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nyheder2019april30

Middle Pleistocene human skull reveals variation and continuity in early Asian humans

A team of scientists led by LIU Wu and WU Xiujie from the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first ever Middle Pleistocene human skull found in southeastern China, revealing the variation and continuity in early Asian humans.

6h

7h

'Bionedbrydelige' poser er stadig intakte efter tre år i naturen

Nyt britisk studie viser, at poser, der markedsføres som biologisk nedbrydelige, kun nedbrydes meget langsomt. Efter tre år i vand og jord kunne de stadig bruges.

10h

Making glass more clear

Northwestern University researchers have developed an algorithm that makes it possible to design glassy materials with dynamic properties and predict their continually changing behaviors.

4min

New Duckbill Dinosaur Looks Sharp

Fossils found in the Gobi Desert reveal an unusual herbivore. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5min

Ep. 38: Mosquito Music, Wildlife Poaching, and Imaging a Black Hole

Join journalist and author Seth Mnookin as he chats with astrophysicist Andrew Chael about the team that got the first image of a black hole. Also: addressing wildlife poaching in Uganda, and a study (and the resulting news coverage) on the effects of music on mosquitos.

7min

In revamp, Facebook bets on small-scale connections, and romance

Got a crush on another Facebook user? The social network will help you connect, as part of a revamp unveiled Tuesday that aims to foster real-world relationships and make the platform a more intimate place for small groups of friends.

10min

Genetic testing has a data problem. New software can help.

In recent years, the market for direct-to-consumer genetic testing has exploded. The number of people who used at-home DNA tests more than doubled in 2017, most of them in the U.S. About 1 in 25 American adults now know where their ancestors came from, thanks to companies like AncestryDNA and 23andMe.

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The Greatest Love of All Might Just Come From A… Robot?

submitted by /u/_w1kke_ [link] [comments]

13min

Warren Buffett: ‘Cyber poses real risks to humanity’

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

13min

13min

Genetic testing has a data problem. New software can help.

In recent years, the market for direct-to-consumer genetic testing has exploded. The number of people who used at-home DNA tests more than doubled in 2017, most of them in the U.S. About 1 in 25 American adults now know where their ancestors came from, thanks to companies like AncestryDNA and 23andMe.

16min

Warmer water linked to higher proportion of male flounder

In the wild and in the lab, researchers find a relationship between higher water temperature and a lower percentage of female flounder, a cause for concern.

20min

Climate change may bring acidic oceans full of jellyfish

Since the beginning of the industrial era, humanity has been pumping out unprecedented levels of CO2 into the atmosphere. A significant portion of this CO2 is sucked back into the ocean, where it reacts with water to produce carbonic acid. Most species fair poorly in the newly acidic ocean. Jellyfish, however, seem to resist ocean acidification more than others. None Human beings don't do well wh

21min

Destructive plant pest thwarted by two native fungi

Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge.

22min

Warmer water linked to higher proportion of male flounder

If southern flounder live in warmer water during a critical window of early development, a higher percentage become male—more than 90 percent in some cases—research from North Carolina State University found. Having a high proportion of adult males over the long term could threaten both wild populations and the valuable commercial fishing industry, which depends on larger female flounder.

22min

Biologists warn of peril from biological invasions as White House proposes to halve funding

As the Trump Administration prepares to cut in half the budget for the National Invasive Species Council, a group of invasive species experts led by a University of Rhode Island professor has issued a warning about the growing peril of biological invasions and the increasing threat they pose to the economy, environment, public health and national security.

22min

Space station power shortage delays SpaceX supply run

A major power shortage at the International Space Station has delayed this week's SpaceX supply run.

23min

Television programming for children reveals systematic gender inequality

Programming children watch on American TV shows systematic gender inequality, according to new research co-authored by Dafna Lemish of the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University-New Brunswick.

23min

Destructive plant pest thwarted by two native fungi

Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge.

23min

Scientists investigate the relationship between bumphead parrotfish and their coral reef habitat on a molecular level

The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. That white sand slithering between your toes? It consists mostly of their excrement.

23min

Warmer water linked to higher proportion of male flounder

If southern flounder live in warmer water during a critical window of early development, a higher percentage become male—more than 90 percent in some cases—research from North Carolina State University found. Having a high proportion of adult males over the long term could threaten both wild populations and the valuable commercial fishing industry, which depends on larger female flounder.

23min

New forecasting system alerts residents of New Delhi about unhealthy air

Residents of New Delhi and nearby heavily polluted areas of northern India now have access to air quality forecasts that provide critical information for reducing their exposure to potentially unhealthy air.

23min

Biologists warn of peril from biological invasions as White House proposes to halve funding

As the Trump Administration prepares to cut in half the budget for the National Invasive Species Council, a group of invasive species experts led by a University of Rhode Island professor has issued a warning about the growing peril of biological invasions and the increasing threat they pose to the economy, environment, public health and national security.

23min

New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture

In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. The study will form the basis of future research on the bird's wishbone, which is supported by these particular muscles and is hypothesized to bend during flight.

23min

New 3D microscope visualizes fast biological processes better than ever

Researchers have combined their expertise to develop a new type of microscope. The revolutionary new light-field microscopy system makes it possible to study fast biological processes, creating up to 200 3D images per second. Initial tests have already delivered new insights into the movement of blood cells in a heart.

23min

Cryptographic breakthrough helps spies to shake hands

When spies meet, they use secret handshakes to confirm their identities, ensuring they are who they say they are. Now, researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology, and colleagues, have solved a 15-year-old problem that allows handshake-style encryption to be used for time-delayed digital communications such as email — a challenge once thought to be impossible.

25min

Genetic testing has a data problem; New software can help

As at-home genetic testing becomes more popular, companies are grappling with how to store all the accumulating data and how to process results quickly. A new tool called TeraPCA can help.

25min

NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Fani stronger, more organized

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Fani appeared more organized than the previous day.

29min

Climate change may bring acidic oceans full of jellyfish

Since the beginning of the industrial era, humanity has been pumping out unprecedented levels of CO2 into the atmosphere. A significant portion of this CO2 is sucked back into the ocean, where it reacts with water to produce carbonic acid. Most species fair poorly in the newly acidic ocean. Jellyfish, however, seem to resist ocean acidification more than others. None Human beings don't do well wh

32min

Marine scientists investigate the relationship between bumphead parrotfish and their coral reef habitat on a molecular level

The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. That white sand slithering between your toes? It consists mostly of their excrement.

34min

New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture

In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. The study will form the basis of future research on the bird's wishbone, which is supported by these particular muscles and is hypothesized to bend during flight.

34min

Disease-causing nibbling amoeba hides by displaying proteins from host cells

A parasitic amoeba that causes severe gut disease in humans protects itself from attack by biting off pieces of host cells and putting their proteins on its own surface, according to microbiologists.

34min

Evolving alongside viruses impacts susceptibility to future infections

Researchers have shown that when fruit flies co-evolve with viruses, different genetic changes occur to those caused by encountering a virus for the first time, altering the insects' susceptibility to future infection.

34min

Anti-stress brain chemical is related to PTSD resilience after trauma

Fewer receptors for the anti-stress brain chemical nociceptin is associated with less severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in college women who have experienced sexual violence, according to a new study.

34min

Team develops system to legally test GPS spoofing vulnerabilities in automated vehicles

Southwest Research Institute has developed a cyber security system to test for vulnerabilities in automated vehicles and other technologies that use GPS receivers for positioning, navigation and timing.

34min

Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect

Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge.

39min

Television programming for children reveals systematic gender inequality

Programming children watch on American TV shows systematic gender inequality, according to new research.

39min

Consumers prefer pork cooked to 145 degrees Fahrenheit, study says

Are pork chops on the menu this grilling season? According to new research from University of Illinois meat scientists, pork enthusiasts can improve taste, juiciness, and tenderness by cooking chops to the new USDA standard: 145 degrees Fahrenheit (63 C).

41min

Field study finds pellet-fed stoves cut pollutant emissions 90 percent, nearing gas-stove performance

A study by North Carolina State University researchers finds that a new cookstove design, which makes use of compressed wood pellets, reduces air pollution by about 90% for a range of contaminants associated with health problems and climate change. The findings stem from a Rwanda field study designed to test the performance of the stoves in real-world conditions.

41min

Disease-causing nibbling amoeba hides by displaying proteins from host cells

A parasitic amoeba that causes severe gut disease in humans protects itself from attack by biting off pieces of host cells and putting their proteins on its own surface, according to a study by microbiologists at the University of California, Davis.

46min

F.D.A. Approves IQOS, a New Tobacco Device

The agency said the “heat-not-burn” tobacco device was an alternative to traditional cigarettes.

47min

Disease-causing nibbling amoeba hides by displaying proteins from host cells

A parasitic amoeba that causes severe gut disease in humans protects itself from attack by biting off pieces of host cells and putting their proteins on its own surface, according to a study by microbiologists at the University of California, Davis.

47min

Innovative treatment restores sight in patient

Innovative treatment has improved the vision of a patient suffering from a rare cancer-related syndrome affecting the eye, new research reports.

49min

Insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis

Researchers have made new progress in understanding how cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), the proteins that detect the active components of marijuana, are controlled in the brain.

49min

New 3D microscope visualizes fast biological processes better than ever

Researchers have combined their expertise to develop a new type of microscope. The revolutionary new light-field microscopy system makes it possible to study fast biological processes, creating up to 200 3D images per second. Initial tests have already delivered new insights into the movement of blood cells in a heart.

49min

Peer-to-peer 'free trade' in excess energy

People who generate their own power through solar panels and wind turbines may soon be able to decide where to distribute their excess energy, rather than back to the national grid.

49min

Test allows doctors to determine most effective treatment for women with breast cancer

A breast cancer test has been found that helps doctors make treatment decisions for some breast cancer patients.

49min

Glial cells may play key epilepsy role

Neuroscientists present a new, detailed accounting of how a mutation in a fly model of epilepsy undermines the ability of glial cells to regulate the balance of ions that neurons need to avoid producing seizures.

49min

Only some people get one health benefit from social support

Scientists have long known that the support of friends and family plays a key role in protecting people's physical health. But a new study suggests that the benefits don't go to people who may really need it — those with low self-esteem.

49min

Biden Is With the Unions. Are They Still With Him?

“I make no apologies,” Joe Biden told the crowd in Pittsburgh, finally making his declarative pitch after a long and meandering windup. “I am a union man, period.” The sound bite was both a thank-you and a promise. Addressing a live audience for the first time since declaring his third run for the White House, the former vice president had rented a local Teamsters hall and surrounded himself with

50min

Tropical forests could soon lose their 'enchanted mist'

Nexus Media News Global warming will deprive tropical mountain forests in Central and South America and the Caribbean of their iconic clouds. Climate change could cause the disappearance of the 'enchanted' cloud cover over tropical forests in the Western Hemisphere in the next 25 years.

52min

Oculus Quest brings your real-world motion into VR. Here's what that's like.

Technology The next-gen headset is totally self-contained. We played with the new Oculus Quest VR headset. It's pretty cool.

52min

Biologists warn of peril from biological invasions as White House cuts funding

As the Trump Administration prepares to cut in half the budget for the National Invasive Species Council, a group of invasive species experts has issued a warning about the growing peril of biological invasions and the increasing threat they pose to the economy, environment, public health and national security.

1h

Who is a Paleontologist, Really?

Academic gatekeeping obscures the contributions of communities vital to the study of ancient life. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Facebook skifter fokus: Vil værne om privatliv

Der skal være et større fokus på privatlivet fremadrettet, mener Facebook.

1h

Isle Royale winter study: 13 new wolves, 20 radio-collared moose

Michigan Technological University's 2019 Isle Royale Winter Study focuses on the implications of newly introduced wolves and the movements of newly collared moose.

1h

Photos: The Royal Life of Emperor Akihito

After a nearly 30-year reign, Japan’s Emperor Akihito stepped down today in an abdication ceremony in Tokyo. The 85-year-old monarch is passing the throne to his son, Crown Prince Naruhito, after acknowledging that his age and poor health were making it difficult for him to fulfill his duties. Akihito was Japan’s 125th emperor, part of a line of succession that some have traced back more than 2,5

1h

A Daughter Reflects On Her Parents' Addiction In 'All That You Leave Behind'

Writer and documentary filmmaker Erin Lee Carr, daughter of the late NY Times columnist David Carr, talks about her parents' drug addiction and what it was like to have her father as a writing mentor.

1h

Trump Orders New Restrictions On Asylum System

The changes would charge asylum-seekers application fees and limit access to work permits, among other things.

1h

Understaffed Alabama Prisons Struggle With Violence, Suicide And Crowding

The state's jails have been cited by a recent Justice Department report for corruption, drugs, sexual abuse, lack of mental health support and crumbling facilities.

1h

Trump Sues Deutsche Bank And Capital One Over Congressional Subpoenas

Subpoenas issued by House committees two weeks ago ask the banks to hand over documents related to Trump's finances.

1h

Abortion Could Become Felony Offense In Alabama

If passed, a bill making its way through the state's House of Representatives could punish doctors who perform the procedure with at least 10 years in prison.

1h

Venezuela Unrest: Opposition Leader Guaidó Calls For Military Uprising

Juan Guaidó says he's launched the "final phase" of a plan to oust President Nicolás Maduro. The government says it's putting down a "small coup attempt."

1h

Political Crisis In Venezuela Escalates

Opposition leader Juan Guaidó says he is in the final phase of a plan to oust Nicolás Maduro. Maduro's officials say they are successfully putting down a coup attempt.

1h

U.S. Measles Outbreaks Are Driven By A Global Surge In The Virus

The World Health Organization tallied over 112,000 measles cases in the first quarter of 2019 — up more than 300% compared with the same period in 2018. (Image credit: Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

Grading Sen. Elizabeth Warren's Student Loan Relief Plan

Presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s student loan relief plan could help 95 percent of people burdened by student debt. So why are some critics on the right and the left calling it unfair?

1h

Isle Royale winter study: 13 new wolves, 20 radio-collared moose

Michigan Technological University's 2019 Isle Royale Winter Study focuses on the implications of newly introduced wolves and the movements of newly collared moose.

1h

Evolving alongside viruses impacts susceptibility to future infections

Researchers have shown that when fruit flies co-evolve with viruses, different genetic changes occur to those caused by encountering a virus for the first time, altering the insects' susceptibility to future infection.

1h

Evolving alongside viruses impacts susceptibility to future infections

Researchers have shown that when fruit flies co-evolve with viruses, different genetic changes occur to those caused by encountering a virus for the first time, altering the insects' susceptibility to future infection.

1h

Field study finds pellet-fed stoves cut air pollutant emissions 90%

A field study finds that a new cookstove design, which makes use of compressed wood pellets, reduces air pollution by about 90% for a range of contaminants associated with health problems and climate change. The findings stem from a Rwanda field study designed to test the performance of the stoves in real-world conditions.

1h

Researchers define Alzheimer's-like brain disorder

A brain disorder that mimics symptoms of Alzheimer's disease has been defined with recommended diagnostic criteria and guidelines for advancing future research on the condition.

1h

Bizarre Black Hole “Drags” Spacetime, Blasts Wobbling Plasma Jets

Erratic Behavior Black holes are already one of the most peculiar phenomena in the universe, but V404 Cygni takes strangeness to the next level. Instead of spewing jets of plasma from its poles, like most black holes, astronomers caught this black hole almost 8,000 light-years from Earth shooting jets in rapidly changing directions — all while its gravitational pull dragged the fabric of spacetim

1h

From Futurism Studios, I Am Human Explores the Future of Biotechnology

Will breakthroughs in neurotech change what it means to be human? Futurism’s latest documentary follows three people with implantable brain interfaces and will premiere on May 2nd at the Tribeca Film Festival. The post From Futurism Studios, I Am Human Explores the Future of Biotechnology appeared first on Futurism .

1h

Reef engineers

The next time you find yourself luxuriating in some exotic, Instagrammable vacation spot, thank a parrotfish. That white sand slithering between your toes? It consists mostly of their excrement.

1h

NC study: Warmer water linked to higher proportion of male flounder

In the wild and in the lab, researchers find a relationship between higher water temperature and a lower percentage of female flounder, a cause for concern.

1h

Novel software to balance data processing load in supercomputers to be presented

The team will present its research in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, at the 33rd International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium on May 22, 2019.

1h

Chronic disruptions to circadian rhythms promote tumor growth, reduce efficacy of therapy

In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at Penn Medicine show circadian disruptions trigger an increase in cell proliferation that, ultimately, shifts the cell-cycle balance and stimulates the growth of tumors in mice.The findings also suggest that 'chronotherapy' — the delivery of treatment timed to the host's circadian rhythm — can improve disease outcomes of drugs

1h

Designer drugs to inhibit hepatitis A virus

Structure-based drug design revealed that a compound previously investigated for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer could function as a lead compound for the development of drugs to treat hepatitis A virus infection, according to a study publishing April 30, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Dan Su of Sichuan University, Zihe Rao of Tsinghua University, Xiangxi Wang of the Chinese

1h

Circadian rhythm disruption tips the cell-cycle balance toward tumor growth

Disrupting normal circadian rhythms promotes tumor growth and suppresses the effects of a tumor-fighting drug, according to a new study publishing April 30, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yool Lee, Amita Sehgal, and colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania.

1h

First human germline gene editing was deeply flawed science, Chinese experts argue

The first reported instance of germline gene editing in humans was bad science as well as bad ethics, according to a commentary publishing April 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Haoyi Wang of the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Hui Yang of the Institutes of Neuroscience, CAS, both well-known experts in gene editing.

1h

What can be done to prevent another CRISPR crisis?

The public announcement last fall from China regarding gene editing on human embryos, conducted without the benefit of scientific review or ethical debate, has raised global concerns that more rigorous standards must be established to guide research in germline gene therapy, according to a new article publishing on April 30 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by medical ethicist Arthur L. Capl

1h

Dry sand can bubble and swirl like a fluid

Put two types of sand grains together in a chamber, and they can flow like fluids under the right conditions.

1h

High-efficiency thermoelectric materials: New insights into tin selenide

Tin selenide might considerably exceed the efficiency of current record holding thermoelectric materials made of bismuth telluride. However, it was thought its efficiency increased dramatically only at temperatures above 500 degrees Celsius. Now measurements at the BESSY II and PETRA IV synchrotron sources show that tin selenide can also be utilised as a thermoelectric material at room temperature

1h

Scientists develop new model to describe how bacteria spread in different forms

A new model describing how bacteria spread when moving in two different ways has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

1h

Scientists develop new model to describe how bacteria spread in different forms

A new model describing how bacteria spread when moving in two different ways has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

1h

Mountain Man Singer Reinvents Herself As Daughter Of Swords, Announces Album

One of the three gorgeous voices at the heart of Mountain Man, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig releases her first solo album, Dawnbreaker , on June 28. Hear the title track. (Image credit: Kendall Bailey Atwater/Courtesy of the artist)

1h

New Mix: Japanese Breakfast, Kate Tempest, Future Teens, More

This week we've got a love song from Kate Tempest, music made in a hotel from Japanese Breakfast, a near-perfect pop-punk heartbreaker by Mannequin Pussy and more. (Image credit: Courtesy of the artists)

1h

Monthly Music Report: The 10 Best New Albums We Heard In April

Lizzo gives us a powerful gospel of self-love, PUP serves up odes to nihilism, Glen Hansard opens up his acoustic palette, plus seven more albums you need to hear. (Image credit: Courtesy of the artists)

1h

Monthly Music Report: The 20 Best New Songs We Heard In April

Lil Nas X upended country's traditional gatekeepers, FKA Twigs experienced a phoenix-esque rebirth, Carly Rae Jepsen shimmied into the corners of what-could've-been, plus 17 must-hear songs. (Image credit: Courtesy of the artists)

1h

Nolan Gasser's New Book Explores Musical Taste And Where It Comes From

NPR's Audie Cornish talks with Nolan Gasser, chief musicologist and architect of Pandora Radio's Music Genome Project about his book Why You Like It: The Science and Culture of Musical Taste.

