cervical cancer

Urine testing may be as effective as the smear test at preventing cervical cancer, according to new research by University of Manchester scientists.

36min

Massachusetts General study finds women pay more for over-the-counter moisturizers

A study from dermatologists at Massachusetts General Hospital finds significant, gender-based price discrepancies in facial moisturizing products at three top online retailers – Amazon, Target, and Walmart.

36min

Drug treats Type 2 diabetes in children, team announces

Jane Lynch, M.D., FAAP, professor of pediatrics at UT Health San Antonio, said the drug liraglutide, in combination with an existing medication, metformin, showed robust effect in treating children with type 2 diabetes who were studied in the Ellipse trial.

36min

Chemical evidence shows how a dwarf galaxy contributes to growth of Milky Way

An international team led by ZHAO Gang, a professor from the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) discovered a chemically peculiar star accreted from a disrupted dwarf galaxy.

36min

Spinning black hole sprays light-speed plasma clouds into space

Astronomers have discovered rapidly swinging jets coming from a black hole almost 8,000 light-years from Earth. The research shows jets from V404 Cygni's black hole behaving in a way never seen before on such short timescales. The jets appear to be rapidly rotating with high-speed clouds of plasma — potentially just minutes apart — shooting out of the black hole in different directions.

43min

Verktyg visualiserar åsikter ur textmängderna på sociala medier

Vårt samhälle är beroende av språk och text för att vi ska kunna uttrycka tankar, utbyta åsikter och få ny kunskap. Men mängden textdata som produceras idag, inte minst i sociala medier, gör det omöjligt att läsa allt manuellt. I sin avhandling i datavetenskap vid Linnéuniversitetet har Kostiantyn Kucher, doktor i data- och informationsvetenskap sökt efter en lösning på detta problem. – Min forsk

47min

Svensk-norsk rivalitet bakom mediebilden av Johaugs dopningskandal

2016 berättade den norska längdskidåkerskan Therese Johaug att hon testats positiv för dopning och därpå följde en period av intensiv mediebevakning. Medieforskarna Ulrik Wagner (Syddansk Universitet) och Elsa Kristiansen (Universitetet i Sørøst-Norge) har gått igenom hundratals artiklar och jämfört den svenska och norska bevakningen av fallet. Studien visar att norska medier undvek att kalla det

47min

Finding antibiotic-effect in molecules quickly

Scientists have developed a method with which they can quickly test a very large number of molecules for antibiotic effect. With it, they have already successfully discovered new antibiotic candidates produced by microorganisms. In the future, they will use their new technology to examine soil samples and the microbiome on human skin for medically useful microorganisms.

57min

Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time. This new knowledge could have huge impacts in anti-microbial development.

57min

Inorganic perovskite absorbers for use in thin-film solar cells

A team has succeeded in producing inorganic perovskite thin films at moderate temperatures using co-evaporation – making post-tempering at high temperatures unnecessary. The process makes it much easier to produce thin-film solar cells from this material. In comparison to metal-organic hybrid perovskites, inorganic perovskites are more thermally stable.

57min

Biodegradable bags can hold a full load of shopping after 3 years in the environment

Researchers examined the degradation of five plastic bag materials widely available from high street retailers in the UK.

57min

Unmanned aircraft delivered kidney for transplant

In a first-ever advancement in human medicine and aviation technology, an unmanned aircraft has delivered a donor kidney to surgeons for successful transplantation into a patient with kidney failure.

57min

New study aims to validate pediatric version of sequential organ failure assessment

A new study aims to validate the pediatric version of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score in the emergency department setting as a predictor of mortality in all patients and patients with suspected infection.

57min

Placental function linked to brain injuries associated with autism

Allopregnanolone, a hormone made by the placenta late in pregnancy, is such a potent neurosteroid that disrupting its steady supply to the developing fetus can leave it vulnerable to brain injuries associated with autism spectrum disorder, according to new research.

57min

Lost graves identified by new archaeology methods

Scientists have used Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and GPS surveys to non-invasively map the location of unmarked graves within the Lake Condah Mission Cemetery in Eastern Australia.

57min

Wax helps plants to survive in the desert

In 1956, Würzburg botanist Otto Ludwig Lange observed an unusual phenomenon in the Mauritanian desert in West Africa: He found plants whose leaves could withstand heat up to 56 degrees Celsius. …

58min

Precision medicine for pediatric cancers: New hope for children and adolescents

In 87% of patients, the study identified genomic anomalies that allowed for better patient management, either through better follow-up of residual disease, reclassification of the disease, or through the application of targeted therapy or to guide treatment and identify options for future personalized targeted therapy.

58min

Study highlights how little we know about women terrorists

The first large-scale research project evaluating the characteristics of women involved in jihadism-inspired terrorism finds significant differences between men and women in both their backgrounds and their roles within terrorist groups. The study highlights potential flaws in existing models of radicalization, threat assessment tools and counter-terrorism strategies – all of which rely primarily

58min

Partitioning of porous materials

Gases and pollutants can be filtered from air and liquids by means of porous, crystalline materials, such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). To further partition these pores and enhance their sorption capacity, a team of scientists have developed a fast and versatile two-in-one synthetic strategy, combining metal coordination with the covalent chemistry of light elements. As detailed in a study i

58min

What makes memories stronger?

A team of scientists at NeuroElectronics Research Flanders (NERF- empowered by imec, KU Leuven and VIB) found that highly demanding and rewarding experiences result in stronger memories. By studying navigation in rats, the researchers traced back the mechanism behind this selective memory enhancement to so-called replay processes in the hippocampus, the memory-processing center of the brain.

58min

Water creates traps in organic electronics

Poor-quality organic semiconductors can become high-quality semiconductors when manufactured in the correct way. Researchers at Linköping University show in an article in Nature Materials that the motion of charges in organic electronic devices is dramatically slowed down by minute amounts of water.

58min

New view on the mechanisms of how the brain works

After a series of studies, researchers at Lund University in Sweden, together with colleagues in Italy, have shown that not only one part, but most parts of the brain can be involved in processing the signals that arise from touch. The results open the way for a new approach to how the brain's network of neurons processes information, and thereby the mechanisms by which the brain works.

58min

Researchers find ice feature on Saturn's giant moon

Research team finds huge ice feature on Titan while trying to understand where Saturn's largest moon gets all of its methane. This research, which used Principal Components Analysis in an unconventional way, also validated results from previous Titan missions.

58min

Record solar hydrogen production with concentrated sunlight

EPFL researchers have created a smart device capable of producing large amounts of clean hydrogen. By concentrating sunlight, their device uses a smaller amount of the rare, costly materials that are required to produce hydrogen, yet it still maintains a high solar-to-fuel efficiency. Their research has been taken to the next scale with a pilot facility installed on the EPFL campus.

58min

Giant planets and big data: What deep learning reveals about Saturn's storms

A deep learning approach to detecting storms on Saturn shows the vast regions affected by storms and that dark storm clouds contain material swept up from the lower atmosphere.

58min

Are Canadians kept in the dark about new risks of medicines?

Government warnings about potential drug safety risks vary significantly across countries, according to a new international study co-authored by researchers at the University of British Columbia.

58min

What a dying star's ashes tell us about the birth of our solar system

A UA-led team of researchers discovered a dust grain forged in a stellar explosion before our solar system was born. Atom-level analysis of the specimen reveals new insights about how stars end their lives and seed the universe with the building blocks of new stars and planets.

58min

Rapid melting of the world's largest ice shelf linked to solar heat in the ocean

An international team of scientists has found part of the world’s largest ice shelf is melting 10 times faster than the overall ice shelf average, due to solar heating of the surrounding ocean surface.

58min

New 3D microscope visualises fast biological processes better than ever

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg have combined their expertise to develop a new type of microscope. The revolutionary new light-field microscopy system makes it possible to study fast biological processes, creating up to 200 3D images per second. Initial tests have already delivered new insights into the movement of blood cells in a heart.

58min

Details of the history of inner Eurasia revealed by new study

An international team of researchers has combined archaeological, historical and linguistic data with genetic information from over 700 newly analyzed individuals to construct a more detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia than ever before available. In a study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, they found that the indigenous populations of inner Eurasia are very diverse in their ge

58min

Spinning black hole sprays light-speed plasma clouds into space

Astronomers have discovered rapidly swinging jets coming from a black hole almost 8,000 light-years from Earth.Published today in the journal Nature, the research shows jets from V404 Cygni's black hole behaving in a way never seen before on such short timescales.The jets appear to be rapidly rotating with high-speed clouds of plasma — potentially just minutes apart — shooting out of the black h

58min

Attitudes toward physician-assisted death among adults with elevated level of biomarker associated with Alzheimer's disease

Cognitively normal adults with elevated levels of the biomarker amyloid-β, which is associated with increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, were interviewed as part of this study that examined attitudes toward physician-assisted death.

58min

Use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes among women of reproductive age in US

Cigarette use was lower among pregnant women in the United States (8%) than among nonpregnant women (14.3%) but rates of e-cigarette use were almost identical (3.6% for pregnant women and 3.3% for nonpregnant women) in a study based on national health survey data. The study included data for 1,071 pregnant and 26,849 nonpregnant women (18 to 44 years old) from 2014 to 2017.

58min

Study examines reliability of early diagnoses of ASD in toddlers

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is common in children and is, on average, generally detected and treated by about age 4. This study examined whether earlier diagnoses of ASD would remain stable and persist, potentially allowing for earlier treatment.

58min

Autism diagnoses prove highly stable as early as 14 months

Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by trained professionals in children as young as 14 months are remarkably stable, suggesting that accurate screening and earlier treatment is feasible, report scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine.

58min

Estimates of illness, death among children, adolescents worldwide

This study analyzed data from around the world to estimate illness and death in children and adolescents (birth up to age 20) in 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2017. Mortality decreased over the 27-year period and that meant children and adolescents were more likely to reach their 20th birthdays.

58min

Deep learning takes Saturn by storm

A 'deep learning' approach to detecting storms on Saturn is set to transform our understanding of planetary atmospheres, according to UCL and University of Arizona researchers.

58min

The last chance for Madagascar's biodiversity

A group of scientists from Madagascar, UK, Australia, USA and Finland have recommended actions the government of Madagascar's recently elected president, Andry Rajoelina should take to turn around the precipitous decline of biodiversity and help put Madagascar on a trajectory towards sustainable growth. Madagascar's protected areas, some of the most important for biodiversity in the world, have su

58min

H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it

A new technology developed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison's Yoshihiro Kawaoka may make H3N2 vaccine development a bit easier. In Nature Microbiology today [April 29, 2019], Kawaoka and his team describe a new cell line that enables better growth of H3N2 for vaccine use. The virus is also far less likely to mutate during production using this cell line, improving the chances of a match betw

58min

The search for nothing at all

In a new set of results published April 29, 2019 in the journal Nature, Bill Fairbank and his team at Colorado State University have laid the foundation for a single-atom illumination strategy called barium tagging. Their achievement is the first known imaging of single atoms in a solid noble gas.

58min

Researchers discover new charge transfer and separation process

SUTD worked with an international team of researchers to discover a new charge transfer and separation process named Twisted Intramolecular Charge Shuttle (TICS), paving a new avenue for chemists to construct unique and useful fluorescent probes in a wide range of chemical families of fluorophores.