1h

Woodstock 50 Canceled By Its Investors

The Dentsu Aegis Network, which had been funding the ambitious, three-day 50th-anniversary music festival with headliners including Jay-Z and Santana, says that the August event will not happen. (Image credit: Brian Ach/Getty Images for Something in the Water)

1h

Vote: Who Has The Best Desk In The 2019 Tiny Desk Contest?

Every entry video for the Tiny Desk Contest must feature a desk. For our next just-for-fun fan vote, we want you to tell us your favorite desk. (Image credit: YouTube)

1h

Toro Y Moi: Tiny Desk Concert

Toro y Moi loses the voice processing, synths and other heavy effects for a stripped-down acoustic set at the Tiny Desk. (Image credit: Claire Harbage/NPR)

1h

More Than 'Kind Of Blue': In 1959, A Few Albums Changed Jazz Forever

Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Dave Brubeck, Ornette Coleman and Charles Mingus all cut timeless classics, each pointing the form in a different direction. (Image credit: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

From Betty Boop To Popeye, Franz Von Suppé Survives In Cartoons

You may not recognize the Austrian composer by name, but if you like cartoons, you've heard the music of Franz von Suppé. (Image credit: Wikimedia)

1h

After 25 Years, Snow Patrol Gets More Honest Than Ever

Award-winning Northern Irish band Snow Patrol is currently touring the United States. The group stopped by NPR to perform a few songs and chat about its latest album. (Image credit: Simon Lipman/Courtesy of the artist)

1h

Listen To The Latest Edition Of KCRW's 'Metropolis'

Jason Bentley captures the hypnotic pulse of modern city life in a weekly dance show on Saturday nights. (Image credit: KCRW)

1h

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

On this month's Heavy Rotation , hear the latest songs from Ari Lennox, Anderson .Paak, Ben Kweller, Y La Bamba and more. (Image credit: Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Coachella)

1h

The Story Of 'The Fabulous Stains' And Riot Grrrl

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains, made in the early 1980s, inspired many of the early members of the underground feminist punk movement.

1h

New three-dimensional imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture

A new three-dimensional model of the skeletal muscles responsible for bird flight provides the most comprehensive and detailed picture of anatomy to date.

1h

New three-dimensional imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture

A new three-dimensional model of the skeletal muscles responsible for bird flight provides the most comprehensive and detailed picture of anatomy to date.

1h

Climate, grasses and teeth: The evolution of South America mammals

Atmospheric circulation changes about 6 million years ago dried the South American climate and fueled the expansion of grasslands and grass-eating mammals, according to new research.

1h

Prominently posted rules boost participation, cut harassment online

Clear behavioral rules posted prominently on online discussions can markedly increase participation while cutting harassment, new research has found.

1h

As oceans warm, microbes could pump more carbon dioxide back into air, study warns

A new study suggests that carbon dioxide regeneration may become faster in many regions of the world as the oceans warm with changing climate. This, in turn, may reduce the deep oceans' ability to keep carbon locked up. The study shows that in many cases, bacteria are consuming more plankton at shallower depths than previously believed, and that the conditions under which they do this will spread

1h

Excessive rainfall as damaging to corn yield as extreme heat, drought

Recent flooding in the Midwest has brought attention to the complex agricultural problems associated with too much rain. Data from the past three decades suggest that excessive rainfall can affect crop yield as much as excessive heat and drought. In a new study, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Illinois linked crop insurance, climate, soil and corn yield data from 1981 through 2016

1h

Cosmology Has Some Big Problems

The field relies on a conceptual framework that has trouble accounting for new observations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

Is Measles Here To Stay?

Vaccination eliminated measles from the U.S. nearly 20 years ago. But with this year's record-setting outbreaks, are we close to measles to making a sustained comeback? (Image credit: solidcolours/Getty Images)

1h

Trump And Democrats Agree On $2 Trillion For Infrastructure, But Not On How To Pay

Democratic congressional leaders called the White House meeting "very constructive," but the big question remains unanswered. The parties will reconvene in a few weeks to discuss funding options. (Image credit: Evan Vucci/AP)

1h

Tony Awards Nominations 2019: 'Hadestown' And 'Ain't Too Proud' Lead The Count

Tootsie , Beetlejuice and The Prom round up the Tony category for best musical, while The Ferryman , Gary , Ink , Choir Boy and What the Constitution Means to Me are all up for best play. (Image credit: Matthew Murphy/Courtesy of Hadestown, The Musical)

1h

U.S. Measles Outbreaks Are Driven By A Global Surge In The Virus

The World Health Organization tallied over 112,000 measles cases in the first quarter of 2019 — up more than 300% compared with the same period in 2018. (Image credit: Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

Trump Sues 2 Banks To Block Democrats From Investigating His Finances

The lawsuit seeks to prevent Deutsche Bank and Capital One from responding to subpoenas from two House panels seeking personal financial documents related to the president, his family and his company. (Image credit: Michael Probst/AP)

1h

Juan Guaidó Says 'The Moment Is Now!' To Remove Maduro, Sparking Clashes In Venezuela

Saying "we are making history," Venezuela's opposition leader makes his boldest attempt yet to oust President Nicolás Maduro. On Tuesday, Juan Guaidó declared "Operation Freedom" has begun. (Image credit: Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

Alleged California Synagogue Shooter 'Part Of The History Of Evil,' His Parents Say

The parents of the man accused in the attack on the Poway synagogue in San Diego have condemned the attack as shocking and evil. A family attorney says they will not pay for his legal defense. (Image credit: Sandy Huffaker/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

Emperor Akihito, Japan's 'Surprising Pacifist,' Steps Down After 30 Years

Japan's defeat in World War II "produced in him strong feelings against war and its chaos," says a childhood friend. Akihito has expressed deep remorse at home and abroad for Japan's wartime actions. (Image credit: Kazuhiro Ngoi/AFP/Getty Images)

1h

Donkeys Are Dying Because China Wants Their Hides For A Traditional Remedy

China reportedly needs 4 million donkey hides a year for the traditional medicine ejiao . They're importing hides from poor countries — and dealing a blow to people whose livelihood depends on donkeys. (Image credit: Ofir Sarfaty/EyeEm/Getty Images)

1h

Japanese Emperor Akihito Abdicates Throne; New Crown Prince To Ascend

The 85-year-old emperor is the first to retire in more than 200 years. His son, the Crown Prince Naruhito, will become emperor on Wednesday. (Image credit: AP)

1h

Is Buying A House Overrated?

The Nobel laureate who co-created the way our nation measures home prices says that over the long run, they don't increase much. And when they do, it can mean a bubble. Are we in one now? (Image credit: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

1h

Teen Suicide Spiked After Debut Of Netflix's '13 Reasons Why,' Study Says

Boys ages 10-17 killed themselves at a much higher rate in the month after Netflix's show about suicide was released in 2017. Researchers attribute an extra 195 deaths that year to the series. (Image credit: Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP)

1h

Abortion In The Third Trimester: A Rare Decision Often Made In Tragic Circumstances

Concerned about the makeup of the Supreme Court, abortion-rights advocates are pushing for state legislation to protect abortion rights throughout pregnancy, in some cases into the third trimester. (Image credit: Sarah McCammon/NPR)

1h

'My Kids Are In Survival Mode': A Chat With 2019's Teacher Of The Year

Rodney Robinson, a teacher at a juvenile detention center in Richmond, Va., and the 2019 National Teacher of the Year, talks about needing diverse teachers and a culturally relevant curriculum. (Image credit: Steve Helber/AP)

1h

Even In The Robot Age, Manufacturers Need The Human Touch

At modern auto plants, some tasks, like welding together a car's body, are entirely automated. But other essential jobs, including major portions of final assembly, are still best left to people. (Image credit: Camila Domonoske/NPR)

1h

Advanced detection tool to limit the spread of devastating tree pathogens

Seeking to prevent the introduction and spread of quarantine tree pathogens, the EU Horizon 2020-funded project HOMED (HOlistic Management of Emerging forest pests and Diseases) supports the development of an innovative tool for on-site detection of pathogens. The tool was developed by a team of scientists from the Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council (IPSP-CNR) an

1h

Rapid permafrost thaw unrecognized threat to landscape, global warming researcher warns

A "sleeping giant" hidden in permafrost soils in Canada and other northern regions worldwide will have important consequences for global warming, says a new report led by University of Guelph scientist Merritt Turetsky.

1h

Advanced detection tool to limit the spread of devastating tree pathogens

Seeking to prevent the introduction and spread of quarantine tree pathogens, the EU Horizon 2020-funded project HOMED (HOlistic Management of Emerging forest pests and Diseases) supports the development of an innovative tool for on-site detection of pathogens. The tool was developed by a team of scientists from the Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, National Research Council (IPSP-CNR) an

1h

Scientists probe the ethical and scientific dangers of gene-edited babies

Two papers from the US and China unite in the condemnation of poor science and even poorer behaviour. Stephen Fleischfresser reports.

1h

New study identifies drug that can reverse hyperactivity induced by parasitic infection

When rodents get infected by Toxoplasma gondii, the single-celled brain parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, they become hyperactive risk-takers. In findings published this week in mBio, researchers show for the first time that it's possible to reverse that behavioral change.

1h

Cosmology Has Some Big Problems

The field relies on a conceptual framework that has trouble accounting for new observations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1h

'Game Of Thrones' Season 8, Episode 3: 'At Least We're Already In A Crypt'

The Battle of Winterfell is finally here, and it's the most brutal episode of the series yet — one that comes with a body count and a surprise, truly shattering conclusion. (Image credit: Helen Sloan/HBO)

1h

The Record-Breaking Box Office Of 'Avengers: Endgame,' By The (Huge) Numbers

Nobody is surprised that Avengers: Endgame is a hit, but even by superhero standards, it's had an enormous debut weekend, both in the U.S. and internationally. (Image credit: Film Frame/Marvel Studios)

1h

Mourning Has Broken Them: 'Avengers: Endgame'

The culmination of the Avengers franchise proves a remarkably intimate and somber affair until it concludes with a climactic battle more thrilling than anything superhero cinema has delivered to date. (Image credit: Marvel Studios)

1h

'Game Of Thrones' Season 8, Episode 2: 'Think Back To Where We Started'

On the eve of the biggest battle yet, the series pauses for an episode that delivers old-school Game of Thrones thrills: characters talking in rooms — including a milestone Jaime/Brienne moment. (Image credit: HBO)

1h

In 'Someone Great,' The Greatest Someone Might Be Your Best Pal

Gina Rodriguez stars in Someone Great , a Netflix comedy that follows three friends trying to have one last adventure before everything changes for good. (Image credit: Sarah Shatz/Netflix)

1h

'Game Of Thrones' Season 8, Episode 1: 'Nothing Lasts'

The first episode of the final season was dense with reunions, recriminations and revelations as just about the entire cast made it to Winterfell. (Image credit: HBO)

1h

'The Perfect Date': A Teen Romcom By Any Other Name Is Reasonably Sweet

Noah Centineo stars as a kid with a plan to make a lot of money by going on a lot of fake dates — but yes, before he can get rich, he meets a girl he really likes. (Image credit: Netflix)

1h

'Little': A Wrong-Body Comedy That Can't Get Comfortable

There's a lot to like about Little , including the central performance of Marsai Martin. But the jokes are a little too slow to pull the formulaic story along. (Image credit: Eli Joshua Adé/Universal Pictures )

1h

Which Characters Will Lose The 'Game Of Thrones?': A Chronicle Of Many Deaths Foretold

Just 6 episodes — an estimated 7 hours and 20 minutes — remain. Here are our predictions for which characters will (and especially won't) make it through to the end of the final season — and why. (Image credit: HBO)

1h

'Fosse/Verdon' Wiggles And Kicks, But Fails To Satisfy

The FX series is deeply interested in Bob Fosse as an awful genius, but much less invested in Gwen Verdon as an overlooked collaborator. (Image credit: Eric Liebowitz/FX)

1h

The Top 27 Songs Of 'Crazy Ex-Girlfriend,' Ranked, Ruthlessly And Dispassionately

The CW's romantic-comedy-drama-fantasy-musical just aired its series finale, after four seasons and 157 original songs. Critic Glen Weldon ranks the all-time best tunes the series served up. (Image credit: Scott Everett White /The CW)

1h

Brie Larson's Directorial Debut Glitters With The Charming 'Unicorn Store'

Brie Larson stars opposite Samuel L. Jackson, her Captain Marvel compatriot, in the oddball magical-realism comedy Unicorn Store on Netflix. (Image credit: Logan White /Netflix )

1h

With 'Shazam!' DC Superhero Movies Bring The Thunder … And The Lightening Up

The breezy, funny elements of DC's latest superhero film feel so fresh they throw the movie's duller, more rote sections into sharper relief. (Image credit: Warner Bros. Pictures )

1h

Fears Are Forever In Jordan Peele's 'Twilight Zone'

A new incarnation of The Twilight Zone , narrated and executive produced by Jordan Peele, sees community somewhat differently from the original, but retains its sense of moral peril. (Image credit: Robert Falconer/CBS)

1h

How to preorder Oculus Quest and Rift S right now – CNET

You can now preorder the Oculus Quest and Rift S VR headsets, both starting at $399 and shipping by May 21.

1h

Instagram to start hiding the number of likes on posts

'We want your followers to focus on the photos and videos you share, not how many likes they get'

1h

Valve Index Is a Powerful VR Headset, Even Without ‘Half-Life’

Whatever your thoughts are on virtual reality (for me the best it’s really good for is quick cardboard gimmicks) you can’t deny that Valve has been all in trying to push the tech […] The …

1h

Facebook launches redesign to focus on groups as it tries to make private social network

Facebook is to be redesigned to focus on groups and other features, it has announced.

1h

UK advisers set to recommend 2050 carbon neutral deadline

The UK's top advisory body on climate change is set to recommend the government reduce carbon emissions to net zero by 2050, in a move that would help Britain reclaim its global leadership on the environment.

1h

American students pledge future salary to avoid debt

American college students are turning to a new strategy to avoid the debt trap that has captured millions, pledging a share of their future earnings to pay for their education rather than borrowing.

2h

Cable firm Altice USA scoops up streaming news site Cheddar

Cable-broadband operator Altice USA said Tuesday it was acquiring the youth-focused streaming news group Cheddar for $200 million.

2h

Zuckerberg to explain how Facebook gets 'privacy focused'

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will kick off the company's annual F8 developer conference Tuesday with what are expected to be more details about his new "privacy-focused" vision for the social network—part of his strategy for batting away Facebook's growing array of critics, emboldened regulators and competitors.

2h

Robotics Startup Anki Is Shutting Down

The fate of the company's various consumer robotics products is unclear. The post Robotics Startup Anki Is Shutting Down appeared first on ExtremeTech .

2h

Instagram Is the New Mall

Ever since Instagram first allowed brands to make shoppable posts , consumers have been asking for the same from influencers—where, after all, most Instagram user are getting their product recommendations. Now, they’ll finally be able to buy everything their favorite creators recommend directly through their feed. Instagram will take a cut of every sale made through its platform, likely generatin

2h

Why John Singleton Wanted the ‘Z’ in Boyz n the Hood

John Singleton, who died Monday at 51, made his mark on Hollywood very early on, when his debut movie, Boyz n the Hood , became a massive hit in the summer of 1991. Singleton, who was 23 at the time, would become the youngest filmmaker ever to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Director and the first African American to compete in the category. Singleton also wrote the Oscar-nominated scr

2h

Breastfeeding mums are finally getting spaces to pump at some US institutions

Breastfeeding mums are finally getting spaces to pump at some US institutions Breastfeeding mums are finally getting spaces to pump at some US institutions, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01335-y Some universities offer dedicated lactation space, but there’s still plenty of room for improvements.

2h

Scaling Product Through Design: Numina’s Path Through the URBAN-X Accelerator Program

French author and aviator, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, once said, “A goal without a plan is just a wish.” For many startups, design is the “plan” required to achieve a goal, develop practical solutions, and bring new products to life. In today’s startup world, very seldom do companies succeed at first endeavor. Version 1.0 becomes 2.0, which becomes 2.5. Progress is planning, designing, often itera

2h

All the new features Facbeook announced at the 2019 F8 conference

Technology Zuck is talking about privacy and Facebook's overall future. Facebook's developer's conference typically unveils some interesting information. Here's what you need to know.

2h

Enigmatic Beluga whale off Norway so tame people can pet it

A beluga whale found in Arctic Norway wearing a harness that suggests links to a military facility in Russia is so tame that residents can pet the mammal on its nose.

2h

Facebook Wants to Connect You With Your 'Secret Crush'

The new dating feature will let you express romantic interest in up to nine friends at once.

2h

Oculus Quest Review: VR Has Never Felt This Free

The new stand-alone virtual-reality headset lets you roam without wires. This is the VR you've been waiting for.

2h

Trump’s science adviser on research ethics, immigration and presidential tweets

Trump’s science adviser on research ethics, immigration and presidential tweets Trump’s science adviser on research ethics, immigration and presidential tweets, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01396-z Five months into the job, Kelvin Droegemeier tells Nature what it’s like to work with the US president.

2h

Enigmatic Beluga whale off Norway so tame people can pet it

A beluga whale found in Arctic Norway wearing a harness that suggests links to a military facility in Russia is so tame that residents can pet the mammal on its nose.

2h

SwRI develops system to legally test GPS spoofing vulnerabilities in automated vehicles

Southwest Research Institute has developed a cyber security system to test for vulnerabilities in automated vehicles and other technologies that use GPS receivers for positioning, navigation and timing.

2h

YouTube will exclusively stream 13 MLB games this season

YouTube will live stream 13 Major League Baseball games in the second half of this season, the company announced today. The schedule of which games those will be hasn't yet been …

2h

Bird Announces Monthly Scooter Subscription Service

Personal Scooting The electric scooter company Bird just unveiled a new subscription service: instead of hunting for an available unit and paying to activate it, customers can pay a monthly fee to get access to their own scooter for a full month. The new subscription service, currently available only in San Francisco and Barcelona, may have originated as a workaround to San Francisco’s August rul

2h

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]

Suicide-bombing aphids defend colonies against predators Soldier nymphs of N. monzeni repairing a gall breach by discharging body fluid. The tendency of social insects, such as ants, termites, and aphids, to engage in self-sacrificing acts of altruism for the benefit of colonies has long been considered one of nature’s oddities….