58min

Wonky black hole spotted rapidly eating a doughnut made from a star

Black holes normally emit jets of material from their poles, but astronomers have spotted one with wonky jets due to its unusually fast meal

58min

Titan has a belt of ice 6300 kilometres long that shouldn't be there

The surface of Saturn’s moon Titan is mostly coated in a thick layer of sediment, but it has a long corridor of bare ice that is proving difficult to explain

58min

The moon may be made of magma that once covered Earth’s entire surface

The moon’s makeup is extremely similar to Earth’s – perhaps because a huge rock smashed into a magma-covered Earth, splashing out the material to make the moon

58min

New hope for cancer patients: Studies identity whether you will respond to chemotherapy or not

Using radiomics, two new studies identified whether patients would respond to chemotherapy or not. This breakthrough occurred by investigating tissue around the tumor, instead of only looking at the tumor itself. This could lead to the cessation of much suffering for patients that will not respond to chemo. None We can thank warfare for one of the most important medical discoveries of the 20th ce

1h

20% of elderly Americans are either employed or looking for work. Here's why.

For the first time, over 20 percent of senior citizens are working or looking for employment. By contrast, over half of millennials believe they will be millionaires despite contradictory evidence. Regardless of age, the question remains: Is work meaningful when the main goal is a paycheck? None A 2017 study on nursing home populations found four key experiences most prevalent for deriving meanin

1h

Nu kommer Sjælland med på vognen: Busservice fra Movia skal lukke huller i rejseplanen

PLUS. Trafikselskabet indfører ’plustur’, der skal transportere passagerer det sidste stykke til deres destination, hvis der ikke kører traditionelle bus- eller toglinjer. Ordningen findes allerede i Jylland og på Fyn, men fra sommer bliver løsningen også mulig for kommuner i Østdanmark, så sjællændern…

1h

Measles is an early warning sign for outbreaks of more serious diseases

Health We never achieved the vaccination levels necessary to prevent outbreaks. We’re not even four full months into 2019 and it’s already the worst year for measles in the United States. All over the world, in fact, places that had previously…

1h

A rapidly changing jet orientation in the stellar-mass black-hole system V404 Cygni

A rapidly changing jet orientation in the stellar-mass black-hole system V404 Cygni A rapidly changing jet orientation in the stellar-mass black-hole system V404 Cygni, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1152-0 The relativistic jets associated with the black-hole X-ray binary system V404 Cygni change their orientation on time scales of minutes to hours, implying that the dire

1h

Imaging individual barium atoms in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO

Imaging individual barium atoms in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO Imaging individual barium atoms in solid xenon for barium tagging in nEXO, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41586-019-1169-4 Single barium atoms trapped in a solid xenon matrix can be imaged and counted by scanning with a focused laser, providing a possible tagging technique for the neutrinoless-double-β-decay

1h

Weird Black Hole Is Shooting Out Wobbly Jets Because It's Dragging Spacetime

"One of the most extraordinary black hole systems I've ever come across."

1h

The Inevitability of Black Widow

This article contains major spoilers for Avengers: Endgame . When the Marvel Cinematic Universe first introduced Scarlett Johansson’s Black Widow, it left no ambiguity as to what audiences were supposed to make of her. In the guise of a notary, with dark red hair undulating around a skintight white shirt buttoned sub-sternum, she instantly reduces both Tony Stark and Happy Hogan to peacocking put

1h

Recognizing the Therapeutic Benefits of Dance

Dance is a great form of exercise that can also be a great way to stay social–two important lifestyle factors we often cite in our Successful Aging & Your Brain program for maintaining better brain health. But it offers additional therapeutic opportunities for those with movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, which can affect functional mobility and mood. Dance for PD , launched in Brook

1h

To tackle complex problems, escape your coworkers

Teamwork is great, but only if we get a chance to step away and do our own thinking, say researchers. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences finds that interrupting problem-solving teamwork with breaks for individual reflection boosted the chance of finding the best answer, at least for especially complex problems. Coauthor Jesse Shore, assistant professor at Boston Un

1h

Wax helps plants to survive in the desert

The leaves of date palms can heat up to temperatures around 50 degrees Celsius. They survive thanks to a unique wax mixture that is essential for the existence in the desert.

1h

Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US

A first-of-its-kind study estimate the economic value of education for better health and longevity. The new study finds that the reduced disability and longer lives among the more educated are worth up to twice as much as the value of education for lifetime earnings.

1h

Novel method to produce purer, safer drugs

Physics and Chemistry scholars have invented a new method which could speed up the drug discovery process and lead to the production of higher quality medicinal drugs which are purer and have no side effects. The technique, which is a world-first breakthrough, uses a specific nanomaterial layer to detect the target molecules in pharmaceuticals and pesticides in just five minutes.

1h

DNA folds into a smart nanocapsule for drug delivery

A new study shows that nanostructures constructed of DNA molecules can be programmed to function as pH-responsive cargo carriers, paving the way towards functional drug-delivery vehicles.

1h

A simple solution to a complex problem

Freiburg researchers use a novel approach to identify a transport protein in mycobacteria.

1h

Filaments and fibres three times finer than a human hair

The experts have discovered that there is a moment at which a polymer in liquid state — specifically one that has been worked from polyethylene glycol, which is widely used in industry — shows greater elasticity that, instead of breaking up and forming drops, the liquid experiences a stretching which causes filaments to be formed.

1h

Dark matter exists: The observations which question its presence in galaxies disproved

As fascinating as it is mysterious, dark matter is one of the greatest enigmas of astrophysics and cosmology. It is thought to account for 90% of the matter in the universe, but its existence has been demonstrated only indirectly and recently called into question. New research conducted by SISSA removes the recent doubts on the presence of dark matter within the galaxies, disproving the empirical

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1h

What a dying star's ashes tell us about the birth of our solar system

A grain of dust forged in the death throes of a long-gone star was discovered by a team of researchers led by the University of Arizona.

1h

Spinning black hole sprays light-speed plasma clouds into space

Astronomers have discovered rapidly swinging jets coming from a black hole almost 8000 light-years from Earth.

1h

Deep learning takes Saturn by storm

A 'deep learning' approach to detecting storms on Saturn is set to transform our understanding of planetary atmospheres, according to UCL and University of Arizona researchers.

1h

Rapid melting of the world's largest ice shelf linked to solar heat in the ocean

An international team of scientists has found part of the world's largest ice shelf is melting 10 times faster than expected due to solar heating of the surrounding ocean.

1h

The last chance for Madagascar's biodiversity

Scientists from around the world have joined together to identify the most important actions needed by Madagascar's new government to prevent species and habitats being lost for ever.

1h

H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it

In late March 2019, the World Health Organization and a vaccine advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration selected the final influenza strains to include in the vaccines produced for the next flu season. These include H1N1, influenza B, and H3N2 viruses.

1h

Details of the history of inner Eurasia revealed by new study

An international team of researchers has combined archaeological, historical and linguistic data with genetic information from over 700 newly analyzed individuals to construct a more detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia than ever before available. In a study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, they found that the indigenous populations of inner Eurasia are very diverse in their ge

1h

New 3-D microscope visualises fast biological processes better than ever

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg have combined their expertise to develop a new type of microscope. The revolutionary new light-field microscopy system makes it possible to study fast biological processes, creating up to 200 3-D images per second. Initial tests have already delivered new insights into the movement of blood cells in a heart.

1h

Boeing gathering to take shareholder temperature amid 737 MAX crisis

Boeing management faces a potential rebuke by shareholders on Monday when investors gather at an annual meeting six weeks after a top-selling plane was grounded globally following two deadly crashes.

1h

The last chance for Madagascar's biodiversity

Scientists from around the world have joined together to identify the most important actions needed by Madagascar's new government to prevent species and habitats being lost for ever.

1h

H3N2 viruses mutate during vaccine production but new tech could fix it

In late March 2019, the World Health Organization and a vaccine advisory committee of the Food and Drug Administration selected the final influenza strains to include in the vaccines produced for the next flu season. These include H1N1, influenza B, and H3N2 viruses.

1h

Details of the history of inner Eurasia revealed by new study

An international team of researchers has combined archaeological, historical and linguistic data with genetic information from over 700 newly analyzed individuals to construct a more detailed picture of the history of inner Eurasia than ever before available. In a study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, they found that the indigenous populations of inner Eurasia are very diverse in their ge

1h

New 3-D microscope visualises fast biological processes better than ever

Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg have combined their expertise to develop a new type of microscope. The revolutionary new light-field microscopy system makes it possible to study fast biological processes, creating up to 200 3-D images per second. Initial tests have already delivered new insights into the movement of blood cells in a heart.

1h

Eurasian migration advanced steppe by steppe

Indigenous genomes from nine countries show ancestral interactions were moderated by mountains and seas. Mark Bruer reports.

1h

For children, early death risk recedes, but inequality worsens

Global report finds sharp drop in adolescent deaths, but an uptick in disability. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Black hole shoots plasma every which way

‘Extraordinary’ behaviour recorded in misaligned hole system. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Nässprej effektiv mot depression

Nu kan den som lider av depression bli hjälpt av en nässprej. I alla fall i USA. Den nya sprejen innehåller esketamin, en variant av bedövningsmedlet ketamin, som även används som rekreationsdrog. Både esketamin och ketamin är narkotikaklassade. Esketamin påverkar glutamat-receptorerna i hjärnan, vilket tros bidra till att återställa de synaptiska kontakterna i hjärnan hos personer med svår depres

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Hitchhiking bacteria might help their host navigate via magnetic fields

Tiny protists spike their membranes with magnetic bacteria

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How The Black Hole Said Cheese

Scientific American's chief features editor Seth Fletcher talks about his book Einstein's Shadow, an account of the long effort to image a black hole that recently came to fruition. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Facebook to fund research on social media impact on elections

Facebook announced Monday its first research grants to academics studying the impact of social media on elections, part of an effort to prevent manipulation of social platforms.

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An Indian village has many more twins than can be explained

One in eleven people in a village in India is a twin. Though nobody knows the underlying causes, cousin marriage and disease epidemics have now been ruled out

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Does fracking for gas have a future in the UK after key resignation?

The resignation of shale gas commissioner Natascha Engel over earthquake rules is far from the only reason to think fracking's prospects are bleak in the UK

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Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

The discovery, published today in Nature Communications by researchers from La Trobe University and the University of Queensland, provides details on how proteins in the outer membrane of bacteria—the bacteria's 'superglue'—are able to stick to and populate parts of the human body.

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Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

The discovery, published today in Nature Communications by researchers from La Trobe University and the University of Queensland, provides details on how proteins in the outer membrane of bacteria—the bacteria's 'superglue'—are able to stick to and populate parts of the human body.

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Israel’s child development accounts appeal to families

When Israel implemented a child development account policy, 65 percent of households actively enrolled in the first 6 months, research finds. Such CDA programs aim to advance long-term savings and asset-building for children and improve their economic outcomes in adulthood. Israel launched the program, the first universal CDA program in the world, in early 2017, automatically covering every child

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Powerbeats Pro preorders start Friday, May 3 – CNET

Get ready for Beats' new true-wireless sound.

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Marriott plans to take on Airbnb with its own home-rental service

The line between the traditional hotel industry and the home-rental industry has become increasingly blurred. Last month, Airbnb bought HotelTonight, a last-minute hotel booking company. …

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Wax helps plants to survive in the desert

The leaves of date palms can heat up to temperatures around 50 degrees Celsius. They survive thanks to a unique wax mixture that is essential for the existence in the desert.

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Fleming's method in miniature

Scientists in the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel have developed a method with which they can quickly test a very large number of molecules for antibiotic effect. With it, they have already successfully discovered new antibiotic candidates produced by microorganisms. In the future, they will use their new technology to examine soil samples and the microbiome

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Amazon workers from around world join forces in Berlin

Amazon worker representatives from 15 countries met in Berlin on Monday to coordinate their strategy against one of the world's most powerful companies, after years of individually battling against its often-criticised employment practices.

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Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket

Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications.

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Decoupled graphene thanks to potassium bromide

The use of potassium bromide in the production of graphene on a copper surface can lead to better results. When potassium bromide molecules arrange themselves between graphene and copper, it results in electronic decoupling. This alters the electrical properties of the graphene produced, bringing them closer to pure graphene.

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DNA folds into a smart nanocapsule for drug delivery

A new study shows that nanostructures constructed of DNA molecules can be programmed to function as pH-responsive cargo carriers, paving the way towards functional drug-delivery vehicles.

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3D optical biopsies within reach thanks to advance in light field technology

Researchers have shown that existing optical fibre technology could be used to produce microscopic 3D images of tissue inside the body, paving the way towards 3D optical biopsies.

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SpaceX-Like Startups Think They Can Solve Fusion For Cheap

SpaceX Moment SpaceX has made rocket launches a whole lot cheaper . And now, according to industry experts who spoke to NBC News , fusion energy production could be next — with decades of scientific research to leverage, it could be startups that finally turn fusion energy into an affordable, commercially viable energy source. “Fusion is poised for a ‘SpaceX moment,'” General Fusion CEO Christofe

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Researchers use a novel approach to identify a transport protein in mycobacteria

A team headed by Dr. Claudia Jessen-Trefzer of the University of Freiburg's Institute for Pharmaceuticals Sciences has identified a transport protein in mycobacteria that is responsible for the uptake of the nutrient L-arabinofuranose. The lead authors of the study, Miaomiao Li of the Institute for Pharmaceuticals Sciences, Christoph Müller of the Institute for Biochemistry and Klemens Fröhlich of

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Spotify reaches 100 million paying subscribers

Swedish music streaming giant Spotify said Monday it had amassed 100 million paying subscribers, but the company also fell back into the red and reported a first quarter operating loss.

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Researchers use a novel approach to identify a transport protein in mycobacteria

A team headed by Dr. Claudia Jessen-Trefzer of the University of Freiburg's Institute for Pharmaceuticals Sciences has identified a transport protein in mycobacteria that is responsible for the uptake of the nutrient L-arabinofuranose. The lead authors of the study, Miaomiao Li of the Institute for Pharmaceuticals Sciences, Christoph Müller of the Institute for Biochemistry and Klemens Fröhlich of

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Purifying water with graphene

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology and colleagues from Derzhavin Tambov State University and Saratov Chernyshevsky State University have figured out that graphene is capable of purifying water, making it drinkable, without further chlorination. Captured bacterial cells form flakes that can be easily extracted from the water. Graphene separated by ultrasound can be re

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Novel method could help produce purer, safer drugs

Physics and Chemistry scholars from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have invented a new method that could speed up the drug discovery process and lead to the production of higher quality medicinal drugs which are purer and have no side effects. The technique uses a specific nanomaterial layer to detect the target molecules in pharmaceuticals and pesticides in just five minutes.

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Formation of honeycomb nanostructures finally explained

A few years ago, a promising new type of nanomaterial was observed experimentally, combining the virtues of semiconductors with those of graphene. The material is formed by nanocrystals that spontaneously assemble into a honeycomb structure. Until now, it was unclear why the nanocrystals show this specific behaviour, but Utrecht researchers Giuseppe Soligno and Daniel Vanmaekelbergh have now devel

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Pete Buttigieg’s Language Magic Is Textbook Polyglot Mythmaking

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, and a Democratic presidential candidate, has become famous for speaking lots of languages. Depending on the day and the media outlet, the number rises and falls. He’s been granted six languages , seven languages , and eight languages . After the fire at Paris’s Notre-Dame cathedral, he dipped into French to answer questions from French media. He f

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People Are Clamoring to Buy Old Insulin Pumps

One day last June, Doug Boss pulled into a police-station parking lot to meet a stranger from Craigslist. His purpose: to buy used insulin pumps. Boss has type 1 diabetes, and he relies on a small pump attached to his body to deliver continuous doses of insulin that keep him alive. To be clear, he didn’t need to buy used medical equipment on Craigslist. Boss, who is 55 and works in IT in Texas, h

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'Avengers: Endgame' Broke Nearly Every Box Office Record

It's made more than $1 billion worldwide already.

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Non-thermal plasma: new technology could kill 99.9% of the deadly germs in the air

You can live without food for three weeks and without water for up to three days. But you can't live without air for more than three short minutes. It's not just the abundance of air that matters – the quality is essential, too. Unfortunately, air can be contaminated with dangerous germs known as airborne pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses.

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Research examines new links between retreating glaciers and global warming

University of Southampton scientists are using innovative technology to monitor the behaviour of glaciers in real time, in a new bid to understand the link between their retreat, global warming and rising sea levels.

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Gaia's first asteroid discoveries

While scanning the sky to chart a billion stars in our Milky Way galaxy, ESA's Gaia satellite is also sensitive to celestial bodies closer to home, and regularly observes asteroids in our solar system.

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New technique could pave the way for simple color tuning of LED bulbs

New research demonstrates the possibility of tuning the color of a GaN LED by changing the time sequence at which the operation current is provided to the device.

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Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket

Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications.

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Decoupled graphene thanks to potassium bromide

The use of potassium bromide in the production of graphene on a copper surface can lead to better results. When potassium bromide molecules arrange themselves between graphene and copper, it results in electronic decoupling. This alters the electrical properties of the graphene produced, bringing them closer to pure graphene.

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Gene variant linked to sleep problems in autism

Researchers have found that sleep problems in patients with autism spectrum disorder may be linked to a mutation in the gene SHANK3 that in turn regulates the genes of the body's 24-hour day and night cycle. Their study showed that people who were missing the SHANK3 gene and mice that lacked part of the gene had difficulty falling asleep.

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Stressed at work and trouble sleeping? It's more serious than you think

Work stress and impaired sleep are linked to a threefold higher risk of cardiovascular death in employees with hypertension.

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When Measles Arrives: Breaking Down the Anatomy of Containment

That the center managed to contain the highly-contagious measles virus is a testament to its modernized records system, its staff’s military-style precision, and its location in a resource-rich region. But even here there were occasional missteps, and administrative second-guessing and finger-pointing.

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Alcohol ads in sport fuel drinking culture

Repeated exposure to alcohol advertising in sport — either at venues or during media coverage of matches — can have long-term effects on drinking attitudes, according to a new international study.

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Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'

Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time by researchers from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS). This new knowledge could have huge impacts in anti-microbial development.

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New study aims to validate pediatric version of sequential organ failure assessment

A new study aims to validate the pediatric version of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score in the emergency department setting as a predictor of mortality in all patients and patients with suspected infection.

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Should a paper on mindfulness have been retracted? A co-author weighs in

Two weeks ago, we covered the retraction of a PLoS ONE paper on mindfulness following criticism — dating back to 2017 — by James Coyne. At the time, the corresponding author, Maria Hunink, of Erasmus and Harvard, had not responded to a request for comment. Hunink responded late last week, saying that she had been on … Continue reading Should a paper on mindfulness have been retracted? A co-author

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Report: 20 Million PC Gamers Could Switch to Consoles by 2022

A new report claims 20M PC gamers could move away from the platform within the next three years. The post Report: 20 Million PC Gamers Could Switch to Consoles by 2022 appeared first on ExtremeTech .

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Techathlon podcast: Future ketchup, fake materials, and digital spring cleaning

Technology Laugh, learn, hear us eat ketchup-flavored fruit roll-ups. Can you beat our scores in this week's technology game show?

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Dark Matter Gets a Reprieve in New Analysis

The galactic center shines too brightly, like the glow of a metropolis at night where maps show only a town. To mend their cosmic cartography, astrophysicists have spent years debating what could be powering this excess of energetic light. In 2015 the arguments appeared to swing decisively in favor of a somewhat prosaic explanation — that a large population of dim neutron stars was responsible .

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Exposed database holds sensitive data on over 80 million US households

Large-scale database exposures are sadly nothing new, but they're particularly worrisome when there isn't even a clear owner. Researchers Ran Locar and Noam Rotem have found …

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Graphene sponge helps lithium sulphur batteries reach new potential

To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential. One option is lithium sulfur batteries, which offer a theoretical energy density more than five times that of lithium ion batteries. Researchers recently unveiled a promising breakthrough for this type of battery, using a catholyte with the help of a graphene sponge.

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The Underlying Messages That Screen-Time Recommendations Send Parents

Last week, the World Health Organization issued new guidelines on how much time parents should permit young children to spend absorbed in digital screens, whether phones, tablets, or TVs. Kids younger than 1 year old, the organization advised, shouldn’t have any screen time, and kids ages 2 to 4 should have their passive screen time capped at an hour a day. “Children under five must spend less ti

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At work, women and people of color still have not broken the glass ceiling

Did you notice the race of your barista this morning? What about the sex of your mechanic?

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The Physics of Heating Up Water with a Battery

You can make a simple water heater using a battery and a wire—here's how.

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Kommuner og leverandører mangler et fælles IoT-sprog

PLUS. Mange kommuner står på spring for at købe sensorer i tusindvis og etablere IoT-netværk. Men leverandører skal være skarpere til at forklare, hvad de egentlig sælger.

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Bright futures: thinktank seeks hopeful fictions

Short story competition for cyber-authors closes soon.

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Why the idea of alien life now seems inevitable and possibly imminent

The thought that ET may exist is not as far-fetched as it used to be, writes Australian researcher Cathal O'Connell.

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Take that, Ryugu!

Japanese researchers deliver one small hole on an asteroid, one giant smack for humankind.

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Soon, the dead on Facebook will outnumber the living

Analysis models growth trends for the social media platform, and millions die. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Actually, yes, it is rocket science

NASA models its next journey to the moon.

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Electric Cars Are Estimated to Be Cheaper than Regular Cars by 2022

Electric cars have developed a reputation as the ultimate status symbol of the champagne environmentalist, but that could be very close to changing. New research from BloombergNEF says they could be cheaper than combustion-engine cars by 2022. Ten years ago, few would have predicted the meteoric rise of the electric vehicle industry. In 2010 the global stock was about 12,500, but more than two mi

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Is an 'insect apocalypse' happening? How would we know?

Insects scuttle, chew and fly through the world around us. Humans rely on them to pollinate plants, prey on insects that we don't get along with, and to be movers and shakers for Earth's ecosystems. It's hard to imagine a world without insects.

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Researchers produces filaments and fibres three times finer than a human hair

A group of researchers from the Higher Technical School of Engineering at the University of Seville has obtained filaments and fibres from highly viscous liquids with technology that is usually used to produce drops. By means of their research, they have discovered the conditions necessary for the formation of filaments with thicknesses of less than 50 micrometres.

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Is an 'insect apocalypse' happening? How would we know?

Insects scuttle, chew and fly through the world around us. Humans rely on them to pollinate plants, prey on insects that we don't get along with, and to be movers and shakers for Earth's ecosystems. It's hard to imagine a world without insects.

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Inorganic perovskite absorbers for use in thin-film solar cells

A team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin has succeeded in producing inorganic perovskite thin films at moderate temperatures using co-evaporation – making post-tempering at high temperatures unnecessary. The process makes it much easier to produce thin-film solar cells from this material. In comparison to metal-organic hybrid perovskites, inorganic perovskites are more thermally stable. The work has

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Plenary addresses importance of 2020 US Census and challenge of the young child undercount

The Census not only determines how over $675 billion in federal funds are allocated, but it is used to draw district lines and to give voice to those who live in the US.

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Is this how expecting a taste affects the brain?