2h

Time domain versus energy domain neutron scattering analysis of protein dynamics [Physical Sciences]

In PNAS, Kneller (1) suggests a quantum-theoretical justification of the “Frauenfelder energy landscape model” of protein dynamics applied to quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) (2, 3). The diffusion-broadened QENS spectrum, centered at ω = 0, is explained (Fig. 1 and ref. 2) by a distribution of narrow inelastic lines centered at…

2h

Reply to Doster: Franck-Condon and Van Hove formulation of quasielastic neutron scattering from complex systems [Physical Sciences]

Doster (1) criticizes a number of points in ref. 2, where a Franck–Condon-type spectroscopic formulation of incoherent neutron scattering is presented. My responses are given below. First, the Franck–Condon formulation of incoherent neutron scattering does not contradict standard scattering theory, and it is even based on it. It merely starts…

2h

Phototransduction gain at the G-protein, transducin, and effector protein, phosphodiesterase-6, stages in retinal rods [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS, Yue et al. (1) deal with the question of amplification early in the phototransduction cascade. Although their approach is elegant, we cannot agree with some major points in their analysis and conclusions. The authors suggest that their estimate of “12–14 transducin–PDE effector complexes” per photoisomerization is different from…

2h

Reply to Heck et al.: Signal amplification at the rhodopsin-to-transducin{middle dot}phosphodiesterase step in rod phototransduction [Biological Sciences]

In PNAS (1), we estimate ∼12–14 active transducin·phosphodiesterase complexes (GT*·PDE*s) produced per active rhodopsin (Rho*) in mouse rods. This is the effective gain—more informative by not including the empty gain from GT*s failing to activate PDE. Nearly all previous estimates were on the total number of GT* produced per Rho*…

2h

Profile of Zhisheng An [Profiles]

Zhisheng An of the Institute of Earth Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) is a leader in the multidisciplinary field of Earth system science. His integration of Quaternary geology and global change methodologies beginning in the 1980s marked a paradigm shift and continues to facilitate climate change research….

2h

Hyena politics: The dynamics of dynasties [Ecology]

In most species, individual attributes such as size, strength, and condition influence individuals’ ability to monopolize resources [resource-holding power (RHP)] and establish high-ranking positions in dominance hierarchies (1). But there are some taxa in which dominance rank becomes decoupled from individual differences in RHP. For example, in the eusocial wasp…

2h

New age for progressive multiple sclerosis [Medical Sciences]

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disease with high prevalence between 20 to 50 y of age and a predominant 3:1 female:male ratio. Heterogeneous in its pathological and clinical manifestations (1), MS has been classified into relapsing–remitting and progressive forms. Primary progressive MS (PPMS) is defined as…

2h

A diecast mineralization process forms the tough mantis shrimp dactyl club [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Biomineralization, the process by which mineralized tissues grow and harden via biogenic mineral deposition, is a relatively lengthy process in many mineral-producing organisms, resulting in challenges to study the growth and biomineralization of complex hard mineralized tissues. Arthropods are ideal model organisms to study biomineralization because they regularly molt their…

2h

Structural dynamics and transient lipid binding of synaptobrevin-2 tune SNARE assembly and membrane fusion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) and their conformational transitions play an important role in neurotransmitter release at the neuronal synapse. Here, the SNARE proteins are essential by forming the SNARE complex that drives vesicular membrane fusion. While it is widely accepted that the SNARE proteins are intrinsically disordered in their monomeric…

2h

Modular, stereocontrolled C{beta}-H/C{alpha}-C activation of alkyl carboxylic acids [Chemistry]

The union of two powerful transformations, directed C–H activation and decarboxylative cross-coupling, for the enantioselective synthesis of vicinally functionalized alkyl, carbocyclic, and heterocyclic compounds is described. Starting from simple carboxylic acid building blocks, this modular sequence exploits the residual directing group to access more than 50 scaffolds that would be…

2h

Neoproterozoic to early Phanerozoic rise in island arc redox state due to deep ocean oxygenation and increased marine sulfate levels [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

A rise in atmospheric O2 levels between 800 and 400 Ma is thought to have oxygenated the deep oceans, ushered in modern biogeochemical cycles, and led to the diversification of animals. Over the same time interval, marine sulfate concentrations are also thought to have increased to near-modern levels. We present…

2h

Disconnection description of triple-junction motion [Engineering]

Grain boundary (GB) migration in polycrystalline materials necessarily implies the concurrent motion of triple junctions (TJs), the lines along which three GBs meet. Today, we understand that GB migration occurs through the motion of disconnections in the GB plane (line defects with both step and dislocation character). We present evidence…

2h

Macromolecular relaxation, strain, and extensibility determine elastocapillary thinning and extensional viscosity of polymer solutions [Engineering]

Delayed capillary break-up of viscoelastic filaments presents scientific and technical challenges relevant for drop formation, dispensing, and adhesion in industrial and biological applications. The flow kinematics are primarily dictated by the viscoelastic stresses contributed by the polymers that are stretched and oriented in a strong extensional flow field resulting from…

2h

Counterexamples in scale calculus [Mathematics]

We construct counterexamples to classical calculus facts such as the inverse and implicit function theorems in scale calculus—a generalization of multivariable calculus to infinite-dimensional vector spaces, in which the reparameterization maps relevant to symplectic geometry are smooth. Scale calculus is a corner stone of polyfold theory, which was introduced by…

2h

How a well-adapting immune system remembers [Physics]

An adaptive agent predicting the future state of an environment must weigh trust in new observations against prior experiences. In this light, we propose a view of the adaptive immune system as a dynamic Bayesian machinery that updates its memory repertoire by balancing evidence from new pathogen encounters against past…

2h

Early tropical crop production in marginal subtropical and temperate Polynesia [Anthropology]

Polynesians introduced the tropical crop taro (Colocasia esculenta) to temperate New Zealand after 1280 CE, but evidence for its cultivation is limited. This contrasts with the abundant evidence for big game hunting, raising longstanding questions of the initial economic and ecological importance of crop production. Here we compare fossil data…

2h

Machine learning-assisted directed protein evolution with combinatorial libraries [Applied Biological Sciences]

To reduce experimental effort associated with directed protein evolution and to explore the sequence space encoded by mutating multiple positions simultaneously, we incorporate machine learning into the directed evolution workflow. Combinatorial sequence space can be quite expensive to sample experimentally, but machine-learning models trained on tested variants provide a fast…

2h

Interaction between p53 N terminus and core domain regulates specific and nonspecific DNA binding [Biochemistry]

The p53 tumor suppressor is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein that activates gene transcription to regulate cell survival and proliferation. Dynamic control of p53 degradation and DNA binding in response to stress signals are critical for tumor suppression. The p53 N terminus (NT) contains two transactivation domains (TAD1 and TAD2),…

2h

Structural insight into TRPV5 channel function and modulation [Biochemistry]

TRPV5 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 5) is a unique calcium-selective TRP channel essential for calcium homeostasis. Unlike other TRPV channels, TRPV5 and its close homolog, TRPV6, do not exhibit thermosensitivity or ligand-dependent activation but are constitutively open at physiological membrane potentials and modulated by calmodulin (CaM) in a calcium-dependent manner….

2h

Cytosolic Fe-superoxide dismutase safeguards Trypanosoma cruzi from macrophage-derived superoxide radical [Biochemistry]

Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD), contains exclusively Fe-dependent superoxide dismutases (Fe-SODs). During T. cruzi invasion to macrophages, superoxide radical (O2•−) is produced at the phagosomal compartment toward the internalized parasite via NOX-2 (gp91-phox) activation. In this work, T. cruzi cytosolic Fe-SODB overexpressers (pRIBOTEX–Fe-SODB) exhibited higher re

2h

Coherent directed movement toward food modeled in Trichoplax, a ciliated animal lacking a nervous system [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Trichoplax adhaerens is a small, ciliated marine animal that glides on surfaces grazing upon algae, which it digests externally. It has no muscles or nervous system and only six cell types, all but two of which are embedded in its epithelium. The epithelial cells are joined by apical adherens junctions;…

2h

Distinct segregation patterns of yeast cell-peripheral proteins uncovered by a method for protein segregatome analysis [Cell Biology]

Protein segregation contributes to various cellular processes such as polarization, differentiation, and aging. However, the difficulty in global determination of protein segregation hampers our understanding of its mechanisms and physiological roles. Here, by developing a quantitative proteomics technique, we globally monitored segregation of preexisting and newly synthesized proteins during cell

2h

Environmental DNA for improved detection and environmental surveillance of schistosomiasis [Environmental Sciences]

Schistosomiasis is a water-based, infectious disease with high morbidity and significant economic burdens affecting >250 million people globally. Disease control has, with notable success, for decades focused on drug treatment of infected human populations, but a recent paradigm shift now entails moving from control to elimination. To achieve this ambitious…

2h

Testing the role of trait reversal in evolutionary diversification using song loss in wild crickets [Evolution]

The mechanisms underlying rapid macroevolution are controversial. One largely untested hypothesis that could inform this debate is that evolutionary reversals might release variation in vestigial traits, which then facilitates subsequent diversification. We evaluated this idea by testing key predictions about vestigial traits arising from sexual trait reversal in wild field…

2h

Exaggeration and cooption of innate immunity for social defense [Evolution]

Social insects often exhibit striking altruistic behaviors, of which the most spectacular ones may be self-destructive defensive behaviors called autothysis, “self-explosion,” or “suicidal bombing.” In the social aphid Nipponaphis monzeni, when enemies damage their plant-made nest called the gall, soldier nymphs erupt to discharge a large amount of body fluid,…

2h

Designer covalent heterobivalent inhibitors prevent IgE-dependent responses to peanut allergen [Immunology and Inflammation]

Allergies are a result of allergen proteins cross-linking allergen-specific IgE (sIgE) on the surface of mast cells and basophils. The diversity and complexity of allergen epitopes, and high-affinity of the sIgE–allergen interaction have impaired the development of allergen-specific inhibitors of allergic responses. This study presents a design of food allergen-specific…

2h

Hypoxia-inducible factors in CD4+ T cells promote metabolism, switch cytokine secretion, and T cell help in humoral immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]

T cell help in humoral immunity includes interactions of B cells with activated extrafollicular CD4+ and follicular T helper (Tfh) cells. Each can promote antibody responses but Tfh cells play critical roles during germinal center (GC) reactions. After restimulation of their antigen receptor (TCR) by B cells, helper T cells…

2h

DNA threads released by activated CD4+ T lymphocytes provide autocrine costimulation [Immunology and Inflammation]

The extrusion of DNA traps contributes to a key mechanism in which innate immune cells clear pathogens or induce sterile inflammation. Here we provide evidence that CD4+ T cells, a critical regulator of adaptive immunity, release extracellular threads of DNA on activation. These DNA extrusions convey autocrine costimulatory signals to…

2h

Select sequencing of clonally expanded CD8+ T cells reveals limits to clonal expansion [Immunology and Inflammation]

To permit the recognition of antigens, T cells generate a vast diversity of T cell receptor (TCR) sequences. Upon binding of the TCR to an antigen–MHC complex, T cells clonally expand to establish an immune response. To study antigen-specific T cell clonality, we have developed a method that allows selection…

2h

Cancer stemness, intratumoral heterogeneity, and immune response across cancers [Medical Sciences]

Regulatory programs that control the function of stem cells are active in cancer and confer properties that promote progression and therapy resistance. However, the impact of a stem cell-like tumor phenotype (“stemness”) on the immunological properties of cancer has not been systematically explored. Using gene-expression–based metrics, we evaluated the association…

2h

Cellular senescence in progenitor cells contributes to diminished remyelination potential in progressive multiple sclerosis [Medical Sciences]

Cellular senescence is a form of adaptive cellular physiology associated with aging. Cellular senescence causes a proinflammatory cellular phenotype that impairs tissue regeneration, has been linked to stress, and is implicated in several human neurodegenerative diseases. We had previously determined that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) derived from induced pluripotent stem…

2h

Mutations in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein can broadly rescue blocks at multiple steps in the virus replication cycle [Microbiology]

The p6 domain of HIV-1 Gag contains highly conserved peptide motifs that recruit host machinery to sites of virus assembly, thereby promoting particle release from the infected cell. We previously reported that mutations in the YPXnL motif of p6, which binds the host protein Alix, severely impair HIV-1 replication. Propagation…

2h

Functional connectomics of affective and psychotic pathology [Neuroscience]

Converging evidence indicates that groups of patients with nominally distinct psychiatric diagnoses are not separated by sharp or discontinuous neurobiological boundaries. In healthy populations, individual differences in behavior are reflected in variability across the collective set of functional brain connections (functional connectome). These data suggest that the spectra of transdiagnostic…

2h

Intrinsic planar polarity mechanisms influence the position-dependent regulation of synapse properties in inner hair cells [Neuroscience]

Encoding the wide range of audible sounds in the mammalian cochlea is collectively achieved by functionally diverse type I spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) at each tonotopic position. The firing of each SGN is thought to be driven by an individual active zone (AZ) of a given inner hair cell (IHC)….

2h

Delta-secretase-cleaved Tau antagonizes TrkB neurotrophic signalings, mediating Alzheimer’s disease pathologies [Neuroscience]

BDNF, an essential trophic factor implicated in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival, is reduced in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). BDNF deficiency’s association with Tau pathology in AD is well documented. However, the molecular mechanisms accounting for these events remain incompletely understood. Here we show that BDNF deprivation triggers Tau proteolytic cleavage…

2h

Hypoxia tolerance in the Norrin-deficient retina and the chronically hypoxic brain studied at single-cell resolution [Neuroscience]

The mammalian CNS is capable of tolerating chronic hypoxia, but cell type-specific responses to this stress have not been systematically characterized. In the Norrin KO (NdpKO) mouse, a model of familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR), developmental hypovascularization of the retina produces chronic hypoxia of inner nuclear-layer (INL) neurons and Muller glia….

2h

Protease-independent action of tissue plasminogen activator in brain plasticity and neurological recovery after ischemic stroke [Neuroscience]

Emerging evidence suggests that tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), currently the only FDA-approved medication for ischemic stroke, exerts important biological actions on the CNS besides its well-known thrombolytic effect. In this study, we investigated the role of tPA on primary neurons in culture and on brain recovery and plasticity after ischemic…

2h

Constitutive release of CPS1 in bile and its role as a protective cytokine during acute liver injury [Physiology]

Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase-1 (CPS1) is the major mitochondrial urea cycle enzyme in hepatocytes. It is released into mouse and human blood during acute liver injury, where is has a short half-life. The function of CPS1 in blood and the reason for its short half-life in serum are unknown. We show…

2h

Deep learning in turbulent convection networks [Applied Physical Sciences]

We explore heat transport properties of turbulent Rayleigh–Bénard convection in horizontally extended systems by using deep-learning algorithms that greatly reduce the number of degrees of freedom. Particular attention is paid to the slowly evolving turbulent superstructures—so called because they are larger in extent than the height of the convection layer—which…

2h

Scale-free resilience of real traffic jams [Applied Physical Sciences]

The concept of resilience can be realized in natural and engineering systems, representing the ability of a system to adapt and recover from various disturbances. Although resilience is a critical property needed for understanding and managing the risks and collapses of transportation systems, an accepted and useful definition of resilience…

2h

Shock growth of ice crystal near equilibrium melting pressure under dynamic compression [Applied Physical Sciences]

Crystal growth is governed by an interplay between macroscopic driving force and microscopic interface kinetics at the crystal–liquid interface. Unlike the local equilibrium growth condition, the interplay becomes blurred under local nonequilibrium, which raises many questions about the nature of diverse crystal growth and morphological transitions. Here, we systematically control…

2h

Intrinsically cell-penetrating multivalent and multitargeting ligands for myotonic dystrophy type 1 [Biochemistry]

Developing highly active, multivalent ligands as therapeutic agents is challenging because of delivery issues, limited cell permeability, and toxicity. Here, we report intrinsically cell-penetrating multivalent ligands that target the trinucleotide repeat DNA and RNA in myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1), interrupting the disease progression in two ways. The oligomeric ligands…

2h

Unified energetics analysis unravels SpCas9 cleavage activity for optimal gRNA design [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

While CRISPR/Cas9 is a powerful tool in genome engineering, the on-target activity and off-target effects of the system widely vary because of the differences in guide RNA (gRNA) sequences and genomic environments. Traditional approaches rely on separate models and parameters to treat on- and off-target cleavage activities. Here, we demonstrate…

2h

Commonly used FRET fluorophores promote collapse of an otherwise disordered protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

The dimensions that unfolded proteins, including intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), adopt in the absence of denaturant remain controversial. We developed an analysis procedure for small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) profiles and used it to demonstrate that even relatively hydrophobic IDPs remain nearly as expanded in water as they are in high…

2h

{alpha}-Sheet secondary structure in amyloid {beta}-peptide drives aggregation and toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by the deposition of β-sheet–rich, insoluble amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques; however, plaque burden is not correlated with cognitive impairment in AD patients; instead, it is correlated with the presence of toxic soluble oligomers. Here, we show, by a variety of different techniques, that these Aβ…

2h

Correlated interfacial water transport and proton conductivity in perfluorosulfonic acid membranes [Chemistry]

Water must be effectively transported and is also essential for maximizing proton conductivity within fuel-cell proton-exchange membranes (PEMs). Therefore, identifying relationships between PEM properties, water transport, and proton conductivity is essential for designing optimal PEMs. Here, we use coherent Raman spectroscopy to quantify real-time, in situ diffusivities of water subspecies,…

2h

Severe haze in northern China: A synergy of anthropogenic emissions and atmospheric processes [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Regional severe haze represents an enormous environmental problem in China, influencing air quality, human health, ecosystem, weather, and climate. These extremes are characterized by exceedingly high concentrations of fine particulate matter (smaller than 2.5 µm, or PM2.5) and occur with extensive temporal (on a daily, weekly, to monthly timescale) and…

2h

Climate models can correctly simulate the continuum of global-average temperature variability [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Climate records exhibit scaling behavior with large exponents, resulting in larger fluctuations at longer timescales. It is unclear whether climate models are capable of simulating these fluctuations, which draws into question their ability to simulate such variability in the coming decades and centuries. Using the latest simulations and data syntheses,…

2h

Anthropogenic strath terrace formation caused by reduced sediment retention [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Across North America, human activities have been shown to cause river incision into unconsolidated alluvium. Human-caused erosion through bedrock, however, has only been observed in local and isolated outcrops. Here, we test whether splash-dam logging, which decreased in-stream alluvial cover by removing much of the alluvium-trapping wood, caused basin-wide bedrock…

2h

K isotopes as a tracer for continental weathering and geological K cycling [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The causal effects among uplift, climate, and continental weathering cannot be fully addressed using presently available geochemical proxies. However, stable potassium (K) isotopes can potentially overcome the limitations of existing isotopic proxies. Here we report on a systematic investigation of K isotopes in dissolved load and sediments from major rivers…