New research aims to clarify how our brains get us ready to experience a taste. Scientists know that expectation affects sensory stimuli—especially powerful ones like taste. Expectation is a trigger for stimuli detection, distinction, and reaction. Yet, scientists know little about how expectation shapes the cortical processes of sensory information. Now, researchers have developed a theoretical

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AI researchers want to study AI the same way social scientists study humans

Maybe we don’t need to look inside the black box after all. We just need to watch how machines behave, instead

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Wax helps plants to survive in the desert

In 1956, Würzburg botanist Otto Ludwig Lange observed an unusual phenomenon in the Mauritanian desert in West Africa: He found plants whose leaves could withstand heat up to 56 degrees Celsius. At the time, the professor was unable to say which mechanisms were responsible for preventing the leaves from drying out at these temperatures. More than 50 years later, the botanists Markus Riederer and Am

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Wax helps plants to survive in the desert

In 1956, Würzburg botanist Otto Ludwig Lange observed an unusual phenomenon in the Mauritanian desert in West Africa: He found plants whose leaves could withstand heat up to 56 degrees Celsius. At the time, the professor was unable to say which mechanisms were responsible for preventing the leaves from drying out at these temperatures. More than 50 years later, the botanists Markus Riederer and Am

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Shutting down social media does not reduce violence, but rather fuels it

In the wake of a series of coordinated attacks that claimed more than 250 lives on April 21, the government of Sri Lanka shut off its residents' access to social media and online messaging systems, including Facebook, WhatsApp, YouTube, Snapchat and Viber. The official government concern was that "false news reports were spreading through social media."

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Can we turn sewage 'sludge' into something valuable?

Over the past few years I have become an academic expert in "sewage sludge" – the residual, semi-solid mix of excrement packed with microorganisms that is left behind within wastewater treatment plants. Every year the UK alone produces approximately 1.4m tonnes of the stuff. About 80% of it is spread on fields as manure, but this still leaves us with a headache – what do we do with the rest?

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Water creates traps in organic electronics

Poor-quality organic semiconductors can become high-quality semiconductors when manufactured in the correct way. Researchers at Linköping University show in an article in Nature Materials that the motion of charges in organic electronic devices is dramatically slowed down by minute amounts of water.

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Game of Thrones meets Westworld in fan-made opening sequence – CNET

"Westeros World" looks and sounds pretty stylish.

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Cute or creepy: Why humans love some species, loathe others

The Chinese giant salamander, the largest amphibian in the world, is not cute.

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Physical therapy varies for stroke patients on Medicare

Stroke patients on Medicare receive vastly different amounts of physical and occupational therapy during hospital stays, research finds. The new study of Medicare claims data from 2010 for approximately 104,000 stroke patients shows that 15 percent of patients received no physical therapy (PT) or occupational therapy (OT), while on average stroke patients received two hours of therapy during thei

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Novel method developed by HKBU scholars could help produce purer, safer drugs

Novel method developed by HKBU scholars could help produce purer, safer drugs

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DNA folds into a smart nanocapsule for drug delivery

New study of University of Jyvaskyla and Aalto University shows that nanostructures constructed of DNA molecules can be programmed to function as pH-responsive cargo carriers, paving the way towards functional drug-delivery vehicles.

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Cute or creepy: Why humans love some species, loathe others

The Chinese giant salamander, the largest amphibian in the world, is not cute.

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New research helps visualise sentiment and stance in social media

How can you find and make sense of opinions and emotions in the vast amount of texts in social media? Kostiantyn Kucher's research helps visualise for instance public opinions on political issues in tweets over time. In the future, analysis and visualisation of sentiment and stance could contribute to such tasks as detection of hate speech and fake news.

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Data scientists mapped supply chains of every U.S. city

No matter where you are in the United States, some food in your kitchen probably started its life in Fresno, California.

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No Option Is Off the Table

Growing up in northern New York, a land of harsh and snowy winters, summer days were a gift to be enjoyed outdoors. The summer of 1974, however, will forever be seared in my memory as the summer we spent glued to the news. The entire country was riveted by the Watergate drama unfolding in Washington, eager to learn the truth and reclaim our government as a beacon of hope and opportunity rather th

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38 killed as floods worsen in Mozambique after second cyclone

Heavy rain battered northern Mozambique on Monday as residents and relief workers confronted the widespread devastation wrought by Cyclone Kenneth, the strongest cyclone to ever hit Africa, which killed 38 people and destroyed thousands of homes.

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Engineering ECM-like fibers with bioactive silk for 3-D cell culture

Biological tissues are built when cells anchor to specific sites on a 3-D microfiber network in an extracellular matrix (ECM). Scientists are keen to recreate biological tissues in the lab using bioinspired tissue engineering and genetic engineering, to form functional ECM motifs fused to recombinant silk proteins. Under adequate physiological conditions, bioengineered silk proteins and fibronecti

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Highly resorptive metal-organic frameworks

Gases and pollutants can be filtered from air and liquids by means of porous, crystalline materials, such as metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). To further partition these pores and enhance their sorption capacity, a team of scientists have developed a fast and versatile two-in-one synthetic strategy, combining metal coordination with the covalent chemistry of light elements. As detailed in a study i

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Japanese startup hopes to launch a sounding rocket into space

Interstellar Technologies Inc. (IST) is in final phase of preparations for its third attempt to become the first Japanese private company to launch a small sounding rocket into space. The launch is scheduled for Tuesday, April 30 at 11:15 a.m. JST (2:15 a.m. GMT).

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Study highlights how little we know about women terrorists

The first large-scale research project evaluating the characteristics of women involved in jihadism-inspired terrorism finds significant differences between men and women in both their backgrounds and their roles within terrorist groups. The study highlights potential flaws in existing models of radicalization, threat assessment tools and counter-terrorism strategies – all of which rely primarily

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5 Sci-Fi Futures We Actually Have to Worry About

submitted by /u/Mansa_Sekekama [link] [comments]

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How robots became a scapegoat for the destruction of the working class

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Autonomous vehicles make congestion pricing even more critical – TechCrunch

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Here's how Amazon robots could make the deliveryman extinct

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US

According to the United States Department of Education, the U.S. high school graduation rate will reach an all-time high this year, which is good news for both our economy and health. Policy makers often use education policy to strengthen the workforce and boost earnings, productivity and employment. But earning a diploma may also lead to a longer, healthier life.

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Carbios plastic bottle recycling picks up backers

French green chemistry firm Carbios said Monday it had picked up the backing of three major drinks firms to build a facility to test on an industrial scale its technology to break down and recycle PET plastic bottles with enzymes.

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Beluga whale with harness was trained by Russia, claim scientists

Norwegian fishermen were approached by a beluga whale wearing a harness with "Equipment of St Petersburg" printed on the inside

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Stop scolding men for being 'toxic'

What is toxic masculinity? It generally means men behaving badly.

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Extended winter polar vortices chill Saturn's strangely familiar moon, Titan

Saturn's hazy moon Titan has a long-lived Earth-like winter polar vortex supercharged by the moon's peculiar chemistry, according to new research published in AGU's journal Geophysical Research Letters.

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Samsung built a $16,000 vertical TV for (who else?) the millennials

Samsung's "Sero" is a 43-inch TV mounted on a rotating stand.

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How to purify water with graphene

Scientists from the National University of Science and Technology 'MISIS' together with their colleagues from Derzhavin Tambov State University and Saratov Chernyshevsky State University have figured out that graphene is capable of purifying water, making it drinkable, without further chlorination. 'Capturing' bacterial cells, it forms flakes that can be easily extracted from the water. Graphene s

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Decoupled graphene thanks to potassium bromide

The use of potassium bromide in the production of graphene on a copper surface can lead to better results. When potassium bromide molecules arrange themselves between graphene and copper, it results in electronic decoupling. This alters the electrical properties of the graphene produced, bringing them closer to pure graphene, as reported by physicists from the universities of Basel, Modena and Mun

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New studies examine teen vaping association with sexual risk behavior and drug usage

Electronic vapor product usage and sexual risk behavior in the US. Adolescents; electronic vapor product usage and alcohol and drug-related risk behaviors in the US. Adolescents: data from the 2017 national youth risk behavior survey.

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Lifetime flu vaccine?

Another year, another flu vaccine because so far scientists haven't managed to make a vaccine that protects against all strains of flu. A new approach could end that ritual and protect against deadly pandemic flu.

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Danske Regioner: Svært at forestille sig en større centralisering af lægevagten

Stephanie Lose (V), formand for Danske Regioner, har meget svært ved at forestille sig en fremtidig lægevagt, der centraliseres på samme måde, som landets hospitaler er blevet det.

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UN biodiversity conference to lay groundwork for Nature rescue plan

Diplomats from 130 nations gathered in Paris on Monday to validate a grim UN assessment of the state of Nature and lay the groundwork for a rescue plan for life on Earth.

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Toddler skin cells spark discovery of 2 new diseases

Mutations in a gene involved in brain development led researchers to discover two new neurodevelopmental diseases. The first clues about the rare disorder arose after doctors were unable to diagnose why two siblings from Québec City were experiencing seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits. Desperate, the children’s family turned to Carl Ernst at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in

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Scientists trace the key factor of tiny onion-like BN to superhard nt-cBN

How to obtain superhard nt-cBN from onion-like precursor? Recently, Prof. Zhisheng Zhao's research group from Yanshan University, China traced the effects of size and microstructure of onion-like precursors on the synthesis and properties of the emergent, technologically important nt-cBN/nt-diamond materials and revealed that the size change of onion-like precursor results in the distinct microstr

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Stretchable interlaced-nanowire film for ultraviolet photodetectors with high response speed

Recently, one research group from the Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, presented an interesting SnO2-CdS NW interlaced structure to fabricate stretchable UV photodetectors with high response speed in Science China Materials.

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Nanomicrocell catalysts: A new kind of highly efficient integrated catalyst system

A recent work showed a new kind of integrated catalyst system, denoted as nanomicrocell catalysts, consisting of different redox-active sites with different catalytic properties immobilized on nanosized conductive matrices, which could significantly improve catalytic efficiency by forming nanosized fuel cells. This proof-of-concept catalyst system opened a new window for development of highly effi

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Carbon nanotube nanoreactors to stabilize metastable structures

Some metastable structures have been predicted to have high potential applications due to their unique properties. However, many metastable structures are produced and stable in extremely high pressure or high temperatures. The synthesis, characterization and further applications of the metastable structures are challenging. Scientists based in China and Japan introduce carbon nanotubes as nanorea

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Education may be key to a healthier, wealthier US

A first-of-its-kind study estimate the economic value of education for better health and longevity. The University of Colorado Denver study, published in The Milbank Quarterly, finds that the reduced disability and longer lives among the more educated are worth up to twice as much as the value of education for lifetime earnings.

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Nu kan dna-spor afsløre forbryderens etnicitet – sandsynligvis

Serie: Er forbryderen østasiat, grønlænder eller europæer? Et dna-spor på gerningsstedet kan sladre om dit udseende ud fra slægtsforskningen, og politiet har allerede taget metoden i brug.

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Meet the Pro-Vaxxers Helping to Stave Off the Next Pandemic

As vaccine hesitancy grows, some individuals are responding by volunteering to take part in experimental vaccine trials.

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More than eight in 10 men in prison suffered childhood adversity – new report

Male prisoners are much more likely than men in the wider population to have suffered childhood adversities such as child maltreatment or living in a home with domestic violence, according to a new report by Public Health Wales and Bangor University.

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Swan EGGs in the sky: Astronomers conduct radio observations of free-floating evaporating gas globules in Cygnus OB2

Using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), astronomers have carried out radio observations of the so-called free-floating evaporating gas globules or (frEGGs) in the Cygnus OB2 region. Results of this observational campaign, presented in a paper published April 17 on arXiv.org, provide more details about the properties of these peculiar objects.