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Social alliances improve rank and fitness in convention-based societies [Ecology]

Social hierarchies are widespread in human and animal societies, and an individual’s position in its hierarchy affects both its access to resources and its fitness. Hierarchies are traditionally thought of in terms of variation in individual ability to win fights, but many are structured around arbitrary conventions like nepotistic inheritance…

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Predators attacking virtual prey reveal the costs and benefits of leadership [Ecology]

A long-standing assumption in social behavior is that leadership incurs costs as well as benefits, and this tradeoff can result in diversified social roles in groups. The major cost of leadership in moving animal groups is assumed to be predation, with individuals leading from the front of groups being targeted…

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Rapid screening of engineered microbial therapies in a 3D multicellular model [Engineering]

Synthetic biology is transforming therapeutic paradigms by engineering living cells and microbes to intelligently sense and respond to diseases including inflammation, infections, metabolic disorders, and cancer. However, the ability to rapidly engineer new therapies far outpaces the throughput of animal-based testing regimes, creating a major bottleneck for clinical translation. In…

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Dating glacier ice of the last millennium by quantum technology [Environmental Sciences]

Radiometric dating with 39Ar covers a unique time span and offers key advances in interpreting environmental archives of the last millennium. Although this tracer has been acknowledged for decades, studies so far have been limited by the low abundance and radioactivity, thus requiring huge sample sizes. Atom trap trace analysis,…

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Evolution of social norms and correlated equilibria [Evolution]

Social norms regulate and coordinate most aspects of human social life, yet they emerge and change as a result of individual behaviors, beliefs, and expectations. A satisfactory account for the evolutionary dynamics of social norms, therefore, has to link individual beliefs and expectations to population-level dynamics, where individual norms change…

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Functional characterization of 3D protein structures informed by human genetic diversity [Genetics]

Sequence variation data of the human proteome can be used to analyze 3D protein structures to derive functional insights. We used genetic variant data from nearly 140,000 individuals to analyze 3D positional conservation in 4,715 proteins and 3,951 homology models using 860,292 missense and 465,886 synonymous variants. Sixty percent of…

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Inherited predisposition to malignant mesothelioma and overall survival following platinum chemotherapy [Medical Sciences]

Survival from malignant mesothelioma, particularly pleural mesothelioma, is very poor. For patients with breast, ovarian, or prostate cancers, overall survival is associated with increased sensitivity to platinum chemotherapy due to loss-of-function mutations in DNA repair genes. The goal of this project was to evaluate, in patients with malignant mesothelioma, the…

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Single-cell whole-genome sequencing reveals the functional landscape of somatic mutations in B lymphocytes across the human lifespan [Medical Sciences]

Accumulation of mutations in somatic cells has been implicated as a cause of aging since the 1950s. However, attempts to establish a causal relationship between somatic mutations and aging have been constrained by the lack of methods to directly identify mutational events in primary human tissues. Here we provide genome-wide…

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Causal inference accounts for heading perception in the presence of object motion [Neuroscience]

The brain infers our spatial orientation and properties of the world from ambiguous and noisy sensory cues. Judging self-motion (heading) in the presence of independently moving objects poses a challenging inference problem because the image motion of an object could be attributed to movement of the object, self-motion, or some…

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Compulsive drug use is associated with imbalance of orbitofrontal- and prelimbic-striatal circuits in punishment-resistant individuals [Neuroscience]

Substance use disorders (SUDs) impose severe negative impacts upon individuals, their families, and society. Clinical studies demonstrate that some chronic stimulant users are able to curtail their drug use when faced with adverse consequences while others continue to compulsively use drugs. The mechanisms underlying this dichotomy are poorly understood, which…

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Modulation of fear generalization by the zona incerta [Neuroscience]

Fear expressed toward threat-associated stimuli is an adaptive behavioral response. In contrast, the generalization of fear responses toward nonthreatening cues is a maladaptive and debilitating dimension of trauma- and anxiety-related disorders. Expressing fear to appropriate stimuli and suppressing fear generalization require integration of relevant sensory information and motor output. While…

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Reduced default mode network functional connectivity in patients with recurrent major depressive disorder [Neuroscience]

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common and disabling, but its neuropathophysiology remains unclear. Most studies of functional brain networks in MDD have had limited statistical power and data analysis approaches have varied widely. The REST-meta-MDD Project of resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) addresses these issues. Twenty-five research groups in China established the…

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Giant nonvolatile resistive switching in a Mott oxide and ferroelectric hybrid [Physics]

Controlling the electronic properties of oxides that feature a metal–insulator transition (MIT) is a key requirement for developing a new class of electronics often referred to as “Mottronics.” A simple, controllable method to switch the MIT properties in real time is needed for practical applications. Here we report a giant,…

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Strain-induced spontaneous Hall effect in an epitaxial thin film of a Luttinger semimetal [Physics]

Pyrochlore iridates have provided a plethora of novel phenomena owing to the combination of topology and correlation. Among them, much attention has been paid to Pr2Ir2O7, as it is known as a Luttinger semimetal characterized by quadratic band touching at the Brillouin zone center, suggesting that the topology of its…

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Phase-conjugate mirror for water waves driven by the Faraday instability [Physics]

The Faraday instability appears on liquid baths submitted to vertical oscillations above a critical value. The pattern of standing ripples at half the vibrating frequency that results from this parametric forcing is usually shaped by the boundary conditions imposed by the enclosing receptacle. Here, we show that the time modulation…

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Inner Workings: Genomics blazes a trail to improved cannabis cultivation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Marijuana legalization continues apace around the globe with governments the world over now recognizing some medical use for cannabis consumption. But that increasing acceptance belies a hidden truth: Researchers still don’t really understand the genetic roots of the plant’s biochemical bounty. Biologically, the distinction between the two forms of cannabis…

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Same-sex marriage legalization associated with reduced implicit and explicit antigay bias [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

The current research tested whether the passing of government legislation, signaling the prevailing attitudes of the local majority, was associated with changes in citizens’ attitudes. Specifically, with ∼1 million responses over a 12-y window, we tested whether state-by-state same-sex marriage legislation was associated with decreases in antigay implicit and explicit…

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Fine-scale damage estimates of particulate matter air pollution reveal opportunities for location-specific mitigation of emissions [Sustainability Science]

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution has been recognized as a major source of mortality in the United States for at least 25 years, yet much remains unknown about which sources are the most harmful, let alone how best to target policies to mitigate them. Such efforts can be improved…

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Climate change and educational attainment in the global tropics [Sustainability Science]

Climate change may negatively impact education among children via exposure to extreme temperature and precipitation conditions. We link census data from 29 countries across the global tropics to high-resolution gridded climate data to understand how climatic conditions experienced in utero and during early childhood affect educational attainment at ages 12…

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Correction for Drollette et al., Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities [Correction]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Elevated levels of diesel range organic compounds in groundwater near Marcellus gas operations are derived from surface activities,” by Brian D. Drollette, Kathrin Hoelzer, Nathaniel R. Warner, Thomas H. Darrah, Osman Karatum, Megan P. O’Connor, Robert K. Nelson, Loretta A. Fernandez, Christopher M. Reddy, Avner Vengosh,…

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Correction for Khoddami et al., Transcriptome-wide profiling of multiple RNA modifications simultaneously at single-base resolution [Correction]

BIOCHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY Correction for “Transcriptome-wide profiling of multiple RNA modifications simultaneously at single-base resolution,” by Vahid Khoddami, Archana Yerra, Timothy L. Mosbruger, Aaron M. Fleming, Cynthia J. Burrows, and Bradley R. Cairns, which was first published March 14, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1817334116 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 116:6784–6789). The authors note that…

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Correction for Tang and Dubayah, Light-driven growth in Amazon evergreen forests explained by seasonal variations of vertical canopy structure [Correction]

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Light-driven growth in Amazon evergreen forests explained by seasonal variations of vertical canopy structure,” by Hao Tang and Ralph Dubayah, which was first published February 21, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1616943114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:2640–2644). The authors wish to note the following: “It has come to our…

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When Your Amazon Purchase Explodes

Nicholas Jones didn’t think twice about purchasing a lithium-ion battery from Amazon in 2016. Like most Americans , he was used to ordering whatever he needed on the site and having it show up at his front door days later. So when his laptop’s battery stopped working, Jones, then a graduate student, went online, found a replacement HP battery for about $15, and bought it. A few nights later, he w

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Burger King Will Sell Meatless Whoppers Across US This Year

Where’s the Beef? On April 1, Burger King announced plans to begin selling meatless Whoppers at restaurants in St. Louis, Mo., a decision that seemed like it could’ve been an April Fool’s Day prank — Whoppers without the flame-grilled beef patties carnivores had come to know and love? Blasphemy. But it was very real, and apparently a rousing success. The company now plans to test Whoppers contain

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Gender impacts brain activity in alcoholics, study finds

A new study finds that compared to alcoholic women, alcoholic men have more diminished brain activity in areas responsible for emotional processing, as well as memory and social processing among other functions.

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The plan to turn Saudi Arabia into a renewable energy leader

submitted by /u/V2O5 [link] [comments]

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Field study finds pellet-fed stoves cut air pollutant emissions 90%

A field study finds that a new cookstove design, which makes use of compressed wood pellets, reduces air pollution by about 90% for a range of contaminants associated with health problems and climate change. The findings stem from a Rwanda field study designed to test the performance of the stoves in real-world conditions.

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Analysis of old people's civic participation

A team of the University of Barcelona has analysed the research carried out over the last 55 years on old people's civic participation. The available evidence shows civic participation has a positive impact on the quality of life and physical and mental health. More than half of the analyzed studies have been conducted in the United States.

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Unexpected Source Fuels Rapid Melt at World's Biggest Ice Shelf

A hole in nearby sea ice allows sunlight to warm the ocean water in contact with the ice — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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With a Simple Twist, a ‘Magic’ Material Is Now the Big Thing in Physics

Pablo Jarillo-Herrero is channeling some of his copious energy into a morning run, dodging startled pedestrians as he zips along, gradually disappearing into the distance. He’d doubtlessly be moving even faster if he weren’t dressed in a sports coat, slacks and dress shoes, and confined to one of the many weirdly long corridors that crisscross the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technolo

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Milky Way star with strange chemistry is from dwarf galaxy

Astronomers have discovered a star in the Milky Way Galaxy with a chemical composition unlike any other star in our Galaxy. This chemical composition has been seen in a small number of stars in dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way. This suggests that the star was part of a dwarf galaxy that merged into the Milky Way.

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Hay Fever & Seasonal Allergies: Symptoms, Causes & Treatment

As pollen swirls through the air, how do your sinuses feel?

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Amazing AI Generates Entire Bodies of People Who Don’t Exist

Embodied AI A new deep learning algorithm can generate high-resolution, photorealistic images of people — faces, hair, outfits, and all — from scratch. The AI-generated models are the most realistic we’ve encountered, and the tech will soon be licensed out to clothing companies and advertising agencies interested in whipping up photogenic models without paying for lights or a catering budget. At

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The Climate-Friendly Vegetable You Ought to Eat

Kelp is delicious and versatile, and farming it is actively good for the ocean. Melissa Clark wants you to just try a bite.

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A Taste of Seaweed

If you’re not ready to cook with kelp but are interested in trying a bite or two, here are some prepared seaweed products worth seeking out.

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US science academy leaders approve plan to expel sexual harassers

US science academy leaders approve plan to expel sexual harassers US science academy leaders approve plan to expel sexual harassers , Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01397-y The National Academy of Sciences has come under pressure to address misconduct in recent years.

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Consumers prefer pork cooked to 145 degrees, study says

Are pork chops on the menu this grilling season? According to new research from University of Illinois meat scientists, pork enthusiasts can improve taste, juiciness, and tenderness by cooking chops to the new USDA standard: 145 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Evolving alongside viruses impacts susceptibility to future infections

Researchers have shown that when fruit flies co-evolve with viruses, different genetic changes occur to those caused by encountering a virus for the first time, altering the insects' susceptibility to future infection.

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New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture

In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences in the University of Missouri's School of Medicine have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. The study will form the basis of future research on the bird's wishbone, which is supported by these particular muscles and is hypothesized to bend during flight.

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Disease-causing nibbling amoeba hides by displaying proteins from host cells

A parasitic amoeba that causes severe gut disease in humans protects itself from attack by biting off pieces of host cells and putting their proteins on its own surface, according to a study by microbiologists at UC Davis.

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NASA's Aqua Satellite finds Tropical Cyclone Fani stronger, more organized

Visible imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite showed Tropical Cyclone Fani appeared more organized than the previous day.

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For Open Source, It's All About GitHub Now

The Apache Software Foundation, steward of the world's most popular web server, has moved most of its open source projects to GitHub.

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What 'Rock Tides' Reveal About Movements of the Earth

(Inside Science) — Earth’s interior teems with movement and heat, a characteristic that manifests in memorable fashion as volcanoes and earthquakes. But even Earth’s more seemingly stable solid rocks move, too. Understanding just how rocks respond when they are pushed and pulled by natural forces, such as tectonic activity, or human-caused forces, like hydraulic fracturing, can make mining, const

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Skepticism grows over whether the first known exomoon exists

New analyses of the data used to find the first discovered exomoon are reaching conflicting results.

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Newly recognised form of dementia could now be easier to diagnose

Limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy (LATE) is distinct from Alzheimer’s disease and tends to affect people near the end of their lives

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Watch Out SpaceX: Chinese Startups Are Testing Reusable Rockets

Reusable Future Two Chinese launch startups have successfully tested and demonstrated rockets that set the groundwork for future reusable launch vehicle technology, SpaceNews reports . China decided to open up the launch of small satellites to private companies in 2014 and at least 15 SpaceX-like startups, according to Reuters , have emerged as a result. Orbit and Beyond Space Transportation, a C

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Strategy to make graphene luminescent

A research project is able to incorporate luminescence into this super material, paving a new way to continue expanding properties.

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Watchful waiting reasonable for patients with diabetic macular edema and good vision

People with good vision despite having center-involved diabetic macular edema can safely forego immediate treatment of their eye condition as long as they are closely monitored, and treatment begins promptly if vision worsens, according to clinical trial results.

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Put down the protein shake: Variety of protein better for health

Researchers have examined whether there are any ongoing ramifications or potential side-effects from long-term high protein intake or from consuming certain types of amino acids.

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Daily briefing: An asteroid is NOT about to hit Earth

Daily briefing: An asteroid is NOT about to hit Earth Daily briefing: An asteroid is NOT about to hit Earth, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01404-2 But if it were, we’d be ready. Plus an algorithm clears thousands of cannabis-related convictions and the sudden collapse of thawing permafrost.

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Form of dementia that ‘mimics’ Alzheimer's symptoms discovered

Disorder known as LATE affects different brain proteins and may need different treatment A new form of dementia that “mimics” the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and is thought to affect about one in five elderly people has been recognised in a major scientific report. The international review concluded that a substantial fraction of patients aged over 80 who were assumed to have Alzheimer’s are sufferin

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This Startup’s Making Tech to Convert Air Pollution Into Gasoline

Carbon-Neutral Gasoline A Silicon Valley entrepreneur thinks there’s still a place for gasoline in the future — we just need to source it from the air instead of the ground. Rob McGinnis is the founder and CEO of Prometheus, a startup developing a machine that pulls carbon out of the atmosphere and transforms it into usable gasoline. The idea is that the device would trap and convert more carbon

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This shrimplike creature makes aluminum armor to survive the deep sea’s crushing pressure

Aluminum hydroxide gel also protects its exoskeleton from disintegrating

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Scientists develop new model to describe how bacteria spread in different forms

A new model describing how bacteria spread when moving in two different forms has been published today in the open-access journal eLife.

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How the brain integrates sensory input

Hearing, sight, touch – our brain captures a wide range of distinct sensory stimuli and links them together. The brain has a kind of built-in filter function for this: sensory impressions are only integrated if it is necessary and useful for the task at hand.

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Researchers define Alzheimer's-like brain disorder

Researchers at Rush University Medical Center and scientists from several National Institutes of Health-funded institutions, in collaboration with international peers, described the newly-named pathway to dementia, Limbic-predominant Age-related TDP-43 Encephalopathy, or LATE, in a report published today in the journal Brain.

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Right combination of diet and bacteria limits cancer progression

Researchers from the University of Luxembourg have discovered a combination of dietary factors and gut bacteria that inhibits the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings, which were published in the prestigious, open-access journal Cell Reports, could help exploit dietary regimens for therapeutic purposes to improve chemotherapy efficacy and reduce toxicity.

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Bots exploiting blockchains for profit

Like high-frequency traders on Wall Street, a growing army of bots exploit inefficiencies in decentralized exchanges, which are places where users buy, sell or trade cryptocurrency independent of a central authority, a new study found. The researchers also found that high fees paid to prioritize certain transactions pose a security threat to the entire blockchain.

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Isle Royale winter study: 13 new wolves, 20 radio-collared moose

Michigan Technological University's 2019 Isle Royale Winter Study focuses on the implications of newly introduced wolves and the movements of newly collared moose.

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To boldly go or anxiously hang back?

UC San Francisco research has identified a particular group of nerve cells in the brain that play an important role in anxiety's influence over behavior. The researchers have found that turning off signaling from this small population of neurons in the front of the mouse brain can act as sort of a 'chill pill,' reducing the likelihood of anxious behavior driven by signals from another brain region

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Can the effects of the ketogenic diet help prevent epilepsy after traumatic brain injury?

Neuroscientists at Tufts prevented the development of epileptic activity in mice after traumatic brain injury by using a drug that mimics the metabolic effects of the ketogenic diet.

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Guidelines proposed for newly defined Alzheimer's-like brain disorder

A recently recognized brain disorder called limbic-predominant age-related TDP-43 encephalopathy, or LATE, mimics clinical features of Alzheimer's disease. LATE has for the first time been defined with recommended diagnostic criteria and other guidelines for advancing and catalyzing future research. NIH-funded scientists collaborating with international peers described the newly named pathway to d

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When is Alzheimer's not Alzheimer's? Researchers characterize a different form of dementia

Alzheimer's is dementia, but not all dementias are Alzheimer's (which may explain why so many Alzheimer's drugs have failed in clinical trials). A study published in Brain provides a framework for a newly characterized form of dementia called LATE.

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Nanomaterials mimicking natural enzymes with superior catalytic activity and selectivity

A research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. These nanomaterials can be applied for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

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Your genetic make-up has little impact on your dental health, new study finds

A new study estimates that one in three Australian children have tooth decay by the time they start school.

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A Newly Recognized Brain Disorder Can Mimic Alzheimer's. Here's How It's Different.

Researchers are officially defining a new brain disorder that mimics Alzheimer's disease.

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China plans mission to Earth’s pet asteroid

China plans mission to Earth’s pet asteroid China plans mission to Earth’s pet asteroid, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01390-5 Spacecraft will return samples to Earth and be open to researchers around the world.

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Responding to extremist attacks: For Muslim leaders, 'It's damned if you do, damned if you don't'

Muslim leaders face a perilous task when asked to publicly respond to violent attacks carried out by Muslim extremists.

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UK car output to collapse on no-deal Brexit: industry

Britain's car output under a no-deal Brexit could collapse to a level last seen in "the dark days of the 1980s", the nation's industry body forecast on Tuesday.

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In Search of a (Subjective) Fountain of Youth

Research finds fascinating connection between IQ and aging — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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A mysterious dementia that mimics Alzheimer’s gets named LATE

An underappreciated form of dementia that causes memory trouble in older people gets a name: LATE.

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Can stress in the womb lead to mental resilience later in life?

Maternal stress during or after pregnancy has been repeatedly associated with subsequent psychiatric problems and non-coding 'epigenetic' DNA changes during childhood. Published in Frontiers in Genetics, a study now shows that in high-violence communities where children experience abuse of their mother both during AND after pregnancy, psychiatric problems appear to be less frequent – and a differe

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Research decodes one way cancer survives treatment, proposes a way to prevent it

Cancer cells have various tricks up their metaphorical sleeves to survive in the face of chemotherapy, radiotherapy and other cancer treatments. Now researchers at Mayo have decoded one of those tricks using cell lines and patient-derived cancer cells, and proposed a way to resensitize breast cancer cells to treatment.

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Brain signaling proteins hit the road running

Surprisingly complex movements in an important neurotransmitter receptor may help explain the brain's unpredictable response to drugs, according to a new study. New research from an international team, published this week in the journal Neuron, has revealed that the resting state of signaling proteins are much more dynamic than previously thought.

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The Mystery of Babies’ First Words

One Friday in 1977, a 1-year-old named Nathaniel living in Leiden, in the Netherlands, said “mawh,” which his English-speaking parents enthusiastically greeted as his first word. It came with a pointing gesture, and all weekend, his parents responded by giving him what he pointed at, because mawh , they thought, clearly meant more . But when they got home from work on Monday, their Dutch-speaking

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Donor-Derived iPS Cells Show Promise for Treating Eye Disease

Age-related macular degeneration patients who received injections of retinal cells derived from donors’ induced pluripotent stem cells have maintained their level of eyesight for a year.

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The Wizard's Lights Go Out at Sea | Deadliest Catch

As Keith looks to finish his king crab season, a short circuit cuts power to the Wizard's forward lights. Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeadliestCatch https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Deadl

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In Search of a (Subjective) Fountain of Youth

Research finds fascinating connection between IQ and aging — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Amid genomic data explosion, scientists find proliferating errors

Washington State University researchers found a troubling number of errors in publicly available genomic data as they conducted a large-scale analysis of protein sequences.

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Amid genomic data explosion, scientists find proliferating errors

Washington State University researchers found a troubling number of errors in publicly available genomic data as they conducted a large-scale analysis of protein sequences.

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Breaking open the gates of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is a major health threat, with about two million people in the US getting an antibiotic-resistant infection per year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Gram negative bacteria, including types like E.coli and Salmonella, are often more difficult to kill because of their two-pronged defenses—they have two membranes rather than one, and also have

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Human ancestors were 'grounded:' New analysis shows

African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism.

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Antibiotics may treat endometriosis

Researchers have found that treating mice with an antibiotic reduces the size of lesions caused by endometriosis. The researchers are planning a clinical trial to test the strategy in women who have the painful condition.

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Why a smell test should become part of a regular doctor visit

A new study suggests that older adults with poor sense of smell may see an almost 50% increase in their risk of dying within 10 years — surprisingly in healthier individuals.

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Darwin can help your doctor

Taking an evolutionary view can inspire new ideas in clinical microbiology. And looking at microbial communities, rather than just the pathogenic micro-organisms, can also lead to new insights. That is why clinicians, bioinformaticians analyzing pathogens and evolutionary biologists should all work together. These are the conclusions of a diverse group of scientists.

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Nanomaterials mimicking natural enzymes with superior catalytic activity and selectivity

A research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. These nanomaterials can be applied for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

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Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder prevalence is very high in susceptible groups worldwide

A major new review of the world literature has found that fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is 10 to 40 times higher in certain susceptible groups than the general population. These groups include children in care, people in correctional services or special education services, Aboriginal populations, and people using specialized clinical services.

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This Streaming Service is Tailor-Made for Science and Technology Lovers

Over the last decade, the number of cord-cutters in the U.S. rose by a staggering 3500 percent, from just 900,000 in 2008 to an estimated 33 million in 2018 . And the good news for consumers is that, as the number of cord-cutters has gone up, so too has the number of streaming services to choose from proving a high volume of original shows, many of are excellent. But they’re mostly fiction and re

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Breaking open the gates of antibiotic resistance

Antibiotic resistance is a major health threat, with about two million people in the US getting an antibiotic-resistant infection per year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Gram negative bacteria, including types like E.coli and Salmonella, are often more difficult to kill because of their two-pronged defenses—they have two membranes rather than one, and also have

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NASA instrument to more accurately measure ozone discovered by 'accident'

NASA research scientist Tom Hanisco set out to build an instrument capable of measuring a short-lived chemical that cleanses the atmosphere of methane—a potent greenhouse gas—but found instead that his discovery outshined the best commercial instruments at measuring ambient levels of ozone.

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In 11 Years, Pluto’s Atmosphere Will Be Completely Frozen Solid

White Christmas It’s about to be winter on Pluto, the most distant planet — well, former planet — from the Sun. When winter comes in 2030 — remember that one Pluto year is about 248 Earth years — new research suggests that Pluto’s thin, Nitrogen-heavy atmosphere will completely collapse, condensing and freezing into a layer of solid frost, according to CNN . It’s an epic cosmic event, involving t

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Opinion journalism keeps the lights on. But at what cost?

Basic facts are up for debate, especially in the realm of science and politics. So which facts can you trust? Start by looking at trusted sources like Wikipedia , Snopes , and factcheck.org . "If people with money don't start supporting fact-checking systems then fact-checking systems will become increasingly rarer," says Dreger. Digital audiences are in the habit of sharing and reposting op-eds

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Facebook F8 2019 Liveblog: All the News as It Happens

When Facebook kicks off its annual developer conference with a keynote address on Tuesday morning, we'll be liveblogging it right here.

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Advanced detection tool to limit the spread of devastating tree pathogens

New easy-to-transport tool, suitable for non-scientists to promote the advanced detection and limits the spread of some of the most devastating tree pathogens in the European context. The technique was developed with the support of the EU-funded Horizon 2020 research and innovation action HOMED.

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Regenstrief, IU Health study helps chaplains provide proactive care to families in crises

A new model developed and implemented by the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University Health provides chaplains with a framework to deliver better care to families and other surrogate decision makers during health emergencies.The model was designed to help chaplains provide proactive, semi-structured spiritual care to meet family members' needs while being responsive to each person's spiritual

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Pregnancy shifts the daily schedule forward

New research from Washington University in St. Louis finds that women and mice both shift their daily schedules earlier by up to a few hours during the first third of their pregnancy. A new study by researchers in Arts & Sciences and at the School of Medicine shows how impending motherhood induces changes in daily timing of a mother which, when disrupted, may put a pregnancy at risk, as reported i

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Rapid permafrost thaw unrecognized threat to landscape, global warming researcher warns

University of Guelph Prof. Merritt Turetsky and an international team of researchers asssessed abrupt thaw studies across the permafrost zone to estimate the overall effect. They found carbon emissions have the potential to double the climate feedback associated with permafrost thawing because abrupt thaw releases more methane. It will also have drastic effects on landscape, from altering traditio

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Excessive rainfall as damaging to corn yield as extreme heat, drought

Recent flooding in the Midwest has brought attention to the complex agricultural problems associated with too much rain. Data from the past three decades suggest that excessive rainfall can affect crop yield as much as excessive heat and drought. In a new study, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Illinois linked crop insurance, climate, soil and corn yield data from 1981 through 2016

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Study: Health care providers split on who should prescribe HIV prevention drug

UB researchers interviewed a small sample of PrEP-prescribing providers in New York State to conduct a qualitative analysis of their perspectives on the preventive medication.

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Sleep and exercise affect new moms differently than new dads

In a study looking at the daily lives of new parents, researchers found that getting more physical activity and sleep was linked with more personal well-being. However, fathers who slept more on average than other fathers reported lower overall well-being and less closeness with their partner and child. Additionally, on days when mothers exercised more than usual, there was a higher chance of an a

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Responding to extremist attacks: For Muslim leaders, 'It's damned if you do, damned if you don't'

Muslim leaders face a perilous task when asked to publicly respond to violent attacks carried out by Muslim extremists.

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Crisis and suicide prevention services struggle with demand after celebrity suicides

The US may lack the resources needed to meet increases in demand for suicide prevention services that occur after celebrity suicides, according to a recent study of crisis mental health services. The study highlights the need for suicide prevention hotlines to procure additional funds, allocate existing funds more efficiently, and develop contingency plans to accommodate increases in call volumes,

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Opinion journalism keeps the lights on. But at what cost?

Basic facts are up for debate, especially in the realm of science and politics. So which facts can you trust? Start by looking at trusted sources like Wikipedia , Snopes , and factcheck.org . "If people with money don't start supporting fact-checking systems then fact-checking systems will become increasingly rarer," says Dreger. Digital audiences are in the habit of sharing and reposting op-eds

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London tubes, schools and homes 'face climate change chaos'

Heatwave of 2018 will become the capital’s new normal, claims Green party in report Hundreds of schools, hospitals and tube stations in London are at risk of flooding or overheating as the climate crisis accelerates and global temperatures continue to rise, according to a study. The report, commissioned by the Green party on the London Assembly, paints a bleak picture of life in the capital as gl

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Extreme flooding leads to deaths in Indonesia and Mozambique

Dozens of people have died in Indonesia and Mozambique as a result of storms and flooding, possibly driven by climate change

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LIGO may have just spotted a black hole devouring a neutron star

In a cosmic clash of the titans, we may have just spotted a black hole eat a neutron star – the first collision seen between a mixed pair of these massive objects

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Could Air-Conditioning Fix Climate Change?

Researchers propose a carbon-neutral “synthetic oil well” on every rooftop — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Could Air-Conditioning Fix Climate Change?

Researchers propose a carbon-neutral “synthetic oil well” on every rooftop — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Almost half of World Heritage sites could lose their glaciers by 2100

Glaciers are set to disappear completely from almost half of World Heritage sites if business-as-usual emissions continue.

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Twelve-year follow-up after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

A 12-year retrospective clinical study of patients who received peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for malignant neuroendocrine tumors demonstrates the long-term effectiveness of this treatment, which also allows patients to maintain a high quality of life.

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Tracking small things in cells

Living cells can react to disturbances with a changed metabolism, but direct observation of trafficking metabolites in live cells is difficult. An international team of scientists has now developed a class of remarkably small fluorophores called SCOTfluors. The dyes emit light in the visible to near-infrared range and can be attached to common metabolites.

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Keeping fit is more than physical: It's a state of mind

According to a new study differences in what motivates individuals and how they self-regulate behavior influence how they keep fit. The study associates personal characteristics with whether people are likely to prefer solo or group exercise activities, CrossFit® training, resistance training, or team sports, how frequently they work out, and if they are likely to stick to their routine.

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Michael Gove 'shares high ideals' of climate protesters

The environment secretary agrees with some of Extinction Rebellion's demands, but says there are "open questions" about the timescale for action.

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Low income is a risk factor for 'catastrophic' amputation after knee joint replacement

Above-knee amputation (AKA) is a rare but severe complication of deep infection after knee replacement surgery. Low-income patients are at increased risk of this catastrophic complication, reports a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

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Lines blurring between human herpes simplex viruses

The herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) that commonly infects the mouth, is continuing to mix with the genital herpes virus (HSV-2) to create new, different recombinant versions. Genital co-infection with both viruses could create opportunities for the viruses to recombine. This ability of the viruses to recombine poses problems for vaccine development, due to the risk of a live vaccine for genital herpe

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Star with strange chemistry is from out of town

Astronomers have discovered a star in the Milky Way Galaxy with a chemical composition unlike any other star in our Galaxy. This chemical composition has been seen in a small number of stars in dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way. This suggests that the star was part of a dwarf galaxy that merged into the Milky Way.

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What predicts college students' drinking habits? How much they think others are drinking

A new study by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University examined students' genetic risk of alcohol use, roommates' drinking habits and the perception of peer drinking.

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Breaking open the gates of antibiotic resistance

Creating a defect in tRNA molecules could weaken bacteria's two-pronged defense and help make faster-acting antibiotics

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Fat cell discovery could help combat obesity-related health issues

A world-first discovery has identified three different kinds of fat cells including a 'fast burning' type which if unlocked might help people lose weight.

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Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing

Researchers studying how pain works at the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on Earth — the Australian box jellyfish. A single sting to a human causes necrosis of the skin, excruciating pain and, if the dose of venom is large enough, cardiac arrest and death within minutes. The new antidote, discovered using CRISPR genome

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New screening approach helps identify sources of rare genetic diseases in children

Scientists are using a new approach to pinpoint the causes of rare genetic diseases in children and identify treatment options faster than with traditional methods. The new approach combines DNA sequencing and a chemical analysis called metabolomics to identify mutant genes that cause defective metabolic pathways in patients.

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New mathematical approach tested for the search of flight MH370

The 2014 disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 remains ones of the biggest mysteries in aviation. Recent efforts combining satellite data with a new mathematical approach, analyzing how debris moves around the ocean, aim to make headway in the search. Using Markov chain models, a team of researchers has narrowed down a potential crash location substantially north of the region where most

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11 lande kritiserer EU-kommissær: Sløser med kemikalier i legetøj

I brev til EU-kommissæren for det indre marked efterlyser 11 europæiske ministre skrappere grænseværdier for kemikalier i legetøj til børn, og kritiserer kommissæren for at arbejde for langsomt.

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Letters: ‘We Never Get Formal Teaching in How to Argue’

The New Science of How to Argue—Constructively Earlier this month, Jesse Singal wrote about the dynamics of today’s online flame wars—and described a new movement to study and learn from disagreement. “Erisology” looks specifically at unsuccessful disagreement. A ccording to the Sweedish blogger John Nerst, who coined the word, an unsuccessful disagreement is “an exchange where people are no clos

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Researchers may have an antidote for the deadliest jellyfish sting on Earth

Study suggests venom from Chironex fleckeri interacts with cholesterol genes

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Chatterbox parents may boost tots' intelligence

A major new study has identified a link between kids who hear high quantities of adult speech and better nonverbal abilities such as reasoning, numeracy and shape awareness.

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US cities host more regionally unique species than previously thought

To better understand whether rapidly growing cities are hosting the same species, a team analyzed an immense volume of data gathered by citizen scientists during the four-day global City Nature Challenge. Study findings suggest that despite similarities across cities, urban biodiversity still strongly reflects the species that are native to a region. However, observations of shared "cosmopolitan'

4h

New giant virus may help scientists better understand the emergence of complex life

Virologists have discovered a giant virus that, much like the mythical monster Medusa, can turn almost amoeba to a stone-like cyst.

4h

The space rock that hit the moon at 61,000 kilometers an hour

Observers watching January's total eclipse of the Moon saw a rare event, a short-lived flash as a meteorite hit the lunar surface. Astronomers now think the space rock collided with the moon at 61,000 kilometers an hour, excavating a crater 10 to 15 meters across.

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Possible link between autism and antidepressants use during pregnancy

An international team has found a potential link between autistic-like behavior in adult mice and exposure to a common antidepressant in the womb. They also identified a treatment that helped improve memory loss and social interactions, according to the new study.

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How a Google Street View image of your house predicts your risk of a car accident

Insurance companies, banks, and health-care organizations can dramatically improve their risk models by analyzing images of policy holders’ houses, say researchers

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New mathematical approach tested for the search of flight MH370

The 2014 disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 remains ones of the biggest mysteries in aviation. More than $150 million has been spent so far to identify where the plane carrying 239 passengers crashed into the Indian Ocean, with no success. Recent efforts combining satellite data with a new mathematical approach aim to make headway in the search for plane crashes.

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Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing

Researchers at the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on earth—the Australian box jellyfish.

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Mathematical analysis suggests new area for missing MH370 search

Modelling of buoy behaviour in ocean currents pushes likely crash site further north. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Kæmpe ismasse på størrelse med Spanien smelter alarmerende hurtigt

Opvarmet havvand har fået dele af en enorm plade af is ved Antarktis til at smelte ti gange hurtigere end normalt.

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How Wearable AI Will Amplify Human Intelligence

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Tax code should not make hiring robots more affordable than people

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D.C. Is First to Plan to Remove, Retrofit Flood-Prone Buildings

submitted by /u/GenomeBrando [link] [comments]

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A New Dental Procedure Could Eliminate Tooth Loss

submitted by /u/push2019 [link] [comments]

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Gender impacts brain activity in alcoholics

Compared to alcoholic women, alcoholic men have more diminished brain activity in areas responsible for emotional processing (limbic regions including the amygdala and hippocampus), as well as memory and social processing (cortical regions including the superior frontal and supramarginal regions) among other functions.

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Chatterbox parents may boost tots' intelligence

A major new study, led by researchers at the University of York, has identified a link between kids who hear high quantities of adult speech and better nonverbal abilities such as reasoning, numeracy and shape awareness.

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MUSC psychologists release results of survey of 'Maria generation' kids

Psychologists from the Medical University of South Carolina have just published one of the largest post-disaster screening projects in U.S. history. The report, available online through JAMA Network Open, measured the magnitude of Hurricane Maria's impact on the mental health of children in Puerto Rico.

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Do 'microglia' hold the key to stop Alzheimer's disease?

A Leuven research team led by Prof. Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven, UK DRI) studied how specialized brain cells called microglia respond to the accumulation of toxic proteins in the brain, a feature typical of Alzheimer's. The three major disease risk factors for Alzheimer's — age, sex and genetics — all affect microglia response, raising the possibility that drugs that modulate this response c

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Amid genomic data explosion, scientists find proliferating errors

Washington State University researchers found a troubling number of errors in publicly available genomic data as they conducted a large-scale analysis of protein sequences.

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$4.6 million grant funds clinical trial of stem cell immunotherapy for metastatic sarcoma and other hard-to-treat cancers

Scientists at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research have been awarded a $4.6 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine — also known as CIRM — to support a phase I clinical trial of a novel treatment for advanced sarcomas and other cancers with a specific tumor marker called NY-ESO-1.

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Space Station Power Outage Delays SpaceX Delivery

Delayed Resupply NASA delayed plans for a SpaceX resupply mission to the International Space Station due to a problem with one of the station’s eight electrical distribution units, Spaceflight Now reports — though the outage does not pose any immediate concern to the station’s crew, NASA reassured in an official update . The power distribution unit in question is one of the units that connect the

4h

What if Air Conditioners Could Help Save the Planet Instead of Destroying It?

Scientists propose a framework for modifying AC units to suck in carbon dioxide and spit out fuels for use in vehicles like cargo ships.

4h

Deadly box jellyfish antidote discovered using CRISPR genome editing

Researchers at the University of Sydney have discovered an antidote to the deadly sting delivered by the most venomous creature on earth—the Australian box jellyfish.