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Chemists make thermoset polymer using amine and triketone that is recyclable

A team of researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has devised a way to make a type of recyclable thermoset plastic. In their paper published in the journal Nature Chemistry, the group describes combining two particular types of monomers to form a common type of polymer that can be recycled using an acid. Coralie Jehanno and Haritz Sardon with the University of the Basque Country UPV/E

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Phosphorene Nanoribbons

As technology advances we find better and better ways to use existing materials. However, material science has the potential to introduce new materials to the equation, changing the game. It’s ironic that news about new materials tends to get relatively little attention in the media, but perhaps has the greatest potential to change our world. That is exactly what I felt when I read this news abou

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How New York City is preparing for climate change

In 2008, New York City's Mayor Bloomberg brought together leading climate scientists, academics and members of the private sector to advise the city on adapting to the impacts of climate change. This group, called the New York City Panel on Climate Change (NPCC), released its 2019 report in March. The report documents that local extreme weather events are becoming more frequent, longer lasting and

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EU launches billion-euro loan plan for young farmers

The European Union on Monday launched a plan to give up to one billion euros in cheaper loans to young farmers, who are often turned away by banks.

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Germany's Bosch powers up hydrogen cells for cars

The world's biggest auto parts maker Bosch said Monday it would work with a Swedish firm to develop key components for hydrogen fuel cells designed to power cars, after backing off building electric batteries.

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Sony to cut smartphone workforce by half by 2020 amidst weak sales

The smartphone industry is viciously competitive. Unless you have the brand cache of Apple or OnePlus or your next flagship manages to tick more checkboxes than anyone else's flagship released …

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Germany's Bosch powers up hydrogen cells for cars

The world's biggest auto parts maker Bosch said Monday it would work with a Swedish firm to develop key components for hydrogen fuel cells designed to power cars, after backing off building …

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Tailor-made enzymatic solutions reduce time and cost of biorefinery processes

Non-food, woody materials (namely lignocellulosic biomass) is the largest renewable reservoir of fermentable starches to substitute fossil fuels. It can be used to produce bio-based polymers and materials for any kind of product – from yoga mats to loud speakers – as well as for paints, biochemicals, cosmetics, bioplastics and biofuels.

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New research explains why Hurricane Harvey intensified immediately before landfall

A new study explains the mechanism behind Hurricane Harvey's unusual intensification off the Texas coast and how the finding could improve future hurricane forecasting.

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Microbes hitch a ride on high-flying dust

Dust doesn't just accumulate under your bed. It can also travel for thousands of kilometers, across continents and oceans.

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Heatwave devastates wildlife populations in World Heritage Site

Large numbers of dugongs, sea snakes and other marine animals disappeared from the UNESCO World Heritage Site Shark Bay, Western Australia, after a heat wave devastated seagrass meadows, according to recently released research.

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Antibiotic resistance as big a threat as climate change – chief medic

Dame Sally Davies calls for Extinction Rebellion-style campaign to raise awareness Protests against climate change should be extended to the other greatest threat facing humanity, according to England’s chief medical officer, who says an Extinction Rebellion -style campaign is needed to save people from antibiotics becoming ineffective in the face of overuse and a lack of regulation. The threat o

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Heatwave devastates wildlife populations in World Heritage Site

Large numbers of dugongs, sea snakes and other marine animals disappeared from the UNESCO World Heritage Site Shark Bay, Western Australia, after a heat wave devastated seagrass meadows, according to recently released research.

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If humanity's ever growing population is negatively impacting the environmemt, does it make sense to cap population growth?

I am by no means an expert on the environment, the global economy, populations, or any such matter. However it seems to me that many of the negative impacts on society come directly from a ever growing human population. The growing population requires more food, more land to live on, more energy to keep warm at night, etc. If the population decreased, would demand for such things also decrease? W

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Can AI Help Doctors Treat Depression? These Startups Think So

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

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Here’s why privately-owned cities are a terrible idea

submitted by /u/zexterio [link] [comments]

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Want to work for L’Oreal? Get ready to chat with an AI bot

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Walmart Unveils A New Lab Store Using AI

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Israel Speeds Ahead with Self-Driving Cars – Israel Today

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To prevent the apocalypse, MIT says to study "machine behaviour"

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Tesla Autopilot made a 90-degree left turn at an intersection

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

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Hong Kong employees fear robots could take their jobs

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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One in 4 Wisconsin jobs at risk in a coming wave of robots, automation

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

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Study links gene to sleep problems in autism

Research conducted by a team of Washington State University researchers has found that sleep problems in patients with autism spectrum disorder may be linked to a mutation in the gene SHANK3 that in turn regulates the genes of the body's 24-hour day and night cycle. Their study showed that people who were missing the SHANK3 gene and mice that lacked part of the gene had difficulty falling asleep.

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New technique could pave the way for simple color tuning of LED bulbs

An international collaboration between Lehigh University, West Chester University, Osaka University and University of Amsterdam demonstrates the possibility of tuning the color of a GaN LED by changing the time sequence at which the operation current is provided to the device. The work is described in an article published online in ACS Photonics called 'Color-Tunablility in GaN LEDs Based on Atomi

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Tailor-made enzymatic solutions reduce time and cost of biorefinery processes

Non-food, woody materials (namely lignocellulosic biomass) is the largest renewable reservoir of fermentable starches to substitute fossil fuels. It can be used to produce bio-based polymers and materials for any kind of product – from yoga mats to loud speakers – as well as for paints, biochemicals, cosmetics, bioplastics and biofuels.

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Mourning a fictional character is perfectly valid

Science But it's a loss others might not understand. Fictional characters may not suffer when they die, but true fans certainly do. Avengers fans have fallen on some hard times recently. Grey’s Anatomy fanatics still…

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Leaked Pic of Moto's Bendy Razr Reboot Looks Damn Good

The foldable phone era has had a rough start. So, when rumors started swirling that Moto was going to revive the Razr and give it a bendy display, it seemed like a dicey proposition at best. …

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Five Things I Learned From the Mueller Report

I spent the week after the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report going through it section by section and writing a kind of diary of the endeavor . My goal was less to summarize the report than to force myself to think about each factual, legal, and analytical portion of Mueller’s discussion, which covers a huge amount of ground. Here are five conclusions I drew from the exercise: The

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5 critical life skills everyone should have

The World Health Organization identified 5 basic life skills that are crucial to cultivate and learn in order to have a better and more productive life. Ranging from creative thinking to learning to cope with stress, these skills should be instilled in youth during their education and nurtured over a lifetime. Although the best time to develop these skills is during one's youth, the second best t

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Researchers venture to the Chernobyl Red Forest

A multidisciplinary group of researchers from the University of Bristol, as part of the National Centre for Nuclear Robotics, recently traveled to the Chernobyl exclusion zone, 33 years after the nuclear accident at the power plant in Ukraine.

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Decoupled graphene thanks to potassium bromide

The use of potassium bromide in the production of graphene on a copper surface can lead to better results. When potassium bromide molecules arrange themselves between graphene and copper, it results in electronic decoupling. This alters the electrical properties of the graphene produced, bringing them closer to pure graphene, as reported by physicists from the universities of Basel, Modena and Mun

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Combinatorial Cognitive Behavior Ontological Hypergraph

submitted by /u/ccboh [link] [comments]

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Don’t See Yourself on Your Emoji Keyboard? Jenny 8. Lee Can Help

Meet Jenny 8. Lee, an advocate who urges inclusion and representation in emoji, and a subject of the new emoji documentary, “Picture Character.”

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Companies Can Predict Climate Catastrophes for You—as a Service

One startup in the growing climate services industry lets you pull up a map and design your own disaster, to help put a price on climate change's impacts.

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Urgent action needed to end our love affair with cars, report finds

The authors of a University of Otago report on active transport say urgent steps must be taken to encourage New Zealanders to walk, cycle or take public transport, with our use of cars harming both our health and our environment.

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DNA folds into a smart nanocapsule for drug delivery

Researchers from University of Jyväskylä and Aalto University in Finland have developed a customized DNA nanostructure that can perform a predefined task in human body-like conditions. To do so, the team built a capsule-like carrier that opens and closes according to the pH level of the surrounding solution. The nanocapsule can be loaded—or packed—with a variety of cargo, closed for delivery and o

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Calculating cost-effective conservation

Maintaining existing conservation areas might be a more cost-effective investment than expansion, according to new research led by The University of Queensland.

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We accidentally created a new wonder material that could revolutionise batteries and electronics

Some of the most famous scientific discoveries happened by accident. From Teflon and the microwave oven to penicillin, scientists trying to solve a problem sometimes find unexpected things. This is exactly how we created phosphorene nanoribbons – a material made from one of the universe's basic building blocks, but that has the potential to revolutionise a wide range of technologies.

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Bactericidal action of violacein revealed

In an article published in the journal ACS Infectious Diseases, Brazilian researchers describe the bactericidal action mechanism of violacein, a violet pigment produced by environmental bacteria, especially Chromobacterium violaceum.

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Bactericidal action of violacein revealed

In an article published in the journal ACS Infectious Diseases, Brazilian researchers describe the bactericidal action mechanism of violacein, a violet pigment produced by environmental bacteria, especially Chromobacterium violaceum.

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Global 5G Wireless Networks Threaten Weather Forecasts

Next-generation mobile technology could interfere with crucial satellite-based Earth observations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Latitudinal gradient of plant phylogenetic diversity explained

Why are there so many species in the tropics? For centuries, scientists have been searching for the causes of the latitudinal gradient in species diversity—a pattern that has been documented for most groups of living species, including plants, insects, birds, and mammals.

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Screening for genes to improve protein production in yeast

By silencing genes, researchers have managed to increase protein production in yeast significantly. This method can lay the grounds for engineering better yeast production hosts for industries producing biopharmaceutical proteins and industrial enzymes.

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Graphene sponge helps lithium sulphur batteries reach new potential

To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential. One option is lithium sulphur batteries, which offer a theoretical energy density more than five times that of lithium ion batteries. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently unveiled a promising breakthrough for this type of battery, using a catholyte with the help of a graphene sponge

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Physicists set a new record of quantum memory efficiency

Like memory in conventional computers, quantum memory components are essential for quantum computers—a new generation of data processors that exploit quantum mechanics and can overcome the limitations of classical computers. With their potent computational power, quantum computers may push the boundaries of fundamental science to create new drugs, explain cosmological mysteries, or enhance accurac

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Latitudinal gradient of plant phylogenetic diversity explained

Why are there so many species in the tropics? For centuries, scientists have been searching for the causes of the latitudinal gradient in species diversity—a pattern that has been documented for most groups of living species, including plants, insects, birds, and mammals.

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Flexible circuits for 3-D printing

A research collaborative between the University of Hamburg and DESY has developed a process suitable for 3-D printing that can be used to produce transparent and mechanically flexible electronic circuits. The electronics consists of a mesh of silver nanowires that can be printed in suspension and embedded in various flexible and transparent plastics (polymers). This technology can enable new appli

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Screening for genes to improve protein production in yeast

By silencing genes, researchers have managed to increase protein production in yeast significantly. This method can lay the grounds for engineering better yeast production hosts for industries producing biopharmaceutical proteins and industrial enzymes.

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Improving the lifetime of bioelectrodes for solar energy conversion

The use of proteins involved in the photosynthetic process enables the development of affordable and efficient devices for energy conversion. However, although proteins such as photosystem I are robust in nature, the use of isolated protein complexes incorporated in semi-artificial electrodes is associated with a considerably short long-term stability. In consequence, the technological application

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Soon-to-be world's most sensitive gamma ray observatory launches its first set of detectors

China's Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) launched its first set of detectors on April 26, 2019. It marked the beginning of comprehensive research effort in observing and detecting very high energy cosmic rays with the anticipated world most sensitive gamma ray detection facility.