4h

How to recover from activism burnout | Yana Buhrer Tavanier

When you're feeling burned out as an activist, what's the best way to bounce back? TED Senior Fellow Yana Buhrer Tavanier explores the power of "playtivism" — the incorporation of play and creativity into movements for social change. See how this versatile approach can spark new ideas, propel action and melt fear.

4h

'Seeing the light' behind radiation therapy

Delivering just the right dose of radiation for cancer patients is a delicate balance in their treatment regime. However, in a new study, researchers have developed a system they say may improve the ability to maximize radiation doses to cancer tissues while minimizing exposure to healthy ones.

4h

The Meme Terrorists

The aim of terrorism is terror. It’s an easy tautology to overlook, for it appears to carry no information. But terrorism’s aims are political and social, even when its methods are violent. When a gunman opened fire in a synagogue in Poway, California, near San Diego, on Saturday, he killed one person and wounded three others. Those figures are low by mass-shooting standards, but the attack has b

4h

John Singleton Changed How Hollywood Sees Black America

When the 22-year-old director John Singleton was reportedly offered $100,000 to back away from directing his 1991 feature film, Boyz n the Hood , the newly minted film-school graduate balked in the Columbia Pictures office. “I said, ‘Well, we have to end this meeting right now because I’m doing this movie,’” Singleton recalled in a 2003 documentary about the film, Friendly Fire: Making an Urban L

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SpaceX’s Unnerving Silence on an Explosive Incident

The smoke was visible for miles. The day, April 20, was sunny on the Florida coast, with few clouds. The plumes, thick and glowing orange, rose over the horizon and crawled across the sky. Beachgoers stopped to stare. A photographer for Florida Today , on assignment to cover a surf festival, turned the lens away from the waves and snapped some pictures . The ashy clouds were coming from Cape Cana

4h

Extinction Rebellion: Activists say meeting with Michael Gove 'disappointing'

Extinction Rebellion says the environment secretary refused declare a climate emergency.

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Almost half of World Heritage sites could lose their glaciers by 2100

Glaciers are set to disappear completely from almost half of World Heritage sites if business-as-usual emissions continue, according to the first-ever global study of World Heritage glaciers.

4h

Key by Amazon brings in-car package delivery to Ford, Lincoln vehicles – Roadshow

Ford's connected-car services are also expanding to include mobile car washes.

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Too much smiling in a sales pitch could kill the deal

Spending too much time exuding joy is one of the fastest ways to lose a potential investor. A new study published in the Academy of Management Journal concludes one of the keys to financial persuasion is to strategically incorporate emotion and limit its duration.

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This geologist is Earth's planetary protection officer

Space Guardian of the galaxy. Lisa Pratt was nearly 2 miles below ground in a South African gold mine when the lights went off and the air stopped moving.

5h

Chloride-channel in muscle cells provides new insights for muscle diseases

Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have mapped the structure of an important channel in human muscle cells. The new insights about the chloride-channel can contribute to greater understanding of muscle diseases such as ALS, and the findings may enhance drug development at NMD Pharma.

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Twelve-year follow-up after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

A 12-year retrospective clinical study of patients who received peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for malignant neuroendocrine tumors demonstrates the long-term effectiveness of this treatment, which also allows patients to maintain a high quality of life. The study is featured in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

5h

Almost half of World Heritage sites could lose their glaciers by 2100

Glaciers are set to disappear completely from almost half of World Heritage sites if business-as-usual emissions continue.

5h

Too much smiling in a sales pitch could kill the deal

Researchers found a direct connection between salesmen spending too much time flashing their biggest smile during a presentation and the amount of capital raised.

5h

A third of type one diabetes is misdiagnosed in the over 30s

The study, led by the University of Exeter, shows that 38% of patients with type 1 diabetes occurring after age 30 were initially treated as type 2 diabetes (without insulin). the team found that half of those misdiagnosed were still diagnosed as type 2 diabetes 13 years later.

5h

'Seeing the light' behind radiation therapy

Delivering just the right dose of radiation for cancer patients is a delicate balance in their treatment regime. However, in a new study from UBC Okanagan and Duke University, researchers have developed a system they say may improve the ability to maximize radiation doses to cancer tissues while minimizing exposure to healthy ones.

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Keeping fit is more than physical: It's a state of mind

Preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) face heightened risks of death, critical illness, and prolonged hospitalization, particularly if they progress to develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

5h

New research offers insight into the proteins in the brain that detect cannabis

Researchers at the University of Bristol have made new progress in understanding how cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs), the proteins that detect the active components of marijuana, are controlled in the brain.

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The ACR and the Arthritis Foundation present new guidelines offering therapeutic approaches and treatment options for juvenile idiopathic arthritis

Today, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR), in partnership with the Arthritis Foundation (AF), released two guidelines on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). One guideline aims to provide therapeutic approaches for non-systemic polyarthritis, sacroilitis and enthesitis; and the other focuses on the screening, monitoring and treatment of JIA with associated uveitis.

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Two species of colourful stick insects discovered in Madagascar

DNA analysis of two stick insect specimens in northern Madagascar has revealed they are native to the island, not overseas visitors

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The space rock that hit the moon at 61,000 kilometers an hour

Observers watching January's total eclipse of the Moon saw a rare event, a short-lived flash as a meteorite hit the lunar surface. Spanish astronomers now think the space rock collided with the Moon at 61,000 kilometres an hour, excavating a crater 10 to 15 metres across. Prof Jose Maria Madiedo of the University of Huelva, and Dr. Jose L. Ortiz of the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia, publi

5h

GM reports lower sales in China, North America

US automaker General Motors saw profits more than double in the first quarter, but said Tuesday that lower sales in China and North America ate into total revenues.

5h

US cities host more regionally unique species than previously thought

Scientists are analyzing a rare snapshot in time of urban plants and animals. To better understand whether rapidly growing cities are hosting the same species, a concept known as urban homogenization, a team from the California Academy of Sciences analyzed an immense volume of data gathered by citizen scientists during the four-day global City Nature Challenge. The 14 U.S. cities included in the s

5h

New DNA test stops illegal shipment of endangered eels

Researchers have developed a new method to identify illegally trafficked European eels, and it has already led to the arrest and prosecution of smugglers in Hong Kong.

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US cities host more regionally unique species than previously thought

Scientists are analyzing a rare snapshot in time of urban plants and animals. To better understand whether rapidly growing cities are hosting the same species, a concept known as urban homogenization, a team from the California Academy of Sciences analyzed an immense volume of data gathered by citizen scientists during the four-day global City Nature Challenge. The 14 U.S. cities included in the s

5h

New DNA test stops illegal shipment of endangered eels

Researchers have developed a new method to identify illegally trafficked European eels, and it has already led to the arrest and prosecution of smugglers in Hong Kong.

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Researchers design a strategy to make graphene luminescent

Lighter than aluminum, harder than a diamond, more elastic than rubber and tougher than steel. These are only a few of the characteristics of graphene, a super material that acts as an excellent heat and electrical conductor. Due to its features, it is considered a key player in future technological advances in the fields of research, electronics, IT and medicine.

5h

Researchers obtain first-ever underwater ultrasound scans of wild reef manta rays

A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge and the Manta Trust has successfully scanned a pregnant wild reef manta ray underwater to obtain clear ultrasound images of her foetus, using the world's first contactless underwater ultrasound scanner.

5h

LS2 report: Before the return of the cold

Since the start of January, the liquid helium flowing through the veins of the LHC's cooling system has gradually been removed the accelerator and, one by one, the eight sectors of the LHC have been brought back to room temperature. "It takes about four weeks to bring a single sector from its nominal temperature of 1.9 K (-271°C) back to room temperature," explains Krzysztof Brodzinski, an enginee

5h

Signs of faster melting in world's largest ice shelf

Part of the world's largest ice shelf is melting 10 times faster than the rest, shedding light on how it might respond to climate change.

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When a 'she' becomes an 'it'

What happens in the human brain when a woman is put on a par with an object? A research answering this question was conducted at the Department of Psychology and Cognitive Science and the Center for Mind/Brain Sciences (CiMEC) of the University of Trento and was published today in "Scientific Reports". The results could provide new instruments and insights in the study of gender and racial violenc

5h

New research to explore technology needed for peer-to-peer 'free trade' in excess energy

People who generate their own power through solar panels and wind turbines may soon be able to decide where to distribute their excess energy, rather than back to the national grid.

5h

How scratching may prime children with eczema for food allergy and anaphylaxis

Eczema, a chronic itchy inflammatory skin disease, affects about 15 percent of U.S. children. It's a strong risk factor for food allergies — more than half of children with eczema are allergic to one or more foods — and most people with food allergy have eczema. But the connection between the two hasn't been clear. New research in a mouse model demonstrates, for the first time, that scratching t

5h

Antibiotics may treat endometriosis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that treating mice with an antibiotic reduces the size of lesions caused by endometriosis. The researchers are planning a clinical trial to test the strategy in women who have the painful condition.

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Researchers obtain first-ever underwater ultrasound scans of wild reef manta rays

A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge and the Manta Trust has successfully scanned a pregnant wild reef manta ray underwater to obtain clear ultrasound images of her foetus, using the world's first contactless underwater ultrasound scanner.

5h

Spørg Fagfolket: Hvad ligger der i begrebet 'naturligt laktosefri ost'?

En læser har set en del oste i Tyskland, som er markeret som 'laktosefri gennem naturlig modning'. Hvad betyder det? Det svarer Landbrug & Fødevarer på.

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The end of the trail

NASA reveals Mars rover Opportunity’s long and winding road.

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Researchers close in on antidote for agonising jellyfish sting

Box jellyfish stings are so painful they can kill adult humans. Nick Carne reports.

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Retrofit air-con to tackle climate change, researchers say

A simple tech fix could prompt radical environmental and economic overhaul. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Inflatable Robot Astronauts and How to Control Them

The typical cultural image of a robot—as a steel, chrome, humanoid bucket of bolts—is often far from the reality of cutting-edge robotics research. There are difficulties, both social and technological , in realizing the image of a robot from science fiction—let alone one that can actually help around the house . Often, it’s simply the case that great expense in producing a humanoid robot that ca

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Here’s how to eat your way through LA

Fast food and car culture found each other in Los Angeles. Add a unique blend of cultures and cuisines, and LA is a culinary hotspot second to none. This map details some of the city's most famous eateries. WALTER: He lives in North Hollywood on Radford, near the In-N-Out Burger– THE DUDE: The In-N-Out Burger is on Camrose. WALTER: Near the In-N-Out Burger– DONNY: Those are good burgers, Walter

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Innovative treatment restores sight in patient

Innovative treatment has improved the vision of a patient suffering from a rare cancer-related syndrome affecting the eye, new research in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology reports.

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Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows

African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism.

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The Grid Might Survive an Electromagnetic Pulse Just Fine

A new report enters the debate over whether an EMP from a nuclear blast or a solar flare would cripple the power grid and concludes that actually, we'll probably be OK.

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The Quiet Beauty of High-Octane Sports Cars

Ryan Young captured the drifting action in his series 'Home on the Grange'.

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EU court advisor sides with Airbnb in row in France

The legal advisor to the EU's top court sided with Airbnb on Tuesday as the home-sharing giant faces legal action in France aimed at restricting its services.

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General Electric tops profit estimates, calls 737 MAX 'new risk'

General Electric reported better-than-expected quarterly profits on Tuesday, lifting hopes over its turnaround, even as it signaled a potential hit tied to the Boeing 737 MAX grounding for which it provides engines.

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NASA ponies up for next-gen solar sails

Diffraction-based sails could be propelling satellites within five years. Andrew Masterson reports.

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Science history: the man who made the first electronic instrument

Leon Theremin was an inventor, a musician, and a spy. Jeff Glorfeld reports.

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Security Experts Unite Over the Right to Repair

Securepairs.org is pushing back against a tech industry that wants independent repair legislation to be scary.

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The US white majority will soon disappear forever

Since the settlement of Jamestown in 1607 and the start of the Colonial period, the U.S. has been predominantly white.

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Better power law predicts quakes, wealth, blood vessels

A statistical measurement called a power law exponent can predict giant earthquakes, financial windfalls, and the blood vessels in our bodies. For the last century, researchers have used what’s called a power law to predict certain kinds of events, including how frequently earthquakes at certain points on the Richter scale will occur. But researcher Mitchell Newberry noticed that this power law d

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The 'Sonic the Hedgehog' movie trailer is here, and fans have some issues with it

The first trailer for the upcoming live-action film based on video game Sonic the Hedgehog is here, and fans of the Sega star don't seem thrilled.

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Calif. Uses Algorithm to Scrub Thousands of Cannabis Convictions

California Cleaning Marijuana is now legal in California, but an estimated one million people in the state still suffer the consequences of past cannabis convictions. Now, a new algorithm is making it far easier for Californians to have those convictions stricken from their records, according to BBC News — thereby eliminating the barriers that accompany a criminal record. “We live in a technologi

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Muting Mutations

A solid, believable animal model of a human disease (preferably in a small animal like a mouse!) is a very important thing to have in a drug discovery project, but they are hard to come by . A mouse is not a human , and neither are the other small organisms that we’d like to use. But there’s no other way to go. We still share huge amounts of biochemistry with basically any living creature on Eart

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Samara scientists discovered a new path for the synthesis of helical molecules — helicenes

Together with the colleagues from the USA universities, they discovered a new path for the synthesis of helical molecules — helicenes.

6h

The space rock that hit the moon at 61,000 kilometers an hour

Observers watching January's total eclipse of the Moon saw a rare event, a short-lived flash as a meteorite hit the lunar surface. Spanish astronomers now think the space rock collided with the moon at 61,000 kilometers an hour, excavating a crater 10 to 15 meters across. Professor Jose Maria Madiedo of the University of Huelva, and Dr. Jose L. Ortiz of the Institute of Astrophysics of Andalusia,

6h

New giant virus may help scientists better understand the emergence of complex life

A team of scientists led by virologist Masaharu Takemura at Tokyo University of Science and Hiroyuki Ogata at Kyoto University in Japan have discovered a giant virus that, much like the mythical monster Medusa, can turn almost amoeba to a stone-like cyst.

6h

Anti-stress brain chemical is related to PTSD resilience after trauma

Fewer receptors for the anti-stress brain chemical nociceptin is associated with less severe posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in college women who have experienced sexual violence, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier.

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Tracking small things in cells

Living cells can react to disturbances with a changed metabolism, but direct observation of trafficking metabolites in live cells is difficult. An international team of scientists has now developed a class of remarkably small fluorophores called SCOTfluors. The dyes emit light in the visible to near-infrared range and can be attached to common metabolites. The study was published in the journal An

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Satellite data and AI help fight Sweden's forest fires

According to Swedish authorities, there is a high risk of forest and grass fires this week and some communities, such as Upplands Bro (northwest of Stockholm), have taken the step of banning the traditional bonfires that neighborhoods organize to celebrate Walpurgis Night (or Valborg).

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Several small steps: Elephant calves caught on camera in Cambodia

First, the good news. Footage from the 46 camera traps deployed by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) in Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains is giving us a privileged insight into the lives of the Asian elephants that roam through in one of the continent's last remaining forest wildernesses.

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New research to explore technology needed for peer-to-peer 'free trade' in excess energy

Households and businesses that generate their own power through micro-renewables, such as solar panels and wind turbines, may soon be able to decide where to distribute their extra energy thanks to funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

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Several small steps: Elephant calves caught on camera in Cambodia

First, the good news. Footage from the 46 camera traps deployed by Fauna & Flora International (FFI) in Cambodia's Cardamom Mountains is giving us a privileged insight into the lives of the Asian elephants that roam through in one of the continent's last remaining forest wildernesses.

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This is the worst measles outbreak in 20 years

The US is experiencing its worst measles outbreak in two decades—695 cases in 22 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts say it’s entirely preventable. In the Brooklyn and Queens neighborhoods of New York, officials confirmed 390 cases of measles, and officials in California identified a new outbreak of the disease in Los Angeles County. In 2000, the US govern

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'Russian spy whale': the disturbing history of military marine mammals

Norwegian fishermen were reportedly approached by a beluga whale wearing a Russian harness, complete with GoPro camera holder, sparking speculation that the animal had been trained to gather intelligence by the Russian Navy. While this theory has not been confirmed, it is entirely plausible: armed forces around the world have a long and disturbing history of exploiting marine mammals.

6h

A Chinese Startup Got 3 Times Square Billboards to Diss Tesla

Three Billboards A Chinese car-hailing company called Shenma Zhuanche bought three separate billboards outside Reuters’ Times Square headquarters in New York City to beef with Tesla. Inspired by the blockbuster film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” the company says it’s trying to publicly shame the electric automaker for bad customer service. Here’s the backstory: The company purchase

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Protein catalogue brings personalized treatments a step closer

Protein catalogue brings personalized treatments a step closer Protein catalogue brings personalized treatments a step closer, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01373-6 Mutation map offers clues that could help scientists to characterize tumours.

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Odense-firma vil lade droner sortere data med hård hånd

PLUS. Bedre persongenkendelse og automatisk sortering af data er nogle af de egenskaber, som odenseanske Lorenz Technology arbejder på at gøre standard i droner.

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'Russian spy whale': the disturbing history of military marine mammals

Norwegian fishermen were reportedly approached by a beluga whale wearing a Russian harness, complete with GoPro camera holder, sparking speculation that the animal had been trained to gather intelligence by the Russian Navy. While this theory has not been confirmed, it is entirely plausible: armed forces around the world have a long and disturbing history of exploiting marine mammals.

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Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows

African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism.

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Bonobos and chimps equally love meat

In an African forest where leopards and poisonous mamba dwell, a University of Oregon team once had to flee charging boar. But it was a brief detour in research that adds to the idea that bonobos are neither hippies nor vegans.

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Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows

African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism.

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Bonobos and chimps equally love meat

In an African forest where leopards and poisonous mamba dwell, a University of Oregon team once had to flee charging boar. But it was a brief detour in research that adds to the idea that bonobos are neither hippies nor vegans.

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'Rock Tides' Yield Insights into How Rocks Move

'Rock Tides' Yield Insights into How Rocks Move Understanding how seemingly solid rocks get squished could make mining and construction projects safer. AtacamaRocks_topNteaser.jpg Rock formations in the Atacama Desert. Image credits: Phil Whitehouse via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Tuesday, April 30, 2019 – 09:00 Rebecca Boyle, Contributor (Inside Science) — Earth’s interior teems

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New computational tool improves identification of genes of potential clinical significance

Like finding a needle in a haystack, identifying genes that are involved in particular diseases can be an arduous and time consuming process. Looking to improve this process, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a new bioinformatics tool that analyzes CRISPR pooled screen data and identifies candidates for potentially relevant genes with greater sensitivity and acc

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New computational tool improves identification of genes of potential clinical significance

Like finding a needle in a haystack, identifying genes that are involved in particular diseases can be an arduous and time consuming process. Looking to improve this process, a team led by researchers at Baylor College of Medicine has developed a new bioinformatics tool that analyzes CRISPR pooled screen data and identifies candidates for potentially relevant genes with greater sensitivity and acc

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Energizer’s massive battery/phone proves a viral hit ? crowdfunding success

Oof. This isn’t the sort of thing you want to see when you’re rounding the corner of your crowdfunding campaign: There are long shots and then there’s coming up with $15,000 of your $1.2 million …

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Scientists develop stereodefined N and S atom-codoped graphdiyne for oxygen evolution

The oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is of great significance in energy-related techniques, such as metal-air batteries and water splitting. Chinese scientists have doped site-defined sp-N and S atoms into graphdiyne, which enables highly active catalysis of OER.

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Relationship between root microbiome and nitrogen use efficiency revealed in rice

A collaborative team led by Prof. BAI Yang and Prof. CHU Chengcai from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), recently examined the variation in root microbiota within 68 indica and 27 japonica rice varieties grown in field conditions. They revealed that the indica and japonica varieties recruited distinct root microbiota.

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The new 'runner's high'? MJ users often mix weed, workouts

A study of cannabis users in states where it's legal found 82 % use the drug before and/or after exercise, with many reporting it increases enjoyment, enhances recovery, and heightens motivation.

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US cities host more regionally unique species than previously thought

To better understand whether rapidly growing cities are hosting the same species, a team from the California Academy of Sciences analyzed an immense volume of data gathered by citizen scientists during the four-day global City Nature Challenge. Study findings suggest that despite similarities across cities, urban biodiversity still strongly reflects the species that are native to a region. However

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Possible link between autism and antidepressants use during pregnancy

An international team led by Duke-NUS Medical School has found a potential link between autistic-like behaviour in adult mice and exposure to a common antidepressant in the womb. They also identified a treatment that helped improve memory loss and social interactions, according to the new study published in the journal Molecular Brain.

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Nanomaterials mimicking natural enzymes with superior catalytic activity and selectivity

A KAIST research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. These nanomaterials can be applied for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

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Researchers identify causes and mechanisms of polycystic ovary syndrome using family-based genetic analysis

The findings will enable personalized medicine approaches to disease prediction and potential new therapies for PCOS.

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A surprise: Bonobos eat and share meat at rates similar to chimpanzees

Small forest antelope in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have more to worry about than being eaten by leopards. In at least one portion of jungle, Weyn's duikers are the preferred meat consumed by bonobos, according to anthropologists.

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Food packaging claims mislead consumers with ideas of health

Research finds four distinct ways that food brands claim to be "healthy" and how those types of claims influence consumers' expectations and choices for breakfast cereals, despite not being linked to the actual nutritional quality of the product.

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How Language Shapes the Brain

The ascent of Japan’s Emperor Naruhito offers a lesson in the neuroscientific power of words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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From the archive

From the archive From the archive, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01323-2 How Nature reported evidence of geological activity on the Moon in 1969, and the crippling effects of a freak snowstorm in 1919.

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European eel found to spawn across 2000 km wide region of the North Atlantic Ocean

A team of researchers with members from Japan, Sweden, Denmark and Germany has found evidence showing that European eel spawn across a 2000 km wide region of the North Atlantic Ocean. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of recently hatched eel larvae in the North Atlantic Ocean, and what they found.

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European eel found to spawn across 2000 km wide region of the North Atlantic Ocean

A team of researchers with members from Japan, Sweden, Denmark and Germany has found evidence showing that European eel spawn across a 2000 km wide region of the North Atlantic Ocean. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of recently hatched eel larvae in the North Atlantic Ocean, and what they found.

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How Language Shapes the Brain

The ascent of Japan’s Emperor Naruhito offers a lesson in the neuroscientific power of words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Women May Soon Start Using AI to Tell Good Eggs From Bad

Future Fertility, the first company to use artificial intelligence to grade the viability of women’s harvested eggs for use in IVF or for freezing, unveils its system.

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Professor leads science study for new space-based observatory concept

After two years of intensive work, led by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Space Science Division, the design for a conceptual space-based observatory is headed to the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine's Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophysics, which establishes the astronomy community's priorities for the next decade.

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Despite its green image, NZ has world's highest proportion of species at risk

A recent update on the state of New Zealand's environment paints a particularly bleak picture about the loss of native ecosystems and the plants and animals within them.

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AX J1949.8+2534 is a supergiant fast X-ray transient, observations confirm

Based on the results from a set of telescopes, astronomers detected X-ray variability of the source AX J1949.8+2534 and confirmed that the object is a supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT). The finding is reported in a paper published April 22 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

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Feral Cats in Australia Sentenced to Death by Sausage

Feral cats are driving many Australian species to the brink of extinction, and the government is stepping in.

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European universities dismal at reporting results of clinical trials

European universities dismal at reporting results of clinical trials European universities dismal at reporting results of clinical trials, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01389-y Analysis of 30 leading institutions found that just 17% of study results had been posted online as required by EU rules.

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‘Flailing’ blood cells and plasma signal chronic fatigue

Researchers have created a blood test that can flag chronic fatigue syndrome, which currently lacks a standard, reliable diagnostic test. People with the debilitating and often discounted disease may soon have scientific proof of their ailment. “Too often, this disease is categorized as imaginary,” says Ron Davis, professor of biochemistry and of genetics at the Stanford University School of Medi

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Put down the protein shake: Variety of protein better for health

University of Sydney researchers have examined whether there are any ongoing ramifications or potential side-effects from long-term high protein intake or from consuming certain types of amino acids.

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Researchers design a strategy to make graphene luminescent

A University of Cordoba research project is able to incorporate luminescence into this super material, paving a new way to continue expanding properties

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Watchful waiting reasonable for patients with diabetic macular edema and good vision

People with good vision despite having center-involved diabetic macular edema can safely forego immediate treatment of their eye condition as long as they are closely monitored, and treatment begins promptly if vision worsens, according to clinical trial results. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute and is published online today in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Despite its green image, NZ has world's highest proportion of species at risk

A recent update on the state of New Zealand's environment paints a particularly bleak picture about the loss of native ecosystems and the plants and animals within them.

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Study: Flying Cars Could End Up Being Greener Than Electric Cars

Late to the Party In a new study published in the journal Nature , a group of researchers from Ford Motors’ Research and Innovation Center in Michigan argue that electric flying cars could actually end up reducing emissions over electric cars back on the ground — and free up congested roads in the process. But unfortunately, there’s a pretty big catch. “However, gaps in necessary technology and p

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How Language Shapes the Brain

The ascent of Japan’s Emperor Naruhito offers a lesson in the neuroscientific power of words — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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The same, but better: How we represent ourselves through avatars

Most people who create avatars of themselves only make minor changes compared with their real selves, according to a new University of Alberta-led study.

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Evidence of bone disease found in medieval skeletons

A large team of researchers from across the U.K. has found evidence of Paget's disease of the bone in multiple medieval skeletons uncovered in northwest Britain. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their study of the skeletons and what they found.

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Future bright for mini synchrotrons

Colliding a stream of electrons with laser light near an array of tiny silver structures could be the recipe for a new X-ray source that could revolutionize medical imaging and security scanning.

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How we found a white dwarf – a stellar corpse – by accident

One of the great things about science is that, when you start to observe a new object in space, you can never be sure quite what you'll find.

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New research takes deeper look at Venus's clouds

Venus is known for its clouds of sulfuric acid covering the entire planet and its super-fast winds moving at hundreds of kilometers per hour, but our neighboring planet's thick clouds make it difficult for scientists to peer deep inside its atmosphere.

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Study finds both men and women take a negative view of women who drink

In a study examining perceptions of women who drink alcohol, a Worcester Polytechnic Institute professor and colleagues found that both men and women view women who drink alcohol in a social setting to be "less human." The study, published in the journal Sex Roles, looks at the social perceptions of women and men who drink alcohol, and considers the consequences of these perceptions.

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Scientists examine the ethnobotanical uses of stramonium

The Datura genus, which includes stramonium, encompasses a number of plant species that have featured heavily in the traditional medicine and popular culture of countries such as Mexico and Spain.

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Researchers design a new method to probe tissues in living organisms

The formation of the embryo, from its very early stages of development, is a complex choreography that is still a mystery to science. How each cell forms, and how tissues develop correctly are processes ruled by biochemical signals, but also by mechanical signals.

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Why jackals thrive where humans dominate

As humans put nature under the plow, asphalt, and concrete, some creatures thrive through an "enemy of my enemy is my friend" approach, embracing our disruption of the natural order, and rushing to fill the void created by hunting and habitat change.

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Why your veterinarian may refuse to euthanise your pet

Vets often grapple with the moral dilemma of when a client wants to kill an inconvenient pet. Clients might, for instance, hint that caring for the pet has become too much trouble, or that it interferes with their lifestyle or living situation. This is called "convenience euthanasia".

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Sales of opioid painkiller codeine have halved in Australia

Sales of codeine have halved in Australia after an over-the-counter ban and fears that people would be driven to stronger prescriptions have not come true

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Researchers design a new method to probe tissues in living organisms

The formation of the embryo, from its very early stages of development, is a complex choreography that is still a mystery to science. How each cell forms, and how tissues develop correctly are processes ruled by biochemical signals, but also by mechanical signals.

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Nanomaterials mimicking natural enzymes with superior catalytic activity and selectivity for detecting acetylcholine

A KAIST research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. These nanomaterials can be applied for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

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Traditional masculinity may keep English-speaking men from studying new languages

For decades, more women have been entering male-dominated educational fields and careers. The proportion of men in female-dominated areas, on the other hand, has remained mostly unchanged. Now, gender gaps in female-dominated undergraduate majors—like foreign language—are larger than gender gaps in biology, math or the physical sciences.Foreign language proficiency is a useful skill that can lead

7h

Why jackals thrive where humans dominate

As humans put nature under the plow, asphalt, and concrete, some creatures thrive through an "enemy of my enemy is my friend" approach, embracing our disruption of the natural order, and rushing to fill the void created by hunting and habitat change.

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Why your veterinarian may refuse to euthanise your pet

Vets often grapple with the moral dilemma of when a client wants to kill an inconvenient pet. Clients might, for instance, hint that caring for the pet has become too much trouble, or that it interferes with their lifestyle or living situation. This is called "convenience euthanasia".

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Informal and illegal housing on the rise as our cities fail to offer affordable places to live

Despite the cooling property market, affordable rental housing remains in critically short supply across Australia. Unable to get a private rental unit or social housing, many low-income renters must resort to informal and insecure accommodation. These range from share homes or rooms, to dwellings that breach planning or building regulations.

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Development and application of a high-content virion display human GPCR array

Development and application of a high-content virion display human GPCR array Development and application of a high-content virion display human GPCR array, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09938-9 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important targets for drug discovery. Here, the authors develop a Virion Display array of 315 functional non-odorant GPCRs, providing a pl

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A binding cooperativity switch driven by synergistic structural swelling of an osmo-regulatory protein pair

A binding cooperativity switch driven by synergistic structural swelling of an osmo-regulatory protein pair A binding cooperativity switch driven by synergistic structural swelling of an osmo-regulatory protein pair, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10002-9 The bacterial protein Cnu together with the transcription repressor H-NS regulate expression of virulence factors in a

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The glycosylation design space for recombinant lysosomal replacement enzymes produced in CHO cells

The glycosylation design space for recombinant lysosomal replacement enzymes produced in CHO cells The glycosylation design space for recombinant lysosomal replacement enzymes produced in CHO cells, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09809-3 Lysosomal replacement enzymes are taken up by cell surface receptors that recognize glycans, the effects of different glycan features ar

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Genomic analysis on pygmy hog reveals extensive interbreeding during wild boar expansion

Genomic analysis on pygmy hog reveals extensive interbreeding during wild boar expansion Genomic analysis on pygmy hog reveals extensive interbreeding during wild boar expansion, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10017-2 The pygmy hog (Porcula salvania), now highly endangered and restricted in a small region at the southern foothills of the Himalaya, is the only suid species

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Red-shifting mutation of light-driven sodium-pump rhodopsin

Red-shifting mutation of light-driven sodium-pump rhodopsin Red-shifting mutation of light-driven sodium-pump rhodopsin, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10000-x Microbial rhodopsins are photoreceptive and widely used in optogenetics for which they should preferable function with longer-wavelength light. Here, authors achieve a 40-nm red-shift in the absorption wavelength o

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Information-rich localization microscopy through machine learning

Information-rich localization microscopy through machine learning Information-rich localization microscopy through machine learning, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-10036-z Single-molecule methods often rely on point spread functions that are tailored to interpret specific information. Here the authors use a neural network to extract complex PSF information from experiment

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Publisher Correction: Unusual substrate and halide versatility of phenolic halogenase PltM

Publisher Correction: Unusual substrate and halide versatility of phenolic halogenase PltM Publisher Correction: Unusual substrate and halide versatility of phenolic halogenase PltM, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09731-8 Publisher Correction: Unusual substrate and halide versatility of phenolic halogenase PltM

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ZnO composite nanolayer with mobility edge quantization for multi-value logic transistors

ZnO composite nanolayer with mobility edge quantization for multi-value logic transistors ZnO composite nanolayer with mobility edge quantization for multi-value logic transistors, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09998-x Designing multi-value logic transistors with stable and reliable intermediate states remains a challenge. Here, the authors report the mobility edge quant

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Nationale konferencer skal forbedre behandlingen for kræftpatienter

Kirurger, onkologer og radiologer fra hele landet skal på konferencer vurdere udvalgte patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen. Det skal sikre et mere ensartet tilbud på tværs af landet, mener Sundhedsstyrelsen.

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Study reveals how glial cells may play key epilepsy role

In eLife, MIT neuroscientists present a new, detailed accounting of how a mutation in a fly model of epilepsy undermines the ability of glial cells to regulate the balance of ions that neurons need to avoid producing seizures.

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Can sweet potatoes save the world?

Some foods are known as seasonal wonders, making an appearance only once or twice a year when families gather for holiday feasts. Cranberry sauce, pecan pie, eggnog. Sweet potatoes, typically with tiny marshmallows roasted on top, were once on that list. But sweet potatoes are on the rise. They have become increasingly recognized as a superfood packed with essential vitamins and nutrients, and are

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Can sweet potatoes save the world?

Some foods are known as seasonal wonders, making an appearance only once or twice a year when families gather for holiday feasts. Cranberry sauce, pecan pie, eggnog. Sweet potatoes, typically with tiny marshmallows roasted on top, were once on that list. But sweet potatoes are on the rise. They have become increasingly recognized as a superfood packed with essential vitamins and nutrients, and are

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Synkende bygninger og verdens værste trafikpropper: Indonesien flytter sin hovedstad

Med sine godt ti millioner indbyggere er jakarta verdens syvende største hovedstad, og i mere end 70 år har man overvejet at flytte den. Nu bliver det en realitet.

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GPS gives directions, but what does it take away?

Technology Excerpt: Wayfinding GPS makes sure we get where we need to go. But what do we lose in the process? In Wayfinding, author M.R. O'Connor investigates the science and mystery of human…

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The Tiete, Sao Paulo State's main river, is filtered by dam reservoirs

In São Paulo City, Brazil, the Tietê River is polluted by a vast amount of waste, mainly domestic sewage, but the farther it runs into the interior, the better the quality of its water becomes. It is much less murky at Barra Bonita, 294 km from São Paulo, and transparent at Buritama (546 km).

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Skeptic vs Denier

The skeptic vs denier debate won’t go away. I fear the issue is far too nuanced for a broad popular consensus. But that should not prevent a consensus among science communicators, who should have a technical understanding of terminology. A recent editorial in Forbes illustrates the problem. The author, Brian Brettschneider, makes a recommendation for when to use which term, which sounds superfici

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Imported wolves settle in as Lake Superior island teems with moose

Long-running predator-prey study on Isle Royale has fresh data and new wolves

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Researchers discover new charge transfer and separation process

Charge transfer and separation is a fundamental process in the energy conversion that powers life on Earth. Besides deployment in solar cells and photocatalysts, this process is found in photosynthesis, as it enables energy conversion by harvesting light and then transferring and converting it into chemical energy.

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OCO-3 ready to extend NASA's study of carbon

When the Orbiting Carbon Observatory 3, OCO-3, heads to the International Space Station, it will bring a new view—literally—to studies of Earth's carbon cycle.

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Breakthrough in high-yield drought-resilient chickpeas

A global study led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) and involving scientists from The University of Western Australia has identified genes that can be used to develop drought and heat tolerant chickpeas.

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Mind the gap: New study examines pay and job rank among academic economists

The pay gap between male and female economists at UK universities has not fallen for 20 years, a new study has revealed.

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An atom in a cavity extracts highly pure single photons from weak laser light

Quantum physicists can now distil a kind of photon schnapps. When spirits are distilled, the alcohol content increases relative to the water content. A similar method developed by a team from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics in Garching works on light quanta – photons. It extracts individual photons from a light source, pushes back the unwanted vacuum component, and reports this event. S

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Prescriptions for opioid painkiller codeine have halved in Australia

Sales of codeine have halved in Australia after an over-the-counter ban and fears that people would be driven to stronger prescriptions have not come true

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First exomoon might not actually exist as astronomers reach stalemate

What appeared to be the first moon ever discovered around planet circling another star may not really exist, but it seems like we’ll never know for sure

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Breakthrough in high-yield drought-resilient chickpeas

A global study led by the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) and involving scientists from The University of Western Australia has identified genes that can be used to develop drought and heat tolerant chickpeas.

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Ocean's 'seasonal memory' affects Arctic climate change

Following four expeditions in the Arctic Ocean and satellite data analysis, a team of Russian climate scientists featuring MIPT researchers described the ocean's "seasonal memory." This refers to a mechanism explaining how atmospheric circulation has caused the ice in the Eurasian Arctic to melt faster than in the American Arctic in the 21st century. The paper was published in the journal Atmosphe

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Chemical evidence shows how a dwarf galaxy contributes to growth of the Milky Way

Small stellar systems like dwarf galaxies are thought to be the main building blocks of the Milky Way. However, it is unclear how many and what kind of stars in our galaxy originated from satellite dwarf galaxies.

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Astronomers discover 2,000-year-old remnant of a nova

For the first time, a European research team involving the University of Göttingen has discovered the remains of a nova in a galactic globular cluster. The remnant is located near the centre of the globular cluster Messier 22 and has recently been observed using modern instruments. The results will be published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics.

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Dark matter exists: Observations disprove alternate explanations

As fascinating as it is mysterious, dark matter is one of the greatest enigmas of astrophysics and cosmology. It is thought to account for 90 percent of the matter in the universe, but its existence has been demonstrated only indirectly, and has recently been called into question. New research conducted by SISSA removes the recent doubts on the presence of dark matter within galaxies, disproving t

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Inorganic perovskite absorbers for use in thin-film solar cells

A team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin has succeeded in producing inorganic perovskite thin films at moderate temperatures using co-evaporation – making post-tempering at high temperatures unnecessary. The process makes it much easier to produce thin-film solar cells from this material. In comparison to metal-organic hybrid perovskites, inorganic perovskites are more thermally stable. The work has

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A weather tech startup wants to do forecasts based on cell phone signals

ClimaCell claims its service, which taps into millions of wireless devices, is 60 percent more accurate than traditional forecasting methods.