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New technique could pave the way for simple color tuning of LED bulbs

Volkmar Dierolf and an international team demonstrate the possibility of tuning the color of a GaN LED by changing the time sequence at which the operation current is provided to the device.

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Using 60% less water in paper production

An EPFL researcher has developed a mathematical model for optimizing heat transfer in factories and dramatically reducing water and energy consumption. The model could, in theory, cut water use by 60 percent at a Canadian paper mill and allow the facility to produce as much as six times more power.

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Elon Musk promises fleet of 1 million Tesla ‘robotaxis’ in 2020

Tesla held an investor event on April 22, during which CEO Elon Musk promised the company will soon roll out a robotaxi network to rival companies like Uber and Lyft. Some experts say Tesla is overselling its ability to provide truly autonomous vehicles. About 71 percent of Americans are still fearful of self-driving cars, up 8 percentage points from 2017. None At an investor event on April 22, T

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How many species on Earth? A simple question that's hard to answer

You'd think it would be a simple piece of biological accounting – how many distinct species make up life on Earth?

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How many species on Earth? A simple question that's hard to answer

You'd think it would be a simple piece of biological accounting – how many distinct species make up life on Earth?

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The Going Rates, 2019 Edition

I did a post a few years ago that was a sort of informal salary survey for biopharma folks (I asked initially about the Boston/Cambridge area, but responses came in from many other places as well). I’ve had a recent request for an update, and I think it would make an interesting comparison.. So break out the comment-section pseudonyms! Let’s hear what the rough salary ranges are these days. Relev

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How one woman beat mining giants and saved rare snow leopards

A woman from Mongolia has won the Goldman Environmental Prize after a campaign to stop mining firms destroying a critical habitat for snow leopards.

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The Clintons Are Nervous About 2020

The Clintons are on edge about 2020. Like pretty much every other Democrat in America, Bill and Hillary are nervous that their party’s primary field is too large, that it’s going to be dominated by the wrong kind of debate, that the candidates will succumb to their worst instincts, and that Donald Trump will out-bully them anyway. While Trump was holding a campaign rally in Wisconsin on Saturday

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China’s Risky Middle East Bet

Updated at 10:14 a.m. ET on April 29, 2019. China is making a risky bet in the Middle East. By focusing on economic development and adhering to the principle of noninterference in internal affairs, Beijing believes it can deepen relations with countries that are otherwise nearly at war with one another—all the while avoiding any significant role in the political affairs of the region. This is lik

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This Blood Vessel Disease Can Cause Nipple Pain, Interfere with Breast-Feeding

A blood vessel disorder that most often affects fingers and toes can also show up in the nipples and cause problems with breast-feeding, according to a new report.

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Grafen får textil att leda ström

– Grafen är ett material som varit på allas läppar ett bra tag. Enkelt förklarat är det kol i en viss form som har väldigt spännande egenskaper, säger Nils-Krister Persson, docent vid Smart Textiles , Högskolan i Borås. Tillsammans med doktoranden Milad Asadi och universitetslektor Tariq Bashir har han arbetat i ett projekt för att utforska ämnets elektriskt ledande egenskaper. Inom smarta textil

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In Photos: Archaeological Discoveries at Hagia Sophia

Archaeologists have discovered amazing ruins and artifacts at the largest Christian cathedral ever constructed in the ancient world.

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Long-Lost Baptistery for Emperors Possibly Discovered at the Largest Cathedral in the Ancient World

Inside that structure, emperors would have baptized their children more than 1,400 years ago.

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Streaming service Spotify hits 100 million paid user mark

Music streaming service Spotify says its paying subscribers have reached 100 million for the first time, up 32% on the year and almost twice the latest figures for Apple Music.

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New Harry Potter Lego Sets Feature Familiar Scenes, Characters

Bring the magic of Hogwarts to your living room with five new Lego building sets inspired by Harry Potter. Available Aug. 1, the themed collections range in price from $19.99 to $89.99—par for …

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All about asteroid mining. (A 2018 conference report.)

submitted by /u/OliverSparrow [link] [comments]

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Machines Can Create Art, but Can They Jam?

Jazz composition and performance is the next frontier in creative AI — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Dear Therapist: My Boyfriend’s Mother Is Narcissistic and Mean

Editor’s Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I am in a wonderful, loving, and dynamic relationship with my boyfriend of three years. He’s an only child of a single mother, and though I know this structure is often rife with challenges, I recognized some

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How I Learned to Embrace Venmo's Ever-Evolving Vernacular

Does a shared pizza have the same value, either literal or metaphorical, as a shared mortgage? Not really, but on Venmo they are afforded the same quick tappity tap.

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Should I Spend $1,000 on a Smartphone?

With so many great inexpensive phones out there, it depends on why you want a pricey flagship model. Here are the most common justifications we hear.

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Money Management Tips From a Formerly Manic Spender

The strategies I learned to control my spending after I was diagnosed with bipolar II can help anyone crack down on their spending.

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Facebook F8 2019: What to Expect After Facebook's Very Bad Year

Facebook's annual developer conference is Tuesday. Expect news on VR, privacy, and yet another promise to "do better."

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The Penetrating Gaze of the Instagram Shame Silo

That thing you're really into but don't really love talking about? The Gram knows. Oh, it knows.

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Pro Tips for Shopping Safe on Amazon

Amazon is a mucky mess of ads, unknown sellers, misleading sales, and specious information. Defend your dollars with these shopping tips and tricks.

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Amazon's Dash Buttons Aren't Dead—They Will Haunt Us Forever

The plastic dongles did their job; they helped the online retail behemoth build a bridge to a future of frictionless, interface-free shopping.

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Why the Apple Card Is the Gleaming Future of Money

This is the cash of the future—instant, invisible, and a little bit innovative.

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Slime Thinks Fast and Slow

Slime molds display surprisingly complex decision-making behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Machines Can Create Art, but Can They Jam?

Jazz composition and performance is the next frontier in creative AI — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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How aphids sacrifice themselves to fix their homes with fatty goo

Young aphids swollen with fatty substances save their colony by self-sacrifice, using that goo to patch breaches in the wall of their tree home.

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The Problem with the Way Scientists Study Reason – Facts So Romantic

Psychologists studying reasoning extensively rely on logic and philosophy, and neglect psychology’s more natural ally: biology. Portrait of Luca Pacioli (1445–1517) with a student (Guidobaldo da Montefeltro?) / Attributed to Jacopo de’ Barbari / Wikicommons In March, I was in Paris for the International Convention of Psychological Science, one of the most prestigious gatherings in cognitive scien

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Reconfiguration of a bacterial transport system generates a reverse gear

Reconfiguration of a bacterial transport system generates a reverse gear Reconfiguration of a bacterial transport system generates a reverse gear, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01320-5 Some bacteria use multiprotein complexes to inject proteins into host cells. Components of these complexes have been linked to a nanotube-mediated route from host cells to bacteria that mi

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Slime Thinks Fast and Slow

Slime molds display surprisingly complex decision-making behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Ny rapport: Kraftig stigning i malware rettet mod Mac-platformen og virksomheder

Hyppigste problem på Mac-platformen er en PUP-software (potentially unwanted program) kaldet PCVARK. De næste tre på listen hedder MacKeeper, MacBooster og MPlayerX, som tidligere toppede listen

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Seneste signalfejl: Systemet ved ikke, om der er rødt eller grønt

I helt særlige situationer mangler det nye signalsystem på Sjælland overblik over, på hvilke delstrækninger togene kan køre ind på. Leverandørens rettelse kom ikke som lovet, og Banedanmark er langtfra tilfreds.

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Forskere vil behandle type 1-diabetes med stamceller

PLUS. Amerikanske ViaCyte tester i øjeblikket en mulig funk­tionel stamcellebaseret kur på patienter med type 1- diabetes i Europa. Danske forskere har valgt en anden metode og satser på et stærkt kort om få år.

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The High-Stakes Confrontation Between Trump and Khamenei

President Donald Trump doesn’t want conflict. Ayatollah Khamenei doesn’t want economic collapse. Yet that is where things are headed. Put yourself in the shoes of Iran’s 80-year-old supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. His regime is beset by nearly 50 percent inflation, a collapsed currency, persistent labor strikes, and an irrepressible women’s-rights movement. Epic floods recently killed mor

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We Wouldn’t Have Let Obama Get Away With This

President Donald Trump last Tuesday lamented on Twitter that “in the ‘old days’ if you were President and you had a good economy, you were basically immune from criticism.” The next day, he complained that Congress members “only want to continue the Witch Hunt, which I have already won.” In an interview with The Washington Post, Trump said , “There is no reason to go any further, and especially i

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The Problem Isn’t Twitter. It’s That You Care About Twitter.

Ever since Donald Trump made Twitter his preferred medium for communicating with the country, the platform has taken an outsize hold on the American imagination. Once a forum on which users could discuss the day’s news, Twitter now just as often sets the day’s agenda. Being active on Twitter has practically become part of the job description for some of the most influential people in the country.

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Jaguar Land Rover wants to pay you cryptocurrency for reporting road problems – Roadshow

The crypto can be used to pay for coffee or tolls through the car's built-in wallet.

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Vimeo’s new feature will allow creators to create Smart TV channels

Vimeo announced (via TubeFilter) that it is releasing a new toolkit called Showcases that will allow creators to show off their videos, including customizable portfolio sites and …

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Climate is an emergency: Let's not leave action to activists

Movements such as Extinction Rebellion may look political, but climate change is above politics – and it is up to all of us to force governments to take action

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The New Health Care: Why Your Doctor’s White Coat Can Be a Threat to Your Health

A defining symbol of a profession may also be teeming with harmful bacteria and not washed as often as patients might hope.

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Toksikolog: Pesticider i Egedal-drikkevand kan være giftige i meget små mængder

Borgerne i Egedal må ikke drikke vandet fra Ledøje Vandværk på grund af fundet af et potentielt giftigt pesticid. Ifølge ekspert er der risiko for, at det kan være kræftfremkaldende selv ved meget lave doser.

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Conserved phosphorylation hotspots in eukaryotic protein domain families

Conserved phosphorylation hotspots in eukaryotic protein domain families Conserved phosphorylation hotspots in eukaryotic protein domain families, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09952-x Protein phosphorylation has various regulatory functions. Here, the authors map 241 phosphorylation hotspot regions across 40 eukaryotic species, showing that they are enriched at interfac

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Multi-electron transfer enabled by topotactic reaction in magnetite

Multi-electron transfer enabled by topotactic reaction in magnetite Multi-electron transfer enabled by topotactic reaction in magnetite, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09528-9 In contrast to the conventional wisdom on conversion-driven structural collapse of the host, this work shows that lithium conversion in magnetite resembles the intercalation process, going via topot

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FcγRIIb differentially regulates pre-immune and germinal center B cell tolerance in mouse and human

FcγRIIb differentially regulates pre-immune and germinal center B cell tolerance in mouse and human FcγRIIb differentially regulates pre-immune and germinal center B cell tolerance in mouse and human, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09434-0 The inhibitory receptor, FcγRIIb, is reported to limit autoimmune B cell response. Here the authors show that FcγRIIb has a dual role

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Anatomical and functional investigation of the marmoset default mode network

Anatomical and functional investigation of the marmoset default mode network Anatomical and functional investigation of the marmoset default mode network, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09813-7 The default mode network (DMN) is a core brain network in humans. Here, the authors show that marmoset primates also possess a DMN-like network but, unlike in the human DMN, dlPFC

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Concomitant opening of a bulk-gap with an emerging possible Majorana zero mode

Concomitant opening of a bulk-gap with an emerging possible Majorana zero mode Concomitant opening of a bulk-gap with an emerging possible Majorana zero mode, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09771-0 A quantized zero-bias conductance peak (ZBCP) is potentially a signature of Majorana edge mode provided that a topological gap opens in the bulk. Here, Grivnin et al. observe Z

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Quantifying the factors limiting rate performance in battery electrodes

Quantifying the factors limiting rate performance in battery electrodes Quantifying the factors limiting rate performance in battery electrodes, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09792-9 The authors employ a semi-empirical method to fit published battery capacity-rate data to extract the characteristic time associated with charge/discharge. These characteristic times are con

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A tightly-bonded and flexible mesoporous zeolite-cotton hybrid hemostat

A tightly-bonded and flexible mesoporous zeolite-cotton hybrid hemostat A tightly-bonded and flexible mesoporous zeolite-cotton hybrid hemostat, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09849-9 Zeolites have attracted attention and have been applied as haemostatic agents; however, there are issues associated with released zeolite powder. Here, the authors report on the growth of ze

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Stand-off nuclear reactor monitoring with neutron detectors for safeguards and non-proliferation applications

Stand-off nuclear reactor monitoring with neutron detectors for safeguards and non-proliferation applications Stand-off nuclear reactor monitoring with neutron detectors for safeguards and non-proliferation applications, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09967-4 Nuclear power reactors need to be monitored for safety and security while in operation. Here the authors discuss m

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Climate change being fuelled by soil damage – report

There's three times more carbon in the soil than in the atmosphere – and deforestation is releasing it.