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Exploring new ways to control thermal radiation

When scientists are trying to make things better, they will often turn to a standard rule and try to disprove or disrupt it.

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Unique synthetic antibodies show promise for improved disease and toxin detection

Scientists have invented a new "synthetic antibody" that could make screening for diseases easier and less expensive than current go-to methods. Writing in the journal Nano Letters, a team led by Markita Landry of Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley describes how peptoids – synthetically produced molecules, first created by Ron Zuckermann at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry, that are similar to protein-b

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New statistical technique finds La Nina years more favorable for mountain snowpack than El Nino years

When there are multiple factors at play in a situation that is itself changing, such as an El Nino winter in a changing climate, how can scientists figure out what is causing what? Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed an advanced statistical method for quantifying and visualizing changes in environmental systems and easily picking out the driving factor.

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Tropisk parasitsjukdom ökar i Sverige

– Det är fortfarande en väldigt ovanlig sjukdom här, men antalet fall har mer än fördubblats de sista tio åren. Sjukdomssymtomen kan i sina olika former vara snarlika de som förekommer vid andra diagnoser som ger långvariga sår eller benmärgssjukdomar. För att ställa rätt diagnos är det därför viktigt att sjukdomen blir känd inom primärvården, på hudmottagningar och på barnkliniker runt om i land

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Forskertalent hædres med Boserupprisen

Den lægevidenskabelige pris Boserupprisen går i år til postdoc Nicolai J. Wewer Albrechtsen…

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Klorid-kanal i muskelceller giver ny viden om muskelsygdomme

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet har kortlagt strukturen af en vigtig kanal ind de menneskelige…

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AI is turning thoughts into speech. Should we be concerned?

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Ross: Artificial intelligence could make us all obsolete

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Aeroswift successfully 3D prints 0.5 m tall large scale airframe for UAV

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If machines produce everything we ever need…

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AI cuts Dubai bus accidents by more than half

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Only some people get one health benefit from social support

Scientists have long known that the support of friends and family plays a key role in protecting people's physical health.But a new study suggests that the benefits don't go to people who may really need it — those with low self-esteem.

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Permafrost collapse is accelerating carbon release

Permafrost collapse is accelerating carbon release Permafrost collapse is accelerating carbon release, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01313-4 The sudden collapse of thawing soils in the Arctic might double the warming from greenhouse gases released from tundra, warn Merritt R. Turetsky and colleagues.

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¡Hola Alexa! Amazon's assistant will speak Spanish later this year – CNET

Eventually, Alexa will have full Spanish language support.

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Alleged Huawei router 'backdoor' is standard networking tool, says firm

Media reports of a secret spying device in millions of domestic routers are ‘misleading’ says under-fire Chinese telcoBritain’s Vodafone discovered security failings in Huawei internet routers …

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The Concept of Neurodiversity Is Dividing the Autism Community

It remains controversial—but it doesn't have to be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Twitter expanding video programming and working with NFL, MTV, Univision and others

Twitter is expanding its lineup of live and on-demand premium video programming across sports, gaming, entertainment and news.

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Joe Biden Can’t Really Decide If He Wants to Be a Front-Runner

PITTSBURGH—Joe Biden wants to be the front-runner, but he still wants to come off as scrappy. He wants all the attention from being a former vice president and from leading primary polls, but all the credit for beating expectations and raising more money in his first 24 hours than the records set by a socialist senator from Vermont and a former congressman who couldn’t win statewide. He wants the

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Science Fiction’s Preoccupation With Privacy

I n a 1975 essay titled “ American SF and the Other ,” the great science-fiction writer Ursula K. Le Guin took her genre to task. Science fiction, she began, centers on “the question of The Other—the being who is different from yourself. This being can be different from you in its sex; or in its annual income; or in its way of speaking and dressing and doing things; or in the color of its skin, o

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The Concept of Neurodiversity Is Dividing the Autism Community

It remains controversial—but it doesn't have to be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Mystery Sea Opened Up During the Antarctic Winter. Now, Scientists Know Why.

In 2017, the open sea grew nearly 100 times its size in just a month.

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As Pesticide Turns Up in More Places, Safety Concerns Mount

A growing body of research is challenging the assumption that neonicotinoids are safer and less likely to spread than other pesticides — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Kickstarter Celebrates 10 Years of Funding Your Crazy Ideas

The platform has helped artists and founders collectively raise over $4 billion for a variety of art projects, movies, hardware startups, and naughty board games.

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How to Land a Plane in 'Non-Normal' Situations

Print this out and bring it with you on your next flight. Just in case.

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Here’s what causes the aurora-like glow known as STEVE

Amateur astronomer images and satellite data are revealing what causes the strange atmospheric glow called STEVE.

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The Concept of Neurodiversity Is Dividing the Autism Community

It remains controversial—but it doesn't have to be — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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SAS cancels more flights as pilot strike continues

Scandinavian air carrier SAS said Tuesday it had to cancel another 504 flights on Wednesday, affecting 47,000 passengers, as a pilot strike continued into its fifth day.

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As Pesticide Turns Up in More Places, Safety Concerns Mount

A growing body of research is challenging the assumption that neonicotinoids are safer and less likely to spread than other pesticides — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Weird chromosome may have spurred evolution of thousands of songbirds

Songbirds appear to have an extra chromosome in cells involved in sexual reproduction. The extra DNA could help explain why there are so many songbird species

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Black Hole Spits Out High-Energy Jets at Near Light-Speed

Black holes gobble up most matter around them, but some of it escapes, spewing nearly-light-speed jets of material.

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As Pesticide Turns Up in More Places, Safety Concerns Mount

A growing body of research is challenging the assumption that neonicotinoids are safer and less likely to spread than other pesticides — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Russians Likely Used This Beluga Whale As a Spy. Here's Why.

Fishermen in Norway came across a Russian spy late last week, but the interloper wouldn't reveal its mission, and with good reason: It couldn't, because it was a beluga whale.

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Så förändrade global uppvärmning dinosauriernas miljö

För 183 miljoner år sedan ökade koldioxiden i jordens atmosfär på grund av enorma vulkanutbrott. Det ledde till en global uppvärmning på 7 grader och genom att studera förändringar i fossil från den tiden förstår forskarna hur livet på land och i haven påverkades. Effekter både på land och i hav På land försvann mer än hälften av de växtarter som studerats. Frodiga skogar med hög mångfald av arte

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Efter flere forsinkelser: Letbane til Grenaa er åbnet

Nu, hvor sidste godkendelse er kommet på plads, er letbanestrækningen mellem Aarhus og Grenaa endelig åbnet efter flere omgange med forsinkelser. Letbanen opfordrer passagererne til at væbne sig med tålmodighed overfor forsinkelser i begyndelsen.

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PriceWaterhouseCoopers: Gladsaxe bør stramme op på it-sikkerheden

Gladsaxe Kommunes it-sikkerhed følger såvel nationale strategier som EU’s krav, men it-sikkerheden bør skærpes, lyder konklusion efter undersøgelse.

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Learning My Father’s Language

My mother achieved real competence in Irish, and then gradually lost it. Her exertions were motivated by unrequited love, her ambitions, and even her politics. After she died, I found all these great propaganda pamphlets from the early 1980s, with titles like “Britain’s War Machine in Ireland.” All of them aimed at Irish Americans like herself. But it was hard, in the exurbs of New York with a dy

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A Segregation-Era Tactic Makes a Comeback

On March 1, 2016, Donald Trump pointed to a group of protesters at a campaign rally in Louisville, Kentucky, and said “Get ‘em out of here,” piously adding, “Don’t hurt ‘em.” Supporters assaulted the protesters as they were led out. The protesters later sued Trump for “incitement to riot”; a panel of the Sixth Circuit dismissed the claim: “The mere tendency of speech to encourage unlawful acts” i

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Conservatives Have a Different Definition of ‘Fair’

When the Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren put forth a sweeping plan to cancel student debt last week, she also exposed the deep divide between how liberals and conservatives think—and, inadvertently, why liberals often have so much trouble getting their ideas enacted into law. Under the plan that Warren announced, about 42 million Americans would have up to $50,000 in outstandin

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Spain’s Past Is Lost

“We have won the election,” Pedro Sánchez, the leader of the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE), told a jubilant crowd at his party’s headquarters on Sunday night. “The future has won and the past has lost.” Much of the campaign leading up to Spain’s third national election in four years did indeed feel like an argument over the country’s history. Sánchez presented himself as a strong advoca

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Why scientist-mums in the United States need better parental-support policies

Why scientist-mums in the United States need better parental-support policies Why scientist-mums in the United States need better parental-support policies, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01315-2 Without a national paid family-leave policy, some researchers are struggling at crucial career phases.

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Journalist’s questions lead to expression of concern for paper on melatonin and pistachios

A spectroscopy journal has issued an expression of concern over a 2014 paper by researchers in Iran on the amount of the sleep hormone melatonin in pistachios after German authorities — prompted by a journalist’s questions — concluded that the analysis was in error. The article, “Expression of concern to spectrofluorimetric determination of melatonin in … Continue reading Journalist’s questions le

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Danmark 'outsourcer' CO2-udledning: Kun halvdelen af besparelserne bliver til virkelighed

Hver gang danske borgere og virksomheder sparer et ton CO2, bliver udledningen af ca. 500 kg i virkeligheden ‘outsourcet’ til udlandet. Danske afgifter kan blandt andet være årsagerne, vurderer Det Økonomiske Råd.

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Nasdaq extends acceptance period for Norway exchange

US stock market operator Nasdaq said Tuesday it was giving Oslo Stock Exchange shareholders more time to accept its near-700 million euro takeover bid, as it battles Euronext for control of the Norway bourse.

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F8 2019: How to Watch Mark Zuckerberg's Keynote Live

On Tuesday, Facebook's F8 developer conference will kick off with a Zuckerberg keynote. You can watch it right here.

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From Apples to Popcorn, Climate Change Is Altering the Foods America Grows

In every region, farmers and scientists are trying to adapt an array of crops to warmer temperatures, invasive pests, erratic weather and earlier growing seasons.

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In a Switch, Some Republicans Start Citing Climate Change as Driving Their Policies

Driven partly by polls showing voters in both parties — particularly younger ones — are worried about a warming planet, some lawmakers are changing how they talk about climate change.

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Reinventing the Tomato for Survival in a Changing World

Like other small farmers and researchers, Brad Gates is trying to ensure a future for the tomato by breeding hardier varieties and persuading more Americans to grow their own.

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How Does Your Love of Wine Contribute to Climate Change?

Consumers don’t have access to much information about how businesses operate, but they can ask questions and focus on one tangible item, the bottle.

9h

Tip: How to Prepare Yourself for Space

Rehearse basic bodily functions (use a diaper). Get counseling in advance.

9h

In Times of Crisis, Social Media Blackouts Jeopardize Public Safety

Governments claim that their goal in severing communication links is to prevent the spread of disinformation and decrease violence in times of crisis. But evidence is scant that massive disruptions to digital communication achieve their intended purposes, and studies say they instead put the public at risk.

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In this league, drone races are won by brainwaves alone

submitted by /u/quantumcipher [link] [comments]

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Sponges and corals: Seafloor assessments to help protect against climate change

Little is known about deep ocean environments. But scientists focussing on the depths of the North Atlantic are now learning more about their ecosystems—including the role of vast sea sponge grounds – and how to safeguard them against the effects of climate change and industry.

10h

Account for sex in brain research for precision medicine

Account for sex in brain research for precision medicine Account for sex in brain research for precision medicine, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01366-5 Account for sex in brain research for precision medicine

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What your research-integrity officer would like you to know

What your research-integrity officer would like you to know What your research-integrity officer would like you to know, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01369-2 What your research-integrity officer would like you to know

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Japan responds: stem-cell therapy justified

Japan responds: stem-cell therapy justified Japan responds: stem-cell therapy justified, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01364-7 Japan responds: stem-cell therapy justified

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Germline editing: could ban encourage medical tourism?

Germline editing: could ban encourage medical tourism? Germline editing: could ban encourage medical tourism?, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/d41586-019-01365-6 Germline editing: could ban encourage medical tourism?

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Drone used to aid 3D remake of Japanese internment camp

A University of Denver team is using drone images to create a 3D reconstruction of a World War II-era Japanese internment camp in southern Colorado.

10h

Samsung denies new Galaxy phone burnt from malfunctioning

Samsung on Tuesday stood by its new Galaxy S10 5G model after a South Korean smartphone owner posted pictures online of a charred handset claiming it had mysteriously "burnt".

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Slow Down of the Gulf Stream during 1993–2016

Slow Down of the Gulf Stream during 1993–2016 Slow Down of the Gulf Stream during 1993–2016, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-42820-8 Slow Down of the Gulf Stream during 1993–2016

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Comparison of Once-Daily Administration of Edoxaban and Rivaroxaban in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

Comparison of Once-Daily Administration of Edoxaban and Rivaroxaban in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Comparison of Once-Daily Administration of Edoxaban and Rivaroxaban in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43224-4 Comparison of Once-Daily Administration of Edoxaban and Rivaroxaban in Asian Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

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A transnational perspective of global and regional ecosystem service flows from and to mountain regions

A transnational perspective of global and regional ecosystem service flows from and to mountain regions A transnational perspective of global and regional ecosystem service flows from and to mountain regions, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43229-z A transnational perspective of global and regional ecosystem service flows from and to mountain regions

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Transcriptomic profiling identifies novel mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the cytochrome P450 (Cyp)3a11 gene

Transcriptomic profiling identifies novel mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the cytochrome P450 ( Cyp ) 3a11 gene Transcriptomic profiling identifies novel mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the cytochrome P450 ( Cyp ) 3a11 gene, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43248-w Transcriptomic profiling identifies novel mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of

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Intraperitoneal administration of fosfomycin, metronidazole, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients undergoing appendectomy is safe: a phase II clinical trial

Intraperitoneal administration of fosfomycin, metronidazole, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients undergoing appendectomy is safe: a phase II clinical trial Intraperitoneal administration of fosfomycin, metronidazole, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients undergoing appendectomy is safe: a phase II clinical trial, Published online: 30 April 2

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Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism and green photoluminescence in Cu doped ZnO thin film synthesised by neutral beam sputtering

Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism and green photoluminescence in Cu doped ZnO thin film synthesised by neutral beam sputtering Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism and green photoluminescence in Cu doped ZnO thin film synthesised by neutral beam sputtering, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43184-9 Enhanced room temperature ferromagnetism and green photoluminescen

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DNAH11 variants and its association with congenital heart disease and heterotaxy syndrome

DNAH11 variants and its association with congenital heart disease and heterotaxy syndrome DNAH11 variants and its association with congenital heart disease and heterotaxy syndrome, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43109-6 DNAH11 variants and its association with congenital heart disease and heterotaxy syndrome

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High levels of drug resistance in commensal E. coli in a cohort of children from rural central India

High levels of drug resistance in commensal E. coli in a cohort of children from rural central India High levels of drug resistance in commensal E. coli in a cohort of children from rural central India, Published online: 30 April 2019; doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43227-1 High levels of drug resistance in commensal E. coli in a cohort of children from rural central India

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Diamonds: Tears of the Gods

Diamonds are the April birthstone. They aren’t forever, but they are geologically remarkable — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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As Nuclear Waste Piles Up, Private Companies Pitch New Ways To Store It

Nuclear power plants around the country are running out of room to store spent fuel. Federal plans for a permanent disposal site are stalled, so private companies come up with their own solutions. (Image credit: Olivia Sun/NPR)

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It-sikkerhed i en cyberangrebstid: Version2 Infosecurity ruster dig til de cyberkriminelle

Det er NU, du skal melde dig til Ingeniørens og Version2's store – og gratis – it-sikkerhedsmesse Infosecurity Denmark d. 1. og 2. maj i Øksnehallen i København. Messen får i år selskab af den internationalt anerkendte Data & Cloud Expo.

10h

Alien abduction: an unlikely solution to the climate crisis

An Oxford lecturer claims that a secret breeding programme to create alien-human hybrids will save humanity from environmental disaster Name: Alien abductions. Appearance: Vague. Continue reading…

11h

Industriens IoT er mere end blot at koble maskiner i skyen

PLUS. Med det industrielle Internet of Things er det på papiret let at opdage, når en maskine har behov for service. Men det er ikke altid så let at handle på data i virkeligheden, mener dansk remote access-leverandør.

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The emerging threat of deepfake videos for politics and markets.

submitted by /u/funygui [link] [comments]

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Anti-ageing has often been seen as quack science. Not any more

Ideas of living to 150 are dead and buried – but new anti-ageing drugs promise we can live healthier for longer. We should welcome them

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Image of the Day: Cone Preservation

Researchers treat mice with retinitis pigmentosa using a gene therapy that reduces cone loss.

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Nytt verktyg hittar hiv-patienter med sviktande behandling

37 miljoner människor globalt lever i dag med hiv, många av dem i låginkomstländer. Forskare från Skånes universitetssjukhus och Lunds universitet har utvecklat ett verktyg som kan göra det enklare att med små resurser upptäcka sviktande behandling hos hiv-positiva patienter.

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Expert: Justin Trudeau's French isn't bad; Quebecers just don't think he belongs

Quebec's criticism of Justin Trudeau's French serves to position him as an "outsider" to Quebecois identity, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

12h

Miniature transponder technology to be used in the war against ocean plastic

Low-cost acoustic tags attached to fishing nets are being trialled as part of a major new project to reduce marine litter and 'ghost fishing'.

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Airbus profits plunge, blames scrapping of A380

European aerospace giant Airbus announced Tuesday its net profit fell sharply in the first quarter, blaming in part its decision to stop building the loss-making A380 super-jumbo.

12h

Chronicles of the Rings: What Trees Tell Us

Studying the historical data stored in centuries-old trees is a burgeoning field, with labs around the world learning more about historical patterns of weather and climate and the effects on humans.

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What if an asteroid was about to hit Earth? Scientists ponder question

Here's a hypothetical: a telescope detects an asteroid between 100 and 300 meters in diameter racing through our solar system at 14 kilometers per second, 57 million kilometers from Earth.

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Egypt's rebounding tourism threatens Red Sea corals

In serene turquoise waters off Egypt's Red Sea coast, scuba divers ease among delicate pink jellyfish and admire coral—yet a rebounding tourism sector threatens the fragile marine ecosystem.

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Samsung Electronics hit with quarterly profit slump

Samsung Electronics, the world's biggest smartphone and memory chip maker, reported a slump in first-quarter net profits Tuesday, in the face of a weakening chip market and rising competition.

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High fuel costs drive Lufthansa deeper into red in Q1

German airline group Lufthansa plunged deeper into the red in the first quarter, it said Tuesday, blaming the rising price of fuel and intense competition in Europe but sticking to annual targets.

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Virgin Australia delays Boeing 737 MAX order

Virgin Australia said on Tuesday it had delayed delivery of its order of 48 Boeing 737 MAX aircraft over safety concerns, following two deadly crashes.

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Girls outscore boys on tech, engineering, even without class

Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America's girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data.

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