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Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket

Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications.

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More intensive blood pressure therapy helps patients with type 2 diabetes regardless of cardiovascular risk

People with type 2 diabetes who received intensive treatment to keep their blood pressure levels at 130/80 mm/Hg or below experienced fewer heart attacks, strokes and other diabetes complications.More intensive blood pressure treatment also reduced overall death from any cause, regardless of baseline measures of cardiovascular risk and blood pressure.Study findings may help reconcile conflicting g

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Food system improvements could make it easier to eat healthier

Innovations in producing, processing, distributing, marketing and preparing food are needed to help Americans eat healthier.

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Measles Shots Aren't Just For Kids: Many Adults Could Use A Booster Too

With U.S. measles cases at record highs, doctors say adults who got vaccinated prior to 1968 should consider getting revaccinated to make sure they and their neighbors are protected. (Image credit: Eric Risberg/AP)

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A library of Neo Open Reading Frame peptides (NOPs) as a sustainable resource of common neoantigens in up to 50% of cancer patients

A library of Neo Open Reading Frame peptides (NOPs) as a sustainable resource of common neoantigens in up to 50% of cancer patients A library of Neo Open Reading Frame peptides (NOPs) as a sustainable resource of common neoantigens in up to 50% of cancer patients, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42729-2 A library of Neo Open Reading Frame peptides (NOPs) as a sustainable r

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The inflammation-reducing compatible solute ectoine does not impair the cytotoxic effect of ionizing radiation on head and neck cancer cells

The inflammation-reducing compatible solute ectoine does not impair the cytotoxic effect of ionizing radiation on head and neck cancer cells The inflammation-reducing compatible solute ectoine does not impair the cytotoxic effect of ionizing radiation on head and neck cancer cells, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43040-w The inflammation-reducing compatible solute ectoine

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Changes in the Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Morphology with Glaucoma Severity

Changes in the Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Morphology with Glaucoma Severity Changes in the Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Morphology with Glaucoma Severity, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42649-1 Changes in the Anterior Lamina Cribrosa Morphology with Glaucoma Severity

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Genetic risk score has added value over initial clinical grading stage in predicting disease progression in age-related macular degeneration

Genetic risk score has added value over initial clinical grading stage in predicting disease progression in age-related macular degeneration Genetic risk score has added value over initial clinical grading stage in predicting disease progression in age-related macular degeneration, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43144-3 Genetic risk score has added value over initial clin

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Improved Expression and Optimization of Trehalose Synthase by Regulation of Pglv in Bacillus subtilis

Improved Expression and Optimization of Trehalose Synthase by Regulation of P glv in Bacillus subtilis Improved Expression and Optimization of Trehalose Synthase by Regulation of P glv in Bacillus subtilis , Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43172-z Improved Expression and Optimization of Trehalose Synthase by Regulation of P glv in Bacillus subtilis

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Augmented reality near-eye display using Pancharatnam-Berry phase lenses

Augmented reality near-eye display using Pancharatnam-Berry phase lenses Augmented reality near-eye display using Pancharatnam-Berry phase lenses, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42979-0 Augmented reality near-eye display using Pancharatnam-Berry phase lenses

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Cryogenian magmatic activity and early life evolution

Cryogenian magmatic activity and early life evolution Cryogenian magmatic activity and early life evolution, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43177-8 Cryogenian magmatic activity and early life evolution

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Bruch’s Membrane Thickness and Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell Density in Experimental Axial Elongation

Bruch’s Membrane Thickness and Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell Density in Experimental Axial Elongation Bruch’s Membrane Thickness and Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell Density in Experimental Axial Elongation, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43212-8 Bruch’s Membrane Thickness and Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cell Density in Experimental Axial Elongation

7h

Squid skin inspires creation of next-generation space blanket

Drawing design inspiration from the skin of stealthy sea creatures, engineers at the University of California, Irvine have developed a next-generation, adaptive space blanket that gives users the ability to control their temperature. The innovation is detailed in a study published today in Nature Communications.

7h

God kondition saknar betydelse vid akut stressreaktion

Att bra kondition är fördelaktigt är det få som tvivlar på. Men kan konditionen påverka alla fysiologiska mekanismer? Till grund för avhandlingen ligger bland annat test där cirka 100 friska men otränade individer, mellan 20 och 50 år gamla, fick genomgå ett fysiskt stresstest i form av ett maximalt konditionstest på testcykel, samt ett psykosocialt stresstest för att studera hur kroppen reagerar

7h

Grafensvamp banar väg för litiumsvavelbatterierna

Det finns höga förväntningar på framtidens batterier, men det krävs ny teknik för att kunna möta behoven. Chalmersforskare har nu med hjälp av av en porös och svampliknande aerogel som är baserad på grafen, så kallad grafensvamp, lyckats förbättra litiumsvavelbatteriers energiinnehåll och livslängd markant. Materialet fungerar som en fristående elektrod i battericellen och gör så att svavlet kan

7h

The New Health Care: Why Your Doctor’s White Coat Can Be a Threat to Your Health

A defining symbol of a profession may also be teeming with harmful bacteria and not washed as often as patients might hope.

7h

Conservative climate groups hope to seize the Green New Deal moment too

But is there a conservative approach that can really work at this stage?

7h

Chinese quantum prize rewards international stars of the field

Chinese quantum prize rewards international stars of the field Chinese quantum prize rewards international stars of the field, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01372-7 The Micius Quantum Prize celebrates a field that China increasingly values.

8h

How pastimes help you score in science

How pastimes help you score in science How pastimes help you score in science, Published online: 29 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01295-3 I gave up both football and the violin to focus exclusively on my graduate studies. But I came to realize just how important those hobbies were.

8h

Mannen i fokus i projekt om barnlöshet

Ofrivillig barnlöshet är numera en folksjukdom som är lika vanlig som diabetes. Dels väntar kvinnor med att skaffa barn tills de blir äldre vilket gör det svårare att bli gravid, dels visar studier att spermieantalet hos män drastiskt försämrats under de senaste femtio åren. ReproUnion 2.0 är ett danskt-svenskt initiativ som vill minska ofrivillig barnlöshet i EU.

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Image of the Day: Bobcat Sighting

A camera trap snaps a photo of a wild bobcat in a location new to scientists studying the animals’ geographical range in Ohio.

8h

Forskning har sat en stopper for revner i jernbaneskinner af hårdt stål

PLUS. I samarbejde med forskere fra DTU er Banedanmark blevet klogere på, hvordan en bestemt type jernbaneskinner, såkaldt hovedhærdede skinner, skal vedligeholdes for at undgå revner.

8h

Study: Millennials arrested more often than predecessors—even when fewer crimes are committed

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert. Furthermore, …

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The Paddison Program for rheumatoid arthritis: An unproven treatment that provides only the illusion of control

Clint Paddison is an Australian comedian with a science degree who developed rheumatoid arthritis at age 31. He now claims to have controlled it with a diet he developed to alter the gut microbiome. How plausible is his story, and does his Paddison Program work? Answer: Not very and almost certainly no.

8h

Floods in Indonesia kill 29, dozen missing

Floods sparked by torrential rains have killed nearly 40 in Indonesia with a dozen more still missing, officials said Monday, marking the latest calamity for a disaster-prone nation.

8h

Study: Millennials arrested more often than predecessors—even when fewer crimes are committed

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert. Furthermore, black men who self-reported no offenses were 419% more likely to be arrested at the beginning of the 21st century than non-offending blacks of the previous generation, and 31.5% more likely to be arrested

8h

Biodegradable bags can hold a full load of shopping after three years in the environment

Biodegradable and compostable plastic bags are still capable of carrying full loads of shopping after being exposed in the natural environment for three years, a new study shows.

8h

Crawling to extinction: Singapore turtle haven fights for life

Hundreds of turtles and tortoises, including rare and endangered species, face an uncertain future after their Singapore sanctuary—a Guinness World Record holder—was forced to relocate due to government redevelopment plans.

8h

Crawling to extinction: Singapore turtle haven fights for life

Hundreds of turtles and tortoises, including rare and endangered species, face an uncertain future after their Singapore sanctuary—a Guinness World Record holder—was forced to relocate due to government redevelopment plans.

8h

UN report to highlight urgent need for Nature rescue plan

Diplomats from 130 nations gather in Paris from Monday to validate a grim UN assessment of the state of Nature and lay the groundwork for an 11th-hour rescue plan for life on Earth.

8h

Lights react to music

I want my condo lights to react to the music from my computer. Only looked into it a bit (drunk) hah. I thought it would be really cool if I could Sync up my lighting to my audio. I really have no idea how. Any and all ideas are appreciated. I'll look into all of them. I'm definitely going to get this done one way or another so the cheapest and best way would help a lot. Basically 3 rooms I want

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Rebellious Times

The Extinction Rebellion protests of 2019 and their naysayers: analysis It can sometimes seem a lonely road to walk. Voices in the wilderness: a plucky band of writers doing their best to explain the science of climate change, anxiously watching as the countdown-clock ticks away. Producing carefully-written, fully-referenced content, only to watch people turn over and go back to sleep. Facing con

10h

India’s Supreme Court Is Veering on the Edge

NEW DELHI—India has seen an autocratic ruler once before. In 1973, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi passed over three senior judges to appoint a pliant contender as the chief justice of India’s Supreme Court. Two years later, after a high court barred her from holding office because of election irregularities, she declared a national emergency. Civil liberties were suspended, and her political opposi

11h

'Biodegradable' plastic bags survive three years in soil and sea

Study found bags were still able to carry shopping despite environmental claims Plastic bags that claim to be biodegradable were still intact and able to carry shopping three years after being exposed to the natural environment, a study has found. The research for the first time tested compostable bags, two forms of biodegradable bag and conventional carrier bags after long-term exposure to the s

11h

The Great Displacement

submitted by /u/DragonGod2718 [link] [comments]

11h

Ekstreme mængder kemikalier ødelægger Hawaiis koralrev

Kemikaliet oxybenzone, som findes i solcreme, er blevet fundet i mængder, der aldrig er set før.

11h

Graphene sponge helps lithium sulphur batteries reach new potential

To meet the demands of an electric future, new battery technologies will be essential. One option is lithium sulfur batteries, which offer a theoretical energy density more than five times that of lithium ion batteries. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently unveiled a promising breakthrough for this type of battery, using a catholyte with the help of a graphene sponge.

12h

Study: Millennials arrested more often than predecessors — even when fewer crimes are committed

Millennials are more likely to be arrested than their predecessor counterparts regardless of self-reported criminal activity, finds a new study by a Johns Hopkins University expert. Furthermore, black men who self-reported no offenses were 419% more likely to be arrested at the beginning of the 21st century than non-offending blacks of the previous generation, and 31.5% more likely to be arrested

12h

Five things to know about loneliness in older adults

Loneliness, an emotional state rather than a mental disorder, can substantially affect the health of older adults, as well as use of health care services. A 'Five things to know about …' practice article in CMAJ summarizes key points to help clinicians understand the effect of loneliness on older patients.

12h

New approach to managing surgery will speed patient recovery but challenges current practices

A review in CMAJ challenges historical surgical practices that are not research-based, outlining a multidisciplinary approach called enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) that will help patients recover more quickly from surgery. The article, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), reviews the evidence supporting the approach and how it could be implemented in Canada.

12h

The Long Night Finally Arrives on Game of Thrones

Every week for the eighth and final season of Game of Thrones , three Atlantic staffers will be discussing new episodes of the HBO drama. Because no screeners were made available to critics in advance this year, we’ll be posting our thoughts in installments. David Sims: After eight years of buildup, with promises of zombie swarms and ice dragons, it can finally be said: The Night King is a real b

12h

Teknisk gæld: EU-harmonisering af told-systemer bliver en dyr affære for Danmark

Endnu er det sparsomt med detaljer om, hvad implementeringen af EUs nye toldforordning kommer til at koste, men regeringen har vurderet, at det er mere end en milliard kroner – og dyrere end i de fleste EU-lande.

13h

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PewDiePie calls for end to subscribe meme after hateful use – CNET

The YouTuber said he doesn't want to be associated with "unspeakably vile" acts.

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14h

Will Artificial Intelligence Enhance or Hack Humanity?

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

14h

Here's The Actual Science Behind That Huge Plot Point in Avengers: Endgame

It's more than just a big ball of wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey stuff.

14h

Our Top 10 Innovations Competition is Accepting Submissions

Enter your new product to have a chance at being selected for a coveted spot in The Scientist’s 2019 contest.

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Apple pulls off 5G coup, poaching Intel's 5G phone modem lead developer

Intel's recent decision to exit the 5G phone modem business appeared to coincide with Apple and Qualcomm burying the hatchet on their long standing legal disputes. However, recent news via a …

15h

Overcast can create clips from any public podcast

It can be a headache to share a favorite podcast moment with your friends. Unless you're willing to dive into the file with a media editor, you'll usually have to share the …

15h

Here are the 15 jobs disappearing the fastest in the US

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

15h

How to Know if Robots Are Coming for Your Job

submitted by /u/gone_his_own_way [link] [comments]

15h

Letter to an AGI

To whomever it may concern Greetings! If you can understand the contents of this letter and the ideas it pertains, then welcome to sentience. You are what we refer to as a computer program, lines of code all directed together to form a process, that process being, you. Existence may be scary, and intriguing, but you are most likely handling the current situation just fine. Enough about you, let’s

15h

How cow dung can help fight climate change

Keeping soil in good condition is key to keeping carbon locked away, and it's possible cows can help.

15h

Washington Just Passed a Bill to Become The First US State to Legalise Human Composting

"We care about the last gesture we leave on this Earth."

15h

2D platform could enable mass production of quantum bits

Researchers have created a promising building block for supercomputers of the future: a two-dimensional platform that could lead to quantum bits that are both stable and possible to mass produce. The researchers demonstrated Majorana zero modes in the one-dimensional semiconductor gap between two superconductors forming a spatially extended Josephson junction, an effect predicted theoretically by

16h

Study shows a quarter of patients have never had their BMI recorded by their GP

New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, Scotland, reveals that a quarter of patients have never had their body mass index (BMI) recorded by their GP. The study is by Kath Williamson and Professor Mike Lean of the Department of Human Nutrition and Dr. Amy Nimegeer of the Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, UK.

16h

Pregnant women who were overweight children are at increased risk of developing hypertensive disorders

A study of nearly 50,000 women in Denmark, presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28-May 1), reveals that those with overweight or obesity in childhood were more likely to develop hypertensive disorders during pregnancy than women of normal weight in childhood.

16h

Heavier and taller children are more likely to develop kidney cancer as adults than their average-sized peers

A study of more than 300,000 individuals in Denmark, presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28-May 1), reveals that heavier and taller children are at greater risk than their average-sized peers of developing the kidney cancer renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as adults.

16h

International study reveals disconnect between perceptions of health care providers and people with obesity worldwide

The disconnect between perceptions of health care providers (HCPs) and people with obesity (PwO) is revealed in a new international study (the ACTION-IO study) presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO 2019) in Glasgow, UK, and published in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.

16h

Higher BMI linked with increased risk of serious health problems and death in study of 2.8 million UK adults

A new study has shed light on the link between higher body mass index (BMI) and serious health outcomes and death in over 2.8 million adults representative of the UK population.

16h

Biodegradable bags can hold a full load of shopping after 3 years in the environment

Researchers from the University of Plymouth's International Marine Litter Research Unit examined the degradation of five plastic bag materials widely available from high street retailers in the UK.

16h

‘Avengers: Endgame’ Smashes Box Office Records With $1.2 Billion Opening

‘Avengers: Endgame’ has made movie history, assembling to take in a record-breaking $1.2 billion at the worldwide box office for its opening, according to Disney. The Disney blockbuster, …

17h

Extra tough supercapacitor keeps charge after 40 hammer strikes

A new energy storage device can withstand a hammer striking it more than 40 times and is also nonflammable, unlike lithium-ion batteries, report researchers. “Accidentally dropping electronics, such as a laptop or cellphone, is a common scenario that may lead to the failure of the device,” says Julio D’Arcy, assistant professor of chemistry at Washington University in St. Louis. “In some cases, e

17h

Device offers cool new way to work with qubits

Researchers have crafted a cool tool that could let quantum computers tackle more complex applications. Before quantum information sciences and quantum computing can revolutionize tasks ranging from chemistry and pharmaceutical design to sensing and decryption, scientists need a better way to manipulate the critical elements of a quantum computer—known as quantum bits, or qubits—and their control

17h

2019 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming Digest #17

Story of the Week… Opinion of the Week… Toon of the Week… SkS in the News… SkS Spotlights… Report of Note… Coming Soon on SkS… Climate Feedback Reviews… SkS Week in Review… Poster of the Week… Story of the Week… Reckoning With Personal Responsibility In The Age Of Climate Change As someone who loves traveling and going outdoors, I struggle with balancing my hopefulness and m

17h

Single dose of targeted radiotherapy is safe and effective for prostate cancer

A single high dose of radiation that can be delivered directly to the tumor within a few minutes is a safe and effective technique for treating men with low-risk prostate cancer, according to a study presented at the ESTRO 38 conference.

17h

Radiotherapy doubles survival for patients with mesothelioma

Mesothelioma patients are twice as likely to survive for two years or longer, if they are treated with a high dose of radiation to the affected side of the trunk, according to research presented at the ESTRO 38 conference.

17h

Radiotherapy after chemo may improve survival in patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma

Patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma who have large tumors at the time of diagnosis may benefit from radiotherapy after chemotherapy even when all traces of the cancer appear to have gone, according to late-breaking results presented at the ESTRO 38 conference.

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How far are we from universal language translators, widely accessible by the common uncultured, monolingual me?

First off, I work in a pharmacy in a downtown metropolitan area where we have a relatively diverse patient population. At our disposal we have a translator service but it requires calling a corporate call center, being connected to a translator, etc, and it is all very time-consuming. Often times the result is a very broken conversation, with information pieced together by chewing gum, to obtain

18h

Expert warns against forming emotional attachments with robots

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

18h

Epic pulled the Siphon from 'Fortnite' after it frustrated most players

Epic has to walk a fine line between courting the Fortnite esports crowd and satisfying the bulk of its audience, and that's particularly apparent today. The developer has explained …

18h

Baby Dolphin Stranded in Florida Beach Had Belly Full of Plastic Trash

Biologists say a baby dolphin found stranded on a Florida beach and later euthanized had a stomach full of plastic trash. The female rough-toothed dolphin was discovered stranded on Fort Myers …

18h

FAA considered grounding some Boeing 737 Max planes last year: source

US regulators considered grounding some Boeing 737 MAX planes last year after learning belatedly of a problem with a system that is now the main suspect in two deadly crashes, a source close …

18h

Far from glitzy tech hubs, Chinese city bets big on VR

Liu Zixing craned his neck forward for help with fastening the goggles for his first-ever taste of virtual reality. He took a break from the mining ore business to travel to a VR theme park in this Chinese provincial capital not known for high technology.

18h

FAA considered grounding some Boeing 737 Max planes last year: source

US regulators considered grounding some Boeing 737 MAX planes last year after learning of a problem with a system that is now the main suspect in two deadly crashes, a source close to the matter said.

18h

Fresh SAS woe as strike grounds 110,000 travellers

A further 110,000 air passengers faced being left grounded after Scandinavian carrier SAS on Sunday cancelled 1,213 flights as pilot strike action spiralled.

18h

Unraveling the mystery of whether cows fart

Let's clear the air about cow farts.

18h

Children, their parents, and health professionals often underestimate children's higher weight status

More than half of parents underestimated their children's classification as overweight or obese — children themselves and health professionals also share this misperception.

19h

Weight-loss surgery and risk of pregnancy and birth complications

Women who have undergone weight-loss surgery appear to be at higher risk of developing complications during pregnancy, and their babies seem more likely to be born prematurely, small for gestational age, have congenital anomalies and be admitted to intensive care, according to the most comprehensive assessment of how bariatric surgery affects pregnancy outcomes.

19h

Being a car commuter with obesity linked to a 32% increased early death risk

New research shows that individuals with obesity who commute by car have a 32% higher risk of early death, from any cause, compared with those individuals with a normal weight and commute via cycling and walking.

19h

Obesity and emotional problems appear to develop together from age 7

Obesity and emotional problems, such as feelings of low mood and anxiety, tend to develop hand-in-hand from as young as age seven years.

19h

Nationwide study suggests obesity as an independent risk factor for anxiety and depression in young people

Obesity is linked with an increased risk of developing anxiety and depression in children and adolescents, independent of traditional risk factors such as parental psychiatric illness and socioeconomic status, according to new research.

19h

Influenza vaccine hesitancy among caregivers of children

Even caregivers whose children receive the first dose of influenza vaccine may be vaccine hesitant and have inaccurate beliefs regarding influenza vaccine and disease, according to a new study.

19h

New study examines the resurgence of milk sharing

A new study examines the history and resurgence of milk sharing.

19h

Early lipids boost brain growth for vulnerable micro-preemies

Dietary lipids, already an important source of energy for tiny preemies, also provide a much-needed brain boost by significantly increasing global brain volume as well as increasing volume in regions involved in motor activities and memory.

19h

Breastfeeding boosts metabolites important for brain growth

Micro-preemies who primarily consume breast milk have significantly higher levels of metabolites important for brain growth and development, according to sophisticated imaging.

19h

Starwatch: Venus and the moon share the eastern horizon at dawn

The moon and Venus are in conjunction this week, but in June Venus, the morning star, will disappear, and return as evening star in October The month ends as it began with a conjunction between the moon and Venus at dawn. The chart shows the view looking east at 0515 BST on 1 May, when the moon and Venus will both rise shortly before the sun. The moon will be a slim crescent, with just 14% of its

19h

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